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Shark: Episode 6

Revenge, thrills, mystery, forbidden romance, investigative crime-solving—this show literally encompasses every genre but comedy and sageuk, and does so with aplomb. I can’t heap enough praise for the assured directing, which keeps the thrilling moments brimming with intensity and the quieter moments as contemplative as they should be, but it’s as good a time as any to say that the acting is really starting to shine, too.

Not like Sohn Ye-jin and Kim Nam-gil were phoning it in before (not even close), but perhaps it’s because their characters are really coming into their own that I can better appreciate all the nuance coming from their performances. They’ve got a lot to convey without the convenience of words to explain how they’re feeling, so the fact that we’re normally fine-tuned to their wavelength is a great place to be. The worst thing a mystery-laden show like this can do is make all of its characters equally mysterious, so we’ve got a great balance going on between the overarching secrets and characters we can empathize with.

Except for Grandpa Jo, that is. Of course he’d be the one drama grandfather to not meet his untimely death while someone withholds a bottle of life-saving pills. He’s just as diabolical as he is healthy, go figure.

 
SONG OF THE DAY

Amanda Mair – “Skinnarviksberget” from the bar scene. [ Download ]

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EPISODE 6 RECAP

Cold open: We see Past Yi-soo ripping a page, or a picture, from Grandpa Jo’s incriminating documents. He leaves the picture inside the locker and takes the rest with him, in the moment right before he gets hit by a truck.

Back in the present, Yi-soo kisses Hae-woo… only someone is snapping a secret picture of them. Ohhhh. Was this something Yi-soo carefully orchestrated? And here I had my hopes up. Or this show is making me super paranoid.

Hae-woo quickly pushes him away, looking shocked and confused. Yi-soo just holds her gaze unyieldingly until she takes a few steps away, but she changes her mind and returns to slap him.

And the photographer turns out to be none other than Secretary Jang, no less. But Yi-soo doesn’t even look her way, so it’s up for grabs whether the kiss was planned or not. (It wasn’t, right? Say it wasn’t.)

Hae-woo notices her missing phone later, which has somehow made its way into Yi-soo’s hands. Yi-hyun calls while it’s in his possession, and it’s heartbreaking to see how much it hurts him to see her name and face pop up on the phone. He’s only a phone call away from the sister he loves.

Tears fill his eyes as he answers the call wordlessly just so he can hear her voice. When he eventually answers, Yi-hyun’s first reaction to a male voice is to ask: “Oppa?” And the way his face lights up, thinking she’s calling him, her real oppa… it’s horrible. He looks so completely devastated that it’s almost hard to watch.

But no, she thinks that it’s Joon-young who picked up the phone. He tells her that Hae-woo left her phone, and chokes back tears until the call ends with his assurance that he’ll return it to her.

Joon-young arrives in that moment to pick Hae-woo up, though she’s returned on her own to pick up her phone. She mentions nothing of the kiss for obvious reasons and remains visibly uncomfortable in Yi-soo’s presence, all but jumping at the chance to get out of dodge.

Tellingly, during the ride home, she uses the same word to describe the rain as Yi-soo did: a sonagi, or sudden downpour. So she’s still thinking of him.

Joon-young picks up on her unusually quiet vibe and asks her if anything unpleasant happened with her and Kim Jun (Yi-soo), but she claims that she’s just sensitive because of her recent case. He’s adorably sweet in offering whatever he can to help her untangle her thoughts, even though she won’t divulge the “secret” details of the case.

He jokes that there shouldn’t be secrets between couples, even though he admits to having a few of his own. When she presses him for details, he smartly replies that he’s so tight-lipped that he was a clam in his past life. Hah. It works to make her smile, though her gaze when she regards him is curious—almost as if she feels guilty.

Yi-hyun has such a warm family life with her adoptive parents, but it’s only when she tells Detective Byun about the telescope she won that he becomes a little perturbed. He doesn’t let it show, and acts like he’s merely curious to know the company that gave it to her. Having an investigator for a father must not be very fun sometimes.

Yi-soo notices that he’s being followed on the way home and ducks into a garage to confront his stalker. The result is a fight where Yi-soo totally dominates thanks to some impressive martial arts skills, and his stalker finally talks once he’s under Yi-soo’s heel.

He was sent to find Yi-soo’s weakness by that child-molesting hotel CEO, and also snapped a few pictures of Yi-soo’s kiss with Hae-woo. Yi-soo removes the data chip from the stalker’s cell phone while trying to ignore the pain shooting up his leg.

But before the guy scampers off, he shouts out a warning: “Be careful of that woman!” Which woman?

We then cut to Secretary Jang as she looks through the kissing photos, which might be a hint. She answers to Junichiro, who calls her from Japan to tell her that he’ll be inviting Joon-young and Hae-woo to a resort he’s opening overseas.

