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Movie Review: 200 Pound Beauty

Plastic surgery is a thing in Korea in a way that would surprise the denizens of most countries. Only since I started living in Los Angeles, spending time in the heart of the Hollywood entertainment machine, have I started to overhear discussions about plastic surgery in the United States that even come close to the way that plastic surgery is so casually discussed in Korea. During time spent in Korea, I have often overheard Korean women discussing getting plastic surgery with talk of prospective procedures like chin shaving and calf reduction spoken with the casual tone that they might also use to discuss buying a car.

Korea’s reputation for fantastic plastics has become so renown at this point that it’s become a destination for those seeking plastic surgery as well as frequent topic of international news media. So it’s no surprise to find Korean cinema taking on the subject as well and 200 Pound Beauty managed to take the subject all the way to the bank, becoming the most successful Korean comedy of 2006, falling only behind the mega-hits The Host and Tazza: The High Rollers.

200 Pound Beauty isn’t the only Korean film to address plastic surgery, which was apparently a hot enough issue by 2006 that it also was the subject of the horror film, Cinderella, in the same year. While Cinderella’s dark satirical take on the phenomenon mustered up over half a million admissions, the romantic comedy of 200 Pound Beauty was the clear audience favorite, having been seen by over 6.6 million Koreans. Much of that probably due to the film’s goofy comedy, strong performance by Kim Ah-joong, and identifiable wish fulfillment.

Based on a story by Yumiko Suzuki, Kim Ah-joong plays the role of Kang Hanna, a large-bodied and kind-hearted woman who works as a ghost singer for tone-deaf Korean pop star Ammy (Ji Seo-yoon) and crushing over her appreciative producer Han Sang-joon (Joo Jin-mo). When she overhears an upsetting conversation between Sang-joon and a jealous Ammy, she spirals into depression, but an opportunity forms from her side job as a phone sex operator and she decides to make a radical change to fix her life: she will get plastic surgery from head to toe to escape the socioeconomic limitations her appearance imposes on her and maybe get to be a pop star (and get the boy) while she’s at it.

Of course, things aren’t always so easy when you adopt a fake identity to fool your boss and crush into letting you work for him again and have your nemesis staking out your mentally ill father (Im Hyun-shik) to find you.

The film does well by choosing to expand on a topical subject matter and is at its strongest in the comedy-focused segments. The film’s sense of comedy is goofy and plays a lot of Hanna’s own naivete when it comes to being conventionally attractive, particularly after her initial transformation. A considerable part of the film’s successful comedy is drawn from Kim Ah-joong’s excellent performance. Although she is initially hampered by the limitations of the body suit she wears before her plastic makeover, she keeps her body in the character of the old Hanna, despite her new frame, giving her a goofy sense of movement and enhancing the naivete of her behavior.

The film is also boosted by a number of funny scenes involving supporting characters like Hanna’s plastic surgeon (Lee Han-wi) and Sang-joon’s man-child producing partner, President Choi (Sung Dong-il), as well as cameos from director Kim Yong-hwa‘s previous collaborators, Lee Won-jong as a beleaguered fortuneteller and Lee Beom-soo as an angry taxi driver.

Having had quite the success with his previous comic endeavor, Oh! Brothers, three years prior, director Kim manages to bring that same comic sensibility to 200 Pound Beauty and those scenes, like in Oh! Brothers, are the highlight of the film, understandingly catapulting this film to success. But the film also suffers from some of the storytelling problems that marred Oh! Brothers, especially with a lack of focus in the story. The film never really decides what it’s about. Plus, it also self-negates the final point that it tries to make in the end and frustratingly glorifies oppressive mainstream standards of beauty.

The film actually manages to hold together in the first half, with the only major weaknesses being the rather flat crush-romance dynamic between Hanna and Sang-joon and the major scene involving Hanna overhearing a private discussion between Ammy and Sang-joon that fails to get properly explained. But from there on, Hanna’s motivation for her operation doesn’t logically make sense, since the whole reason she liked him was supposed to be because of his kindness to her and yet with that dispelled, she still somehow undergoes the procedure to win him over and with no real means to do it except be conventionally attractive, when he clearly rejects the conventionally attractive Ammy.

