Rating:
Average user rating 3.1
41

Trot Lovers: Episode 8

Romance is in the air as the guys step up and start to admit to themselves how they feel about Chun-hee. And possibly to her, too, although they hide behind their horses and guitars. Geon-woo at least takes a direct approach, by wining and dining, whereas Joon-hyun struggles with the realization that perhaps the best thing he can do for Chun-hee is not be around her at all. Chun-hee, however, continues to be awesome, while Soo-in proves that “a woman scorned” is serious business, and begins her second-lead spiral down as she takes on more and more of her mother’s characteristics.

EPISODE 8 RECAP

When Chun-hee realizes she left her phone in Geon-woo’s car, she uses another phone to call it. He’s still standing outside her home, reeling from the discovery that she and Joon-hyun live together. But when he answers her phone, the happy domestic sounds of Byul and Joon-hyun calling for Chun-hee’s attention can be heard in the background, and he lies that he’s too far away: He’ll return her phone to her tomorrow.

But at home, he sits at his desk and broods (beautifully, I might add) over her phone, remembering how much fun the two of them had when they were caught in the rain and had to spend time playing silly games in his car. He smiles, and then clutches at his heart, stunned to realize that it hurts. Pretty sure it’s just metaphorical pain, since he’s realizing just how much he cares about Chun-hee.

The next morning, Geon-woo makes good on his promise and returns her phone. But only on the condition that she make him a home-cooked meal at her house. Joon-hyun is surprised (and suspicious) to learn that she was with Geon-woo yesterday, and tries to convince her that she doesn’t need to do anything for Geon-woo.

But Chun-hee returns home to try and frantically clean up everything, sending out a protesting Joon-hyun to fetch groceries. He lugs them back and is ready to make himself at home, but Chun-hee shoves him back out the door, demanding he keep hidden until after Geon-woo leaves.

Exiled to the platform outside, Joon-hyun complains into his ice cream as he wonders where he should kill time during dinner. But as soon as he sees Geon-woo drive up, he hilariously rolls off the platform and hides underneath it.

Joon-hyun imagines Geon-woo putting the moves on Chun-hee in another “knight in shining armor” move by protecting her from that pesky falling cabinet door. Just as he pictures them about to kiss, he screams, “No!” and charges up the stairs to the house, because Geon-woo is clearly much more dangerous than any broken kitchen cabinet.

Except all that is happening is a pleasant dinner, where Geon-woo convinces Byul to help him out in getting Chun-hee to let him have dinner with them more often. It’s not like she needed much encouragement, though, since she still totally wants them to get together.

Chun-hee tries to block Joon-hyun from entering, but he brashly pretends to be surprised at the food set out, and sits himself down (between Geon-woo and Chun-hee, ha!) and starts stuffing his face. Geon-woo is not thrilled by his intrusion, but Joon-hyun is not thrilled that he’s (once again) using Joon-hyun’s cup, as they do a little petty tug-of-war over it. Geon-woo loses only by Chun-hee’s intervention as she hands over another cup to him.

Geon-woo continues to pretend that he’s unaware Joon-hyun is living there, and after dinner, he “innocently” reminds Joon-hyun that it’s time to go home. Joon-hyun reluctantly follows Geon-woo out of the house (and Geon-woo’s smug smile is glorious).

The two men continue their pissing match as Joon-hyun says that it isn’t really proper for the president of the company to eat at the home of one of his singers. But Geon-woo says that he plans to return often for dinner because he likes eating her cooking, and besides, he didn’t come as the president of Shine Star — he likes Chun-hee.

Joon-hyun returns to the house, ignoring Chun-hee as he goes into his room to wrestle with what it means that Geon-woo likes Chun-hee, and how that makes him feel. It means we’ve finally found ourselves in a love triangle — which President Jo literally points out, after eavesdropping on the men’s conversation.

The next morning, Joon-hyun stares and stares at Chun-hee, trying to figure out what’s so attractive about her: It’s not her eyes, or her nose, although he admits that her smile is rather nice. He’s lost in his smitten world when she notices him staring at her, so she stares right back, asking him what’s wrong. He’s relieved when she assumes he’s just mad at her for using his and Byul’s lettuce for Geon-woo’s dinner.

“Hot Pepper” has been climbing the music charts, and soon Chun-hee is busy with interviews (where Joon-hyun face-palms at her simple and honest answers). She also receives a snazzy company car, which she has to drive herself since Joon-hyun can’t drive.

Once he sees how sleepy she gets while driving (and because he won’t let her drink coffee), he decides to secretly teach himself how to drive — and give Tae-song a heart attack at the same time, ha!