Secretary Jang admits that she doesn’t know how she’s benefitting Junichiro by being there with Yi-soo, to which he admits (he calls Yi-soo by his adopted Korean name): “I am trying to help Jun. I should say I’m supporting what he intends to do, to be exact.”

She wonders if his intention is to bring down the Jo family hotel, but Junichiro insists that that’s not important. It’s how he brings it down that matters. “That’s why Jun needs me, and i need him.” But from the looks of it, he put Secretary Jang in place to keep Yi-soo from deviating off the path he wants, seeing as how he’s already got the Kiss Cam Photos and sees them as a moment of undesirable impulse from Yi-soo.

“That’s why I need you,” Junichiro asserts to Secretary Jang. Iiinteresting.

Yi-soo pops some pain killers at home, clearly conflicted over having encouraged Hae-woo to take the case only to lose sight of his own goals by warning her away soon after. Also a conflicting factor is the kiss, and how he lost sight of himself for that short period.

So in order to remind himself that he needs to be as tough as a shark, Yi-soo grabs an innocent little fish from his aquarium just to watch it gasp for air in his palm. Not cool, dude. What’d that decorative fish ever do to you?

Hae-woo stops at her favorite bookstore with Joon-young, and the air between them is heavy. She asks if he ever forgave the person who hit and killed his brother, and he ambiguously replies that forgiveness isn’t something that can be done with effort alone. But he knows that she wants to talk about something serious, and presses her to say it.

So she tells him about how she’s sure that her father was the driver in the hit-and-run case, and that Yi-soo’s father took the blame. She all but shudders when he asks if that case has to do with the deaths of Yi-soo and his father—she doesn’t want that to be the truth, more than anything. That’s why she has to dig deeper into the case.

“It started with a hit-and-run accident, but something more complicated is behind this. Despite the fact that the past events seem to be connected to the present, there is no point of connection.” And that’s what she needs to find in order to solve the case.

Joon-young asks her the tough question: “If your father is deeply involved in this case, what are you planning to do then? Even if I try to stop you, you’ll never give up, will you?”

He already knows the answer to that question, but it’s definitely taking a toll on her. “Grandfather weighs on my mind. Because he’s such an upright man, I’m afraid he may break.” Oh man. Of course she doesn’t even suspect her grandpa, but it’s going to be rough when she finds out that her dad is the lesser of two evils.

Joon-young commends her for her courage, admitting that if he were in her shoes, he would just look the other way out of fear for the truth. As he supports her with a back hug, she allows herself to cry: “I’m afraid, too. I’m afraid.”

The bookstore ajusshi returns as they’re leaving, but it’s curious that he dodges Hae-woo’s question about what’s in the box he brought. Even curiouser is how he watches them leave so intently…

…Until he pulls out a pen and starts clicking it. GAH! Is he the Poison Pen Assassin?

Hae-woo goes to her grandfather to ask about the Envelope Professor while her dad stumbles home dead drunk and very clearly worried about what she might have to talk to his father about.

She knows that Envelope Professor wanted to talk to Grandpa about the Korean independence movement, and she admits that he might be connected to her current case, only she doesn’t know how. Grandpa plays it cool when she mentions whether there was a tie between Yi-soo’s father and Envelope Professor, asking nonchalantly, “Did the two know each other?”

Hae-woo has no reason to suspect him, so she’s led to believe that her line of thinking is foolish until Dad comes in to drunkenly rant at the top of his lungs that he’s so innocent, he couldn’t even have hurt a bug when he was young. (I thought drunk people were supposed to tell the truth?)

He beats his chest as he declares: “I am not a bad man!” Which, hah. But his rampage seems to have caused Hae-woo to lose some of her nerve, so she doesn’t ask Grandpa anything more about her case.

Yi-hyun happens upon the case file in her adopted dad’s office, but before he can wrestle it away, she notices that the picture of the locker key left at the scene of Yi-soo’s accident wasn’t the same number as the one she found in her music box.

Lo and behold, we see Yi-soo holding the real set of keys for Locker 22.

It’s then that we return to the scene from the cold open, where Past Yi-soo hid a piece of the document in Locker 14. Only after that, he took the key from Locker 22 and kept it with him.

In the present he wonders, “Where could it be?”

As Hae-woo contemplates the words “Han Yi-soo” and “dead” on a board for her investigation, Grandpa Jo makes a call. Just as he’s starting to believe that Yi-soo might still be alive and orchestrating the present, Hae-woo changes Yi-soo’s status to “missing.”

Yi-soo becomes interested in the story of a movie Secretary Jang watched, in which she claims the protagonist had all his memories of a past love erased. Yi-soo wants to know if it worked, and she claims that it did—but in the end, he fell in love with the same girl all over again.

“He erased his memories, but he was still the same person who fell in love with her in the beginning, because that’s something that can’t be erased or changed. Although it was erased from his head, his heart remembered,” she says. Since Yi-soo’s trying to erase his memories of Hae-woo, this isn’t his ideal ending and he dismisses the movie. (Which sounds like Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, not that it really matters.)