Furthermore, because Hanna is in it for the boy (even though the film is rather poor at illustrating that until further into the movie), it undermines the later ambiguous message that she might be doing it for herself, which would have been a much more interesting road for the story to take. But not being able to choose either motivation makes it unclear what the real goal is for Hanna.

But even if the film was just left with the ambiguous message at the film’s end, which is a messy combination of loving who you are or were—in Hanna’s case, being true to that self, the measure of true beauty, and not stomping on the people you care about in your pursuit of success or a man—the film’s ending is pretty poor at conveying any of those sentiments, instead using an emotionally manipulative tear-filled confession for cheap catharsis.

And because the film never resists oppressive standards of beauty, reinforcing them from an early scene where Hanna cries to her background singer friend Park Jung-min (Kim Hyun-sook) and she tells her how men value women through Hanna’s happy ending and the credits tag, the film utterly negates any message of the measure of true beauty and being true to oneself. She might find success as a singer, but that was never a made the major motivation for her and the story simply wasn’t built around that quest, so such success is rather unsatisfying.

The film manages to mask its often muddied and contradictory story with a bit of emotional manipulation and storytelling sleight of hand, so I don’t think most will be bothered by its indecisive and unfocused nature. With more than a small measure of charming comedy and performances from the lead and her supporting actors, the slick presentation that the director was after but never quite achieved in Oh! Brothers, and no small dosage of wish fulfillment, 200 Pound Beauty still undoubtedly entertained over six million moviegoers in Korea alone and will entertain many more internationally.

But I can’t praise the poor and self-negating story nor was I able to stomach the film’s ultimate reinforcement of oppressive standards of beauty, which actually subverts some of the themes of the film. Director Kim has certainly become a better director and writer since Oh! Brothers, but even this comparatively pared-down story never really decides what it wants to be, just like its protagonist. And like Oh! Brothers, I found much of the character comedy in the film quite entertaining and Kim Ah-joong provided quite a performance. For most, that will be enough. But the poorly written story and destructive overall message of the film left me more than a little frustrated after the credits finished rolling. 6/10.

Note: While the Korean DVD is out of print, the Korean Blu-Ray is still available from importers and auction sites as well as DVDs and Blu-Rays from Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan and Thailand. Those looking for streaming versions can find the film on Hulu, Netflix, Crunchyroll and Viki, depending on what country you are in.

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A new review, Yay!

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I was disappointed with the ending of this movie. I felt like it didn't have a proper conclusion - what was the main point? That plastic surgery is good, as long as you are yourself?

I would say that while the movie was funny and lighthearted, it left me feeling unsatisfied.

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As a light comedy, 200PB works (for the most part), but the whole social commentary thing was much less successful.

Definitely, the supporting actors/cameos were the highlights.

JJM was charming in his role and Kim Ah-joong did a good job as well.

One thing tho, KAJ's face bothered me throughout the film, b/c, well, it was a bit too "plasticky" - but then again, I guess that was fitting.

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I AGREE!
this movie was so fun to watch, and i thought it would be all about, "beauty is not skin deep",
and in the end, i was just left in disbelief!!!
but loved lee beom soos cameo! haha
thanks for the review!

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I agree about the ambiguity but I was thoroughly entertained by the movie and I liked it......

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Can I just ask for the ending please? I was always curious to know what happens in the end :-) Thank you.

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Thanks for the review! I thoroughly agreed with your analysis of the movie. While the movie was comical and enjoyable at the beginning, the second half killed whatever love I had for the movie. I found that I didn't sympathize with anyone in the movie, not even Hanna.
I felt like her "final" concert was suppose to elicit teary-eyed sympathies from the audience, I found myself rolling my eyes and thinking, "Wow, can't she just sing her song instead of giving us this pointless confession."
In addition to this, while she did end up dumping her best friend after her operation, I really didn't feel bad for her friend, since she did nothing at the beginning of the film to receive sympathy in the latter portions.

