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Suspicious Housekeeper: Episode 1

Suspicious Housekeeper premiered on SBS earlier this week, and it’s certainly got a little bit of everything—comedy, melodrama, and an interesting mystery revolving the strange housekeeper of the show’s namesake. She always obeys orders, never smiles, and seems to be missing some of the essential components that makes a human a human. Her character alone is worth even a tiny peek into this premiere, which is an adaptation of the insanely popular 2011 Japanese drama Kaseifu no Mita.

As for the rest, well, it’s a bit of a tonal mess. Some of the dry humor lands, but most of the comedy feels out of place and shoehorned in to lighten up all the crying, screaming, and general bleakness that comes with the territory of following a family in mourning. If you’re easily turned off by whole chunks of time spent on chest-thumping grief, then this might not be the show for you. I’m still trying to figure out whether this is even the show for me, so take from that what you will.

 
EPISODE 1 RECAP

A woman clad in dark clothing and a baseball cap looks dead ahead, her serious expression unchanging even as a female voice asks her off-screen, “Can you do anything you’re told to do?”

The woman simply says, “Yes.”

“No matter what it is?”

Again the woman replies, “Yes.”

“Then…” the voice hesitates. “Can you kill a person?”

We don’t hear the answer, but the woman doesn’t look like she’s about to say no.

Cut to: A funeral service where YOON SONG-HWA (Wang Ji-hye) pays her respects to the departed woman and the family she left behind, including a husband and four children.

The recently-widowed husband, EUN SANG-CHUL (Lee Sung-jae), greets Song-hwa as his coworker, but their words are tense and just this side of strained. Hmm. As Sang-chul turns to introduce Song-hwa to his children, his eldest daughter glares at the both of them knowingly. Does she suspect them of an affair?

Song-hwa’s coworkers note her odd absence for the past two days, which she hurriedly brushes off right before the banquet is interrupted when Sang-chul’s youngest daughter runs into the room crying because someone already made fun of her for being motherless, which, ugh. I understand that there are social stigmas at play here, but good grief—her mother’s body isn’t even cold yet and some other kid couldn’t resist a you-don’t-have-a-mom jab?

She can’t stop crying because she misses her mom, and none of her siblings’ efforts to console her seem to be working. Her dad looks powerless and in over his head when it comes to comforting her, so the job is left up to her aunt, who’s also inept.

Everyone watches the family drama unfolding, but no one seems quite as aloof about it all as Song-hwa.

An ominous forty-nine days passes, and we see the same mysterious woman from the opening scene approach the Eun household thirty minutes before she’s scheduled to arrive, causing her to wait patiently outside.

Eldest daughter EUN HAN-GYUL (Kim So-hyun) is first to rise, waking up to a house that looks like it’s never been cleaned. She sees the mysterious woman through the window, but her thoughts are drawn elsewhere as her two younger brothers burst into the kitchen to complain about how their noona isn’t doing enough of the chores Mom did.

Curiously absent is their father, which leaves Han-gyul to wake up her little sister and all but pry away the sweater of Mom’s that she still sleeps with.

Once all the siblings are at the table, they get a chance to imagine the food they’d like to eat before they get what’s really for breakfast: cheap, store-bought kimbap. The youngest daughter yearns for real food she spies on the TV, cueing sighs from all her more mature siblings.

The brothers ask after their absent dad, whom we find literally hiding in the bathroom out of fear. Dad Sang-chul has to psych himself up just to go out and be with his family at their meager breakfast table, which he sits at with the utmost reluctance.

Once he’s faced with his kids, we see why—Dad doesn’t know how to handle their varying requests and answers everything in a stutter, clearly trying to be their dad but failing spectacularly at it.

Interestingly, when he does try to initiate conversation with Han-gyul, she pointedly ignores him.

Her brothers complain that their noona isn’t doing enough housework (which kind of makes me want to slap them), though that is a topic Dad wanted to broach with them. He’s hired some help…

The doorbell rings, and the youngest daughter opens it to let the mysterious woman inside. In an almost robotic voice, the woman introduces herself as the new housekeeper, which takes Sang-chul by surprise since he was expecting someone older.

All the same, he hurries to produce a pair of worn house slippers for her from one of the many clutter piles. She politely/mechanically declines as she pulls out her own perfect pair from her strangely doctor-like bag.

As Sang-chul explains the new housekeeper to his children, he adds that it’s because forty-nine days have passed since their mother’s death. Youngest Daughter asks dad what the meaning behind forty-nine days is, leaving Dad to fumble for an explanation.

But it’s the mysterious (suspicious!) housekeeper who finally explains that the forty-nine days is a period of mourning, whereafter those who are still living are supposed to move on with their lives, sort of in a we’ve-paid-our-dues way. But since she’s suggesting that people move on and forget, Youngest Daughter vehemently protests the idea that she’ll never forget Mom.

The family goes back and forth over what to call their new housekeeper, and just when they settle on calling her emo (aunt), she cuts in to explain that since she is not their mother’s sister, she cannot be called their aunt, even if that’s a common colloquial term for a housekeeper. She’s emphatic without changing her tone, and her explanations are almost textbook-like in their level of detail.

She doesn’t seem to like the idea of being called ajumma either (another common way to call a housekeeper), so she introduces herself by name as PARK BOK-NYEO (Choi Ji-woo), all in the same monotone voice, all without even blinking.

Bok-nyeo goes on a tour through the house, making a mental checklist of all the things she’ll need to do. But when it comes to Mom’s untouched room, the family is in a bit of disagreement—Daddy Sang-chul doesn’t seem averse to doing something with it, but his kids want it left the way it is. So it’s off limits for the time being.

As Han-gyul walks to school with her brothers, the oldest one remarks that it’s odd how Bok-nyeo doesn’t smile. Like, at all. No one knows why.

Bok-nyeo stops Sang-chul on his way out to fix his tie, and the ajumma next door sees this normally-intimate gesture with nosy interest. However, she’s quickly taken aback by Bok-nyeo’s automatic and lifeless introduction, clearly hoping for a gossip-worthier scoop than that.

The ajumma immediately tells her husband how strange their neighbor’s new housekeeper is, but her husband is quick to pick up on the fact that his wife is probably just jealous. Then he spies Bok-nyeo through the window, right before his wife does the same. Bok-nyeo catches her gaze and scares the bejeezus out of her. Ha.

Bok-nyeo goes through the house to clean, but no sooner does she open the door to Mom’s room that eldest son EUN DOO-GYUL (Chae Sang-woo) catches her in the act and demands to know what she’s doing.

He’s taken by surprise when Bok-nyeo’s hand flies at his face to catch a fly mid-flight, Karate Kid-style. That’s her excuse for coming into the room, though there’s gotta be more to it.