On her way to the office after her forced vacation, Hae-woo is troubled by memories of the kiss. Soo-hyun meets her with information he found on Envelope Professor—namely, that he was an activist in his younger days and had actually been imprisoned by the government for it, after which he needed psychiatric treatment for post traumatic stress disorder.

Ah, so this might be how and why he knew Yi-soo’s dad, if we count in his memories of torture at the hands of Yi-soo’s dad. If so, Yi-soo’s dad was into some seriously shady government work.

Their conversation is cut off by the arrival of their boss, who seems to be nursing a broken/bandaged finger as he matter-of-factly informs Hae-woo that she’s been taken off Detective Jung’s murder case.

Though she insists to be kept on, he brings up the fact that her father was in the late detective’s call log as a conflict of interest for her. Plus, if the news broke and she was heading the investigation, it would not only put her in a bad spot but also her Prosecutor General father-in-law.

Speaking of Prosecutor Oh, we find him in a meeting with Grandpa Jo, who offers his personal take on how to solve Detective Jung’s murder case, only it’s actually a suggestion for how Prosecutor Oh can fabricate the events in order to “solve” the case.

So in order to sneak under Hae-woo’s radar, Grandpa Jo wants the case closed while she’s in Japan for Junichiro’s resort opening to prevent her from doing anything to stop it. That sounds good in theory, but does Prosecutor Oh even have that kind of power? I know corruption must be rampant, but can we get a checks and balances system up in here?

Secretary Jang leads Dong-soo into the hotel for his first day of work, where he’s informed that he’ll be working for the actual CEO. He assumes that all CEO’s are old men with rickets, which gets a laugh out of her because he couldn’t be any further from the truth.

Before he goes into meet a surprisingly-young Yi-soo feeding the fish he hasn’t yet killed, she tells him that there’s only one rule: Don’t ask any personal questions. I’d give Dong-soo five minutes before he asks one.

Hah, it doesn’t even take that long—while driving Secretary Jang and Yi-soo as per his job, Dong-soo doesn’t stop talking even to breathe. But he notices that Yi-soo looks about his age and asks him his birth year, which counts as a personal question. He shuts himself up.

There’s a strange moment where Yi-soo asks him if he has a girlfriend. Dong-soo says no. Then Yi-soo asks if he has a boyfriend, and he doesn’t just mean straight guy friends. Dong-soo acts all scandalized, and makes doe eyes at Secretary Jang as he asserts that he does, in fact, like women.

Yi-soo: “That’s too bad.” Say what?

Joon-young has been unable to track down the Pervert CEO ever since Yi-soo got ahold of him, but he finally manages to find the hospital he’s staying in after some digging. The CEO had promised to sell him his hotel, after all.

But Yi-soo is the one who put him in the hospital, and he confronts the pervert about sending someone to find out his weakness. Since Yi-soo holds the threat of blackmail over his head (this was the guy that raped little girls, remember), he immediately apologizes for being foolish, since he’s at Yi-soo’s mercy.

“Shall I tell you my weakness?” Yi-soo asks him menacingly. “I don’t tolerate mistakes.” So he lays out the law for him: Pervert CEO will hand his hotel over to Yi-soo, but he’ll claim that his deal to give it to Joon-young is still good in the meantime.

He can either do all that or go to the police and confess his sins, which prompts Pervert CEO to ask, “No matter how much you love money, shouldn’t you have a bit of a conscience too?” Is this child-molesting pile of shit being serious right now?

Yi-soo doesn’t hit him as I’d hoped, instead leveling him with a vicious look: “You should never teach to others what you can’t practice yourself.”

Joon-young runs into Yi-soo in the hospital lobby, since he’s on his way to meet with Pervert CEO. At Joon-young’s urging, Yi-soo agrees to have a drink with him later.

Soo-hyun gets to follow Hae-woo everywhere but doesn’t get to have any of the fun, since he’s stuck asking for refills in The Only Coffee Shop in Seoul while she and Detective Byun talk about the missing keys for Locker 22. (If it means anything, he has a short interaction with Yi-hyun, who works there as a barista.)

It takes two, but they eventually come to a consensus on the fact that Yi-soo must have hidden the documents in the locker, which is why Detective Jung stole the locker key from the evidence room. There’s no telling whether he would still have the keys or the documents with his belongings.

Hae-woo takes the opportunity to broach the topic of her father’s involvement, but Detective Byun spares her from having to explain since he knows already. What they don’t know is why Yi-soo and his father were killed, and how it ties to the dead Envelope Professor.

The only thing that might tie them together are the documents, but Hae-woo and Detective Byun are stuck, in that neither of them know what was in the documents in the first place. And then there’s that other issue of Hae-woo being taken off the case, even though it seems clear that she’s still running her own investigation.