PS: I loved Lee Beom Soo's cameo in this film =)

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Actually I felt it at the ending, maybe it's something you have to empathy for rather than sympathy. Especially because the pressure around plastic surgery isn't as intense in other places as in Korea, or the idealization of idols. Considering those factors it's understandable why she felt the need to make the confession, and it was clear that it was something she regretted to an extent.

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Thanks for the review. I completely agree. Film couldn't decide if it was stressing the necessity or evils of conforming to a plastic surgery obsessed society. Definitely took away from my overall enjoyment

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I like kim ahjoong's acting very much in 200pb, and I anticipate her upcoming movie "only you" with joowon <3

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Lee Beom Soo's cameo was the best thing of movie...daebak!!

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This was the first Korean movie that I watched & I love it!
I've noticed that when watching Korean movies the story somehow got lost in the middle & there is no clear conclusion at the end

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i remember crying at the ending part when she cried. sobs. this was my first korean movie! so nostalgic. and i totally loved the song byul from the soundtrack. Its still one of my favourite songs!

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I watched this movie few years back and found it extremely annoying, but could never put my finger on why I found it annoying. Thanks for clarifying it for me.

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Thank you for recaping movies that we can find subbed and enjoy your recap much more since we watched the movie and can relate to and think new things about it. Off to read now :)

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I thoroughly disliked this movie. I cringed through the entire viewing.

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That was my take on it also. While there were a few funny parts, it was very much overshadowed by the premise that the only thing that stands between you and total success and happiness is a warm scalpel.

If there was any social message, it was that a movie can suck and still be popular.

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This was one of the first K-movie I watched when I first got interested in Asian movies and dramas. I may have to rewatch it soon, I had forgotten most of it.

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I watched this in korea when it was released, and my male cousin who I went with said that he'd want his girlfriend to get plastic surgery sigh. I enjoyed it immensely, but I have to agree with you from a technical standpoint. I'm going to be forever confused about the bathroom scene with the producer. I will never get a grip on what the major theme and conclusion is (Do get plastic surgery? Your inner self is what is beautiful? You've got to be hot and nice to get the guy?) mostly because the script doesn't either. But even with its failings, Kim Ah Joong did a fantastic fantastic job with it.

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You can also watch it on Netflix! This was the second korean movie I watched with my friends, lol. I saw it when I first got into kdramas. When I watched it last year, I couldn't help but notice how different kim ah joong looked. I thought she was the most beautiful thing I had ever saw in my life in the movie, haha. I was also surprised to find that the king from Frozen Flower played the dude she falls in love with! I was sooooo surprised because he was so strict in FF. Anyway, good movie! Check it out!

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At a superficial level, I was sorta entertained. But if I dig deeper, there really wasn't any heart or soul in this movie. Imho, shallow and forgettable.

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... Shallow and forgettable = +1

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This was one of the first few Korean movies I watched, I remember being really excited to see it cause I kept on hearing good things about it. I learned to take positive reviews about films with a grain of salt cause by the end of it I just didn't get the hype around it all, the story was confusing with where it wanted to go and what it's actual "message" was . I was left feeling indifferent and thinking I wasted my time checking it out. I personally wouldn't recommend it to anyone.

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funny that the movie about a 90-kg woman is so lightweight.
but I hate plastic surgery with a passion. I better put a rag in my mouth or I will explode. please, if you see me starting to say something evil, stop me. it would scare everyone.

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Given I have been struggling with weight all my life, I don't think I'll appreciate this much. Why is this writer/director hell-bent on taking things like progeria and obesity and turning them into cheap comedy?

If this is less confused and more emotionally grounded than 'Oh! Brothers', I can see myself not hurling heavy objects at my screen, since I also quite like Kim Ah Joong, but I am really not sure I want to even attempt it, after the things I have heard. I like my screen.

Thanks for the review though. Great piece.

