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Gap-dong: Episode 11

Some aspects of this latest suspect of the day play out in the expected way, but this episode introduces a big twist that could potentially be a game-changer. While I can’t say that Gap-dong is full of surprises, where it keeps me guessing is in the psychology of its characters, and that ever-present cloud of suspicion that hovers over everybody’s heads, much in the way that Mu-yeom views everyone in his world through a lens of suspicion bordering on paranoia. Is he just being thorough, or is he in danger of losing perspective? Or has the perspective ship long sailed for him? Even so, he may still be our best bet of getting to the bottom of this Gap-dong wheel of mystery, since as he says, you need a little crazy to follow the crazy.

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Bily Acoustie – “너 떠난 오후” (The day I left you) [ Download ]

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EPISODE 11 RECAP

In the nightclub, Tae-oh shoves Maria down to the couch and hovers over her, warning that he hopes she won’t be the woman who dies tonight. It’s almost like he’s treating his killing impulse as a thing apart from himself, saying that he doesn’t know himself when he might strangle her to death. With that, he stalks off angrily, leaving Maria deeply shaken.

Out in the field, Park Ho-seok (aka Poopy) readies to use a hammer on Ji-wool’s mother, but doesn’t get to use it because Mu-yeom comes flying at him, knocking him aside. They engage in a brief scuffle, but it doesn’t take much for Mu-yeom to subdue and handcuff Park Ho-seok, who is taken to the station for interrogation.

Mu-yeom orders him to explain, not swayed by Park Ho-seok’s nervous trembling or flinching in fear. He looks so unlike the part of the vicious serial killer that the cops wonder about him not being the guy, and Chul-gon interrupts to order Mu-yeom out. He states that Park isn’t Gap-dong, and that if Mu-yeom looks past his excitement over capturing a suspect, he’ll see that he doesn’t believe it either.

Mu-yeom returns to the interrogation room and locks the door from the inside, then frees Park from his handcuffs. But he looms menacingly and reminds him of his Crazy Monk reputation and slams that hammer into the table. Mu-yeom asks how Park committed his murders, then slams him to the table and wraps his wrists in a scarf—is this what he did to his victims? Did it make him feel powerful to be begged for mercy? Did it give him a rush?

This pushes Park past his fear, and something finally snaps in him. Wild-eyed, he breaks free of Mu-yeom’s hold and shoves him to the wall, demonstrating that fishing knot with the scarf. “Yeah,” he shouts, “I am Gap-dong!”

Park grabs the hammer from the tabletop and starts to swing it at Mu-yeom. But he stops himself, turning his attention to the observation window instead, knowing that there are people watching from the other side. Going cross-eyed with rage, he asks if the cops are having fun and smashes his hammer into the glass.

Maria’s mother drops by her trailer that night, saying that she’s disappointed to find Maria alone—she was rather hoping to catch her with a friend (ahem). Mom asks if Maria will move back home, but Maria answers that she knows now that avoiding things only makes things harder on her. She adds that she’s not entirely alone here, and Mom perks up, asking if she means Mu-yeom.

She does, but not quite the way Mom means. She says, “Knowing that I’m not the only person who has devoted everything to Gap-dong helps me breathe.”

In the interrogation room, Park Ho-seok glares into that one-way glass and says, almost as though in a trance, “This is all your fault. You began it. I lost everything because of you. At one word from you, my entire life went down the drain.” He can’t see Chul-gon on the other side, but he seems to be speaking directly to him.

“Before you showed up, my life wasn’t this pathetic,” Park Ho-seok continues, his eyes starting to well up with tears. Chul-gon replies, “Other Gap-dong suspects don’t all live like you do.”

Park says, “You’re even worse than Gap-dong. At the very least, Gap-dong knows who he killed. But you don’t even know who you killed, or how many.” He accuses Chul-gon of ruining hundreds of lives by turning people into murder suspects.

Chul-gon replies, “If you need an apology, I’ll do it. But what will change—in your life, or mine?” Park breaks down into sobs.

Profiler Han reviews Park Ho-seok’s file, and something about it makes him take notice. He finds an old magazine featuring a profile on himself… and the young assistant at his side is a young Park Ho-seok.

Mu-yeom finds Chul-gon in the records room, brooding. Chul-gon explains that Park had been a strong suspect in the original case, and had been seen by a witness near the murder site. But Park was impotent and therefore physically incapable of raping women, and dropped as a suspect. Still, he was fired after being suspected of being the culprit, and news of his impotence had leaked as well. So when he heard that Chul-gon was coming back to Iltan to work this case, he wrote the graffiti in the prison hospital.

