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Gap-dong: Episode 12

We get a major breakthrough in this episode, and it’s so big that it has me wondering where we could possibly go from here to keep up the mystery. Are you really giving us the truth at this point, or is this another red herring in a sea of red herrings? I suspect we’re in for some twisting of the situation, but even so, we’re taken in a new direction with the truth and hopefully the next phase of the case takes us somewhere interesting.

SONG OF THE DAY

Park Shi-hwan – “다만 그대를” (Just you) [ Download ]

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EPISODE 12 RECAP

On his flight to Switzerland, Tae-oh can’t hold back his murderous impulse and strikes again. In the aftermath, he looks angry at himself for the lapse, and his reaction goes duly noted by that passenger who has been keeping an eye on Tae-oh through the course of the flight.

Mu-yeom hears that the bloodied police badge in Profiler Han’s office belonged to Chul-gon, to his shock. Chul-gon overhears this phone conversation and must feel that the truth is about to come out, because he imagines himself being interrogated by Mu-yeom, confessing to being Gap-dong—or at least, one of them. Mu-yeom is flabbergasted, knowing Chul-gon’s doggedness in pursuing the case, but Chul-gon explains that his conviction that Gap-dong was multiple people came from his own experience being one of them.

Profiler Han is alarmed to find that badge missing from his bookcase. Mu-yeom arrives with it in his possession and asks for an explanation.

Jumping over to Chul-gon, we get the explanation in alternating points of view—first Profiler Han says that he believed Chul-gon to have been caught in a trap, while we see the flashback via Chul-gon’s memory. Chul-gon carries with him a tattered document he’s carried with him for the past twenty years, which contains his sworn statement detailing his experience from the day of the seventh murder when he’d been staking out the neighborhood.

We see Chul-gon on that day, in his stakeout position when he spots a figure walking by in the rain. The figure bolts upon seeing Chul-gon, and he chases along that rain-slicked road. That person slips in the mud and tumbles down a hill, but when Chul-gon catches up to him, he finds that it’s not Gap-dong but the female victim—she’d mistaken him for Gap-dong and run in fear.

Chul-gon shows her his police badge to allay her fears, but she’s too injured and dies from her wounds. In that statement, Chul-gon blames himself for contributing to the victim’s death, ready to accept whatever punishment comes his way. But he’d never turned it in.

Tae-oh’s departure suggests that Iltan will see no more copycat murders, but the police are briefed on Murder No. 7 just in case. The victim was found where Chul-gon had last seen her, but her hands were tied and a gag stuffed in her mouth, per Gap-dong’s other victims.

Profiler Han explains to Mu-yeom the one difference in this case, which was the police badge found near the victim’s body. He had covered for Chul-gon, believing that it was put there on purpose to target Chul-gon, since he’d been Gap-dong’s most fervent pursuer.

Mu-yeom argues that he should have just told the truth, but Profiler Han says that the situation was reaching a critical point and even the president had gotten involved—any shred of evidence would have been clung to as a reason to catch a suspect, and Chul-gon could have faced the death penalty. But even now, Profiler Han wonders whether he’d made the right call.

Mu-yeom meets with Chul-gon next, and informs him that Profiler Han had believed him to be set up. Chul-gon says that he never turned his statement in because he had belatedly realized he left his badge behind. It would only be a matter of time before he was caught anyway—or at least, that’s what would have happened if Profiler Han hadn’t intervened.

Mu-yeom can’t understand how Chul-gon’s story of an accidental fall lines up with the fact that the victim was found with Gap-dong’s signature marks. Chul-gon deduces that Gap-dong had been watching the whole thing in amusement, and acted after the fact to leave his trademarks on the body.

Chul-gon had carried around his statement for years, intending to submit it as soon as he’d caught Gap-dong. Chul-gon instructs him to turn him in immediately now that he knows the truth of Murder No. 7, warning Mu-yeom not to turn into him—don’t let his obsession with catching Gap-dong ruin his life.

Instead, Mu-yeom takes Chul-gon to eat boiled chicken, now ready to reveal the story of his father, who would steal chickens to feed him. That was the mystery of the bloodstained jacket, and because Dad had been a simpleton, he hadn’t revealed the source of the blood because he knew that stealing was a crime. Mu-yeom admits to having suspecting his father and burning the jacket to cover up for him, and in an ironic twist, his very actions made it impossible to clear his father’s name.

That’s why they’re the same, Mu-yeom tells Chul-gon—they’re both bound to the case by their own self-recriminations, which prevented them from moving on with their lives.

Both Maria and Ji-wool brood that night. Maria had only heard one side of the phone conversation but knows that her stepfather’s name was mentioned in conjunction with the new discovery. Ji-wool, on the other hand, mulls over the discovery that Maria is the old Gap-dong witness.

Ji-wool texts Maria, checking to make sure that she’s okay, saying that she felt worried about her. They have a sweet exchange, just chatting back and forth, asking each other to come to her with problems if they have any.

Mu-yeom ends up turning Chul-gon’s statement in to the police brass, leaving the officials deliberating over what to do about it. Chul-gon’s actions are legally problematic, but the statute of limitations has passed, making it moot. Profiler Han argues that they all believe Chul-gon was acting with the best intentions, and it sounds like they’d all rather sweep it under the rug.

Chul-gon clarifies that Mu-yeom turned him in at his own request—if he’d argued to be let off the hook on a technicality (the expired statute of limitations), he wouldn’t be able to argue for pursuing the expired Gap-dong case.

Poopy Ho-seok is sent back to the prison hospital, where he openly declares that he is the true Gap-dong, only to have the others laugh in his face, or humor his delusion patronizingly. Aw, I think this case actually broke him; he definitely looks out of touch with reality.

Chul-gon is fired, and Mu-yeom finds him brooding over his dead daughter, beating himself up for not having spent more time with her while she was alive. Mu-yeom sympathizes with his obsession, since they were on a race with the clock to get the criminal before their time expired. That thinking is cold comfort now that Chul-gon has already lost his daughter, but Mu-yeom argues that he has to find Gap-dong anyway and let the world know who he is.

Chul-gon tells him to quit now, and not be the gambler at the table who loses everything. The wisest man isn’t the one who wins, but the one who walks away. That doesn’t persuade Mu-yeom in the least, however, and he declares that he won’t lose anybody or anything.

And then they get the call: The seventh murder has been discovered. The police are treating the airplane killing as a premeditated Murder No. 7 and the team moves out to greet Tae-oh when the plane touches back down in Korea. Most of the passengers on the flight are outraged at their aborted trip, but Tae-oh sits back dully, barely reacting to anything.

Mu-yeom’s team transports Tae-oh into custody, and Mu-yeom wonders why Tae-oh would do it, knowing he would be caught. Tae-oh thinks to himself, “I don’t know.”