Sang-chul keeps getting distracted by the sight of Song-hwa at work, and takes the first opportunity he can to catch her alone. “Forty-nine days felt so long, didn’t it?” he asks, right before he adds that he’ll go to her house later. Wait, so he was cheating on his wife? What an asshole.

Song-hwa looks uneasy with his advances, and uses the first opportunity she can to slip away (when Sang-chul is called by Bok-nyeo’s agency). Curiouser and curiouser.

Bok-nyeo’s overly-happy manager is just doing a routine check-up call that turns out to be not-so-routine when she cryptically warns Sang-chul to be careful around his new housekeeper… because she does anything she’s asked to do. Which means that if she were asked to kill a person, she’d do it.

Sang-chul is obviously very confused by all this and the manager quickly laughs it all off like it’s nothing… but I really, really doubt it is. (Because then we wouldn’t have a show.)

Bok-nyeo finds a birthday card in one of Sang-chul’s suit pockets and calls him to get permission to have his suits cleaned. When she asks what she’s to do with the things in his pockets it’s almost like she’s searching for permission to read the card, and when he gives it, she sees that the card is from his late wife.

When asked what she should do with it, Sang-chul flippantly replies that she can just put it anywhere, all while his eyes remain fixed on Song-hwa.

Bok-nyeo purposefully puts the birthday card right on the fridge, and takes a long look at Mom’s portrait.

When Sang-chul returns home from work that night, he’s surprised to find the house so clean it sparkles. He doesn’t notice the birthday card on the fridge as he instead takes to studying Bok-nyeo from behind out of fascination and/or curiosity, since her manager’s words flash through his mind: “If you ask her to kill somebody, she might actually do it.”

Without glancing up, Bok-nyeo stops her dinner preparations mid-chop to ask Sang-chul not to stand behind her, causing him to sputter in surprise. Caught.

Dad’s youngest daughter takes him on a tour through their newly cleaned home in awe, since even the dinner Bok-nyeo makes later is top-notch. She stands by the table while the family eats and declines any invitations to share a meal.

The kids notice that the dishes taste exactly like Mom’s cooking, with eldest Doo-gyul the most suspicious, even when Han-gyul tells him that Mom’s recipes were right on the fridge for Bok-nyeo to use. He’s not convinced.

The youngest son asks for his dad’s help solving a math problem, but Sang-chul has no idea what he’s looking at. Suddenly, Bok-nyeo recites the answer to the equation as easily as if she were reading it from a book, and when Doo-gyul mutters that she probably cheated, she says: “Trash.”

His jaw drops at the insult, until Bok-nyeo finishes her sentence, “Today is recycling day.” But you just know that’s not what she meant. I’m kind of liking her dry sense of humor, but Doo-gyul just finds her suspicious (there’s the title!).

Dad tells his kids that he’s not too sure about keeping Bok-nyeo around since he found out that she does everything she’s asked to do to a fault, causing Doo-gyul to smile mischievously: “Everything she’s told to do?” Uh oh.

The ajumma next door catches Bok-nyeo while she sorts the recycling, but none of her wheedling gets a reaction out of Bok-nyeo. She leaves some recycling for Bok-nyeo to deal with, but when Bok-nyeo crushes it under her feet instead, the ajumma gives an exaggerated reaction straight out of a bad silent film.

The kids’ aunt we saw at the funeral, WOO NA-YOUNG (Shim Yi-young), drops in to bring groceries only to be surprised to find the family sitting at a full table. Youngest Daughter is less excited to see her than she is to see Bok-nyeo return.

Aunt Na-young’s effervescent personality shines through (much to Doo-gyul’s annoyance) as she brings up Youngest Daughter’s upcoming birthday, wanting to plan a party. When Dad asks what she wants for her birthday, his daughter tentatively asks if she can wish for anything. He makes the mistake of saying yes.

“Mommy!” she blurts. “I want to see my mom.”

Even Bok-nyeo looks like she feels sorry for the youngest, who immediately starts to cry when Dad asks her if there’s anything else she’d like. But Aunt Na-young gets a bright idea as she spots a family picture taken during a past birthday, and she cheerfully promises that she’ll let Youngest Daughter meet her mom. (What could possibly go wrong?)

When it’s time for her to leave for the day, Bok-nyeo meticulously changes into her down jacket and black cap. Sang-chul stops her to ask for her advice and a favor—he doesn’t know what Aunt Na-young is planning and wants Bok-nyeo to find out.

“Is this an order?” Bok-nyeo asks. Sang-chul just kind of stutters at the question before he tells her that it is, to which she replies emotionlessly that she’ll obey.

Bok-nyeo goes to the address of Sang-chul’s father-in-law, which is where Aunt Na-young lives. When said father-in-law asks Bok-nyeo to explain why she’s there, she does, but is startlingly literal in a way that father-in-law wasn’t expecting, especially when she tells him that Sang-chul sent her in his place out of fear.

When Aunt Na-young finally arrives, her father just yells at her for associating with Sang-chul and his family. They fuss back and forth at each other in a way only fathers and daughters can, with Na-young insistent that she stay in the lives of her late sister’s family.

Bok-nyeo gives Sang-chul an exact recounting of events, including every word that was said. Her memory is perfect, but not her social skills—she couldn’t get Aunt Na-young’s birthday plans out of her.

Youngest daughter HYE-GYUL (Kang Ji-woo) watches as all the other moms pick their kids up from the kindergarten she attends one by one, absolutely elated when Bok-nyeo arrives to pick her up. Surprisingly, Bok-nyeo even lets her hold her hand.

Hye-gyul arrives home to see the figure of her mother from behind as she cooks, and she immediately thinks it’s her mom since the woman is wearing her mom’s favorite sweater. Good God. If that’s her aunt dressed up as her mom…

Hye-gyul hugs her mom’s(?) back, crying tears of joy. Then her mom(?) turns around… and it’s Aunt Na-young, there to wish her a happy birthday. Cue comedic music.

Aunt Na-young is a lunatic I guess, because she seems to think the act is cute. And the light music seems to tell us that the show thinks it’s cute. I’ll be honest with you guys—it’s not cute. It’s the opposite of cute.

At least the music turns serious as Aunt Na-young serves the family the exact same food she saw them eat in a picture, which is just nine kinds of WRONG. Wrong wrong wrong-ity wrong wrong.

Aunt Na-young tries to salvage the quickly-devolving situation by telling Hye-gyul to think of her as her mom from now on, which only makes Hye-gyul break down as she all but tears her mom’s clothes off her aunt, who only then just realizes what a bad idea this was.

Hye-gyul runs to Mom’s room where she clutches her clothes and sobs, and her fed-up older sister finally yells at her that their mom is dead and nothing will change that. She rips Mom’s clothes out of Hye-gyul’s grasp and orders Bok-nyeo to throw them away.

“Is that an order?” Bok-nyeo asks, like a genie waiting for the magic words. Han-gyul tells her yes, and to throw all Mom’s stuff away while she’s at it. Bok-nyeo: “I will obey your order.”