Chul-gon sighs, “I was the problem. Ultimately it was me who called Gap-dong back.”

So now they understand that Park isn’t the culprit, but Mu-yeom asks how he knew about Gap-dong’s signature fishing knot. Profiler Han has the answer to that—Park learned all about Gap-dong from him.

He explains to an astonished Chul-gon and Mu-yeom about how he’d been approached by Park, who had wanted to catch Gap-dong after having been mistaken for him. Profiler Han, feeling sorry for him, and taken him under his wing. He’s fully contrite now for having done damage with his good intentions, and Chul-gon growls that Profiler Han has been a key factor in several big problem spots, adding to complications rather than unraveling them.

Profiler Han says hotly that yes, he has caused problems for several people, including Mu-yeom and Chul-gon: “Anybody could become Gap-dong—like you.”

The two cops tense. Did Profiler Han just make an accusation? Chul-gon presses him to explain what he means, but Profiler Han backpedals and excuses himself. Mu-yeom’s curiosity has been piqued, but Chul-gon cuts him off and orders him back to work.

In the wake of Park Ho-seok’s capture, Section Chief Cha calls Maria in to ask whether she can confirm his resemblance to Gap-dong. She still can’t really remember what Gap-dong looked like but she doesn’t think Park is the culprit. He’d began by pretending he was Gap-dong, but now sometimes slips into delusions of actually believing himself to be Gap-dong.

Chul-gon’s accusations of creating problems weigh heavily on Profiler Han’s mind. He broods in his office, and while he looks at the criminal psychology books on his shelves, it’s the box tucked behind them that the camera lingers on.

Maria is surprised by the arrival of a moving truck outside her trailer, accompanied by one big monk and four little ones. He’s surprised that she hasn’t heard of Mu-yeom’s moving idea, while she’s surprised at Mu-yeom’s moving idea.

Mu-yeom is, at the moment, taking a PPL break with wifey to buy himself and Hyung-nyun matching windbreakers, because no contemporary series in dramaland is complete without the requisite outdoorwear commercial dropped into it. Mu-yeom has put Hyung-nyun on the task of looking into Chul-gon’s background quietly, but is told that there’s nothing suggesting that Chul-gon could be Gap-dong.

That same comment brings Chul-gon to Profiler Han to ask what he meant by saying anybody could become Gap-dong. He also asks what Profiler Han knows about the seventh murder that he hasn’t told him. Profiler Han dismisses the topic, though not convincingly.

Chul-gon leaves that meeting thinking on that seventh murder, flashing back to the day it was discovered, twenty years ago. It’s a rainy night and Chul-gon huddles in a spot in the woods, perhaps staking out the area as he listens to the radio to pass the time. He tenses to see a figure walking by, unrecognizable because of all the dark, heavy raingear worn—just a plodding shadow in the rain.

Ji-wool visits her mother at the hospital, and Mom is back to her cheerful spirits, looking pretty healthy aside from some bruises. Mom’s had a change of heart, too, and now decides that the once-hated Mu-yeom is now “Son-in-Law” and “our savior.” Her turnaround takes Ji-wool completely by surprise, but she’s not about to complain when Mom urges her to go and bring Mu-yeom by, and that he’s a good man after all. That’s cute.

Mu-yeom arrives at Maria’s trailer, and she’s uncomfortable with this sudden arrangement (of the temple family using her empty building space—the quarters next to the trailer that she moved out of) and tries to pull him aside to talk it over. He turns on the charm and says that they have to move out of the temple, and says they can do all sorts of work around the place to earn their keep, like fixing things up and protecting Maria.

The little monks in training break Maria’s clay bust, and Mu-yeom scolds the boys, although she tells them it’s okay. He helps pick up the pieces and tells her sincerely that he’s sorry, but that he felt too worried leaving her on her own. He asks her not to kick them out, because at least this way he can stay nearby.

Ji-wool calls Mu-yeom from the hospital, practically giddy that her mother finally “consented” (to their marriage, she means), talking like all that’s left is for them to say their vows. Just then she catches sight of a visitor and nearly drops her phone—it’s Tae-oh, here with flowers and a smile.