Chun-hee wraps up an advertisement shoot for an outdoor gear company, and Joon-hyun hides his wounded pride when he’s told managers can wait outside during the after-shoot dinner. But this is an advertisement shoot that was originally supposed to be Soo-in’s, and she’s crushed when she discovers the posters picturing Chun-hee being put up around the office.

Her mother is even less pleased to discover that Chun-hee also stole Soo-in’s chance to throw the first pitch at a baseball game. While Soo-in meekly stands in front of her, Yang Joo-hee furiously demands her daughter to figure out what she’s going to do, because it’s ridiculous that someone who’s spent eight years working hard to debut could suddenly lose it all just in one day to some no-nothing trot singer.

Soo-in sits alone and dejected in the dining hall. Manager Wang shows surprising tenderness when he sits down with her, gently remarking on how hard it’s been for her lately. Her voice trembling, she tells him that she was scared every time performs onstage, because she had to take sole responsibility for those three minutes. But once she’s off the stage, it’s even scarier because she has to endure the sense of loneliness.

Manager Wang decides to take matters into his own hands and puts in a call to someone to find out everything they can about Chun-hee, going on the rationale that if they look hard enough, they’re sure to find something scandal-worthy.

Joon-hyun mopily eats his soondae soup, and Chun-hee tries to cheer him up by handing over a present — it’s the same style jacket as the one she wore for the advertisement. He tries to play it cool, but as soon as Tae-song tries to snatch it away, thinking Joon-hyun doesn’t want it, Joon-hyun slaps him away and clutches the jacket to his chest. Aw.

Later at home, he preens over his new jacket, and as he steps outside to test it out, he spots a suspicious person in the bushes. It’s just President Jo, though, who has taken a fancy to the lettuce Byul planted.

President Jo confesses that he’s moved in next door, and then asks Joon-hyun how it’s going with Chun-hee. Joon-hyun reminds him of the promise that if they make it to first place on Inkigayo (she’s currently at third), President Jo will release Joon-hyun’s new album.

Pil-nyeo is getting ready to meet her internet cafe guy, who texted her to meet at a certain restaurant. That restaurant happens to be Coach Bang’s restaurant, and as soon as Tae-song recognizes Pil-nyeo, he spins around and tries to ignore her. She’s excited to find him again, asking him if he remembers her, and as he goes into the kitchen to get her order of soup, she calls the guy from the internet cafe to tell him that she’s just met the person she’s destined to be with, so they’ll have to reschedule their date. Ha!

He’s totally understanding, and tells her that of course he has to concede to destiny. But soon they realize that the person they’re talking to is actually each other. While Pil-nyeo is over the moon to discover Tae-song is the same guy from the internet cafe, Tae-song looks like he’s about to be sick.

The heat of summer means that Joon-hyun and Chun-hee fight over the one fan she owns, and finally they reach a compromise to all sleep in the living room so everyone can use it. Joon-hyun starts out sleeping a respectable distance away, but soon they’re all cozied up together. The sound of a camera’s shutter snapping makes it clear that someone now has photographic evidence that Joon-hyun is living there. Uh-oh.

The next day, Soo-in invites Geon-woo to the opera, using the tickets that her mother acquired for the express purpose of getting the two of them together. But Geon-woo takes a raincheck and Soo-in, crestfallen, watches him walk away.

He’s already made plans that day to introduce to Chun-hee to one of his dear friends. She’s surprised (and nervous) by the invitation, but willingly gets into the car with him. As they’re driving along, she receives a call from Joon-hyun, who is super proud at the fact that he’s going to pick her up at the practice studio because it’s the first time he’s driven all by himself. So. Cute.

But she tells him that he doesn’t need to, because she already has another appointment, and then hangs up when he asks her about it. At least she’s aware Joon-hyun wouldn’t take well the news that she’s spending the day with Geon-woo.

It turns out that his “friend” is actually his horse, Dal-bong. She’s delighted to make friends with with Dal-bong (and how adorably sad is it that Geon-woo calls the horse his “best friend”?), but a little nervous about the riding lesson Geon-woo gives her.

Soon she’s riding like a champ (or at least not like a total beginner), and Geon-woo looks on in admiration. They walk back to the stables, and Geon-woo uses the horse as an excuse to express what he’s really feeling: “If you patiently wait, they’ll open their hearts one day.” Sigh. And that’s what makes you the second lead.

Chun-hee’s growling stomach disrupts the mood, and he takes her to the fancy dining room that overlooks all the equestrians practicing. She eagerly dives into her steak, until he tells her that it’s actually horse meat.