Just like that, Bok-nyeo starts to throw out Mom’s things, sending the kids into varying states of panic. When the youngest son asks Dad why he isn’t stopping Bok-nyeo, Dad can’t come up with a reply, and Han-gyul turns on him with this fire in her eyes. She accuses her dad of wanting to get rid of this stuff all along, though their reasons are very, very different.

That’s the last straw for Han-gyul, as she flies into a rage by throwing away Mom’s things before she has her own mental breakdown.

Outside, Bok-nyeo sets fire to Mom’s stuff. Doo-gyul rushes out and slaps her across the face (WHAT) so hard she falls to the ground. He doesn’t seem to notice her bloody lip as he shakes her by the shoulders, blaming her for pretty much everything.

Then he turns on Dad: “Are you fine living without mom? Are you?!” Then he has his own mental breakdown, and now this seems like a joke. It’s not supposed to be funny, it just is when he’s third in line to deliver an explanatory monologue about his feelings.

After his turn is over, the youngest son gets to make an angry quip. Once he’s pushed down by his older brother his anger dissolves into sorrow as he gets his turn to cry and explain the pain he’s truly feeling. It’s a chorus line of sadness.

Everyone blames themselves, but no one more than Hye-gyul, since her last memory with Mom was a fight where she’d told her to disappear. Dad’s efforts to comfort her just make her cry harder.

Then the next door ajumma breaks the mood by complaining about the fire happening in their backyard, which takes the scene from everyone wailing and gnashing their teeth in grief to… not that.

The ajumma stands from across the fence to tell an entire tear-stained family that they’ll be looked at differently now that they don’t have a mom, because that’s totally the way real people behave. At least Bok-nyeo puts a stop to her by spraying her with a water hose, using an excuse that we know is a total lie. Cue comedic music and Hye-gyul’s laughter. Because why not.

The water-soaked and makeup-streaked ajumma declares an overdramatic war on the family, which has me wondering if this lady didn’t read any part of the script that wasn’t made up of just her lines, because she thinks she’s acting in Gag Concert when I thought we were all just watching something-like-but-not-necessarily-Schindler’s List.

The family recovers a box from the fire filled with small stones, a gift that Hye-gyul had once given to Mom. This lifts her spirits and they continue with her birthday party like nothing ever happened. Bok-nyeo stands nearby with her bloody lip still, and Dad asks her for birthday candles like his son didn’t just slap her. Something is very wrong with this family.

Luckily, Bok-nyeo produces candles from her magical bag. Then, when they need a birthday card, Bok-nyeo pulls one of those out too. She hands Dad a bill for her overtime later, and he launches into a not-apology by explaining some of his life story, and how he was never ready to be a father.

I do love that Bok-nyeo is all, Are you finished talking? She read my mind.

Little Hye-gyul falls asleep crying and clutching her mom’s box of stones that night. The next day, her classmate calls her stupid and tells her how to actually meet a dead person. This… seems like yet another bad idea.

Daddy Sang-chul tries to salvage his relationship with Song-hwa, who doesn’t want any part of it anymore—she was fine with their affair, but now that his wife is dead, she knows what people will think about her.

At home, Doo-gyul tries to pry open Bok-nyeo’s bag o’ tricks before they realize that Bok-nyeo and their sister should be home by now. No one picks up when they call her agency.

Then we cut back to Song-hwa asking Sang-chul if he’d be prepared to abandon his kids should she not want to break up with him. I think him declining Han-gyul’s call says he is.

The kids go out to look for their little sister, whom we find sitting by the river with Bok-nyeo. Hye-gyul asks her, “Do you really do everything you’re asked to do?”

We see them next as they walk hand-in-hand into the water. Bok-nyeo’s expression doesn’t change as the water reaches Hye-gyul’s chest, steadily inching higher as they march onward to death(?).

After all, Bok-nyeo can’t disobey an order.

 
COMMENTS

Okay, that was messed up.

There’s something irrevocably haunting about that final scene, which achieves a kind of depth that the hour before it tried and mildly failed to set up. It’s already harrowing to see a child presumably marching toward their death in an effort to see their departed mother, but where this show excels in taking it to that next level of soul-suckingly bleak is the fact that Hye-gyul is heading toward that fate hand in hand with an adult who’s supposed to be her caretaker.

It’s that breach of trust with an authority figure that goes beyond neglect or abuse and into another realm of WTF-ery, mostly because Bok-nyeo’s apathy reads as though she truly isn’t human. Her mysteriousness is part of the charm, since I am curious to know how the show plans to explain her existence. Even if she’s dead inside, how is it that she has just enough free will to throw water on an annoying neighbor or cleverly call out an errant son, but not enough to say no to an order? Any order? Even one asking her to kill someone, or to help someone kill themselves? What if the person asking is a child? It’s normally a good thing when a show has you asking so many questions by the first episode, and I’d definitely say that Bok-nyeo is the most interesting aspect of Suspicious Housekeeper by far. Choi Ji-woo is putting in a strong performance.

The story itself is rather straight forward even with the added level of intrigue as to how exactly Mom died, what part Dad had to play in it, what part Song-hwa might’ve had to play in it, and/or whether the ready-to-kill Bok-nyeo might’ve been the murderer. Aside from that mystery we’ve got a family in mourning over the loss of their mother, all of them struggling to heal in their own ways—except for maybe Dad.

Maybe he’s grieving in his own way, but I was definitely taken aback by his “I’m not ready to be a father” speech when he’s got four kids. Accidents happen, but not four of them. And they’re not four little mistakes, two of them are at least into their teenage years—so then he wants pity because he’s been a father for over a decade but he’s still not “ready” to be a father? But he’s ready to leave his kids for an affair? Even if he gets a redemption arc, they might’ve done too good a job in setting him up as an insufferable tool that redemption isn’t an option.

So it’s a plus that some of the characters in this show elicited such strong initial reactions (maybe not if most of those reactions were negative), but the writing was downright problematic at times in that there was just so much of it. Words words WORDS! And then they were super depressing words followed by strange comedic beats. Some shows can manage levity in a sea of melodrama so seamlessly that you barely even notice, making the comedy feel organic as the drama. This show is just not one of them.

In the absence of balance, we get scenes that go on for so long and skew so melodramatic that they could almost be taken for parodies. This is where the directing might be to blame, because though each child had a separate mental breakdown moment in one very long mental breakdown scene, there are different levels of intensity that could’ve been played with instead of just setting the dial to 10 and letting it ride. The loss of a family member is indescribable, but to have not just one child but four violently sobbing for the entire duration of their separate monologues just became way too much to handle, especially when each of their moments happened in a very precise order and in a very spotlight-esque, center stage manner—which made what should’ve felt like raw moments of grief feel like simply manufactured, overwritten lines. It was very much like, “I am [insert child type #47]. I am angry because of [insert trauma here]. But really I’m just covering up my grief which I’ve internalized and transferred onto my [insert type-specific character neurosis].”