He says he’s probably heading to Switzerland, perhaps for good, since his face has been revealed in the media and living here may be too difficult from now on. He asks her to come with him, which she initially takes as a joke, then realizes that he means seriously. She can’t understand why he’d want her with him, and asks if he likes her. Tae-oh merely replies that he might need her—she could be the Sonya to his Raskolnikov. He’s the killer and protagonist of Crime and Punishment, while Sonya is the young woman forced into prostitution for her family, who falls in love with him.

Ji-wool says uneasily that she’s in no position to think of moving away with him, and asks why he’s doing this. He says, “It’s just… I think you could be a brake for me.”

Mu-yeom settles back in Maria’s trailer and asks for a therapy session, explaining that he’s got this woman hanging around that he’d like to get away from. When she says (with some disappointment), “So you saw Ji-wool as a woman,” Mu-yeom scoffs that he didn’t mean Ji-wool—he meant several women, ha.

He refers to the woman he imagined seeing reaching out to grasp his hand, but while she looks up information on her computer, Mu-yeom is mostly just content to stare at Maria. He asks why she mentioned Ji-wool. Could she have been feeling jealousy, perhaps?

She ignores that question and suggests he get his brain checked out just in case. He says that he likes seeing the visions, because it feels like he’s more effective with them spurring him on. Maria attributes that to the visions giving him more motivation.

Getting a bit more serious, Mu-yeom confides that he saw his father in Park Ho-seok, which made him feel terrible. She realizes that his trauma is being suspicious of those he loves, to which he replies, “The problem is what happens afterward—trying to cover it up. Thinking that he could have done it because he wasn’t all there. But this time, I won’t do that.”

Maria guesses that he might be referring to the profiler as the source of suspicion, and encourages him to find out the truth. He calls her cool-headed, given that the profiler is her stepfather, but she answers that it’s because she’s confident of his innocence.

Just then, Ji-wool’s angry voice cuts in from the yard. She’d known that the temple family had to move, but has only just found out where they’ve relocated, and this does not make her happy. She asks Mu-yeom accusingly, “Do you know what I gave up because of you?” and stomps off in tears.

Mu-yeom chases her down and tells her not to cry, saying that he moved here because he couldn’t let Maria be on her own. That’s no consolation to Ji-wool, but he explains that Maria is actually Jae-hee, aka eyewitness to Gap-dong’s ninth murder. And that mollifies her, because Ji-wool can see why he’d be concerned in that case: “If it’s not because you like her, I can understand.” For now at least, Mu-yeom doesn’t say otherwise.

That night, Mu-yeom joins Profiler Han on another fishing outing, where he asks about that “anybody could be Gap-dong” comment, and whether he thinks Chul-gon could be as well. Profiler Han alludes to several well-known killer-next-door cases, and how those culprits seemed like ordinary folk while hiding their true natures from the world. And the impulses that make Gap-dong a murderer can be found in normal people, he says. It’s a convenient way to explain away his comment, but Mu-yeom presses, not buying that he was only talking in a philosophical sense.

While the monk presides over a meditation session at the prison hospital, the gossipy inmates whisper back and forth about the news that Poopy was Gap-dong. Interestingly, the stocky inmate says he’s a police spy, and heard all about it when he was called to the station yesterday and all the cops were talking about it. He has his own guess about who Gap-dong really is, but the monk interrupts the gossip session so we don’t get to hear it.

Ji-wool immerses herself in Crime and Punishment, and finds herself near tears by the time she gets to the end of it. (Spoiler alert: It’s not exactly a happy story. It’s not a typical tragic ending, but the whole thing is rather bleak, though I suppose you could say there are glimmers of hope at the end of the suffering-filled tunnel.)

She calls as Tae-oh is on his way out with packed suitcase, saying that she wanted to give him her answer: “I don’t think I can be your Sonya.” That means she can’t be the woman who stands by his side and brings him back to redemption, but she can (as Sonya did) encourage him to confess. Ji-wool urges, “Go out in the street and shout, ‘I am a murderer.’ I wanted to tell you that. You can’t do that, can you? And if I’m going to be brakes, I want to be stepped on by Ha Mu-yeom.”

Tae-oh took her refusal gracefully, but when she mentions Mu-yeom his face hardens, temper seemingly provoked.

Despite knowing that Tae-oh is a flight risk, the authorities run into trouble getting him on the no-fly list, because he hasn’t officially been charged with a crime. Mu-yeom has a fit at the station and then discusses it with Maria, only to have Tae-oh drop by to see her before he leaves.