Ji-wool is rattled to hear the news and calls Maria, who rushes to meet her at the police station. Ji-wool confides about Tae-oh asking her to be his brakes, blaming herself for turning him down. I can understand her being shaken, but she does seem annoyingly naive about Tae-oh (“But he seemed so normal!”) given that he was already suspected of being a serial murderer… but I suppose annoying naivety is Ji-wool’s trademark.

Maria embraces her and says reassuringly that the seventh murder wasn’t her fault. She makes Ji-wool promise not to blame herself for it.

Reporters mob the police van when it arrives with Tae-oh, and Mu-yeom shoves past them while ushering Tae-oh along. He stops in front of the ladies to ask Maria to look after Ji-wool, then heads inside for the interrogation.

Profiler Han leaves the psychiatric evaluation to Maria, warning her that Tae-oh’s reps may try to claim mental illness as a way to evade responsibility. She’s determined to prevent that.

The immediate problem facing the police is, as always, a lack of evidence. I suppose it seems ridiculously obvious to everyone that Tae-oh is the murderer, but since he wasn’t captured on camera and they don’t have definitive proof, they’re facing a tricky situation. A potential breakthrough arises when the police receive the call from someone stating that he has evidence, but he will only give it to Mu-yeom.

Mu-yeom observes Tae-oh’s interrogation and wonders why he committed a murder in such obvious fashion. Maria says that you can’t understand a psychopath through normal logic, but Mu-yeom believes there must be a reason Tae-oh had to come back, something that drove him to this.

The interrogation isn’t getting anywhere despite hours of questioning, but Tae-oh exhibits particular curiosity when he asks why Profiler Han doesn’t take a bathroom break. At this, Profiler Han shoots Mu-yeom a look and steps aside to let Mu-yeom take over. He uses this as a tiny bit of leverage and says that if Tae-oh explains why he killed the flight attendant, he’ll explain why investigators don’t take bathroom breaks.

Mu-yeom guesses that this murder wasn’t planned, and that it wasn’t meant to be the seventh case. Tae-oh replies that a seventh case follows the sixth, but Mu-yeom contradicts him: “I don’t see it that way. This time, what I see in your eyes is despair.”

That gets Tae-oh’s attention, and Mu-yeom says that in the past Tae-oh looked excited after his murders. Not so this time.

Mu-yeom is interrupted by news of the informant, and steps out to meet with the passenger from the plane who had recognized Tae-oh. The man, a professor, explains growing curious when Tae-oh stepped aside and shot a video clip on his phone, which shows Tae-oh in the flight attendant’s cabin.

When asked why he specifically asked for Mu-yeom, the witness replies that he figured he was trustworthy, considering that he went so far as to falsely confess to a murder in order to capture Gap-dong. There’s something about the professor’s attitude that pings my suspicions, but at present we don’t have any explicit reason to doubt him. For now.

The professor-witness adds that after the murder, Tae-oh returned to his seat and swore under his breath, seemingly angry with himself. Mu-yeom files this away as valuable insight.

Maria questions Tae-oh next, asking whether he acted out of anger for being fooled by a fake Gap-dong—was he upset with himself for feeling the fool? Tae-oh just says dully, “Don’t keep trying to understand me. You can’t understand anyway.”

At the prosecutor’s office, Tae-oh’s lawyer is just waiting for the initial 48-hour holding period is up, and grumbles that the police are going to have to let him go eventually because of a lack of grounds. They’re mere hours away from the deadline, but the prosecutor lights up to receive the call: Evidence has turned up.

Maria gets the call while in the interrogation room, and comments to Tae-oh, “Evidence has come to light. That’s not like you.”

Section Chief Cha is delighted at having video proof, but Mu-yeom says that there’s something even more valuable to come of the witness’s comments—that perhaps Tae-oh made a mistake this time, rather than planning the killing.

Maria watches over the monk boys while cleaning up their room, but the impulse turns compulsive as she cleans and re-cleans and re-cleans the same places. The monk pulls her aside to ask what is bothering her, and Maria admits that she’s worried what happens if things end like this: “If the old Gap-dong gets buried because Ryu Tae-oh has been caught…”

The monk says that the truth has no expiration; even if someone tries to bury it, it will come out at some point. He adds that her being strong will help Mu-yeom as well, because it’s likely he’s feeling the same thing right now.

In the police station library, an officer has a stack of books Mu-yeom requested a while back but hasn’t picked up. Ji-wool ends up taking the books for him, mostly criminal psychology references, though included in the bunch is a copy of Crime and Punishment—and when she falls and drops the books, a note flutters out of it. It goes unnoticed and lies there in the hallway.

Tae-oh is taken back to the prison hospital, where his lawyer visits to ask how he wants him to explain that video clip. Tae-oh wonders if he’s stuck this time, and from the lawyer’s perturbed demeanor, I’d say it sure looks like it. The lawyer sighs that he doesn’t know how to solve this situation… but then he leans forward and adds, “Without going to extremes.”

Tae-oh asks, “Extremes? You mean me disappearing?”

Mu-yeom meets with Chul-gon to discuss the case, and can’t shake the feeling that there’s something different about Murder No. 7—both this time and the case from twenty years ago. “Could it be the turning point?” he asks.

He outlines his theory (which the station doesn’t share) about both seventh murders being unintended. To his surprise, Chul-gon looks at him with a ghost of a smile, saying, “Now you finally seem like a detective to me. What are you doing? If you’ve got a theory, you’d better move.” I can’t say that with his track record Chul-gon’s approval means much to me, but on an emotional level I suppose it brings some degree of satisfaction.

Tae-oh is escorted down the hallway of the hospital by guards, and sees a group of inmates in the next room. Poopy is there insisting to the others that he’s Gap-dong, a vacant look in his eyes and a note of despair to his voice. As Tae-oh’s voice rings in his ears, recalling his excited discovery of his “god” and “hero” in this very hospital, his face takes on a devastated expression.

That dropped note gets ignored all day until Detective Ki-ri stumbles across it and takes a look. He sees the pretty reporter standing nearby jotting down notes, and operating on the assumption that it’s hers, he hands it to her wearing a goofy-smug look on his face. Oh, he so thinks she loves him, doesn’t he? She just shoots him a perplexed look.

So moments later when Ki-ri walks back to his desk, he’s wearing a thunderous expression, having been disabused of his assumption. He writes a memo (“To the owner: Take this back!!!”) and tapes it to the board, then guesses/accuses Young-ae of writing the letter to Mu-yeom. Or maybe it was Ji-wool, he supposes.

Ji-wool takes down the letter and reads it—it’s a shy love confession. It begins, “You probably don’t know this, but I like you…”

Mu-yeom drops by Maria’s trailer that evening, and comments on her downcast expression. He can’t charm her out of her anxiety and she won’t meet his eye, so he gently takes her face in his hands until she looks at him. He asks if she’s okay, then dips his head down slowly, reaching for a kiss.