And all that’s fine really, even if there was so much more telling than there was showing when it came to revealing character. It was the most un-subtle way to tell us about each child specifically, and they weren’t even the only victims of this treatment—Song-hwa had her tell-all moment with Dad where she went from “I want to break up with you” to “I still have feelings for you and now I will explain why those feelings are causing me inner turmoil.” Eventually, I just wanted the episode to end so everyone would just stop explaining their every thought process.

Maybe someone didn’t get the memo that there will be more than one episode with which they can tell a story, but I can’t say I’m totally out of the game either—I’m interested enough to check out a few more episodes, but further recaps look like a no-go when October premieres are just around the corner—and darn if there aren’t some great looking prospects in that bunch.

 
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Thank you for the recap! I was wondering about this show...

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Yes, same here. I watched the first episode on Dramafever and then started looking around to see if others found it as whack as I did. The answer was yes.

I'm not sure what to make of this drama. Choi Ji Woo is doing a great job, I love watching her face for some tell, some flicker of emotion. But as if in compensation there is an awful lot of scenery chewing going on, and the overacting and the odd transitions and the bright colors give it an aspect of unreality that I find oddly compelling.
I am going to keep watching it, and somehow I want it to keep being freaky...

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Definitely whack! As for the overacting-- I find the actor who plays the eldest son to be the worst offender and super distracting because of it. Amusingly, twice during the first two episodes, while I was mentally telling him that he was overacting, another character told his that he was overreacting.

I'd like to add a polite reminder that spoilers aren't allowed on dramabeans unless they're coded using spoiler tags-- that includes any comments here or on the Open Thread that give away anything based on what happened in the j-dorama. Thank you!

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I watched a bit of the first episode and then tuned out. It's probably because I am biased towards the original version (Japanese: Kaseifu No Mita available on dailymotion only 10 or 11 episodes).

The characters seemed to be over the top and I don't find Choi as convincing as I did Matsushima Nanako. At least with Matsushima Nanako I felt like I wanted to know more about her. I felt curious. With Choi, I don't. I just feel like she is playing the character very stiffly.

But....this is not a fair review as I have yet to view the rest of the series. I will assume that the acting and directing gets better as everyone gets a feel for who their character really is.

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The eldest son is painful to watch...he just glares and shouts annoyingly....really...he needs to tone it down even when playing angry....

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I am a Choi Ji woo fan, but can't say that I enjoyed watching her play a robot in the first 2 eps.
That bit of:
"Is that an order?" and her proceeding to do whatever it is that is asked of her is just too weird to be believable.
I too am waiting to see a flicker of human emotion fr her char.

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I checked both episodes out on a whim yesterday and was pleasantly surprised. I really had no expectations but came away interested in the wackiness of the set up. I think I'll tune in next week too. You should check it out!

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Thanks pabo ceo reom, for the recommendation :-). I will follow it.

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I watched all 3 eps so far. I find it absurd and uninteresting. Becos the children are calling the shots, the tone is juvenile.
Choi JW is know for her refined elegance. Here she is stripped of it.
Utterly boring to me. 3 eps are all that I can stand of this show.

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It's a remake of the Japanese drama Kaseifu no Mita (家政婦のミタ - I am Mita, Your Housekeeper). so far it's pretty spot on with the original series. There's a reason for the housekeeper's demeanor and actions no matter how whacked it seems right now.

The original drama goes back and forth with the humor and the tear jerking moments. All in all it was a decent story and I'm looking forward to the rest of Korea's take on the tale.

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Actually, I am finding a rather crucial difference between this version and the Japanese one; in Kaseifu no Mita, the father was sortof a sad-sack character; yes, he'd had an affair and was acting like a scumbag, but he was a weak, ineffectual scumbag drifting on the winds of least resistance. The Korean dad is stronger, but that makes me dislike him more; I feel like he chose the evil, rather than drifted into it. The Japanese Dad seem to cling to his girlfriend like she was a fantasy crush - and she was just as weak and hapless as he was. The Korean adulterous pair are both ambitious and amoral, and a lot harder to like.

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Thanks for the recaps. I really liked this first ep :)

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I'll probably watch until Bok-nyeo's mystery is revealed.

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Me too, I want to know her mystery. Is she the mom with a new face? Is she an alien? Why does she act like Mary Poppins, but talk like a robot? These are burning questions I need answered.

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Did you notice she doesn't react to pain? Her hand was burned and her lip split but she showed no response. She is a shell. What hollowed her out? That is a reason to return next week.

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Maybe she's severely autistic? Like, the world is plain black and white to her. But I'm quite sure they won't pull an autistic card. Probably because she's so emotionally scarred from something? Haven't watched the original version.

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Oh thanks, I'm watching it. :)

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For your own sanity and as a reward for sticking with Sword and Flower, I hope you get something good from the October bunch to recap. I'm not planning on watching Suspicious Housekeeper, but from your recap it seems like it would be... tiring to watch, not to mention recapping it.

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"For your own sanity..."

So true--and oh-so funny. LOL!

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Yeah this a great show so far. I watched the Japanese version and it is good. This version is pretty much sticking to the same storyline which is great but obviously the writers will be adding their own twist to it seeing as it is 20 episodes.

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i actually found the show interesting. and i have to agree with you on the i'm-not-ready-to-be-a-father declaration. you dont make 4 child and call all four of them mistakes!!

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Yeah. Kind of proves how horrible of a father he is, doesn't it? Him saying that really proves how much of an absence he was in their lives. They were obviously raised mostly by mom while dad was out working.

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Which is fine if you had no choice, but he needs dad up for his kids.

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I don't agree on the "not ready to be a daddy" line - it was pretty obvious that he has been mentally absent, and quite often physically absent for most of their marriage. Given his obvious disinterest in actually being a family, I wonder how they even managed to get four kids. He is not ready to be a father because he was never really a husband.

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The first episode seems very familiar with the plot of the Japanese version; Heck, even the props (i.e. Bok-nyeo's clothes, bag and watch) are the same! I don't really know if it is a good thing or not, but if you were able to watch the original version you'd really have a tendency to compare. Good thing the Korean version have good actors, and I think they are doing a good job so far.

I wonder if they are going to make the plot and the ending the same with the original version. If they are not going to change the ending, one thing I think they should have done or should do in succeeding episodes is to "Korean-ize" the show so that you can differentiate from the Japanese version.

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I wonder why this show so popular in Japan

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Because Japanese dramas have a variety of genres...

Unlike Korean dramas, which are basically all about romance.

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also even more popular is a drama about bankers. hanzawa naoki. the japanese are not so devoted to romance so you can learn a lot of new stories from them.