She catches up with the boy who witnessed the hit-and-run and appeals to his conscience by revealing that the teenager he told about the watch was her friend, and she’s only trying to find out why he went missing. “I’m not curious about whether you saw the watch or not. What I want to know is why you lied.”

She’s able to figure out from his posture and silence that someone threatened him with his grandfather’s hospital bills, but when she asks who, Soo-hyun practically runs onto the scene as if to remind the kid to keep his mouth shut.

But Hae-woo’s not blind, so she doesn’t miss the little glance the kid sends Soo-hyun’s way, and figures out that Soo-hyun is the one who threatened the kid to lie. Whoa. Wasn’t expecting that to come out so fast.

When she angrily confronts Soo-hyun about what he did, he claims that he did everything for her and that he won’t ever reveal who ordered him to do it, even though he has no idea how his actions benefitted her and sings like a canary with only a little pressure.

“If you really care about me, then tell me the truth,” she says. He seems reluctant as he asks her if she really has the confidence to go through with the case, and when she proves that she does, he tells her who told him to undermine her investigation: “The Prosecutor General.” Aka, her father-in-law.

Not. Good.

Soo-hyun seems innocent enough despite that, if not too naive for his position: Because her father-in-law said it was for her sake he did what he was told, and only later found out that her father might be involved. He does seem to genuinely care for her, at least, but he can’t stop her from going to confront Prosecutor Oh.

She stops herself eventually, having to process the fact that her father-in-law might be corrupt. Meanwhile Yi-soo stares into his “Orpheus” painting like it’s a crystal ball showing him her every move.

Hae-woo ends up at the bar where Yi-soo is supposed to meet her husband, but she makes it there before he does. Before Yi-soo can even mention the kiss she passes it off, claiming that she’s already forgotten about it because it was a mistake she chalked up to alcohol.

“What if it wasn’t a mistake?” Yi-soo asks. “Even if it wasn’t a mistake, would you still understand?”

 
COMMENTS

Way to be a tease on the romance front, Shark. After the kiss, I was waiting all episode for the fallout and all I got was an engaging hour of television full of big reveals. What gives?

I was worried at first that there wouldn’t be much in the way of surprise as we followed Hae-woo’s crime-solving adventures, but the writer did something ingenious in giving us just enough to know what Yi-soo knows, while at the same time keeping secrets that even he isn’t aware of. It would have been boring if we knew all the details beforehand only to have Hae-woo discover them belatedly, since it would just be like waiting for the inevitable, so while there is an element of that (in that we know she has to eventually discern her family’s involvement)—we don’t necessarily know how it all ties together, either. So there’s an emotional stake in that she’s a very likable character and we know the path she’s on will only hurt her, but she’s also the most active player in the story right now, and for as long as Yi-soo continues to stare at paintings and pull invisible strings, she’s the only method we have to reveal the whole truth.

It seems like her grandfather is the mastermind behind every bad thing that ever happened in the history of the world, but one of the most interesting reveals in the show was that of Yi-soo’s father’s dark past. He wasn’t just some blameless victim, even though we don’t really know his previous crimes or how his past is tied to Grandpa Jo, or how that’s all tied to Junichiro’s revenge. This episode revealed that the common factor might be the Korean independence movement, but that only provides another piece of the puzzle—I need the picture on the box before I can start trying to put it together.

I like that there’s so much to think about without feeling like the show is deliberately obfuscating just for the sake of fooling us into thinking that it’s a cooler show than it is. (Because it is that cool.) The mysteries at play and the choice reveals don’t come off as cheap tricks, but as an organic part of the story, so much so that you can’t separate the mystery element from the rest of the plot and come out with anything coherent. There are different elements, sure, like the romance angle—but now Yi-soo and Hae-woo’s romance isn’t just about them, it’s about serving the big mystery we only have a faint idea of. It’s that dash of raised stakes that makes their scenes together so compelling, even though I wish there were more of them. I forget that patience is a thing sometimes.

Junichiro is definitely someone I want to know more about, though I like him as an unknown and unpredictable factor in Yi-soo’s life exactly because it’s hard to know whether he’s good, ruthless, or somewhere in between. He also said some strange things to Yi-soo from the start, back when he was a teenager, like the whole “We will meet again” line. How DID he know they would meet again? How much of all this did he plan? I’m curious to know not just his reason for revenge (since we know it has something to do with his father and Grandpa Jo), but what he really wants from Yi-soo in the end.

As for Yi-soo—it’s not a problem yet, since we’re still early into the run, but I do hope that we get to see him out of his element soon. Aside from his moments of emotional weakness (which are admittedly done very well), he gets to steer events from his living room while Hae-woo does all the work. If he has time to draw pictures of her and suffocate fish, maybe he could at least pack her lunch for the day, ‘s all I’m saying.

 
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Ever since the last episode, Kim Nam Gil has reminded me of Hitler with that beard and hair style. Ugh

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he has an huge receding hairline and I can't unsee it.