As he does, Ji-wool continues reading the note: “But how could you notice, when you’re so absorbed in the Gap-dong investigation? During these times, love may be a luxury. But even so, love helps me get through this difficult time. Only love.”

Mu-yeom kisses her once, and then again.

The note signs off with the name “Crybaby.” Ji-wool probably has a very good idea of the source of the note, and she starts to text Mu-yeom but winds up deleting the message.

The kissing gets more heated, going from vertical to horizontal as they fall onto her bed, only to have Maria’s phone start to ring. Argh! They sit up briefly but Mu-yeom asks her not to answer, and vertical goes to horizontal again… and we pan over to see that the source of the ignored call is the prison hospital. Aw man, can’t we even enjoy our sexy times in peace?

Mu-yeom answers the phone and tries to fob off the caller, but the prison officer is insistent. Tae-oh has caused a disturbance and is insisting on talking to Maria, saying that he wants to confess.

Sure enough, Tae-oh looks out of control in his cell, screaming wildly and throwing things and rattling the bars on his cage. He punches the metal bars with his bare fist, drawing blood, all the while screaming for Maria.

When she arrives, he’s huddled on the ground and looks up to shoot her a menacing glare. Despite the guard’s protest, she asks to be let into the cell, though in the end she settles for sitting right outside the bars. She tells him to speak whenever he’s ready and waits.

Mu-yeom waits in fits outside the prison, deeply unsettled. Prior to going in, he’d made her promise to visit Tae-oh as his doctor and not as the victim Jae-hee, and she had agreed, but that doesn’t stop him from worrying.

Tae-oh struggles with himself, saying that he’ll probably regret confessing to her today. She assures him that to the contrary, he’ll feel better to unload everything that’s weighing on him. She reminds him that he’d called her here because bottling it up inside was driving him crazy—he wants to tell somebody. She guides the conversation, asking him to start with his hero, Gap-dong. Tae-oh replies that he was happy when he met him.

We cut to a field of reeds. A shadowy figure steps out of a car and walks among the reeds. To confirm to us that this is the real Gap-dong, he begins to whistle that familiar tune.

Still waiting outside the hospital, Mu-yeom reaches for his phone and makes a call. And then… Gap-dong’s phone begins to ring—and the caller is saved in his phone as “Mu-yeom-yi.” Someone close, then, and friendly. And finally our whistler looks up, revealing his face. It’s Section Chief Cha.

 
COMMENTS

On one level, it’s a shocker to see Section Chief Cha in the role of Gap-dong, since he’s generally been the level-headed voice of reason, always arguing on the side of logic and prudence and treating everybody with the gentle hand of authority. On another level, it’s not a shocker at all because (1) this show has trained us to be suspicious of everyone, and (2) we’re frankly running out of people to suspect.

It’s one of the drawbacks of writing a mystery this way, in that you go down the list of red herrings until you’re just plumb out of possibilities. Either you introduce a new culprit, in which case we suspect him immediately, or you go through your cast of existing characters, in which case the pool shrinks until the big revelation is more or less a foregone conclusion. It’s the thing that plagued God’s Gift—14 Days, which burned through so many potential culprits that I stopped caring about any of them. That drama kept spinning us around in circles of misdirection that I just wanted to sit out the emotional whirligig until it could decide, and the side effect of that was to stop giving a damn about the outcome. In fact, when God’s Gift ended I read articles with headlines like “What Gap-dong should do to avoid God’s Gift’s fate,” and I hoped it would pick up a hint or two from that experience.

We have enough episodes left that I hope this drama finds a way to keep tossing surprises in our path, because it’s still pretty early to be revealing the ultimate culprit. I do think that the way this reveal was portrayed makes it difficult to backpedal (without seeming like a total cop-out), but perhaps there are extenuating circumstances, or more misunderstandings down the line.

One thing that annoys me about the execution of this show (the concept is great, but they keep fumbling the follow-through) is that it gives us the answer up front, and so when we watch the protagonists stumbling their way to the truth, our omniscience saps all suspense out of the proceedings. It has the one-two punch of killing the mystery for us AND making the heroes seem dumb for not figuring out what we already know. It’s what we ran into when the show revealed Tae-oh to be our copycat right off the bat, which was so obvious that I think our reactions were hilariously telling—we wove some really ingenious possible explanations out of that, thinking surely there was more to the story. Surely they couldn’t have just told us the culprit in Episode 2. Surely they were yanking our chain. Surely… they weren’t that simple?

And so, in this episode we see right away that Tae-oh is losing control of his steely composure, and that he committed the murder in a fit of anger instead of premeditated calm. First of all, we see him do it in the moment, and then we also see his reaction in the aftermath. So when you have Mu-yeom pondering these clues and wondering at them, you wonder why the cops are still five steps behind the truth. Why is Mu-yeom positing this theory when we already know it to be true? There were a few instances when Mu-yeom wondered at Tae-oh’s motivation that I was confused, because I had thought he already knew the answer, only to be told that he hadn’t quite worked it out yet. So watching the detectives stumble toward what we already know becomes this exercise in anticlimax, and that’s a bummer. You never want your drama to make your heroes seem slow.

The other quibble I have is the playing with semantics just to fuck with us. Chul-gon talks about how he was one of the Gap-dongs, but what he really means is that his action got mistakenly attributed to Gap-dong, which is totally not the same thing. “You could be Gap-dong” is SO not comparable to “you might get accidentally suspected of being Gap-dong.” I get that it serves to throw us for a loop, but this is the kind of twist that is artificial and manipulative, and I do not like it one bit. I want the drama to keep me on my toes because it’s smart, not because you deliberately point me down one path by throwing out bad clues!

That said, Section Chief Cha? Okay, I’m intrigued. You’d better not screw this one up, drama.

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Thanks for the recap! :)

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Can someone tell me who wrote the love letter? Is it Maria or Mu Yeom? If it's Maria, how come it was in the police station? confused here!

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Sectio Chief Cha. I think it's another red herring. I'm intrigued how they'll backpedal their way out of this.

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I think it might be, but at this point not sure how much I care - this is what, Gap Dong #4?

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Gah this show is driving me crazy in a good way. XD Am I the only one that has tried explaining everything to someone only to have them not understand a word or get lost by ep 2?

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Wow..the section chief was never under my radar. .I even doubted the monk..nice twist..I'm hooked

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Ohoho~ So many Gap Dongs. I think there are just so many psychos in this one story, picking up the name Gap Dong. I do not trust what Ryu Tae-Oh is doing now, especially after that meeting with his lawyer though I do think he wants to stop. I do think the drama is having fun with us. And yes, finally sexy times has commenced. I want Ji-Wool to pick it up. Pronto. I love that you're naive, but that doesn't mean that you're stupid, right?