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one of my best friends is scandalously overweight, but she doesnt stress about it. she still has a loving husband a house and the does gardening, she walks 10 km a day and eats healthy food.

people should start thinking if being slim > being good.
children and parents here have become aggressive, children beat each other up because they follow their parents anger. everyone is angry. so is it really a time to think about weight problems?

the first thing they need to cut out is the anger, intolerance, and the emotional handicap to understand each others differences.

turning a sickness into a joke, old age into a joke or weight - thats just plain racism.

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By your last line, i think you mean discrimination? Race is a more nuanced aspect to discrimination; and for the troubles and pain it has wrought for people of colour, race is not something you wish to bring up so easily.

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how is discriminating based on race different than basing it on beauty, height or weight. i hope by people of colour you don't just mean african americans. it would be quite naive to think that other races throughout history weren't subjected to similar or even more severe degrees of discrimination.

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I did mean racism. discrimination is too weak a word. it is racism, based on your physical characteristic people make judgements. no different. it is no longer connected to just skin color but all physical characteristics.

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no, actually. racism is systemic and institutionalized and affects people of color whether they are aware of it or not. discrimination against overweight people is certainly existent and cruel, but please do not conflate it with the severity of racism.

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yeah yeah whatever I am stupid and I dont actually care, so just let it go (that was not sarcastically said, I mean it I have no actual emotions)

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Racism means judging based on race. The word itself is wrong to use for fat-shaming and hate against obese people. Just like sexism isn't racism, because it's based on sex, not race.

Different words to show different types of prejudice and discrimination. They do not convey the gravity of what they describe, just the nature. It's semantically wrong to call it 'racism', when race is not involved.

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Though this movie is about the transformation of an overweight girl to a slim beauty, I do not think it is about the weight problem per se. It is a reflection of the Korean trend of plastic surgeries.

It would be interesting to analyze the psyche of Koreans who seem accepting and willing with plastic surgeries. We Asian has been taught that the beauty means more dimentional faces( big eyes, big noses) like Westerners. But is it true? I myself is Japanese and have been out of my country and living in Europe and the States half of my life... at one point I had very limited contact with Asians. Then one day I happened to watch Lee Junki for the first time, I thought his sharp eyes are strikingly beautiful...he seemed so exotic and handsome. I wondered if I would have thought of him this way, had I continued living in Japan. I wondered we simply have attraction towards our opposites. I must have been sick of looking all those big eyes big noses while living in Europe!!We Asian and Westerners are quite different in many ways and we need to accept who we are.
Generally speaking when I watch Korean dramas I notice that there is something so artificial about the changed faces,,, I am currently watching What's up Fox, there is a girl who is chasing the main lead,,, her everything is sooo artificial that made me feel rather uncomfortable to watch her...
I honestly do not know why the public consider artificial faces and figures so good. I wish I knew.

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I'm from Europe and I'm really fascinated by the Asian obsession with beauty and plastic surgery, mostly because I don't understand it and I haven't grown up in a society that is supportive of such drastic measures to enhance one's outer appearance.
The only cases in my circle of family members and friends that have experience with plastic surgery are the ones related to health issues: for example a cousin of mine had a reduction surgery on her breasts done because they caused her problems in her spine and back.
Personally, I like the imperfections in people's looks. It makes us unique and just us. When I got into watching Asian dramas, the first few months I had real trouble distinguishing between several actresses/actors because they basically all looked so similar and there was no special feature that made the actress/actor look special and I even had to rewatch scenes because I got confused which character did just what.
And in my opinion, faces that have been operated on do not look more beautiful than natural looks. I find it a major turn-off to look at someone who looks so obviously plastic, and while watching dramas it distracts me.
I'm not trying to bash Asians and plastic surgery, please don't misunderstand, I just don't understand the whole thought-process behind it. Especially because any kind of surgery isn't to be taken lightly and a risk to the person's life.

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I've always thought of Asians as beautiful people. Love their long beautiful dark hair, beautiful skin and beautiful small eyes. I think Lee Jun-ki's eyes a gorgeous. He said that back in the days he was thinking about doing eye surgery to make his eyes bigger because everyone around him were doing it but thank goodness he listened to his fans and didn't go through with it.