Utterly grossed out, she tries to discretely spit out her mouthful of food, until he finally laughs and admits he was joking. Relieved to know she’s not eating Dal-bong, she’s thankful when Geon-woo adds that he’s asked the kitchen to send a meal with her to give to Byul. She awkwardly asks if they can add another serving, explaining that she’ll want to eat at home with her sister, too — but Geon-woo is no fool, and knows it’s really meant for Joon-hyun.

Soo-in eventually discovers through her mother’s gossiping friends that she was stood up by Geon-woo so he could take Chun-hee horseback riding. She does not take kindly to this information.

At Shine Star, she pulls Chun-hee aside for a chat, and once they’re alone in the stairwell, she rips into her, demanding if she’s here to sing or to date. When a confused Chun-hee says she’s here to sing, Soo-in scoffs, because it’s clear that she’s got Geon-woo and Joon-hyun in the palms of her hands.

If Chun-hee plans to succeed by seducing men, then she should find another agency, because Shine Star has no place for her. She tells Chun-hee to longer refer to as sunbae, because she’s never had a hoobae like her, and then storms off. Raging, she rips at all the advertising posters until Joon-hyun stops her, demanding to know what’s going on.

Shrieking that everything is always about Chun-hee, she warns Joon-hyun that he should take better care of his singer, because if he’s not careful, there will be a scandal on his hands.

How can he not know that she’s seducing the president of the company? He defends Chun-hee, saying she’s not that kind of girl, but is stunned to realize that the mysterious and sudden appointment she had yesterday was to go horseback riding with Geon-woo.

It looks like there is definitely a scandal brewing with Chun-hee, though — just not centered around Geon-woo. Manager Wang has dug up some dirt on her: It’s the photos from when they all slept in the living room. Yang Joo-hee sets her plan into motion, and soon a reporter comes up to Geon-woo, showing him the photos and warning what it will be like if a singer in his company is caught up in a scandal.

Geon-woo waits for Joon-hyun outside of Chun-hee’s house. Neither man is in the mood to beat around the bush, so he tells Joon-hyun that he knows Joon-hyun’s been living with Chun-hee, but he’s ordering him to move out. Joon-hyun points out that it’s not strange for a manager to live with his trainee.

But Geon-woo shows him the photos — he paid the reporter twice as much as Yang Joo-hee offered in order to keep this out of the papers. He may have managed to block the scandal this time, but it won’t be the last time there will be threats of a scandal. Especially if Joon-hyun keeps living with Chun-hee.

Joon-hyun reminds him that he’s CHun-hee’s manager, and he doesn’t care what people think. He hands the photos back and walks away, but stops in his tracks when Geon-woo reminds him that a singer’s career ends with one breath of scandal: “You, Jang Joon-hyun, should know this very well.” He has faith that Joon-hyun will decide to move out, because Joon-hyun likes Chun-hee, doesn’t he?

The next day, Geon-woo charges into Director Yang’s office and slams the photos down on her desk. He calls her out on trying to sabotage one of their own singers, and she tries to needle him about showing preference to Chun-hee and ignoring Soo-in. But Geon-woo isn’t falling for it — he explicitly tells her that he likes Chun-hee, so she had better stop trying to mess with her, because it’s getting on his nerves.

Chun-hee is preparing for a music show, and as she sits nervously in the dressing room practicing, Joon-hyun rubs her shoulders. He notes that her water bottle is empty, so he rushes out to refill it. As he does, he runs into Chun-hee’s father (who Joon-hyun doesn’t recognize).

He asks Joon-hyun to deliver a gift to Chun-hee, saying it’s “from a fan.” Her father then takes a moment to listen in on his daughter practicing “Hot Pepper,” and as he stands unnoticed in the corner of the doorway, his eyes fill with tears. That night, as they’re going through all the gifts from her fans, Chun-hee reads the letter included with his gift (tea that her mother used to help her vocal cords). She and Byul are happy to know that their father was nearby, but Joon-hyun is kicking himself for not recognizing him earlier.

Joon-hyun later notices Chun-hee sitting in the living room, just staring at the portrait of her, Byul, and their father. As she wipes tears from her eyes, she tells Joon-hyun that she’s going to work really hard, so that their family can quickly live together again. With Geon-woo’s words about scandals ringing through his mind, Joon-hyun broods in his room, reminding himself of how much his own scandal affected his career.

The next day, Joon-hyun tells President Jo that he’s quitting being Chun-hee’s manager. President Jo is astonished, because she’s so close to getting to the top of the music charts, and thus getting his album produced. But he stubbornly says he doesn’t want the album, so their contract is broken.