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The End made me like "What??????????? You gotta be kidding me." Its true that the drama is making us doubt all the characters. First I thought it was Mr. Choi, then the Loser, then Chul-gon and the Dr. Park and now we see Chief Cha as Gap-Dong. I dont know what to expect in the rest of the 8 episodes.
About Ji-wool though, I think I get why she is being so annoyingly naive. She is 17, and maybe at that age you want everything and everyone to be good and always have a happy ending. (Even though she was kinda kidnapped by Tae-oh, which should have been a wake up call) So she might want to believe that Tae-oh looks like/is a normal person.
So cant wait for the next episode and recap.

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I love your recaps but this is a case where your recaps enhances the viewing experience if not better than the episode itself. I nod along to your commentary knowing what we're in for but hoping the execution and result would be better than what we're given.

Chief Cha, the Monk and Profiler Han were high on my suspect list so if anything, I was just waiting for the reveal and the why. But it's weird because at this point, I just think there's multiple Gapdongs with a mastermind that's yet to be revealed. The monk perhaps?

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Yes, I was thinking of the mastermind thing as well. But I was almost going over the edge to the supernatural. I mean..somewhere someone has determined that copycat Gap Dong is gonna imitate each original Gap Dong crime to the smallest detail. I do not even remember who in Iltan PD came up with that one. But then..of all the weirdnessess!...Copycatter does the mimicry. Even down to matching seventh crime?

Old 7th crime...unintentional but different from the others and Gap Dong takes credit for it. Ritual. New 7th crime totally intentional but also different from the others. But both are turning points.

Why do they keep assuming there will be imitations? And why assume there will be more crimes? Who decided this would be the pattern?

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I am sure it was Profiler Han in a mad Dexter-rique twist.

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Yeah, I'm suspecting him too.

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I hope it is not other red herring, it would be too much. I think it is true that Chief Cha was old Gap dong. I'm happy that revealed, because so we can know him, his reason, viewpoint, his function in new investigation. And nobody suspects him because of gentle face, and kind behavior. And yet there are many secrets, for example TaeOh's family or 9th case or MuYeom's relationship in old 5th case (JiWool) because he was sensitive in that.
Old-new 7the case was strange, because in old case couldn't he call paramedic as policeman??? It's possible that she wouldn't have died... Was he so afraid??? And the new 7th case??? I think maybe it was accident, girl was frightened and fallen (and punched in the head). But Why 7th? Because 6th not happened, JiWool's mom survived or did I miss something.

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Mystery and suspense aside, I'm feeling so bad for Ji-Ul.

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If Lee Joon doesn't win an award for his amazing performance/acting in this drama, I'm gonna be so mad and might turn to Ryu Tae Oh (jk!).

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oh my gosh! My thoughts exactly!

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Not sure about the distribution of so many awards out there but to my knowledge TVN doesn't have awards ceremony, the only opportunity is Baeksang and I doubt they will submit this drama to that event. But in any case I think Lee Joon has got the acknowledgement from the industry.

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TvN doesn't have awards like the Big Three, but he certainly is getting a lot of praise for his role. Boy will win himself a Baeksang one day if he keeps doing this well, even if he doesn't get one for this role.

(and can we talk about just how good his face acting is, too? His expression when he realises his Gap-dong worship and re-enactment was all for a lie..)

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It's so sad sad sad watching Ryu Tae Oh loosing his marbles in the interrogation room scene when Oh Maria was talking to him. He's really lost but was aware that he's lost. My God I cried for him.. "stop trying to understand me" Gaaahhh is this drama supposed to be mellow-suspense-thriller? A new genre?

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Wow! Exactly my sentiments. I love Maria and Dr Han and all but I found myself rolling my eyes. These folks who think they know what psycopathology is are calling Tae-oh a psycopath. Yes, of course he's possibly a psychopath..but as he has said before, "Psycopaths are not that simple." This categorizing of himself is something he has been trying to do all his life...and these folks who have lived near psycopaths all their lives can't really say what Tae-oh's brand/style of psychosis is. It's like...folks, stop it with your smug assessment of me. You are stumbling about in the darkness I've been stumbling around in for years."

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Ryu Tae Oh is crying for help in his own way -- apparently nobody hears him correctly -- but all the "experts and pro's" around him have their minds are full with their own (miss)judgement. I see a light in Oh Maria but she needs to clear her mind first from her own burdensome past.

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He really is. I know he's too far gone for redemption, but Lee Joon just plays him with so much ease and even a hint of vulnerability that you can't help feeling bad for him no matter how much of a terrible idea that is. And it's sad to see him try to keep his bearings, whether it was with Ji-wool and that purposely-too-casual attempt to get her to come with him (wtf), or on the plane. And then lose it totally.

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I am so hoping he isn't too far gone for redemption. True, murder and all but (in Arang and the Magistrate) Ju Wal got redemption even after death (being made a reaper and all.) Even though Arang couldn't be his Sonia. I'm thinking this is k-drama and the writers will make him salvageable....in some small way. Fingers crossed anyway.

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That's a pretty spot-on comparison, Carole. I definitely think that if Tae-oh can have redemption, it's only going to come via death, because with every murder, he's been cutting himself off from life.

If there's any hope for even that, it's that he seems to feel something genuine for Maria and, since the kidnapping, Ji-wool. But even with them and especially with Ji-wool, he makes me extremely nervous.

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Now I wonder about his mother. I know mother love is all protective and all but wow...she kinda goes overboard to protect him. Really, he should just give her a tongue-lashing for not correcting him as a kid.

Speaking of mothers...i didn't like the way the writer handled Ji Ul's mom's survival at the hand of Loser. Not that i want her foaming in fear or being devastated like Maria..but she comes out of her ordeal ONLY speaking of her future possible son-in-law? Writer coulda finessed that a bit better.

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So I guess we'd know how the DNA evidence in store was destroyed if Section chief Cha was involved. He may have had access to it. Maybe.

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Well I think the suspicion that Gap Dong was a cop was always there in the background...

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As for Ji wool, I can understand why she's so naiive. Tae Oh is incredibly charming and is able to pass himself off as harmless and can get people to believe in him. He's also INCREDIBLY manipulative. It's not that hard for him to manipulate Ji Wool's emotions and shake her up. Someone like Tae Oh can make people not believe in their own convictions and ignore their instincts. Ji Wool is still a teenage girl, no matter how strong or clever she is, she's still fallible to manipulation. Since we have all the information as a viewer we can say that we'd be able to see through it and not fall for it but who can say how we'd react if we ever in a situation like that?

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Your statements are so true tbh, most serial killers are known to be very manipulative and to some extent look and sound charismatic, it's just a fake charisma but they know how to use it on other people, I don't blame Ji Wool for being manipulated by Tae Oh, there are a lot of adult women being manipulated everyday by these serial killers and majority of the time they are successful in doing that, Ji Wool is just a teenager and have a very pure heart at that, it's very easy to wring emotions and pity out of her.

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Exactly, before he was 100% confirmed as the killer he even turned the charm on Maria and to me, as a viewer, I almost believed he was innocent then. No surprise that a far more naive Ji-wool would believe it too, even though she senses something is off about him.