It's really hard to concentrate sometimes...

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Hitler had bangs and his moustache was sort of like Charlie Chaplin's...nothing like Yi Soo's. But, I agree that the styling leaves a lot to be desired.

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Ditto. My husband doesn't like his facial expressions (aka the angst and the "I'm full of hurt and pain" look) and I can't rid my mind of his high forehead and small moustache.

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Id rather they get rid of the goddamn moustache. I hated that moustache in queen seon deuk, hated it in bad guy and now I am hating it here. It doesnt make him look older, it is just ugly.

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I thought i was going to be one of the very few who think badly of his looks and acting. Now I am losing interest in the show ..

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KNG's acting may not be topnotch but to give him some merit, the episodes so far haven't done him justice. If you think about all the scenes that he appeared in, there are quite a no. where he does nothing but stand/ sit around and brood. I think the PD really has to give him more room to prove his acting chops. There's also merit in watching the show for the show itself. The rest of the cast is pretty good as well.

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Ty Ty Ty!! My thoughts exactly! That damn mustache is ugly as sin and is very distracting LOL

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Omg exactly. I feel like ripping it off him and burning it to ashes. .____.

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kdfan, as for his looks, erm... let's just put it this way. I usually watch a drama more for the male than the female lead. But there are occasions where I watch a show for the show itself, not for how the male lead looks (think Temptation of the Wife). Then again, there are some other shows which I can't make myself to continue watching it (I drop Jun Hur after the male lead came on screen because he's just too old to act like an angsty youth). Give KNG some time.. maybe his acting in future episodes will surpass all obstacles??

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Thank you!

I really, really love this drama so far. It basically DOES everything right, it's a perfect balance of romance, mystery, suspense, crime drama and what not. There's a lot I don't know nor quite understand but as everything seems to happen for a reasons, there are answers somewhere and I can't wait to know.

I'm so exited I can't even write proper English!

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One thing about the episode, though... I actually agree with chief Oh what comes to him transferring the case to prosecutor Park. Yes, chief Oh (or whatever his title is) is doing it for totally wrong reasons, but honestly, it SHOULD be transferred from Hae-Woo because her family member is possibly involved in the case. Shouldn't this be normal procedure in investigations? No one can be expected to be neutral when their own families are in question and so they should not be the ones conducting the investigation.

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I am seriously worried that Haewoo's adorable hubby, a clam in his former life, knows more about this case than he is letting on!
Thanks for the great recap.

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Thanks

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I think that Hae-woo's hubby will become one of the bad guys. He will choose to protect his corrupt father, I hope he doesn't turn that way but we'll see. It seems though that he knows more about the case then he's showing. I like him and I think he loves Hae-woo more then she loves him. He'll never be Yi-Soo whom she still loves after all these years.
Junichiro, I still can't figure him out. What is hit motives exactly except to bring the Jo family down.
And secretary Jang, she obviously is attracted to Yi-soo.
But Honey Lee has done something to her face, it looks so different then it was before....

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LOL I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE WHO THOUGHT HE LOOKED LIKE HITLER LMAO. & oh gosh this drama is amazing i can't wait for the episode where they finally realize the he is actually Yi-Soo and am I the only one who kept crying while watching these drama? Especially the first few episodes.. Damn it was so touching. Best drama to watch no kidding.

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Aigoo, now that you guys have mentioned the Hitler resemblence.... I can't unsee it! Please change his hair and remove the caterpillar, stylist! He's so (potentially so much more) handsome!

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I know... last night I actually had a dream that his mustache had transformed into a mustache like they wore in the civil war era...and my dream self was so happy because he looked so much better. The mustache needs to go.

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Thanks, Heads!! Please keep these Shark goodie recaps coming! Love 'em!

It's amazing that these 2 main actors can look so pretty and act so well.... Not that common a combination!

GFB is a good show too, but Shark is definitely my must-watch on Mon-Tue now. The acting, directing and writing are stellar. I've dropped Cyrano after 2 eps, someone please tell me if I'm making a mistake! =)

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Yes, you are making a mistake. Cyrano is good!

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Kles, this week of cyrano and shark really upped their game. After ep 5/6, i find that i'm actually enjoying it the way i wanted to from ep.1.
Watch it till 6 and if you still aren't feeling it, that's okay. :)

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@duckie and @ilikemangos:
Thanks! I just couldn't get into it after ep 1. Then I forced myself to watch ep 2, just found something missing. Will take your advice and stay onboard for now!

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Heads, that "picture on the box" moment had me at hello. I was torn between laughing and grimacing. I chose to laugh instead. It was an intense moment.

Thanks for the recap!

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favorite part of the episode has to be the one where Dong Soo keeps asking Yi Soo some "personal questions" in the car LOL.