Then he meets with the loan shark ahjussis, holding court as he tells them how to care for Chun-hee as her new managers: things like making sure she wears a scarf, and doesn’t drink cold beverages, and most importantly, doesn’t practice too hard, because she won’t stop once she starts.

They’re dumbfounded that he’s leaving (and they ask if he’s got some incurable disease or something, pfft). He bluffs that it’s time he started to work on his own album, and Chun-hee has grown enough to no longer need his expertise. He needs to focus on his own music — after all, that’s why he became her manager in the first place.

Then he takes Chun-hee out for a day of fun at a Sound Experience Museum, where they play with old and new instruments, a sound wave machine, seashells, and generally have fun with everything — and each other.

As they play around with a “telephone” type apparatus (that amusingly distorts their voices), Joon-hyun uses the cover of goofing around to tell her thank you. When she asks what for, he says: “Just… everything.” Then when he says he’s sorry, she asks why, and he says for “everything,” again.

When they stop to pick up some fruit at the market, Chun-hee is distracted by the pretty hairpins. But Joon-hyun teases her on her taste, and so she leaves it behind.

They finally end up at a beautiful spot in the countryside, and they stop to take in the peacefulness of their surroundings. It’s a special place that only he knows, and she’s the first person he’s brought there. She teasingly says she’s honored, but he he tells her that it’s the place to go when where you’re sad or depressed for no reason, and you want to get comforted by someone. He reassures her that no matter where she is, she’ll shine as a singer.

Then he pulls out the guitar and starts playing Acoustic Collabo’s “You and I,” and Chun-hee is delighted because she knows this song (and Joon-hyun teases her about actually knowing a song that isn’t trot, ha). The two are adorable as they sing their duet, which is also extra sweet because the lyrics are all about how you like someone but don’t have the courage to tell the other person, completely unaware the other person feels the same way.

After dinner (that he made for her and Byul), he tells Chun-hee that he’s no longer going to be her manager. He tells her all about the contract with President Jo, and how he became her manager in the first place. But now it’s time for the two of them to go their separate ways — for her to focus on her career, and for him to start working on his again.

The next morning, he sends Byul off with her lettuce report, waving a cheery goodbye as though that won’t be the last time he sees her. Chun-hee’s spirits are subdued as Joon-hyun escorts her to her radio interview, and even though he acts as happy and encouraging as ever, Chun-hee makes him promise he’ll still be there when she’s done. He promises, but he’s secretly left the hairclip she eyed yesterday on her bag. Oh no, this is goodbye, isn’t it?

As she begins to perform in the radio booth (Shim Soo-bong’s “I Only Know Love”), Joon-hyun returns to the house and gives one last look at the happy space he had shared with Chun-hee and Byul. He chokes back his tears and resolutely leaves home.

After performing, Chun-hee rushes out of the radio studio, but Joon-hyun is nowhere to be found. As he (and his suitcase) make their way down the street, Joon-hyun stops to give one last look back.

COMMENTS

Is someone cutting up onions? Because I’m suddenly all teary-eyed.

One of my favorite things about this show has been how Joon-hyun just became a part of their family, and to see him choose to walk away from it so that Chun-hee can be reunited with her father just kills me. I know this isn’t a surprising decision because we needed to see his character sacrifice something of importance in order to prove how much he cares for her, but it still hurt. (And I can’t even imagine how Byul is going to take being abandoned by “that ahjussi,” considering she’s already been abandoned by her father.)

Even though this show has started to pick up steam on the romantic angle, I still consider the heart of it to be family. Which is why I think it was so important that Joon-hyun first be showing fighting so obstinately for his portion of that little household, even if it was just over a silly cup. Yes; it’s partially because he’s beginning to realize how much he likes Chun-hee and feeling jealous about Geon-woo’s attention. But I still think it’s because he doesn’t want some outsider to invade what has become, for perhaps the first time in a long time, a true home to him.

The domestic scenes in this drama have been my favorite moments, only second to the music performances. Which is probably why I’m such a blubbering mess because I don’t care who Chun-hee ultimately ends up with — I just want everyone to be able to live together forever as one big family (and yes, that includes Geon-woo and Pil-nyeo and Tae-song and, heck, even Dal-bong if we can find a house big enough to fit a horse).

I am a little surprised that we’ve reached this “Noble Idiot” point at the halfway mark, though. The plot, while nothing new if you’ve ever watched one (or ten) rom-coms before, has managed to keep up the swift pace it started out with, and I’ll admit I’m slightly concerned that eventually we’re going to run out of tropes as the writers zoom through their script marathon, and then collapse at the end only to somehow crawl their way to the last episode (Chun-hee could coach them on pacing, I’m sure). I suppose I’m just not ready to wallow in a lot of angst for the next few episodes, because I so enjoy all the small cute moments.