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I love Lee Jun Ki and I think he's one very handsome man. I'm glad he didn't do the surgery either, but it disturbs me that he said "because everyone was doing it" at the time.
Almost sounds as flippant as smoking a cigarette for the first time because everyone was doing it..... :(

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me too, european, and I would never let anyone cut me up like that. I do have a scar on my right hand from a fallen glass door though, from 5th grade, still causing problems cause it cramps. but I want to keep the scar to remind me "glad it wasnt my wrist!"

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I have scars from surfing in coral islands and I've thought about getting rid of this visible one on my leg but I just couldn't do it. The thought of getting cut with a knife is just as scary as being chased by a white shark (in my dreams lol).

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I understand your reasoning to keep the scar, but if it really hurts I would still consider getting it removed. Health above everything and all that. :)
I have a hemangioma (I have no idea if that is the correct English word for it) as big as two 1€ coins placed next to each other on my arm since my birth. My doctor told me it isn't dangerous but I could have it removed and get a scar in return. I never even considered getting the surgery. It is barely noticable despite its size (it looks just like a bump, only a little reddish) and some people only notice it after several months or even years, even though I wear mostly short-sleeved shirts. I've been carrying it around for more than twenty years, it's a part of me and I don't see why I'd have to get rid of it. Imagining my arm without it, now that is weird.

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Everything you said.

Could it be, that Asians are somehow trained to attract no attention? We Europeans are far more individualistic and don't press ourselves into the corset of society as much an as easily. My external impression of Asian societies is that they strive to be alike and low-key. The one point they could mark as their own is the looks. Or is it following the society's order of having to be beautiful and therefore again fitting into the society? Beauty being defined within very narrow limits.

It is a mindset I really don't get and understand.

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I guess you could be right about the narrow beauty standards.
I don't know any specific beauty standards in my country except that tall, blonde women are apparently every man's dream (I wouldn't know, being a woman and all :) ), and yet that is only an idealized version of the perfect woman and in the end many of those men fall for women with different hair colours and heights.
So it suprised me a lot the first few times I read the comments section on dramas or when characters in the dramas completed a supposed small face of another person, because in my country there aren't any specific features that are considered beautiful.

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This is tje first korean MOVIE I watched and it got me hooked ! But thr I watched seducing mr perfect and then there was no doubt im into this ! But I kinda wanted something moee for the couple in the final resolution !

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Thank you for the review!

I came across this title at the very beginning of my kmovie/kdrama adventure, but never decided to watch it. I have issues with the attitude that changing one's looks makes anybody entitled to be loved, happy and appreciated, whereas real talent, skills and work go unnoticed. And then Susan Boyle came and taught many people a lesson.
However, I watched another film concerning plastic surgery, Time by Kim Ki Duk. It shows the other side of the "I am pretty, so you have to love me" way of thinkig. Instead of giving confidence (isn't this the most cited reason for going under the knife?), the procedures can make one doubt their own value and feel insecure.

On a superficial note, I must say I absolutely hate the "fat costume". It is much uglier than the real life overweight. Out of curiosity I just looked at some poster-shooting video, where there was an actual double for the big-size version of the heroine, and I saw that in poster she is photoshopped to be much bigger. Isn't it reinforcing negative stereotypes? That IS NOT funny.

*goes to listen to some Beth Ditto songs*

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This movie is probably my no.1 favourite korean movie after Hearty Paws. Although I do agree that the ending was too open for my liking, the more I think about it the more it seemed to fit with the story. I don't want to say the ending because it might spoil it for others but I think the whole reason she got plastic surgery was partly because of the guy but mostly for her self-esteem. When she heard Sang-Joon and Ammy talking bad things about her, I think then was when she realised that she is not being recognised and she didn't want to someone else to take credit for her talent. So I personally fully understood her motivation to get plastic surgery and claim what she shouldv'e accomplished when she was fat and ugly.
I watched this movie not really thinking about its moral or what it was trying to tell us but I recommend that you don't. You'll enjoy the movie much much more.
Watched it over 5 times without getting bored. 9.5/10!!
Also the Lee Beom-Soo cameo was great and also the scene where she was like Bbang! to her dog at Sang-Joon's house so frigging cute ahhhh.
Highly recommend it!