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Reading Jdrama synopsis, one would think: too weird, or kind of boring, or nothing special, or this is nonsense - but for some strange reason one would end up watching the first episode of said drama and then be like "will definitely watch THIS!" LOL

And Jdrama genres are not confusing at all, it is there for a reason. Genre - Human, 1 Litre no Namida where the premise is of a girl having an incurable disease and is dying but it is a very moving drama. Genre - Family, My Girl where the premise is of a guy who broke up with his older girlfriend four years ago, and now learns that he has to figure out how to be a father to his four year old daughter which is a very heartwarming drama.

But those are very slice of life drama. For the kind of weird (because these are like kind of weird, there are others that are really weird): Genre - Mystery, Keizoku 2 SPEC where the leads are assigned unsolved cases, and such cases are caused by people with special abilities. Genre - Suspense, Orthros no Inu where simply through touch, one 'evil' person can heal people and one 'angel' person can kill people and then they battle it out. Genre - Psychological Thriller, LIAR GAME where the female lead is so gullible she gets scammed into debt who then asks help from an ex-convict so they take part in a game of chance where the only option is to win.

For Jdramas, one should keep an open mind... your perfect drama is possibly that one drama you assumed you would not like....

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Oh, and for Jdramas it is really important to have really good/great subtitles so that the nuances will not be lost...

For example, for Hana Yori Dango look for SARS (subbing group) subtitles - although it is hard subtitles meaning the subtitles is embedded in the videos and it has to be downloaded, it is worth it... It is a lot better than the soft subtitles available...

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Can't agree anymore, you said it very well!!! btw, I love hanzawa naoki, tough the ending isn't really like I expected, still love it and cant wait for season 2.

but you know, jdorama is very consistent about their theme, dont expect romance from Un-romance drama, unlike in kdrama, tough the drama talk about politic, medical, and all (else than romantic), still the romance is their focus... :)

So, even I adore jdrama the most even topped my list of favorite the year, still I watch more kdrama than jdorama, LOL

Jdorama is good for a entertaining and education watching while kdrama good for just entertaining mostly...

btw, kdrama is win for me if talk about rom-com specially if the writer is kim eun sook and hong sister :D

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"Not so devoted to romance" is putting a positive spin on it. Lately the Japanese don't seem to be able to create a good romance. So if you can't do it well, it is best not to be too devoted to it. I am not saying that they don't do very good dramas - they do, and they excel at the quirky and inventive. Just don't expect to have the cockles of your heart warmed very often.

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It is probably a culture thing though, since Japan is very understated where romance/relationship is concerned. Korea is more Westernized in that regard.

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Actually Jdoramas have realistic romance when they go for romance plot while Kdramas are extremely unrealistic but you just stick with it for the quirks and the unrealistic sweetness.....

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I've seen some great romances in jdramas, but I do appreciate that they're capable of putting the romance away at times.

Though the Japanese dramas that do involve romance are often even worse with the dead fish kissing than kdramas. Like, 10xworse - I know we complain about nonresponsiveness/responses not allowed for women in kdrama kisses, but at least they try with the angles. Jdrama kissing is usually literally about two mouths sort of happening to be in the same place at the same time, with no apparent intention of making contact.

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Yes, the understated quality of Japanese displays of affection :ahem: was something that drew me to Kdramas in the first place, LOL.
Of course, there are many other reasons why I like both jdoramas and kdramas, but I really like the differing approaches to similar subject matter. And as someone who "wears their heart on their sleeve", as the saying goes, for me kdrama romances are more realistic, rather than less. I guess I am a kindred spirit.

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Quite true - Japanese shows in general have a much wider range of topics. They are much less afraid to try new things - many are really weird and flop, but those that do succeed often do so in a very big way.

To be honest, I cannot think of a truly original Korean drama plot.

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This show seems all kind of weird, is Bok Nyeo a robot perhaps ?

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That is exactly what I thought!

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What a weird show.....not planning to watch it...

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I think this actress is even more robotic and mysterious than the japanese versions´.

I am getting curiouser and curiouser.

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THANKS HEADSNo2

I am VERY suspicious of bok neo !. What if bok neo is the dead woman , she didn't die but had a make over in her looks ?.

The agency manager also act suspiciously like her employee !! funny !.

What ? not ready to become a father with 4 kids !! and having an affair ?.

He didn't even noticed the housekeeper fingers soar, cleaning the whole house in a day plus cooking ? strange plot writing .

But I like to know WHAT'S NEXT although the plot is clueless AND CHOPPIE at the moment !!.

choi ji woo is doing good acting as the housekeeper.

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additional info. she is like a tape recorder !!

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This Korean adaptation might be following the Japanese original BUT the execution really seems different... Kaseifu no Mita is a really dark drama, and while Suspicious Housekeeper tries to be that - it kind of fails because it ultimately has an identity crisis of being a dark drama, but it can not be too dark so there has to be comedy and possibly romance, AND be 20 episodes long too.

Korean adaptations of Japanese dramas always pale in comparison with the originals. But when Japan did Maou (an adaptation of Korea' s The Devil), it was a lot better in terms of scriptwriting... Acting is not an issue considering the Korean one had Uhm Tae Woong while the Japanese one had idols (the main lead in his debut drama lead role even). Japanese dramas has idols acting, but it is not really an issue because they have a variety of genres and different stories. Korean dramas complain about idols acting when the real problem is simply Kdrama being only romance and/or makjang.

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LOL this sounded like a rant.

But can not really comment much about the drama because anything that can be said at this point would just be too spoilerish...

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Wonder how many Kdrama fans here also watch Jdramas and/or TWdramas?

Seems like the general consensus of most Kdrama fans for this drama is that it is too weird and/or not watching it...

For Kaseifu no Mita, Genre - Mystery, Family.

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Hi dramaqueen1 :) I like strange dramas. I do not need romance to watch and enjoy something. I want to see how this drama develops (I've not seen the Japanese original). I've watched a number of Japanese and Taiwanese dramas. I've seen more Japanese movies than dramas (although it is hard to find subtitled movies and dramas).

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I would watch a lot more dramas if I had more time! I would definitely watch a lot more Japanese dramas if I had the time. But right now, I am waiting to watch a few kdramas that will be premiering soon. Would you happen to know if the movie Japanese movie Villain (Akunin) is available with English subs? I am also looking for a drama, Sleeping Jukujo. Those are two things I have on my watch list.

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There are no subtitles available in general sites... But will try to check thoroughly later and will send you links if ever.

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Do you have an lj account? A locked community have English subtitles available for the Jmovie Akunin for download.

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Do you only need the English subtitles for the Jmovie Akunin? If so, you can try at opensubtitles(dot)org.

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For J/K/TW dramas, do you have favorites or ones that you enjoyed watching a lot?