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I find her annoyingly stupid. Not just naïve, but downright freaking STOOPID. She has seen and been in several shaky situations already, yet she continues on as if nothing has happened, and her only concern in life is being jealous of Dr. Oh.

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That's not quite the case - post-kidnap, she's sussed enough to be wary of Tae-oh and has an inkling of just what he is. She is definitely not the same around him as she was when he was her webtoon model.

I find her fixation on Mu-yeom relentless to the point of annoyance too, but the revelation of Maria's identity is clearly a turning point in the way Ji-wool sees her. I mean, you have her treating Maria as a confidante and turning to her in times of stress, you wouldn't have got that before.

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This episode-- oh the feels!!!!!!!

The bromance! the romance! the falling apart! Oh my gosh!!!! Soooooooo well done! Fangirl squeeing here in these parts.

Not sure what the episode title is called: Confessions?
False ones, non-verbal ones, delayed ones, symbolic ones. Oh my gosh! Love this.

Poor Tae-Oh...it's as if he always needs a script to help him out. I'm not sure if confessing was the "extreme" that faithful family lawyer+mom came up with. Or if it's Tae-oh's idea all on his own ..or if it's a combination of both. Am not sure if trusting his recollection is the right thing for me or for Dr Oh. Part of me wonders if the Cha thing is part of a false past scenario Tae Oh is creating..to put the blame on someone else...but then Mu Yeom is calling him in present. So it can't be false, can it? Weirdly though, I don't remember Mu Yeom really calling Cha for any reason out of the blue.

I'll just say right now that I will always like this writer. True, the execution is crappy and the reliance on perfect k-drama timing and k-drama coincidence does make me groan but writer-nim handles human emotions so naturally, so organically..OMIGOSH!!!!! Fan-for-life here! I'm waiting for writer to find the perfect psychological story because I have no doubt the script would be incredibly touching, perfect, and well-done.

Love my Sang-Hyun-ie. But wow, Lee Joon!!! And writer-nim... great acting, great writing.

Thanks for the recap.

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So who wrote the letter? Maria?

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I totally called it! I knew it was section chief Cha! He looked way too much like the guy in Maria's flash backs.

Ive been waiting so long for Tae Oh's breakdown and finally we got to see it and it was glorious. Well done Lee Joon!

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I've been suspicious of him for a while as well. Especially when he was curious to know if Maria was starting to remember the face of the original Gapdong. Let's hope that we're not being fooled.

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I was shocked when knowing that the silhoutte is Chief Ha! i replayed thrice on that moment and calming myself and making sure if it wasn't him, and i mistakenly him as Mr. Yang but--- whoop! he's Chief Ha!
twist brings so much fun, eh, scriptwriter? like another TvN drama, it full of twist everywhere and make the viewer in despair. ha.
anyhow, on second thought i think tae-oh only wants to talk to ji-ul or even ji-ul secretly escape to the interrogation room to talk to tae-oh.

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It's Section Chief Cha, but we have 8 more episodes to go - I'm not sure if this is a fakeout. Or where Tae-oh is going to go from here.

This drama may fail hard at portraying investigations with any degree of logic, common sense or competence, but damn this writer is amazing at writing interactions between characters, it's what keeps me coming back. And good performances from all the actors (and a stellar one from Lee Joon, damn he terrifies me but I feel pity for him at the same time)

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The detective and investigation parts are pretty shaky. Even the supposed ace detectives seem to spend more time ranting and raving, beating up people, not listening, and pretty much just incompetent. Almost every great revelation they have come up with has been AFTER the fact, not because they did any great detective work.

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well, I remember JB/GF saying they were tired of all the geeeeeniuses in dramaland, so I guess we got what we wanted - incompetents!

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LOL you're right!! I remember at first I (everyone) was like "mehh" when they wrote about the role of a GENIUS psycho barrister in this drama but look at me now!! I guess part of my addiction is the incompetency of the Iltan police corps haha!

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Well, we certainly got an overload of incompetents :P

Although Angel Eyes has slowed down to the point of me doing a lot of fast forwarding, at least the detectives there are acting like REAL detectives (that is pretty much the only part of the show I watch any more).

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It's a double whammy piss me off with the semantics, javabenas, because i kept attributing it to being lost in translation. You're saying it's not, so yeah, it's maddening that it is deliberate misinterpreting meaning, not that it can't be translated exactly in English from Korean.

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do not even get me started on ji wool. that girl just drives me crazy. stupid is too tame a word. i think the writers got a tad too excited with her character. lee joon has me feeling a type of way and it's freaking me out. let's not tone down the truth about how nobody understands his ways blah blah. he's a cold blooded killer the end. i admit that there were teensy moment where i felt for him because lee joon is that damn amazing but nowhere near sympathy. i also suspected Section Chief Cha here and there but found it particularly creepy how he got so excited when dr maria was around, i just figured he was a undercover freaky pervert but i guess this explains it. not sure what the plan is as he is finally revealed but let's see.

mu yeom and Chul-gon didn't start out too great for me but i have really started to warm to them. i know chul gon has been extra crazy in the last few eps but this possible friendship/bromance that i see is kinda nice. especially the part where chul gon praises him during their chat.

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Why wasn't this city on a curfew as soon as they figured out there was a copycat murderer?

Why wasn't there a policeman on the plane tailing Tae Oh? Seems the logical precaution to take with a guy who appears to be psychotic and the most likely suspect. Yunno, just in case he loses it.

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Ah, TS, you're expecting way too much common sense and skill from k-drama cops. ;-)

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We're talking a drama where a cop discovers a murder then doesn't bother calling for backup or even wearing gloves before handling the evidence.

Asking for curfews and tails is way too much, methinks.

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Curfews are pretty hard to enforce and pretty useless. There would no reason why he would could not do his crimes in broad daylight.

But as for tailing, yeah, that should have been done about 6 episodes ago. But even though about 8 people KNOW he is the killer, he just wanders around free, and all those stupid women just meet up with him alone like he is some kind of puppy caught peeing on the floor.

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1. I think Dr. Maria wrote the letter

2. hmmmm -I think the guy on the plane - something did not sit well with me - he is more than a simple passenger, but I am not sure what, but mark my word

3. Ji Wool is crazy - he kidnapped her and left to kill another person - he confessed that he hopes she is able to stop him from killing- but - is she scared - or even thankful that she is alive -nooooooo she is overly concerned that her Oppa is falling for someone else - writer please give her a brain - yes, she is young, but you don't have to make her slooooow

4. I also have a feeling that something is going to happen with our crazy guys who are locked up - there is still a connection to GD - I can just feel it

5. Yes, I can now believe that GD might not be one person but several folks - who used the initial murders to vent their ugly desires/sickness

6. I know this is not a RomCom, buuuuut those kisses were pretty hot and steamy - I had to place the drama on hold for a glass of water - You Go Crazy Monk and Sister Maria - I am not mad with the display of passion in the midst of us asking - WHO IS GAP-DONG???? WHO?????