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So I wasn't going to continue watching because cheating spouses leaves a bad taste in my mouth and makes me uncomfortable even though it's really good; then I read the first few parts of this recap and I knew I couldn't miss out, haha.
I really want to see the Yi Soo and Yi Hyun moment. I'm a sucker for siblings in dramas because I feel like we don't get enough good kind of that relationship in dramas. Usually kdramas have me thinking siblings in korea must really not get along or that everyone is an only child (I'm not that naive but the way that relationship is presented it's easy to think that way).
So while it's a great drama, what's really keeping me is the relationship between Yi Soo and Yi Hyun. I want to see them reunite :)

Thank you! I'll read the rest later after I watch:)

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To comment on the stache', it use to bug me as well, but I really like the syle when his hair isn't in his face.

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HW wasn't cheating here. She didn't participate in the kiss and pushed him away as soon as her surprise was gone.

But, anyways, even though I kinda ship YS and HW, I'm not sure wether I want them to end up together. There's bound to be some revelation about the hubby but I'm hoping that it won't be anything too bad because once HW finds out about her gramps, she's going to need someone to lead on - and that someone can't be YS, me thinks. This is why I don't ship them as an endgame. YS is emotionally very damaged and won't be able to be the strong pillar for HW as he desperately needs one himself. So, I kinda hope that their story will be a story of learning to let go of your first love. Then again, because this is a Korean drama, that's not very likely. Either they end up together or YS dies.

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I agree she wasn't cheating on her husband.

I don't think YS is that emotionally damaged, damaged that he is and very cold to a certain degree but I think he actually can redeem himself.
And I think HW is a mentally a lot stronger then she seems and perhaps they can be that support to each other that they both need.
But my fear is that YS dies in the end....

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The actor does have a tendency to do that.

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Yes, he does have a tendency to do that...I am STILL traumatized by the ending of Bad Guy :(

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Regarding the cheating...when HW failed to tell her husband about the kiss, she was already being disloyal. In a healthy marriage, a wife would share that information with her husband.

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I am also thinking that YS is going to die at the end. I think that this show may be all about the sins of the fathers being visited on the sons - I expect Joon Young to go bad in support of his dad, Hae-Woo's dad is already just the sort of son an evil grandpa deserves - and will probably end up being gramps' weak link - and I think that "daddy" Junichiro is actually just using YS as a means to his own ends, and will dispose of him when he is ready, because YS is going to be held responsible for his real father's crimes.

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I couldn't stay away too...yes his hair is distracting...I like it better when it's not parted...but KNG is mesmerizing in his scenes...the one where he answers the phone broke my heart

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Love your recaps! Absolute gold!
I love all the moments of emotional weakness. Nam Gil is really good at it! The phone call from the sister was done absolutely perfectly, the part when the secretary was telling him about the movie that the mind forgets but the heart remembers was jaw dropping, the part when he sees her in the room at the end was heart stopping.
I do like Nam Gil and his little moustache. It makes him a little more manly. i guess that is the look he is going for.
Can't wait for Monday to come. oh wait, there is Monstar on Friday too : )

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Yap.. that hair.. that hairline.. that style... ugh... so distracting. it's the first I notice everytime KNG is on the scene. Please make me unsee it...

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lmao I'm the one that don't mind the hair?

At least he isn't changing it like he did on Bad guy.

But wish he had this hairstyle here:

He could play a nerd ceo hahahaha

http://sun4ever.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/nam-gil-kim.jpg

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lol the fact that everyone is shouting HITLER and keeps bringing up his not so great hair and mustache is funny.
Personally, i found it rather distracting the first few episodes but at this point, i figure it's better to just overlook it, considering it really can distract from your enjoyment of something. For others, the make it or break it factor in watching.
Shark is too good of a show for that, so i'll learn to like the mustache, the receding hairline, and all other hitler-y features.

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I've actually gotten used to it. Kim Nam Gil is one of those actors who just gets you past things.

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couldn't agree more (or else Bidam got me over the 'stache phobia). KNG has had me in his pocket ever since his tiny part as Hee Jin's Korean doctor in Kim Sam Soon. He spoke and his eyes twinkled and I thought wait, WHO IS THAT? I can't wait until Shark gives him more to do, though.

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I swear when the bookshop ajusshi does that 'tic-tac' with his pen(cil?) he sent shivers down my spine. So lucky that he's working on the side that favours HW, I can't imagine her walking in and out always from that bookshop that's run by a murderer.

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I literally almost fell from my chair screaming.

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When I saw that I was like....Oh!!!! Wow!!! shocked....I always assumed that the guy would be younger! But can't wait for the big reveal about grandpa's actions. He is definitely the mastermind!

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"it’s only when she tells Detective Byun about the telescope she won that he becomes a little perturbed. He doesn’t let it show, and acts like he’s merely curious to know the company that gave it to her. Having an investigator for a father must not be very fun sometimes."

it's only natural to be suspicious about winning a contest you can't remember entering, cause unless you have alzheimers or some other form of dementia, that means you didn't.