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I don't have a live-journal account. If you ever find other links and can share them, I would appreciate it :) As for j-dramas, some of the ones I really like include Orange Days, Yasha, Atashinchi no danshi, Tumbling, and Ooku Tanjou. One of my favorite Taiwanese dramas is In Time with You. I also like the second season of It Started with a Kiss, even if I do not ordinarily like shows where leading men are cold and mean to their leading ladies. But I think that Zhi Shu's character really grows and softens over the course of the second season. I need to try to fit more J-dramas into my schedule :) Do you have any recommendations? As I wrote above, I've seen more movies. I love the diverse, dark, and quirky plots. On of my favorite j-movies is Love Exposure. I also wouldn't mind movie recommendations :)

Have you ever watched the Korean drama-special, White Christmas? When I was watching it, I felt that it seemed more like a J-drama in terms of tone and content.

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I used to watch a fair few jdramas though the last year has been mainly about kdramas. I do agree that they have a wider variety of topics, and are not afraid to skip the romance when the story doesn't demand it (literally the only kdrama I've ever seen with no love storylines is School 2013, and it was practically a revolutionary move for a kdrama!)

Jdramas I've enjoyed include both series of Hana Yori Dango (much, MUCH better acted though BOF had better production values to really convey the ott richness) which most people will know.

I'd also recommend Honey & Clover (slice of life), LIFE (high school), Gokusen (humour, high school) and xxxHolic (horror) to anyone who's looking for recs. And also Zettai Kareshi, which gave me the biggest case of Second Lead Syndrome I've ever had <3.

I loved Mawang in the original, but somehow the j-version of it just doesn't work for me - I love Toma, but he just doesn't live up to what Joo Ji-hoon did with the role, or the tragedy of it all.

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Really enjoyed Hana Yori Dango too! But unlike most, I also liked its cinematography. Boys Over Flowers is too ostentatious, and being rich/privileged is not really synonymous to being ostentatious in my book.

Peridot should at least try the first episode of XXXHOLiC... Recommended it too in the thread below because could not reply in this one anymore.

Mentioned already, but liked Maou better... It was probably the writing/storyline that pushed it ahead.

Based on all the dramas you mentioned, we have watched exactly the same ones though with differing opinions. Kind of cool when you think about it.

Are there J/K/TWdramas and/or movies you have watched and then you're like WTF did I just watch, or WHY did I watch that, or I did watch it BUT I'll just forget that I did... LOL

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I watch both doramas and kdramas, and tbh, there aren't anything that makes me go "Okay that is weird" anymore, I'm used to Japan's willingness to explore unfamiliar or uncomfortable topics, which I took as a positive traits.

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I disagree that it doesn't matter what sort of acting talent you have as long as there are a bunch of different genres. Poor acting is poor acting, no matter what costumes you wear.
Japanese actors have the subtle advantage of generally better writing and production values, but the reason I don't watch more jdoramas is exactly what you mentioned: the proliferation of idol actors with absolutely no talent other than looking melancholic or mugging for the camera.
I will agree that Maou was perhaps better written - it was certainly a tighter, more focused drama - but the acting sucked. Sorry, but for me the acting in The Devil made it a much, much more satisfying drama.

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But there are actors/actresses who can't act, why single out dramas with idols simply because there are idols in it?!

Yamashita Tomohisa is not a good actor, but he gets the really interesting drama projects like Code Blue and Buzzer Beat. So it can not be helped.

Having fave actors/actresses will make me check out their projects. But having an interesting story is what usually makes me finish watching a drama.

Liked Maou better, it is probably a personal preference. It sure is not about length, because some of the Kdramas I really liked are weekend dramas like One Percent of Anything, Creating Destiny, and Smile, You.

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Oh please kdramas are proliferated with idols or pretty faces with mediocre acting too. It's not a Jdrama's thing.

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I agree that a lot of the comedy felt out of place. I am willing to continue with this show. I try to finish whatever I start, even if it is a toil to get through certain shows. There were two or three shows that I actually dropped. Hopefully, the quality and pacing will improve over the next episodes (although episode 2 had similar problems).

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What Kdramas are you anticipating this October? Anticipating Heirs BUT for Krystal and Kang Min Hyuk, and Im Joo Eun and Choi Jin Hyuk - hope these couples would have good storylines and considerable screen time. Recent Kdramas finished watching is Love Rain (girl crush on SNSD Yoona! But this is her only drama that I have watched because Jang Geun Suk/story is age appropriate for her... Well, and 9 Ends 2 Outs, but she was only a minor character there.), King2Hearts, and Arang and the Magistrate. BUT still read all Kdrama recaps here in Dramabeans. Regarding White Christmas, have not watched it yet but now that you mentioned its Jdrama-like tone and content - SO true!

For TWdramas, fave is Smile, Pasta and now watching Just You - but these are fluff dramas. LOL

For Jdramas/Jmovies, it is so varied so advice is check tags like genre or if you have a fave actor/actress, check their filmography in AsianWiki. Will try to recommend a quirky drama though:
XXXHOLiC, Genre - Supernatural (8 episodes only, live action based on manga)

Anyways, hopefully recaps for Suspicious Housekeeper will continue... Watched the original already, but really interested how this Korean adaptation will work out - so far, out of all Korean adaptations made, this stayed true to the original one the most. Although they did add the comedy so...

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So far I am waiting for Basketball, Answer Me/Reply 1994, and Future's Choice. I am not interested in Heirs. I also found out that Park Ki Woong will be in a period-piece drama. I can't find much information on it. Park Ki Woong is one of my favorite actors :) I try not to watch too many dramas at a time. I already have enough viewing material :) Plus, there are dramas coming out a little later. Most of the ones I've watched over the Summer are coming to an end. I am also watching Just You. It's silly but also very cute.

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You watch a lot of KDramas! Where do you get English subtitles for KDramas though? It is really hard to find decent ones lately...

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Lol! I usually watch kdramas on viki and gooddrama. I would also go to dramacrazy (when it was still around!).

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Would watch more KDramas if decent English soft subtitles are readily available... Before there were a lot of subbing groups, but not lately... Or at least it takes a lot longer to be released... *patiently waiting*

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Quite hard to download torrents after some time has passed, so usually download series that caught my eye then would try the first episodes. Would end up finishing those that are really interesting, but will save the other series for later whenever I feel like it... Currently watching list is way too long already, but the to watch later list is a lot longer... LOL

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Hope u do the same for 'secret', I dont plan on watching till the girl's out of jail-dont think I could stand to watch the drama before that!

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The first two episodes of Secret do not impress me at all. The plot appears to be the same old chaebol vs lower class scum yet again. Our favorite "K Group" is back again. So far the plot seems to be mainly founded on paragraph #3 of How to Write a Korean Drama, which states "always fill up as much as you can with Noble Idiots who are perfectly happy to self-destruct for the sake of some scumbag".

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Thanks for the recap. I loved the Flight of the Conchords reference!