7. Lastly I think I am falling for GDWANNABE - I felt sorry that his last killing did not give him pleasure - so please pray for me:) I also felt sad when I saw his hand all bloody - whyyy should I care for Mr. Psycho-who-killed-his-daddy-and-several-women ...maybe because I think his Mama is a nut job, maybe I think he grew up a lonely kid, maybe because he could have been a normal person if he had professional help at a young age...or maybe because he is handsome and is playing this role 200%

9. this really is last ...something is also up with his attorney ...how can a paid staff knows all this info and never appears to be shocked or repulsed by it...hmmmmmmm

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loved everything you wrote.

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<333 this entire comment

And lol forever @GDWannabe, if feeling bad for him is a bad thing then I should request a prayer too.

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Hi there, if I may add to the discourse...
1. I think it's letter from Mu Yeom?
2. Yes that guy in the plane shouldn't have been abruptly into the scene.. if the writer is clever enough
3. I think Ji Wool has brain but of course like other teenagers her emotion drives her actions and she's very impulsive
4. Me too, Poopy should not end just like that in prison. They should continue and should finish his story. At this moment for me it's still floating.
5. Maybe that's what they are trying to tell us is the end.. Gap Dong as a myth and people use his name to commit murders
6. I don't know why but the kiss didn't affect me... my mind is too occupied by the guys in mental prison
7. Me too... me fall head over heels
9 (8?) You are so right about the attorney but I think in dramas that's just how they work.. the quote is "they work for whoever pay the bill" they can make lies into truth if the amount is right. They don't look shocked because poker face is their trademark LOL

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yeah what is up with Plane Dude, I thought he was a police plant or something and then it turned out he wasn't!

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yeah..why'd he have to dash off like that in the middle of the interview?

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Plane Dude is pretty suspicious, but not sure he has any involvement in the killings. He may have followed him, perhaps he is working for his mother, lawyer, some other red herring person?

Or perhaps he really is just a passenger who happened to recognize him and kept an eye on him. But you have to wonder why he did not report the killing on the plane, and instead waited for someone else to find it.

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Did you guys notice when Maria was assigned to do the psycho analysis? Chief Cha said "Are you sure you can do this?" When Maria said yes, he replied "You grew up strong..."

that's the moment i started suspecting him. No one knows Maria was the witness right? But when you read between the lines, Cha's reply implies that he has an idea Maria was Gapdong's survivor. Suspicous...

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Really?? I must have missed that part,do you still remember what episode was that?

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yeah...and she kinda paused after he said that...as if..."You know that?...Why do you know that? Or is your voice familiar?"

Question though: Why would he say that? He's so under control -- if he's Gap Dong. He's kept his game and tricks in control. Why slip like that? Unless the screenwriter just wanted him to do that. Or unless the screenwriter wants to show that Gap Dong/Cha is wanting to taunt Maria.

I kept wondering about Cha because -- forgot which it was-- in a recent drama he turned out to be the innocent-looking bad guy. I kept thinking..."Ah gee, they wouldn't do that in this drama also? Make him the "innocent-looking we-wouldn't-suspect you but wow you're the real bad guy" all over again?

If he is, we have 8 epis for our heroes to realize it and catch him. So....will see if they lose their incompetence.

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It came to my mind too about Chief Cha... he was Insu's (kim namgil) father in Shark LOL

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Does anyone know the song that was playing during the kiss scene? It's sounds like 'Every Single Day' but can't find it. :/

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I checked their main website, the OST is not listed yet, would love to hear the song.

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I think it's long been concluded that the real gapdong is the monk, so if these writers think they're gonna spring him up on us and we gonna be like OMG really? FAIL!!!

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You have concluded it's the Monk?
I still have three on my list, Chief Cha, Chulgon and Monk.

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For me, I keep thinking about the letter. What is its significance? the ending wasn't that much of a shocker...

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i think some girls are getting a little twisted with lee joon because of his prettiness. yes there are moments i feel a teensy bad but let's not lose sight of the fact that he's a cold blooded murderer. mommy and daddy issues don't excuse that.

i am digging the camaraderie/ bromance ? that may be brewing between chul-gon and our lead. i know chul-gon has pissed many off but i think i'm willing to give him a chance. i feel for the guy. he lost everything and gained pretty much nothing in return. he's completely alone so i admire mu yeom for sticking by him and keeping him updated because he knows how much it means to him.

now don't even get me started on ji wool. does that girl not have a conscience? i think there's major lack of character development with her. i mean does she not even feel bad for the fact that her drawings possibly caused murders? why she keeps acting so stupid is beyond me and i'm at a point with her that i just want to slap her. i honestly can't with her.

and i suspected chief cha here and there. but mostly just found it weird how he got so happy around dr maria. it just felt so out of character for him but i just put it down to him being some kind of creepy pervert.

either way shit is getting exciting. bring on the next episode.
AND MORE KISSES PLEASE.

ps: i feel so messed up for this but i thought the lee joon and maria scene where he nearly kissed her was kinda hot. god help me *cries* so strange but they have some good chemistry. not sure what to make of it though.

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Ryu Tae Oh has chemistry with all women in this drama (the cute girl, Dr Oh Maria, even most of the victims)

Mad Monk and Oh Maria have no chemistry at all.
She's emotionless. It's like dating with a wall!!!

Lately, I've been watching some Lee Joon's videos (dramas, movie, music shows, fanmeetings) and I have the feeling he's that type of guy who really knows how to stare at a woman (looks deep into their eyes).

I don't like Kim Min Jung's acting.
Same tone of voice and shocked face in each scene!!!
She could be awesome and I find her so boring...

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yeah..i also need to do penance for that Maria/Ji-Wool couch hotness. I feel as if all these years of feminism have had no effect on me.

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"..some girls are getting a little twisted with lee joon because of his prettiness.."

This +1. I saw the same effect in Heirs, where girls were swooning over the asshats.

And to make it worse, here is a headline from this morning: http://www.infowars.com/in-death-girls-and-boys-swoon-over-santa-barbara-mass-murderer/

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ah me!

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I might be the only one...but I find it kinda unoriginal for Gap-dong to be a cop. So this supposed 'reveal' of Section Chief Cha as GD is a bit of a red herring alert for me...kinda early in the game too, if there's 8 eps left.

Maybe it's just because I'm a crime procedural junkie, but I find law enforcement as serial killers a bit contrived. Yeah, it's because of their background that they're able to be take forensic countermeasures to have 'clean' crime scenes and to evade detection all these years...but it's kinda same ol', same ol' for me.

I know I've had my GD radar on Profiler Han, and he's ex-cop (but not boots on the ground actual cop, just a thinking type). SCC is now up the ranks but still has an active hand in the investigation...obvious reasons would be to keep tabs and steer suspicion on others. Not to mention those sneaky lil moments like his 'concern' for Maria, coupled with his voice of reason against Chul-gon's erratic behavior.