Mu-yeom asks whether Tae-oh wants to find the real Gap-dong and not a mere phony, and warns that he’d follow him to hell to catch him. Tae-oh just laughs, repeating something that Poopy always used to say—that with all those officers on the case, he couldn’t understand how Gap-dong wasn’t caught. Now he understand how he felt.

Mu-yeom prods, saying that Tae-oh must feel upset at leaving the fake to deal with such a heavy price, which seems to strike a chord within Tae-oh. But he retains his outward display of nonchalance, saying he’s no longer all that interested in Gap-dong. He just dropped by to say goodbye to Maria and wish her well.

Mu-yeom points out that Tae-oh won’t find it easy to stop his murderous urges, saying that he’ll be on hand to come after him. Tae-oh says that won’t happen, adding, “You saw yourself how I wanted to stop myself. See? I can stop.”

Mu-yeom wonders if that’s true, looking not at all convinced.

Ji-wool gets a job acting as guide at the police station and takes to it with alacrity, all enthusiasm and cheeriness. It’s not lost on Officer Young-ae that she’s here to keep an eye on Mu-yeom, and Ji-wool doesn’t even hide it.

Mu-yeom, meanwhile, asks to look into Profiler Han’s old file. He’s told there isn’t going to be much since he’s been out of the department for a while, but Mu-yeom is keen to find any kind of information that might be helpful.

Tae-oh boards his plane, where he runs into two people of interest: One is a flight attendant who recognizes him, whom Tae-oh overhears talking on a phone call about how she’s sure he’s the infamous killer and how it was terrible to see him. The second is a middle-aged passenger who watches him closely, then looks away quickly when Tae-oh sees him. None of this is lost on Tae-oh.

Mu-yeom gets a file on Profiler Han dating back to 1996… which includes an accusation by a child victim’s parent of inappropriate contact while he was taking her statement. The victim stated that he’d held her in his lap, and initially she thought it was just friendly contact but later realized it wasn’t. There’s a note suspecting him of having a sexual interest in children, potential symptoms of Lolita syndrome.

He shares this with Chul-gon, who doesn’t believe it for a second and says it’s a false accusation to extort money from the accused. He also notes that Mu-yeom’s suspicions are getting extreme, which Mu-yeom acknowledges freely—his growing desire to nab the criminal is making him extra-suspicious of everyone. He doesn’t even give that report serious consideration, but still believes he should be digging into Profiler Han and those around him, to find out what he meant about anybody becoming Gap-dong.

Mu-yeom points out that the statement is strictly true—but was Profiler Han’s reason for saying that so simple? Or did he have deeper suspicions? It’s his duty to find out.

During his flight, Tae-oh thinks of recent encounters—of Poopy not being the real Gap-dong, and Maria taunting him for having such a pathetic hero. Uh-oh, looks like he’s not so in control of his impulses after all, from the way he struggles to keep his composure and breaks out into a sweat. Finally he can’t contain it anymore and bolts up in the middle of the flight. Most of the passengers are asleep, and sweeps aside the curtain to corner that gossipy flight attendant. Fade to black.

The next thing we know, she’s crumpled in a heap on the floor.

Despite his initial reaction to hearing of Profiler Han’s old case, Chul-gon can’t ignore it and convenes the police brass to confirm it. They listen to a recording of the child’s testimony, and the other officers bark that this is not something Profiler Han would ever do. But it’s still a problem, that they put the case into the hands of a potential child molester, and merits further inquiry.

Tae-oh is back in his airplane seat when the woman’s body is discovered, but he doesn’t look much calmer for it. His hand trembles and he slams his fist down in frustration.

Chul-gon leads a team of detectives in searching Profiler Han’s office. Mu-yeom argues that he wouldn’t have kept anything important in his office, but then he spots that box tucked into the bookcase and pulls it out. Inside is a bloodstained police badge, which makes his eyes widen in alarm. Slowly, Mu-yeom tucks it into his pocket unseen and exits. Chul-gon is distracted by another discovery—a file on himself.

Mu-yeom calls into the station to check into the badge, running the numbers in the database to find who it belonged to. He heads home to find Maria fixing up the children’s new room, and forces a light tone when she sees him. He steps aside to take a call from Young-ae regarding the badge number, and asks if it was Profiler Han’s.

As Mu-yeom waits expectantly to hear the answer, Chul-gon walks by as Young-ae is talking to him and listens in. She confirms that it wasn’t Profiler Han’s badge, but Chul-gon’s.