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I wasn't interested at first, but after reading this, I'm kinda curious about this show. EVEN with the annoying set-ups (bullying orphans, WTF? maybe the kids at school don't know better, but you, ajumma?!), and the more annoying Dad. I'll watch the first episode just to get a taste of what a dark melo's suppose to be like.

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My first impression of Suspicious Housekeeper after the first week was and remains not enough Choi Ji-woo and Kom So-hyun too much of everyone else.

Another impression is I'm very glad I haven't seen the Japanese drama this is based on because for as much as I love K dramas in my opinion the Japanese are better storytellers than the Korans. By that I mean that Koreans don't much care about world building even in the best K dramas there are several moments where all you can do is scratch you head wondering if it makes sense. Whereas the Japanese do a fantastic job of setting up worlds and everything that happens makes sense in the confines of the worlds they build for their dramas. My point being if I had seen Kaseifu no Mita I'd go in hating it knowing it would be screwed up somehow, but since I haven't I actually think I like Suspicious Housekeeper.

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Totally true, tough I watch kdrama more than jdorama but, jdorama absolutely better than kdrama. jdorama dont limited their genre, so I respect jdorama more and adore their quality, specially the writing.

kaseifu no mita (the original verson) is my favorite jdorama of 2011, so I waiting this korean version since it announced but havent watched it yet, waiting a review if it's good enough...

thank you HeadsNo2 for recap, see what happen in next ep, maybe I'll wait again until last ep so can watch it without have to wait every week.

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If the best kdramas you watched left you scratching your head because it didn't make sense, then you haven't been watching a lot of Korean dramas.

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i looooooooooooooooove the girl from "i miss you" and the moon/sun " i follow he every where i know the actress nanny but i cant remember where ive seen her ! so basically im watching this for the girl kim so hyun !!

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Trifling writing...only the actors are keeping me tuned-in and of course the mystery of the housekeeper.

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I liked it...oddness and all. Such a departure from what I normally watch. I am not always looking for love stories and it's nice to see something so fundamentally weird in Kdrama land. I've already watched episode 2 and I am eagerly waiting for episode 3.

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im loving it so fat. the subs & not eatching the original helps i guess. thanks for the recap Heads..

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Loved that "It’s a chorus line of sadness." line.
I'm really digging this so far. It's very different and has an interesting edge to it. When the son slaps Bok nyeo I felt like that was meant to establish to the audience in a shocking way that this family is an absolute MESS. All rules and expectations have gone out the window and they're just surviving in chaos. That's interesting enough to keep me watching.

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Weird. Thanks for the recap, as I think I'll skip the first episode due to the excessive displays of grief and pick up with episode 2.

Nice to see Lee Sung-jae again, but not so nice to know what a creep he's playing. As for Choi Ji-woo, I'll be curious to see her play such an emotionless character, knowing how animated she can be on variety.

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I love you HN2, you always seem to pick up lost caused shows and this one feels pretty messy. I'm actually gonna watch some and get ride of it if its a bad one. Thank you for your efforts :)

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Thanks for the initial recap, HeadsNo2!

This is an instance where both ep 1&2 should have been a joint recap - some important answers that move the plot forward are to be had in 2.

I'm willing to give this one a chance purely because I can't fathom Choi Ji-woo and Kim Hae-son signing onto a project they didn't think was special and worth their time/talents.

The awkward emotional jumps in ep 1 didn't bother me half as much as the oldest son hauling off and clocking the housekeeper (which to me looked more like a punch than a slap) and not one person in the scene really reacted to it. Kinda a WTF!? moment capped off with an inappropriate comedic beat using the water hose with the bitchy neighbor.

But what really struck me as darkly funny (and without giving away anything Spoilery) was how quickly those kids glommed onto the housekeeper's 'Is that an order?' mandate. Let the dark hyjinks begin!
:-)

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A strangely riveting performance by Choi Ji-woo, who persistently reminds of Uhm Tae Woong in looks and acting style here.

I do agree with the comments about how difficult it is going to be for a Kdrama to pull off a concept this dark and mix it up with humor. It is working, so far.

Another weird reference: the nosy neighbor character is a dead ringer for the Gladys Kravitz character on the old American TV series, 'Bewitched,' which has been in re-runs as a "family" show for fifty years. Of course, the nosy neighbor lady with nothing better to do with her time than snoop was a fixture on American shows from that period. Gladys, who had to deal with a witch living next door, stood out a bit.

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Wow. They really stuck to the Jdrama plot for the most part. The drama really was dark though and I barely remembered laughing at anything in it. Even with the weird aunt I just found her weird so I think that the kdrama should probably not try to define supposedly comic moments with comedic music.

I think that aside from that, the first episode did well and I'm curious how they'll stretch the story.

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I just finished the first episode and I loved it! I really acted the lead actress!

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*Liked

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Dear commenters, please use the spoiler tags while comparing this remake to the Japanese original. Not everybody has watched 'Kaseifu no Mita'. I don't want Bok-nyeo's secret to be revealed at this stage.

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Ooh, there's a secret? I think that in itself was a reveal for me!
Ha. Now i'm going to be eyeing the little gal.

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Nevermind, i cant believe i mixed up Bon Nyeo for the youngest child.
I'm sure Bok Nyeo( the housekeeper) has the most secrets in this family.
Curiousss

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I really like this show so far, mainly because it feels so different. Have to agree with the earlier post that episode 2 clarifies a couple of major questions posed in episode 1. However, if you pay attention in the first scene, you hear the Mistress say (as the little girl is sobbing in the background) that now she really does realize the man is the father of 4 children. I take this to mean she does not want to have a ready made family.

As for the chorus line of sadness, speaking from experience, this actually can happen, especially after the sudden death of the person who is the glue of the family. Once a breaking point is hit, it feels like one person snapping causes a domino effect. Strange but true, though I was completely put off by the son physically attacking a woman and no one saying anything.

And the aunt..why???? This character had better go through some development because right now she is an immature mess.

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At first , I had this crazy idea that it's the mom with a new face .

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I'm curious about the convo between the father and his lover - did she say she didn't want to continue because of the 3rd party stigma or was it because of having to bring up the dead mother's kids (which was the case in the Japanese drama) ?

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Whether or not you get hooked on the Korean version, I recommend the original Japanese version, "Kaseifu no Mita" (I'm Mita, Your Housekeeper), which is by all means a drama, not a comedy. And it needs only 11 episodes (instead of this one's 20) to say all that needs to be said. While it starts off in a bizarre way (as does the Korean version), and it takes a little time to get used to the Japanese style and acting, the payoff is well-worth watching.

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Where do you find J-dramas to watch?

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I generally watch them here: http://www.gooddrama.net/drama-shows GoodDrama features Korean, Japanese, Chinese, Taiwanese, and Hong Kong dramas and movies.