But what bothers me in this drama is that amidst the dysfunctionality of ineffective/incompetent law enforcement, a supposed serial killer is up the ranks...smells like a perfect setup. Too perfect, in fact...so I'm not 100% sold yet.

It's too late to introduce a new character to be GD, but in the various people so far--it's hard to say who else could possibly be GD. I've read on here those that are suspicious of the monk who raised Mu-yeom...like PH, what better to 'raise' the son of a suspect than to keep tabs on him, and move right next to Maria's trailer? I don't see someone like a monk, a religious figure, being the source of evil.

Although I have my inklings that this is just a continuous stream of red herrings...it's time to get suspicious of everyone.

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I suspected the captain at least two episodes ago. I think they've hinted now that Gap Dong is more than one person. Whether or not they take us all the way down that road remains to be seen. I've really enjoyed this drama because you rarely see this level of effort put into a plot in Kdrama.

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I think it's definitely likely that there is more than one Gap-dong, I don't question that. We've been getting bits and pieces of hinting from the writer over the identity of the supposedly 'real' GD...but Section Chief Cha seems like another red herring to me. Yes, he seems like a quiet and unassuming pervert but the hinting seems a bit like how the writer pointed out Gentleman Choi and Poopy. We'll see soon enough...

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In American CSI shows, religious people are always the bad ones. Lately, I think Korean dramas have begun to show that cynicism. Japanese dramas also have that tendency to make any religious person --especially Christians-- out to be repressed or evil hypocrites. Korean dramas are not yet sooo cynical but they're on their way.

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What I found odd about the Japanese trope was that all the crazy stuff in the past 50 years was done by non-Christians.

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I agree, American shows have shown quite a number of killers who use/twist their religion to justify their murders and/or to further their agenda. These zealous types are typically Christian, radicalized and way out of touch with the mainstream, as well as hypocrites and repressed, like you mentioned.

That being said, what I meant by 'religious figure(s)' was that shows I've seen don't portray those elder figures as killers--particularly in Buddhism, which is supposed to be a peaceful/calm religion (from what I've heard from family). Christian and Catholic leaders aren't immune, and it's becoming a growing phenomenon (? I guess) to portray them as killers.

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I am not sold on Cha being the bad guy (bad guy #4, or 5?) either. I think the writer may have overdone it a bit with red herrings, and not sure I believe any revelation any more.

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that is one way popular whistling tune, though. So many people seem to know it.

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I echo your sentiment...especially after God's Gift red herrings galore, I'm not easily believing every clue into the 'true' identity of the killer until the last episode.

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First of all the big reveal this week is no surprise to me. I figured out our stalwart yet ineffectual captain was Gap Dong two episodes ago. The surprise to me comes with the hint that there are more than one original Gap Dongs. I agree it's a bit different to have our heroes be portrayed as a bit dense. Although I do think it's a lot more realistic. Right now it is difficult to predict what's in store for us next week. I didn't watch God's Gift because it didn't grab in the first episode like Gap Dong so I'm not sure of the problems about it's plot. Right now even with the few minor problems in plotting Gap Dong is still a far better written, directed and acted drama of this kind than I've seen all year.

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The storyline has reached a level of silliness and bordering preposterous. Writers are holding on, but barely. 10 episodes is enough to complete this mystery.

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Very true but the change/growth/disintegration/possible restoration of Tae Oh is what's keeping me holding on. I'm really torn because the antagonist/secondary character pretty much rules/directs this story.

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Alright guys, let's stop with the hating Ji Wool so much. The girls can act a bit dumb, yeah, but she's there for a reason---the writers aren't going to keep her in the story if she didn't serve a purpose. And this whole purpose, I personally think, is to throw Tae Oh off, make him confused. Remember episode 8? This was, in reality, the first time Tae Oh showed any *actual* feelings. Why else would he have asked those questions? Why else would he have not, you know, killed her? Ji Wool is there to help us dive into his character and to help us realize that, somewhere in that fascinating mind of his, there exists the ability to feel things. He obviously isn't a psychopath. Jeez.
And never-mind this, the girl is so damn cute! She serves as a serious comedy break from all the heavy psychological stuff and, thus, balances out the drama a bit.
I only wish that she'd take a more active role in the plot, she has so much potential. The girl writes a freaking killer webtoon, for heavens sake, take advantage of that!
Anyways, do you really hate her that much?

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Could agree more. I knida wish she would play a more active role in the plot. Her character is so cute!!!!

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Javabeans, thanks for the recap.

Well, if there's going to be any Mu-yeom & Maria love making, I'd like it to be with Vixen Maria. She'd rock Mad Monk's world. Crybaby Maria, not as much, it's still be passionate, but not sizzling like Vixen Maria would be.

Can we film an *alternate scene with Vixen Maria? Make it available on the director's cut as an extra?

So many Gap Dongs. Remember the game show To Tell The Truth where the celebrity panelists had to determine which of the three contestants was "telling the truth" ?

I'm getting that feeling. Will the real Gap Dong please stand up? Mad Monk, Maria, Ji Wool and Chul-gon can be the panelists. Pick any three of the suspected Gap Dongs and go at it.

Remember, the other two contestants can lie, but the actual person has to "tell the truth" when asked.

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I've always been highly suspicious of section chief Chia for a long time!!! He just seems fishy. But well, letz see if itz really him.

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It warmed my heart and made me smile when Chul Gon actually complimented Mu Yeom on being a real detective.

Mu Yeom and Maria's kiss scene was so natural~~ *-* Sweet and sensual.

LIKE WUT. CHIEF CHA?!
I'm still wary that he's another red herring and that maybe he was just investigating the area in dark clothes/cap.... Lol

They are running out of possible suspects for the original Gap Dong.
I wonder if the airplane witness could be a one too.... or THE ONE.
He seemed to observe Tae Oh from the moment he stepped onto the plane.

I'm pretty sure that Maria wrote the letter. I thought that Mu Yeom called her a crybaby before so I backtracked the recaps/EPs, but he didn't. But Maria was bawling her eyes out to him during their phone convo in EP 10.

What I'm a bit uncertain about is does Mu Yeom actually know about the letter? He never came to get those books. But I doubt that Maria had access to the police library or somehow snuck that note in.....

I didn't realize that one of those books was Crime and Punishment. So now I'm thinking it's possible that Ji Wool wrote the letter. She read that book and she has access to the library. She's not really the shy type around Mu Yeom, but she could be when doing a love confession. She has cried in front of him before. But she also looked quite dazed while reading the letter, like she didn't recognize it at all.