 
COMMENTS

Wait, WHAT. Why would Profiler Han have Chul-gon’s badge, and why is it bloodstained, and why wouldn’t Chul-gon know about it? And even if there’s a reasonable explanation for having a badge that doesn’t belong to him, why would he hang onto it instead of report it or return it?

The thing about Gap-dong is that the questions it raises are often much more twisted and dark than the answers the show actually provides, so I’m pretty sure my knee-jerk reactions are pretty much over the top and unwarranted. (Like, say, the possibility of Chul-gon having died, and the one we know not really being Chul-gon. If this were a twistier show, I’d be itching for that to be the direction we take, but it seems a little convoluted for a show that has been, till now, rather straightforward with its crimes.) And admittedly some of the theories I’ve read in all your comments are much more intriguing than what I think will actually happen. So I expect that the true explanation will be logical and maybe less interesting, but nevertheless I’m curious to see where they take this.

Considering that the identity of the present-day murderer hasn’t been much of a question mark, I appreciate that the show is at least weaving a mystery out of the original Gap-dong’s whereabouts and why he’s lain dormant for so long. Furthermore, it’s raised the interesting conundrum of a hunt for a criminal actually provoking more criminal activity, like your worst example of creating your own problems through the process of trying to prevent them. It’s positively Oedipal, which I find a nice narrative twist—this idea that their dogged pursuit of the criminal is just provoking the copycats.

I’m not sure if I find Tae-oh’s trajectory more or less interesting with this latest turn, because Crime and Punishment seems like a flawed symbolic comparison to draw to a copycat killer. Perhaps you’ll disagree, but I think there’s a world of difference between the morality of a man who kills multiple people out of boredom/curiosity/hero worship and feels no remorse over his actions, and the man who (however misguidedly) believes himself to be ridding the world of a terrible human being who preys upon people (thereby making himself a vigilante hero of sorts).

Granted, Raskolnikov suffered from delusions of grandeur, in the sense that he believed himself to be so above the rest of humanity that he was exempt from the laws governing the ignorant masses. And yeah, he did murder a person, and I do think we’re meant to hope for him to find some kind of remorse and rehabilitation by the end of the novel. But the circumstances are so different between the two killers that I find it totally off-putting to put Tae-oh in that weird romantic light leading to potential redemption. It’s apples and oranges, if apples and oranges murdered people.

But literary references aside, I find it interesting how Tae-oh keeps fishing for reasons to attribute his villainy to others. He tells Maria not to provoke him, speaking as though he has no control over the murderous part of himself. I’m not sure if that’s something that has changed about him because I’m pretty sure that’s NOT how he was portrayed at the outset—he was certainly in full control of himself when he killed the straw artist, and the hairstylist, and the cake-carrying woman. Is his contact with Maria (and perhaps also Ji-wool) changing his impulses so that he feels less in touch with that murderous side, or is the show trying to paint him in a different light now? In any case, he does the same thing with Ji-wool, putting the hope of his salvation into the hands of other people. It’s their responsibility to stop him, not his to stop himself.

Then again, he boasts to Mu-yeom that he can totally stop killing whenever he wants to, so maybe he’s just confused and putting up a front. Maybe he doesn’t know he’s out of control yet. Maybe he really does need brakes from the outside, because he’s realized he doesn’t have any of his own.

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Thanks for the recap Javabeans! :)

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THE TWIST AT THE END.
I'm loving this drama, it keeps me on my toes.
As always, thanks Javabeans for your awesome recap!

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I watched it already

So happily confused

And kind of alarmed

I was searching for a breaking point, but I might have to wait still. At least breaking points have answers.
So the old detective and that profiler are hiding something? We'll find out in the next episode. Hopefully. And Ryu Tae Oh... I don't even know, he hero-worshipped Gap Dong because he was a killer who never got caught because he managed to stop. Ryu Tae-Oh seems to want to know how to stop... but until now, would this stewardress be one of the first he murdered because his mind was unstable? Usually he's much calmer but this time he definitely was irked. I wonder what's going to happen to him...

Dang, the Gap Dong murderer mystery just got a lot messier.