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You know... I always wonder why Asian Drama fans call J-Dramas by their Japanese name but for K-dramas, they call them with their English translated name. For example, Boys Over Flowers. You hear people call the Japanese version, Hana Yori Dango but you probably never hear fans call the Korean version, Kkot Buda Namja. It's always Boys Over Flowers.

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International dramas shown on U.S. venues usually are titled in English (or Spanish). So, for example, “Kaseifu no Mita”, is called "I’m Mita, Your Housekeeper" on Hulu.com. I'm just guessing, but because K-dramas are so crazy popular here in the United States, they almost always are featured with their English title if they are subtitled.

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jdramas/jmovies usually do not have official english titles - some do have, but most do not have and only use the literal english translations. for example, Hanazakari no Kimitachi e is literally For You in Full Blossom. Tada, Kimi wo Aishiteru is literally Just Loving You but official english title is Heavenly Forest. thus, it is more common to use the japanese titles.

on the other hand, kdrama and twdrama have official english titles.

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Thanks. I did not know that. I haven't seen a lot of J-dramas on American television, but the few that I have (that is, those with English subtitles) had English titles. Examples: Lucky Seven ; I'm Mita, Your Housekeeper; Partner; Substitute Princess; and Miss Rose.

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there are jdramas that use englsih words in the official japanese title through katakana like Lucky Seven, LIAR GAME, etc. kdramas do that too, use english words in the official korean title through hangul like Full House.

Kaseifu no Mita is literally translated as Mita, The Housekeeper so the English title you see around is a variation of that.

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twdrama usually use the official English titles abroad, the tw title is usually a lot longer...Just Want To Make You Fall In Love With Me is the tw official title for Just You.

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Same thing with Indian movies.

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I think the housekeeper only obeys her employers (dad and the kids). With the rest of people, she shows more free will doing whatever, including throwing water at the neighbor's face.

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Thanks for the recap.

I recognize the aunt from Hundred Years Inheritance. She has such a different personality in this drama. Hilarious.

The dry humor is pretty good, too.

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Show sounds like...something... I think I'd rather watch the Japanese version first since it's shorter to see what all the fuss was all about... On the other hand I'd like to recommend The Queens Classroom which sounds similarly in some respects but is easily the most underrated show of the year

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did you watch the original jdrama version of The Queen's Classroom too?

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Yes..both are great

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As far as the October shows coming up, I honestly don't see a single one that excites me much. I am sort of looking forward to Heirs, but more to see how and when it goes into epic fail mode than any expectations of it being very good.

This show is a bit (OK, a lot) strange, but at least it is something different from the usual k-drama plots of endless love triangles, chaebol princes and Candy Girls.

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I am really enjoying this series so far, and I'm ESPECIALLY glad that I deliberately decided not to watch the original version first. I'm now able to enjoy this one as is, then watch the original to see how they differ, without constantly thinking "they did it better in the Japanese version"

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comparisons are not really in terms of better better, but better different? this is a korean adaptation, so it will manifest that in some form or other.

besides japan remakes their own too: Itazura na Kiss (1996 drama, 2013 drama), Hana Kimi (2007 drama, 2012 drama), Minami-kun no Koibito (1994 drama, 2004 drama). and there are also jdrama adaptations vs movie adaptations. people will always have differing preferences and opinions regarding execution so comparisons are inevitable.

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I just watched the first 15 minutes of the japanese version and was amazed at how each scene in the first episode of the korean version was an exact replica of the japanese one.

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And just realized s. korea is coming out with alot of remakes of japanese dramas.
Most recently queens classroom, suspicious housekeeper, and the upcoming 1 litre of tears.

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To see what next year's dramas will be, just look at what is running now in Japan.

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I've been watching this drama, so far I like it if I ignore the absurdity of some scenes and despite the dad annoying the heck out of me, (like dude you're a grown man, how can you let your children talk to the housekeeper that way), I'm still curious as to see how the show develops ^_^

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I'm torn. Like Heads, I found it to be a poorly-written, tonal mess. I'm worried that I won't be able to buy into Dad's redemption arc (if there is one). Basically, I'm already seeing all kinds of red flags. OTOH, it's super intriguing! It's kinda like I can't not watch, despite my better judgment. Kim Hae Sook (IHYV's Best Mom Ever) is a hoot in this. I'm definitely gonna stick with it for a while longer...

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That is kind of where I am at also. So far none of the new shows are really grabbing me, but this one at least is a bit off beat from the usual chaebol vs Candy vs Noble Idiot plot line.

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I already saw Kaseifu no Mita and it was awesome in an unlikely way. I'm not gonna spoil although I really wished that the ending would be different from the Japanese version

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Hm, i actually enjoyed watching the first two episodes although the writing was sort of un-even. I will, however, get every bit of humour sprinked throughout these first few episodes because of the mourning. Bok nyeo's "Is that an order?" cracks me up everytime!
I think the grief and mourning as a starting episode is never a good one, because you want to draw in as much viewers as possible with a solid start.
With that said, i understand that show jumps right into the aftermath of mom's death and therefore lots of tears.
However, i do agree with the whole confession bit where one kid starts the tears and then it's a domino effect(not saying it's unrealistic, but it diminishes the subtlety and bittersweet moment). I think it would have definitely worked better on the show's part had they divided up each child's turn to shine and so we could keep the emotional beats sprinkled throughout the show.
I do have faith that suspicious housekeeper will find its footing after this dark period in all of the kids' lives and will no longer have to rely on the loss of mom to invoke tears but the journey and reveals of this suspicious housekeeper that turned their house upside down.

Sidenote: choi ji woo should've toned down her literal robotic walk (it kind of throws me out of the moment cause i just laugh). And how the heck is the guy playing dad so different from the man i saw in Gu Family Book? He actually has a really nice physique. Dude is too old for me, but it's weird to see such a different vibe from the same actor.

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Uh the forced "comedy" is redic. This show was anything but funny. It's not supposed to be. Hopefully someone says something to the music guy cause he just dropped the ball big time.

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Hmm..interesting. I guess another drama for me to watch out and wait for every week, after the recently concluded Two Weeks and the soon to end Master's Sun...how I wish this will be recapped until the end...

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I think the spotlight scenes are coz they are mimicking the Japanese drama in a way. It seems to be very similar to the Japanese drama so far. Not sure how far they are going to veer off as they need more material for 20 episodes!

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This could be great, or a just another trope-pocalypse like the 7th Greatest Wanna-be dramas that must not be named. I'm gonna hold off and see if this garners rating before subjecting myself to another round of "and why am I still watching this?"

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I watched the first episode and i feel intrigued and fascinated. I feel like Choi Ji woo is carried this whole show in the first episode, all by herself by her acting and how she's portraying her character.

Also, I feel like she's a hired killer or a secret agaent judging by 'always doing what is ordered' and she may be a friend of the mom or a co-worker that asked her to be the 'guardian' of the kids. She has that feeling with the cold feeling character and doesn't feel anything.

The aunt is annoying.

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