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Yesterday I watched six episodes of GD, because I wasn't able to watch it before and there happened so much that I wouldn't be suprised at all if there still were more Gap Dongs to show up.
I feel it's a little bit of cliche, the original Gap Dong being a policeman. Like come on, it would make sense in aspect as why they haven't been able to catch him, but I'm quite tired of corrupted and psychopath policemans. But I believe the writter won't make the mystery that simple. After all this drama was directed by the same person who did I can Hear Your Voice and that drama was awesome so I expect a good twist still coming to us. Though I find lot of similarities with I Can Hear Your Voice in Gap Dong, not mentioning that the main song is singed by 에브리싱글데이 and makes me totally love the band.
I never actually suspected Chief Ha to be the original Gap Dong, so I was totally shocked when they revealed his face (in the first few seconds I thought it was Chul-Gon, ahem). When he first showed up I thought he might be some kind of spy for the "fatty" (I don't remember his name, but I'm sure those who watch it knows who I'm talking about, he seems to know more than he says) and then he seemed to be a really good guy, even defending Chul-gon when he shooted Mad Monk.
I don't want yet to believe he is the original Gap Dong. For now I think of it as another red herring because we still got 8 episodes left and there is so much of what can happen.
But of course some facts ring in for him being the Gap Dong, but I thought that he knew about Oh Maria being the witness because he had some connection to her in past or with Profiler Han. When I'm at it, it quite schocked me that Profiler Han was accused of pedophilia. He just does not fit for me to be the original Gap Dog, but this drama make us doubt everyone. To the point that I was as many thinking that the biggest twist would be if the original Gap Dong was actually the Monk, carrying the little baby around (which i find hilarious). I was suprised how many people is suspecting him as well.
I'm not against the idea that the original Gap Dong could be multiple persons hiding behind the infamous name. But something tells me it was only one person. Because in all the murders are so many signs of being it just one person and 20 years ago when the murders occured for the first time, I doubt there could be so much copycats because I'm pretty sure at that time only profiler han knew about the fishing knot and kept it for himself because it couldn't be used as evidence or something.
Now about Lee Joon character. He plays it so well that he litrally makes me hate him even though I know it is just his character and that he is such an idiotic fool in real life, haha XD. He played a pretty similiar role in his movie Rough Play so I guess he has some experiences to play crazy dudes. I never felt pity or sympathy for him (I mean his character Ryu Tae Oh of course) bcause I see him as a emotionless bloody...

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After all he killed so many womens just because he though Poppy was the real Gap Dong (I find Poppy going around saying and believing he is a real Gap Dong hilarious, though I'm pretty sad for Gentleman Choi, who could have lived if he knew that Poopy wasn't the real Gap Dong after all) and he listened to him like a puppet. So even though I'm sure he does not feel any emotions (yet), I think he feels somewhat of a regret that he did those things for a fake. And I still wonder if he really killed his father and if we will ever see his half brother (Now I'm not sure if it's a half-brother or a brother so excuse me if I'm wrong). His family really seems to have a serious issues and I wonder what caused it. Because don't tell me he was born and he imediately became a psychopath torturing his brother. I'm pretty sure he must have had some emotions like everyone else before "something" had happened to him which triggured his murderer behavior.
On note to Ji Wool I find her cute and funny and somewhat of a fresh adding to the show. She may seems clueless, stupid and bratty but we can't forget the fact she is a teenager, she is still in high school and she had hardships in her life and after experiencing the "I'm 5th victim" with Tae-Oh I understand why she is so confused (though her naivity is kind of annoying, because she drawed the Monster' Path using Tae Oh suggetions so she should know that he is the cpycat murderer). She believed he was a good person, then she thought he will kill her, but he didn't. Then she seen the pictures of the victim and what he did to her, but then again she have seen the charismatic side of him being unsure again if he is really a psychopath (you know not all murderers are psychopats, but we know he is a hella bloody one). I find more pathetic Oh Maria to going around Tae Oh after knowing he is the killer and treating him for so long s his doctor. And after what she experienced with the original Gap Dong I wonder how she can be so brave in front of Tae Oh. But maybe that's just me, being horrified of murderers, I probably wouldn't be able to stand before him like she did and not to pee my pants. He is handsome so I uderstand why it is so easy for him to lure his victims, but if I knew he was murderer I would defo not be so friendly to him, pretty face or not. I understand maria wanting to find the original gap Dong, but for now we all know Tae Oh is a blind bullet, because he did what he did believing a fake to be the original Gap Dong (I will sincerely miss Poopy, he was interesting character and I'm quite sad he wasn't that funny dumb fool he pretended to be, though at the end he probably became one - at least I still have a hope in his funny jail-clinic mates, patting him with "yeah we all know, you are Gap Dong").
The one thing I'm disappointed at was that I did read somewhere that Tae Oh was supposed not to actually be a murderer, but having some secret connection with Mad Monk. I think that...

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I think that way would be also interesting, making us think he is a copycat murderer an then revealing he is a secret cop or something XD but since we know from the start he is a killer, my hope for it to be true was destroyed.
btw I apology for the longest comment ever that had to be separated into three parts XD But I had to say verything I felt in the past twelve episodes :)

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I think it was Ji-Wool who wrote the note. I don't know if I understood it right, but in episode 4 when the monk was locked up didn't the older monk tell her they used to call her crybaby. I think a lot of time had passed since she wrote it. (teenager time) That when she saw it even she was dumbfounded at how long she's liked him. Even though she doesn't act shy around him she really is scared to tell him seriously how she feels. I like Ji-Wool. Even though I'm an older woman I can't help but root for the love-struck teenager. But she is so going to get her heart broken.

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I think the real Gap Dong is the weird guy on the plane. He has to be. Tae Oh killed the flight attendant and then the other guy did the knots and everything else, just like it happened with the original 7th case.
Chief Cha is just probably trying to get into Gap Dong's character and see if he can come up with something.
Tae Oh is going to confess to the Doc that he knows who the real Gap Dong is because he feels betrayed by him. He copied his hero and didn't leave any evidence, buuuut the real Gap Dong followed him and and "produced" evidence, so he is going crazy...
Don't know if what I wrote makes any sense... hahaha!
Kudos again to Lee Joon. He is fantastic in this role!

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Lee Joon's acting was..astonishing. Wow. Throw an oscar as that boy.
This ep made Tae oh seem alot more ... human? Killing people so you can stop killing people is twisted logic at best, however atleast he was actually trying to stop. Tae Oh has hinted throughout the series that he can't control the impulse to kill people, and as horrible and sick killing people is, you can't really blame someone for having an mental illness. There is something about Maria that bothers me though. When Tae Oh approaches her on the street or is smug, i love when she is harsh and cold towards him, however as his doctor i dont see her trying to help him ever. He clearly has issues even he can;t understand, yet instead of trying to help him stop, she is so intent on locking him up. which as a doctor is very unprofessional.
also, did they ever tell Tae Oh why they don't go to the bathroom during interrogations?? He seemed so curious about it that i wwas waiting for some super cool answer but it never happanend? what was that all about.

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