Because there’s always that threat of birth secrets and cancer, if things start to stagnate — although, in this case, we still haven’t addressed the fact that Soo-in’s mother probably killed Chun-hee’s mother, or what ties President Jo has to Chun-hee’s mother and why he’s so determined to see Chun-hee succeed. To be fair, I’m kind of glad we’ve barely touched on these, because they’re not important to me or to the plot, really. But now that we’ve split up our leads, I’m sure there’s going to be a flood of angst.

So let’s brace ourselves by taking one long last look at the cute.

RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , ,

41

Required fields are marked *

I really adore this show. It's filled with cuteness and Eun-ji's amazing voice (and when she smiles, the whole world stops and stares for awhile).

It's nothing 'wow', not raved about and probably won't win any awards. But it's akin to comfort food - great to come home to at the end of a long stressful work day, and relieves all my tension :)

Thank you for the recap! I really hope the angst will be minimised. Dear writers, keep the cute and the viewers' smiles please!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Exactly comfort food ! For end of a work day!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This episode was great, so much cute from every direction. Every time Eunji sings a cappella it kills me. Her voice along with the storyline at the end made me teary, too, odilettante.

btw, I'm loving all the new writers on DB! I was a little worried I woudn't, but you guys are all awesome and very dramabeanish, and we appreciate all the extra recaps!
:-)

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

hear hear to the unique but cohesive voices on DB!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yeah, I would've said the same thing :)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The drama's just all too fluffy and cute! the music is amazing and the characters are all beautiful in their own way. it's fun to watch and leaves a good feeling.
the only problem i have with it is the excessive make up they're putting on all the actors, it's so obvious and distracting. nobody's face color matches with their neck color. *sigh*
waiting for the next episode and hoping for more cute romance.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I adored the sound museum date !
They both were simply too cute !!!!

One thing I never got, why does he have to stop being her manager because he has to move out of her house ? I mean, what's the purpose !!!!!

*sighs* guess that is a wrong question to ask in a show like this. The hero can't be half noble idiot , he has to go the whole way I suppose !

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

My question exactly? All he had to do was move out if he doesn't want to cause a scandal. It doesn't make sense to me. I'm confused. Am I missing something? I was waiting for this recap hoping to get a clearer picture in case the english translation was not accurate or there were missing dialogues.

If this insane move is to show that Joon Hyun will sacrifice everything for Chun Hee...well then, it's ridiculous. Bad writing, okay?

Don't make Joon Hyun such a jerk at the beginning if the writers now think they have to make him turn 180 degrees just to make us love him and ship for the lead couple.

So disappointing when it had so much potential. :(

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think he doesn't want her to be tainted because of his name. His scandals could affect her and Byul. And for CH this is very important.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I see it as him not wanting his feelings to get in the way of managing her. If he continues managing her, his feelings will interfere and hurt her chances of moving ahead. I mean, I try to convince myself of that anyway, but I don't understand why he doesn't understand that abandoning her is her father abandoning her all over again. Sigh. Noble Idiots, always illogical.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

DB ate up my comments !
Sorry if this becomes a double post !

I really adored their sound museum date !
They both are too cute !! And that duet <3

One thing I didn't get, why did he have to stop being her manager because he move out of her home? I mean what's the purpose!

*sighs* guess I am asking the wrong question to the show. The hero cant be half noble idiot, he has to go all the way by drama logic !

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanksfor the recap Odilettante!

This show is sweet but man Eun-ji can certainly do vocal gymnastics. Love all her singing parts!

This stitched up family still has its hook into me. They are fun characters!

Hey wad-do-u-know - that Son Tae can sing well too - maybe he can duet up with Chun Hee.

Waiting for Monday to roll around.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oops - i meant Tae Song - he sings well.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Love Eun'ji's songs. Last sad song ('I only know Love') totally brought the memory of 'Boys before flowers'. JinDi sang that song at that birthday party where shog got embarassed. That time I thought, wow, she can't act well, but she can sing. lol.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Loved the sassy girl moment :P

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Glad I was not the only one to have spotted it!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Erggg the angst chapter begins. I'm so enjoying the lighthearted feel of this show, and just as you said - the family they've built is the center of it for me. If, as I fear we will, we spend the next few episodes keeping the leads apart while wallowing in the angst I'll be so so disappointed.