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To be fair I think Tae Oh is right in saying he can't control himself from killing other people, he is a serial killer after all, I've watched a lot of serial killer documentaries and there are serial killers like Tae Oh in real life who idolised infamous serial killers and used them as an inspiration to start killing people, most of them started killing when they reached about Tae Oh's age, Tae Oh did totally enjoy killing those women and believe me once you find enjoyment in killing people you can never stop, it's an addiction for them, serial killers like the feeling of having someone else's life in their hands, the only way they can be stopped is by being locked up in prison, Tae Oh thinks that Ji wool can put a stop to this but that's just what he thinks is needed, in actual fact it will never work, a slight provocation in mind can make a serial killer who has stopped killing to kill again, same thing happened with tae oh, he was provoked by that women's behaviour in the plane and without ever realising he snapped, it seems like he only realised that he killed someone after the deed was done.

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In short there is no cure for serial killers and Tae Oh is definitely one of them.

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"It’s apples and oranges, if apples and oranges murdered people." Hahahaha...

Maybe Chul-gon lost the badge on that rainy right 20 years ago before the seventh murder, twenty years ago. The badge was found by Gap Dong, and Profiler Han found it in the seventh murder crime scene.

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I like this theory, that scene in the rain must have meaning, why would Dr Han keep it unless he is Gap Dong?

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Thank you for the recap, Javabeans. Now please excuse me for a while; need to go and watch the engsub episode before I can comment^^

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Yay....I got to see Jang Geun Seok oppa on the poster in the ferrino shop scene...heehee
Thanks for the recap javabeans

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Section Chief Cha and his resemblance to Maria's flashbacks of Gap Dong cannot be ignored.

It's kind of interesting that the show insists on proving that any and everyone has a dark past and also a tragic one. And I felt bad for Poopy cause the poor guy is totally the poster child for tying a fishing knot in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Oh Tae Oh... you look like you're really losing it now. Are you going to start killing on your own terms now? What will be your signature? Headphones placed on top of the body? Complementary peanuts placed near the victims' heads? What kind of havoc will ensue upon your inevitable return to Korea? It's not like the police force will ever actually nail you so unfortunately for your victims the door is wide open with possibilities. Oh well here's hoping you will have a manic breakdown or two. Lee Joon, you are really doing well in this role.

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Thanks, Javabeans, for continuing to recap this weirdly satisfying/unsatisfying drama crack.

I seriously don't know where this'll all end up. Right now, though, I am soooooo loving Lee Yoon's portrayal of Ryu Tae Oh. Oh sure, the smiley-face smirk was getting to me for a while there. But then I realized, the smiley-smirk is what Tae-Oh believes is expected of serial killers. The guy has no inner core, alas. That is his major problem. Well, that and having had violent tendencies since boyhood. But the lack of a self and the need to identify with something outside of himself, to find himself...dang it's so pitiful...And wow, sooooooo well-done!

Am not sure if I've seen another kdrama where that need to find literary/symbolic ideals/models was ever done. It's such a wonderful depiction of "Who am I? What is my purpose? Oh...that paradigm didn't work out for me...uhm...now who am I now?"

First he latches onto Gap Dong because of what Mu Yeom says. Then he reads Crime and Punishment and wants to identify with a serial killer. Oh my Lord! This poor empty confused guy.

And yes, Gap Dong virus is an evil that affects everyone, killing some, permanently maiming others. And the real carrier of the original virus is the Iltan PD.

And the four story questions:
The main plot:
What is the source of the virus?
Why did the virus seem to stop?
The thematic questions:
How does one live sanely, without causing harm, after one has come in contact with this virus?
How does one deal with the responsiblity for having passed along this virus to people with whacked out mental immune systems (like Loser and Tae-Oh?)

Am glad Maria and Mu Yeom have somewhat survived their bout with the evil Gap Dong virus...and happy Yang and Han are understanding their own culpability. But poor Ryu Tae Oh and Loser! What a mess the law enforcement community made with their lives.

I'm liking the execution of the psychological aspects of this script more than the execution of the police procedural scenes. Frankly, I cringe at some of the plot point transitions. Mu Yeom always finding the victim or being in the right place at the wrong time or even locking himself inside the interrogation room with Loser (knowing apparently that Loser would use the fishing knot.) Yeah, it's all pretty badly-executed. But...I'm hooked. What can I say?

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I love how you define Ryu Tae Oh's self - struggling in finding his identity. Isn't it weird; the more I see him the harder for me to hate him. Which is not good since he is a serial killer for God sake! But I am at the point where I feel sympathy and pity him.. we all have some bad habit (although nothing close to murdering people) we want to get rid of in certain level.. hard habit to break. And he's aware of it and he's willing to break it.. ohhhhh poor baby

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I pity him too.. I want to be his Sonya LOL
Too bad Ji Wool decline his offer to go with him to Switzerland, otherwise she could have saved Tae Oh from "murder on the plane" tragedy.