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One of the first k-jilms i saw. I totally agree that the movie totally renegged on what it promised...the idea that beauty isn't about how one looks. But at the same time...it was weirdly realistic. In a sad "that's the way the world is and that's what folks do" kinda way. Thanks for the review.

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I remember watching this movie fairly early in my kdrama career (lol), due to a friend's recommendation. Apparently I was the only one to come out seriously disturbed and unsettled by the movie's message. For her, as I imagine for many others, she was able to gloss over the whole plastic surgery thing as just a romcon gimmick and enjoy the movie for the fantasy that it was.

Basically, it's just nice to see people sharing some of my concerns.

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I liked it for the fluff, even though the underlying message got skewed. It reminded me of the Hong Kong movie Love on a Diet ... (their fat suits were horrible).

My favorite thing really about the movie were the songs ... the remake of a Janet Jackson song and a much better rendition of "Maria" in Korean than Blondie's.

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Gotta agree about the OST I loved it too! The movie is pretty OK if you ignore the serious issues which comes about. For a movie with humour and heart, I always think of My Sassy Girl =)

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I first watched this back in 2007, and it was one of the first Korean movies I ever saw . . . which is probably why I was much more tolerant of its flaws than I would be today.

That being said, the biggest issue I had with it was the romance. After the bathroom scene, I just couldn't get behind it - especially when he started showing an interest once she became skinny. It wasn't even the plastic surgery I took issue with (I mean, that's written right into the premise); it's the fact that she could have taken control of her life by kicking that dirt-bag to the curb, but instead fell back on all her old habits. It would have been better to have her fall for someone new, someone who might not be conventionally handsome - or better yet, a best friend who stuck by her even when she had been overweight. I felt like they took an amazing premise and squandered its full potential.

She really was reborn after leaving the surgeon's office. It's just a shame we didn't get to see her do more with the new chances she was given.

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Just saw this yesterday on Amazon. What a disappointment. The film was occasionally funny but misses the opportunity to explore public perception of beauty and the leads personal struggle with with attraction to someone who doesn't meet his standard of beauty. These areas would have also provided comedic opportunities. Don't waste your time watching this unless you have nothing else to do.

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The ending was so WTF for me, negated pretty much all the funny from before.

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The ultimate message of the movie was depressing :(

This was a 5/10 for me.

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You can also find it on Netfllix, where I watched it. I totally agree with the review and don't recommend it at all. Keep up the good work dramabean!

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If you wanna see a good Korean movie about plastic surgery watch "Shigan" (Time) by Kim Ki Duk.

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i like 200 pounds beauty, BUT why why can't there be a movie where the guy will fall for the fat girl? it's like one has to change them self for someone hot to recognize them. would have liked it better if she was still chubby and he likes her, it would mean he likes her for her.

*sorry i just have problems when stories are written where chubby girls have to be skinny to get the guy*

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There was one show I remember that the big girl did get the guy. It was my Lovely Sam Soon.

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it's unrealistic because if he liked her right away, he would have locked her in a villa and MADE her eat vegetables and learn martial arts to get the weight off but he really did not want to get too close to her social pariah status it seems so I guess in the film's reality - plastic surgery was the way to go. It was nanners.

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at first, I thought he could see thru the plastic surgery and was just pretending not to recognize her. tsk.

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i agree with review..the transformation goofiness is ok but i didn't understand the reasoning o the main motivation of the lead character to do the surgery. if she wants to be accepted why go that drastic change and not just work out or do diet? also, it does not make a good example how women should perceive themselves..which is that beauty is beyond skin deep.

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Great review, a pleasure to read. Thank you very much for sharing your review with us!

I've also written a review on 200 Pounds Beauty, it was originally for a Korean Media and Film course I took as part of my studies at the university. You can read it here if you'd like: http://bit.ly/1a128KU

I think this is a great exemplary film on the plastic surgery issue in South Korea. It's sad to say the least, but I find their ideals of beauty too harsh, and the social perception of beauty continues to puzzle me.