I can kinda convince myself to get behind JH moving out, FOR A WHILE, (are you listening writer-nim? One episode is about enough, and then I need him to go back, preferably at CH's insistence) if only because he's clearly fallen so much harder and faster than CH has at this point. She needs a push to consider what JH means to her, as family or as love-interest - I'm ok with either. While he's been pretty transparently into her for the last few episodes, if she doesn't start showing interest in him too, I'll just be frustrated instead of squeeing when they get together. I like shows where the female lead is equally participating in the romance, and doesn't just have romance, kisses, etc, thrust upon her.

The one piece of the show that really doesn't make sense for me though is the father! Like um, why are you not living at home/not seeing your daughters? I DON'T UNDERSTAND. I hope when we finally reunite them, he reveals a better reason than shame. Otherwise, I'm having trouble understanding why they want such a cowardly guy back in the first place.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yup, the part about the father makes no sense at all, and not sure why are persisting in carrying that trope any further.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

If I dwell on the tried-and-true path that this drama is following, I will have to drop it from my viewing list.

In the first half of its run, the drama beat the dead horse in the realm of jealousy/hazing/sabotage by various stakeholders. What is this, a high school drama?

The beginning of the second half will be about - you called it - noble idiocy. But the drama reserves best for last - some kind of old, unresolved entanglement between one girl's father and the other girl's mother over a mother's death. I will not be surprised if the drama decides to throw in a birth secret while it is at it. A kitchen sink may follow shortly.

This is the classic production-by-numbers.

Yet, I think I will stay for lunch (to borrow from Chekhov), because of the manager (or the actor playing him). I like his persona - transparent, uncomplicated, warm but manly.

One thing to be said for this drama - it does not want to bite more than it can swallow, unlike those overwrought, contrived but ultimately self-imploding ones that came before it this year, like that child-kidnapping drama. What was it called? I can't even remember.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I guess we need the separation for Chun-hee to realize her feelings for Joon-hyun. There's a reason why you're rejecting a rich, patient, understanding president who likes you! But if we need this trope, at least it's early.

One more thing: I like Geon-woo a lot, but wasn't he a bit hypocritical when he ordered Joon-hyun to move out? Wouldn't a newbie trainee (who's somehow managed to succeed in a short time) eating dinner with her president all the time be more of a scandal? It just seems singer-dating-agency-president would spell more trouble than singer-living-with-her-manager-boyfriend.

In any case, the word "scandal" is used too liberally in South Korea.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I like how Geon-Woo is aware of his feelings and tells Chun-Hee, Joon-Hyun and even psychotic mom. I'm still not comfortable with the power dynamic of the president of a company "telling" a trainee to come with him with no prior warning or discussion. Especially in Korean culture, she really can't say no and has no choice. Perhaps this is in keeping with his earlier character where he just does what he wants and doesn't think things through.
I nevertheless like his character and he is nice and earnest (not creepy, lea heroes, or greedy for power). I just want him to have a best friend who isn't a horse!

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Lea horses? Wow, spell check gone wild. That was supposed to be lecherous as in NOT lecherous.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ah, I agree! I feel like men in dramas often tend to "romantic" in that same commanding way ...but especially as he's her boss it adds another element of bleghh to it. I'm liking him less and less, and I think that dynamic is part of it for me.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I only started to watch this series yesterday, and I watch it 8 hours straight! It isn't something new indeed. I find this series is a mix. A mix of (from the pile of dramas I've watched) YTB Lee Soon Shin, Dream High, and my mind just gone blank lol. Will putting more in reply..

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Agreed. I like the lead girl's character, but a lot of the rest just seems to be bits and pieces of many other dramas and clichés all patched together.

In many ways it is almost a remake of "Gloria" but not with 50 episodes. It even seems to have all the same "character slots" - the struggling singer, the younger sibling, the dad.

For me this is another show that started good but is starting to flatline.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree ... not much plot here. But since this is the show that introduced me to Eun-ji's voice, I'll probably always have a soft spot for it. And I now have her on my i-Pod, so I have that to thank Trot Lovers for.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh gosh, I loved this episode so much. Things are progressing rather quickly which makes me worried for the latter half of the show.

But UGH, JJH is killing me. He genuinely cares for CCH and GAH he's such a noble idiot. ;_____;

Favorite part was probably the scene pictured as the episode recap pic--cracked me up so much. Those moments are what I love the most about the show. I don't care much for the romance. I'd rather see all the interactions between Byul, Chun-hee, and Joon-hyun in the house. Heck, I would even watch a spinoff featuring only their adorable interactions inside the house.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ok, this drama is nothing new, but I am enjoying it.