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I have one question: who drove the truck into the telephone booth? Did Junichiro do it and pretend to "save" YiSoo? Or did Junichiro find YiSoo after one of Grandpa Jo's men did it? I'm so confused!

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One of the secrets to be uncovered...

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Myself, I'm leaning more towards Junichiro at least being involved with the truck/phone booth incident. He didn't just happen upon this accident. I think he's been manipulating Yi Soo into blaming Hae Woo's family for all his problems so Junchiro can use Yi Soo as a tool for his own revenge.

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You wrote --> "It seems like her grandfather is the mastermind behind every bad thing that ever happened in the history of the world" <-- loved it. So true.

Gotta say that after watching so many dramas I totally cannot believe any old rich guy is actually a good guy. But this guy...wow! And yet, he comes off so dang noble.

I like Dong Soo a lot. Sweet totally innocent character. Between Nice Guy and Shark, I'm beginning to think that telling someone you're gay is the way to prevent all kinds of complications. But still... wow! I guess this will stop Dong Soo from trying to hook up Yi Soo with women he knows.

I wish I trust newlywed hubby more. If he turns out to be a truly good person, I'll be happily surprised that the writers didn't go the "everyone in the world is evil" route. And yet... why was he snooping around in wifey's laptop in the last episode?

Thanks for the recap.

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I think grandpa is a much more layered person than his son considering the writer set it him to be noble, wise, and warm on first impression. It's always the ones that aren't outwardly evil in the beginning that end up truly being the most evil ones. Cough, im looking at you shunji (gaksital).
I think if hubby ended up actually being decent in the end after all that's happened, that's one k-drama scope shot down cause then not everyone in the show is out to get our hero.
I think him turning on us,however, makes it alot easier for me to root for our OTP to end up together...Although it's not looking like all is going to end well.

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The show delivers for me, the quiet intensity and the right balance of mystery and reveal to keep me interested to keep watching. What's also keeping the show together is the stellar supporting cast. The characters are all bursting with history and back story, I wish I could just mouse over the characters, and click 'download' to find out just exactly what keeps them awake at night, what motivates them, what makes them tick. But the show delivers my wish on a perfect platter. Every scene dedicated to our characters, even if for a few minutes or mere seconds, highlights the exact emotions or perspectives the PD wants us to see (note: there are some slight exceptions think the scarf scene). The PD is particularly successful when he does so subtly or when seemingly carelessly. It's when he tries too hard to explain something that the thing he tries to explain becomes completely misunderstood or not even understandable (think all the subsequent scenes of YS with the shark other than his explanation in ep 1, YS with the struggling fish in his hand, the scarf scene).

I've yet to see HW's real feist in her search for truth though and wonder if I will see it again in the adult HW. Is this turnabout a feature of the actress or a deliberate change in character from one of teenage angst to adult contemplativeness? I like the show for what it's worth but find it hard yet to identify with our leads. KNG has only two kinds of expression on his face ("I'm full of hurt" and "I'm here to hurt you" look) and hardly any dialogue. I suppose it's like what some people say that more is (supposedly) conveyed with less. But for me, something has to give. I cannot identify with YS' angst if I cannot see into his inner world and thoughts. A brooding hero is also allowed some inner dialogue with himself or some flashbacks - I think we are in some dire need of these.

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'It’s when he tries too hard to explain something that the thing he tries to explain becomes completely misunderstood or not even understandable (think all the subsequent scenes of YS with the shark other than his explanation in ep 1, YS with the struggling fish in his hand, the scarf scene). '

I rather liked those scenes. The scarf scene was a metaphor for the love found [at that spot under the tree in the rain], lost and within reach again.
The fish scene was also a metaphor, but for his prey that he intends to hunt down and torture.

This drama pleasantly surprised me. KNG isn't required to say much or show a greater variety of facial expressions. Especially the scene when he is talking on the phone with his sister is telling how good of an actor he really is. He radiates the misery and longing so well!

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Thanks for deciphering the scarf scene so succinctly. It sure was too abstract to grasp in the first instance when I watched it.

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Well at least they know that whatever was in the envelope had to be worth killing for. It also has government ties. They need to stop thinking of everything as a hit and run/murder and more like what they are, coverups of a way bigger crime.

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Ach. The heartbreak that came with that look on Yi Soo’s face when he hears his little sis call him oppa. He obviously misses her so much but is only able to watch from afar and buy her the things she wants. I think that vulnerability -- portrayed by KNG’s excellent acting -- finally got me even more invested in his character and his pain. I believe that is the first time we see him let his guard down to that extent.
AND WAIT. he fights. He knows how to fight. Perhaps he really was raised by a yakuza in japan? lol. So badass with that slow-mo kick in the air. I was fist pumping. Can we get more of these?
Dong Soo is so adorable and that moment of him in the car with yi soo smiling in the back was so sweet. “That’s too bad” in response to dong soo liking women.. was laughing so hard

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i know, that was HOT.