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Alas.... murdering on the plane was his verbally shouting out, "I AM A MURDERER." He couldn't bring himself to say it but yeah...murdered stewardess was his journey toward redemption and stopping himself. Tragedy for her though....

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I swear...maybe humans are just created to sympathize with folks they understand. Whether we want to or not, pity kicks in. I was just looking at the youtube video "Elliott Rodgers Retribution-- of the kid who just killed 6 students in a murder spreee and seriously I feel sorry for him even with his cray cray vindictive laugh. I wish he had met his Sonia.

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I don't feel sorry for him at all. He made a choice to kill people just because he hadn't had sex and women didn't want to date him (with good reason). I feel sorry for his victims and I hope he rots in hell.

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I feel sorry for his victims also. But I don't think life is so easy that we can feel sorry for one person and peacefully not feel sorry for another. Life's too complicated. When I was teaching and we all had to take that course on pedophilia and abuse, I remember learning that inside each pedophile abuser was generally a victim who himself had been abused as a kid. That's just how life is. In the US there is just a whole lotta men with anger issues, entitlement issues, spite issues, who lack social skills and who are not being helped. If it's one person, then we can say the guy is an anomaly or a psycopath. But if it's something that happens a lot, then we have to say there is something happening in this generation.

So yeah, I can feel sorry for the victims and the perpetrator together. As a black woman. I look at the shooter's video and I think, "Seriously? If you say "beautiful blonde girlfriend" one more time, I'll scream." I rolled my eyes several times and thought, "the racial implications, the privilege! Darn it! Aren't Asian or hispanic or or East Indian or black girls good enough for you and your BMW? Wait..are you totally anglo yourself? Why the need to have a blonde trophy on your arm? Did a non-blonde of any race ever approach you and were you just too good for her? Or was she just culturally less-than for you?"

So it's not as if I'm being a wuss. I happen to see most of the angles in this horror. But I can't hate the guy and hell is too horrible a place for a screwed up privileged racist kid to go.

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Agreed, the actor's portrayal of Ryu Tae Oh is so well done. Let's give the credit when it's due. Well done, Lee Joon!

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Hei, Carole.

I'm amazed with your perspective about Tae-Oh character which I'm really into in.

I do believe that he might only COPY the real murderer because he doesn't have the core despite the fact that he has violence tendency.

By the way...
For me....
The “Who am I? What is my purpose? Oh…that paradigm didn’t work out for me…uhm…now who am I now?” kind of drama MIGHT be found in "The Suspicious Housekeeper"
In this TSH, the housekeeper herself was quite unsure about her life purpose after some.... yeah.. difficulties.
TSH is neither a murderer drama nor romance drama but sure it has A LOT of life values.

I wish after finishing the chills of this serial murderer drama, you can cool down a bit by watching TSH :)

Well, let's continue finishing this one of LeeJoon's best acting first. Hee hee

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Gap Dong being a rapist/murderer. Had totally forgotten that. So Maria wasn't rape? I've forgotten why not...or maybe she was and all that is being played down/understated. Why didn't Tae-Oh rape his victims? Why only imitate the murder and not the rape? Ah, so confused right now.

If the rape/murders had to do with uneasiness/anger against women, the monk could be Gap Dong. Dedicating his life to taking care of young boys and eschewing sexual relationships with women.

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Yeah, the original case involved rape and murder. I wonder if the young girl who died in Maria's place was raped.

At the beginning of the show, I wondered why the copycat didn't rape the victims (this was before Taeoh was clearly linked with the new string of murders). I speculated that the perpetrator might have been impotent due to the medication/s he was taking (being a patient at a mental hospital, he might have been taking strong meds).

With the copycat murders, even though the victims weren't raped, I thought that things were still done to their genitalia. Didn't one of the victims have cream or something on her, which the detectives initially thought might have been semen (before the forensic results arrived)? In another of the cases, I thought that something violent was done. The detectives started talking discussing the specifics, but nothing was ever clearly stated because whoever was talking never got to finish speaking. I'm not sure if this was the second copycat murder. You might have to go back and look for what I'm referring to. I think that the viewers probably didn't get to hear the sexually violent details because of t.v. censorship. So even though no rapes occurred, other sexually violent things did.