Even though the duet's beginning did not have a truly spontaneous feel - Jung Eun-ji should have waited a few beats more before delivering her line - I loved their voices together. It made me want to order a full album's worth. Not available (yet), but I can dream.

I have to admit I started watching this to see post-military service Ji Hyun-woo. But it's been less than ideal due in no small part to the unflattering hair color they chose for him. (I noticed it got a little darker in this episode, but still!) Writers, you could have let him go back to his natural hair, using the story that he didn't have the money to keep up that expensive double-processed color-weave. In fact, that's another small detail that niggles at my suspension of disbelief while watching. Joon-hyun is homeless, with no money, and yet his hair stays looking the same? Wish my hair would do that with no money! And c'mon! There are post-military chest and abs and buns under those loose fitting shirts and jackets. Throw me a bone here, writers and costumers! You can do better than this!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recap odilettante.

I certainly hope that the nice moments with Jang Joon-Hyun, Choi Choon-Hee, Jo Geun-Woo, and Choi Byeol continue.

As many have noted in prior posts, sometimes the writing for Trot Lovers shows signs of being lazy and relying too much on clichéd storytelling tropes. Since Jo Geun-Woo is the 2nd lead, the screenwriters Oh Sun Hyung and Kang Yoon Kyung probably won't deviate from their paint-by-numbers formula. It's probably pretty much set in stone that Geun-Woo will not end up with Choi Choon-Hee.

Right now I'm in the camp of - if this is indeed the outcome - hoping against hope that the writers avoid consigning him to simply ending up with Park Soo-In as his romantic love interest.

It certainly appears as if for the last couple of episodes they have tryied to rectify some of the missed opportunities with Jang Joon-Hyun's character.

Finally after 7-8 episodes, the styling for Ji Hyun-Woo has improved tremendously.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Well, now that he's gone his separate way, the series has reached a sensible, realistic conclusion, and we can see that they've learned something and are facing their lives a little wiser and with hope for successful careers and better lives. It's a good way to end the story after eight hours.

Oh, sorry, that was the plot of 'Begin Again', an excellent movie I saw this weekend. This is a kdrama, so they'll have to flog the conflicts to death and add a few more over the next dozen episodes. Hope the writers can handle it!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Okay, that made me laugh way more than it should have :)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I have quite a bit I want to gripe about Trot Lover’s. The premise suckered me in with Ji! Hyun! Woo! And Jung! Eun! Ji!. And the drama seemed like it would be up my alley with light heart and comical goodness so I didn’t mind the rehashing of overused tropes.
BUT. I’m so sad at how the drama has been unfolding lately and am less and less sympathetic for the characters after this week’s episodes. I don’t know how hateful Soo-In is meant to be but I find her circumstances less than favorable. She’s been the trainee for 8 years, working solely for her debut in the industry. Then Chun-Hee, all her poor background and baggage aside, comes and trumps her with (not one!) two Daddy Long Legs. So basically the message is that hard work will go nowhere because you need the favor of really powerful people to do anything.
And, sorry guys, but I’m not on the Geun-Woo bandwagon. Especially after his moment where he basically admits all the support he puts in Chun-Hee’s basket is because he likes her. I get it, they’re cute together and he’s all in luuuuuuuurve. But getting all your advertisements and gigs taken away? C’mon show this whole story would make a villain out of me too if I were Soo-In.
By the way, Lee Se-Youngs acting suxxs (imho) but I do think that she has a potentially meaty role here. Opposite that, Ji Hyun-Woo was faaaantastic in the earlier episodes which is what drew me in to the drama in the first place. But he (or everyone for that matter) has been lackluster for me this week.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Really? I didn't quite get that at all (that Geun Woo gave Soo-in's ads and gigs away to help Chun Hee), but maybe the subtitles didn't do a great job. I got the impression that Chun Hee got the ad and baseball throwing thing because of the popularity of her trot single, which I think is the harsh reality of the entertainment world.

This is not to mention that Soo-In has her own conniving mother in her corner who is actively stonewalling Chun-hee but seems to suffer no repercussions because of it. I almost feel like Geun-woo helping Chun-hee is like leveling the playing field for her.

Lastly, in the entertainment industry, hard work does Not guarantee success (although it is required), but getting bitter and jealous about it only injures yourself.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's true my opinions are based on the subs but I didn't mean to imply that Geun-Woo was giving all of Soo-In's work away. But in the subs, Geun-Woo says something about giving all of his support to Chun-Hee because he likes her, which imo isn't really what a Pres should be saying. I'll admit I'm taking your perspective a lot in to consideration though.