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It was one of the first films I watched, came across it probably in the aftermath of its popularity peak. Before getting into k-industry, in general I had never really paid attention to plastic surgery and stuff being I was in my teen years. It didn't take long before it did and it didn't make sense at all. I mean it's normal for a person to want to appear attractive or at least presentable, but what was going in the industry took it to a whole another level. Producers and managers making snide remarks at trainees and aspiring singers because of their looks or whatnot, leading to a decrease in personal esteem and an increase in quick-fixes and plastic surgery. So I thought the movie would be an interesting one for viewing.

Like many of you, I expected and rooted for the director to take a stand, give us an in-depth look at people's motivations, struggles and delve deep into society's core to offer a new perspective. And it was a highly disappointing ride, I switched off mid-way. Kim Ah Joong was charming, but hobbled by a weak script and direction. The only saving point was the singing at some parts. I guess maybe I expected too much too soon? If taken at face value, the context is courageously laid out but other than that, it made me shake my head so much.

I can't really understand the plastic surgery craze. It's sad that looks are being valued that much and driving people to sacrifice a part of themselves they will never get back. The process is sure to be mentally and physically debilitating. There are exceptions as always such in the case of deformity. At the end of the day, trying to enhance looks further than necessary can only bring more dissatisfaction and further feed a dangerous desire. Well, I wish society would loosen up a bit everywhere because there's a need for a breathing room. It's nothing much, but change has to happen individually first.

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I don't quite understand the WHY IS THE WRITER PROMOTING PLASTIC SURGERY SO EVIL TO HAVE A HAPPY ENDING THE MAIN CHARACTER SHOULD HAVR NOTHING attitude by some people (mainly women viewers). Like seriously? Stop one second from viewing it purely from your life insecurities and think about what Korean society is like as a whole. It is near to impossible to live in Korea happily if you are hideous and/or overweight. Being pretty is a matter of SURVIVAL. Like getting jobs and even being treated better at work. So with this big knowledge in mind...think of why the writer would create such a happy storyline for our character. The viewers see the journey of an overweight girl becoming someone whose life is worth living..buy are they left with a bad taste in their mouths in the end? Absolutely. And why? Because they see how badly she's been treated before and how she almost lost everything important as a result. The writer is saying LOOK KOREA WHAT YOU MAKE WOMEN GO THROUGH TO EVEN HAVE A CHANCE AT HAPPINESS. Idk I thought the message of the movie was pretty satisfying with ironic laughs till the end. Hopefully it was to get Koreans thinking about the hypocrisy and superficiality of "natural beauty"

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she is very REALISTICALLY traumatized by her obesity and I was amused at the anti-surgery stance of the beau which was quite a blow to her - she could easily end up being in a shallow marriage or become a hooker given her self esteem issues. And I guess it was very realistic that her best friend resented her post-surgery success but I wouldn't call this a feel good film at all nor was it intended to be given the title character's constant state of hysteria.

Unlike Love on a Diet, this was not a cute film. I'm not sure if it was a horror show but the main character - well, i don't really think therapy works but what do I know. She probably needs to go on some hikes and maybe get a bettr friend/be a better friend.

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I watched this movie few years ago and frankly did not like it..it just seemed too shallow...like being slim and beautiful through plastic surgery is the answer to every girl's ultimate happiness..

what happened to kindness & good heart meant being beautiful and beauty being skin-deep?..it took plastic surgery for the guy to notice her...... but then I guess that's what happens in real life,however superficial it may seem...
I don't recommend it...depressing movie..if u think abt it..

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Some part of me... thinks she didn't have the surgery. The doctor said natural beauty when removing her gauze. You see how she rushed out of the hospital by stealing a nurse gown. When she was running on the treadmill and during the surgery phase. She was working out. Maybe she wasn't allowed to see herself. The end when the doctor said "can you tell"
If she had surgery he wouldn't say that cause at that point everyone knew she had surgery.
What if she never had the surgery.
Random thought...

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