I wondered why the copycat didn't copy the rapes. It could be that, for the longest time, Taeoh hasn't expressed or overtly expressed sexual desires. He seemed to kill impassively in his quest to connect with his hero.

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The near-strangulation of Maria was the nearest he came to sexuality, I think.

Aaargh, those censors! Now I don't know what all happened.

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I bet Profiler Han is Gap Dong, he likes fishing, and he became Maria's stepfather to keep an eye on her...

All the actors are doing a good job, by the way. I'm enjoying the show so far, mainly because of them. Yoon Sang Hyun is so good, and even Kim Ji Won surprised me.

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Interesting...maybe that's why she had a mental block on Gap Dong's face caused it's her step dad?!

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Whether he's Gap Dong or not, I'm wondering what caused a guy with a supposed Lolita Complex to suddenly NOT prey on a girl in his midst. Of course he's a psychologist but he couldn't have used his psychological tools to brainwash away the sound of his voice...could he?

Whoever Gap Dong turns out to be, they better give us enough backstory on his motivations and psychopathology or else I won't be convinced.

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if profiler Han a gabdong, then he must be younger than his age for sure. i mean, the gabdong did his crime when he was in early 20 and mid 20 but on that time when gabdong is happening, profiler han was older than the gabdong.

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yeah...good point!

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For me this is another daebak episode; it goes along with our guessing about profiler Han and serves our curiosity about Poopy and Chul Gon.
In the interrogation room Poopy recognised Chul Gon's voice on the speaker that what triggered him to aim the hammer to the observation window. Their dialog-in-silent breaks my heart..

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I wonder about that "testimony" of the little girl that caused everyone to think Han had a Lolita complex. Some abused kids are not really good at recounting their encounter with pedophiles and who knows...the questioner might have assumed the wrong thing and led the girl down the wrong path with his questions?

Maria/Vixen does seem to have some trauma she can't remember. If Han was a pedophile and didn't manage to stop abusing kids, there must be some other kid in the neighborhood whom he abused. Or Maria is totally amnesiac about everything. Unless ya know...the love of a mature woman healed him of his pedophilia and all.

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The "testimony" hearing was comedic, the higher chief was funny and everybody was so awkward in having had to listen to the "testimony". I don't know but I found that scene funny LOL

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The Tae-oh character kind of reminds me of the movie Mr Brooks.

And I had the oddest thought that maybe he didn't kill his father all those years ago, that maybe it was his brother

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wow!!!!!! That really is quite possible. But then his hurting his brother would've been...in self-defense?

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I though the brother was younger than Tae Oh?

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I had the same thought about him not killing the father. We have not learned anything about the brother.

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maybe the reason Gap Dong quit killing 20 years ago is because..he's dead?
In flashbacks we see him laughing when Maria says "i thought the winner got to go free".What if he said "you're the winner, then i'm the loser, now you must kill me" just as his way of taunting her..but what if she actually DID kill him?
Trauma would cloud her memory and her stepfather might have covered it up, then taking her out of the country might have been to keep her out of jail untill the stature of limitations had passed instead of fear from Gap Dong.Becuase her stepdad seems more concerned in her memorie comming back and the 9th case then actually fearing Gap Dong going after Maria again.

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oh my gosh!!! Another good idea!

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Wowww! That's an awesome theory! Say Gapdong didn't ask her to kill him but she might have kill him somehow as part of her survival and someone helped her to cover up or to get rid of his body.
We have all sort of good theories here how I wish the writer visits this page! LOL

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but how can maria kill the gabdong? she was not a teenager when the crime occurs, is it possible for a kid to kill a psychopath who'd killed 9 women?
just not make sense for me.
but.
i have doubt on Maria also.

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Gap Dong appears to be missing from the "current drama list" on the right side of the page.

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Is it only me that thinks the reason behind the medal is that Scary Tiger was waiting for the guy to strike and left his medal and coincidentally Profiler Han found it and he thinks Scary Tiger is gapdong, and so tries to protect him?

It seems so obvious..

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But how will it explain the blood stain? Whose blood is it??

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I feel bad for Ryu Tae Oh on this episode :( like he was the only one whose to be the one who couldn't be receive any happy live :(

i mourn for him somehow

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Aren't there cameras on a plane? How Ryu Tae-oh going to get away with that one? He is definitely losing control from how he used to be, which hopefully just means he'll get caught with enough evidence that his lawyer won't be able to buy him out of it.

And our Mad Monk was swoon when he was sitting so close to Maria just staring at her, lol. I was surprised!

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