I can accept that life isn't fair. But I find it less tasteful in Trot Lover's because it's light heart just seems to gloss over these issues. And I don't think I can wholly support Chun-Hee. I get that the show is trying to make her out to be strong and independant but I personally don't find her that strong. It may have something to do with the stonewalling from Soo-In's mother and the other Director. They seem pretty ineffectual as villains though since Chun-Hee is almost always saved by either Joon-Hyun or Geun-Woo. I like Chun-Hee's cheery optimism, but I don't see her using the brash strong will she's supposed to have to figure her own way out of things.

Maybe next week will be redeeming since it does seem like a set-up for Chun-Hee to save the day.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

So sad. He's never had a place that was home and when he finally has one he has to leave! Not cool.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I know there's a reason we call it noble IDIOCY, but really, doesn't it seem like he's just overreacting in a totally drastic way? Why does not living with Chun Hee also mean not being her manager? I just do not, on any level, understand that leap of logic. Can't he just, move out. Thereby avoiding scandal. And still be her manager???

I am genuinely confused.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I actually thought it made complete sense. There are photos of JJH sleeping in not much clothing with CCH and her little sister - he has an existing scandal that mainly revolves around photos of him in underwear sleeping around. That combo is just way too explosive for him to risk. Yes, he could've told her about it, but that would just have been more stress in a situation that she can't do much about. This really is about him, his notoriety, and how badly it could drag her down. The photos are almost incidental; if a tabloid got hold of the fact that he was living with her, even innocently, then that alone could ruin her because his reputation is not that of an unknown manager, he's believed to have loose morals to start with. And there are people from her own damn company actively trying to expose her.

I hate noble idiocy that seems over the top, but in this case I thought it worked. The only way to ensure he doesn't drag her down with him is to cut her off, so that's what he's done. He's done it in the most pleasant way he could, but I get exactly why he did it. Any lesser degree would have left her exposed to possible scandal, this way there is a clean break.

Totally heartbreaking that he's had to give up people he clearly saw as his family. I love that the dynamic here really is that both leads are attracted to being a family before being attracted to one another. It's kind of sweet to see them doing the small things you do to make each other happy without it being an obviously romantic ploy. They just want each other (and Byul) to be happy.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This is such a great drama! The characters are all quirky, in a fun, light-hearted way. Yeah, the story follows the same general plot as many Kdramas, but that is not why I like Kdramas. Kdramas are really about the characters not about especially unique stories. They are character dramas. If I like and get into the characters, the plot just follows, and I can almost watch them forever. Here, the characters are all great, even the evil mom...... And I love the kids and how their roles are written to allow them to be both real people and kids at the same time. This kid is great and the interactions with her are really heart-warming.
Thanks for the recap!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

What's this?
I'm suddenly having second-lead-syndrome-like symptoms, but for the first lead. Well at least that's a first.
I'm pretty sure that's partly because Geon-Woo still creeps me out sometimes. I mean, the part where he was driving Chun-hee to the hospital in a previous episode? Yeah, that reminded me of the car-almost-in-the-ravine scene in You From The Star. And his 'appeal' to Byul looked like a murder plan too.
When he smiles, though... *sighs*

I guess I'm totally with "lpool356" up there. I can watch a whole episode of just my favorite characters talking and enjoying themselves around each other, no plots involved. It didn't really occur to me how ridiculous the part with the Dad is. Yup, he should've been back already. It's still not a good idea to leave your daughters in the hand of gangsters, no matter how many shiny dresses they lend you.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

You know what would redeem the dad thing a bit for me? CCH realizing that while he's her blood, he isn't necessarily reliable enough to be considered core family.

This is a guy who was unreliable to start with, and who then left his school-aged daughter in the care of her struggling older sister, knowing loan sharks were coming for them. He may love them, but he's not really good for them and no matter how much CCH idealizes living together, she doesn't really NEED him in the same way as she needs someone like JJH. The guy who will burn himself with coffee, humble himself for larger goals, or who will just plain make dinner and watch out for Byul.

Dads tend to get idealized in Kdramas, but in this one I really would like to see him welcomed back but relegated to a place in the household where he really can't do that much damage - CCH was already the most responsible parent in her house, dad was more like another kid than another parent, and the second parent role is the one JJH is stepping into.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hye,anybody please help me about the title of the song and the singer for the song chun hee and joon hyun sing together when they go out together

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Currently Airing

Prime-Time Shows This Week
Monday-Tuesday (March 30-31) Wednesday-Thursday (April 1-2) Weekend (April 3-5)