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Yeah the "too bad" line automatically shifted my mind to "no regrets" and that made me grin big hehe

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This recap is just awesome. Thanks, Heads.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is my favorite film, by the way.

I am also a big fan of "the picture on the box" remark and I totally agree. That is why this show is so good. We will NEVER get that. Just hints here and there.

This is not a comment on this show specifically, but as I watch YS struggle to keep this all together: Revenge, romance (for lack of a bitter word), sister lacking, Daddy helping, I wonder if a K-drama would ever take one more step away from bad-guy hero, and make him a hero we really struggle to root for. Give him a really revolting (according to society - not me) weakness: sex addict, sadist, drug user, etc. Then let the audience deal.

That could be his downfall, or he could just keep getting away with it. This anti-hero aspect is more cinematic, I guess, than television. There are a ton of 1970's flicks where the "hero" wasn't.

Anyway....

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Basically, I like when Kim Nam Gil is on. (I also like vampire idol guy, but that's hard not to do.)

The rest of them kind of bore me, saving Japanese Yakuza guy when he's plotting with Honey Lee. But when Kim Nam Gil is on, he's mesmerizing and makes a story that I"m not really into interesting. Also, I like his character, flaws and all, and in particular, when he just cuts the idiots like HW's dad and the pervert CEO down.

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is it just me..or do i think there's cameras inside the little fish...kinda like shiri?

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Loved the Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind reference, too.
It's also one of my fav films.

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First and only reason I haven't started watching this show yet: THAT GOD-AWFUL MUSTACHE. It's actually hideous and I can't stand looking at it. I know Kim Nam Gil is a fantastic actor but I can't watch this with that horrendous caterpillar on his upper lip. It shouldn't bother me this much but it does...

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For some reason, this drama reminded me of the concept behind Prosecutor Princess drama. Obviously the characters are all different, but the plot is very similar. *Possible Prosecutor Princess spoilers ahead* In Princess, main girl also had to reveal her own family's wrong doings, but the biggest difference is that the guy who is guiding her in that direction in this drama is the main protagonist, while in Prosecutor Princess the protagonist was the main heroine, while the guy pulling her strings was secondary. In both cases, the guy doing the revenge was in the love relationship with the heroine. I guess its a common theme for dramas, to have the child reveal his or her own family's bad past.

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I immediately thought of PP when I read the synopsis too, except this one is way more serious and heavy. I think it's also a bit more complicated, as there are more players involved and connected to the heroine.

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“You should never teach to others what you can’t practice yourself.” facepalm! I am really enjoying your recaps Heads.

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Thanks so much again for the write-up!

I just wish KNG would have another hairstyle. His gel-up do isn't so appealing, to say the least.

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This was a much better episode than the previous one (which I have to admit was kind of boring.) Finally we get some fighting action. And yes, that scene with his sister talking to him on the phone brought tears to my own eyes.

As for Bookstore Ahjusshi clicking his pen - I'm still not sold on him being Poison Pen. He could very well be just a red herring.

But what was up with the chief prosecutor and his finger? The cameraman made sure we noticed the finger so it must be important, yet I don't know why.

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Oh yeah, I also meant to say I think what young Yi Soo tore out of the packet was perhaps the evidence of his own father's misdeeds in the past.

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Yes, that is what I think, too.

So I am curious why he saved it at all instead of shredding it?

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Hmm, good point.

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Thank you for the recap. This show is getting a little slow for me. Death stares (at a tiny gold fish), fists clenching, slow walking, not talking... Feelings building up like tsunami but resulting in impotent actions/non-actions so far. Even secretary Jung appeared clueless and confused in this episode. I hope the show will gain some momentum soon.

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Thank you for this one .. ^^ Actually, I think if you removed KNG's moustache here, he won't look serious anymore. He's kind of pretty boy without those hairs, so he really needs to maintain them for the show. lolololol

I do love this drama, not just because of KNG but because it has got a lot of interesting twists and turns. Really! Thanks for the recap. Till next time huh ;)

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Hahaha yes he is indeed a bit of a pretty boy without the stache. Just look at queen seon deok.

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agreed, I think Yi Soo doesn't work with KNG looking too pretty. The mustache adds some degree of sinister and keeps the viewer (well, me at least!) at more of a distance.

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yeah...but in this drama Yi Soo actually did 'plastic surgery' so yeah the adult doesnt look the same i supposed..

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Very interesting drama. In Malaysia the first episode is airing in this week. Young Yi Soon is so good. KNG is an handsome actor. He should modify his mustache just to be sexy look.

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SAME SHOW as equator man, when u have watched one, u have watched them all

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I'm starting to love this drama since the prosecutor's character is developing. She is trying to find out the truth. I also love her choice of fashion. I blogged about her choice of a Carven Queen Elizabeth Stamp shirt on episode 6 at http://www.kdramastyle.blogspot.com

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