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Lee Je-hoon on Secret Door and his past and future work

While many actors express devotion to their art, Lee Je-hoon (30) seems to tackle his chosen profession with particular sincerity and passion. From his debut in 2006 until his enlistment in mandatory military service, he worked steadily in diverse roles and projects. Lee first caught the attention of audiences with his portrayal of a gay man in the short film Just Friends (2009), and received widespread acclaim for his lead performance in the 2011 indie Bleak Night.

He went on to star in commercial projects The Front Line, Architecture 101, and Paparotti, and when he began military duty in October 2012, it felt as though he was being taken from viewers at the peak of his career. Thankfully, since his discharge in late July, Lee has revved up his engine and is raring to go, right from where he left off.

In SBS’s Secret Door, which just aired its first episodes last week, the actor plays Lee Sun (Sado), the crown prince and son of King Yeongjo (played by Han Seok-kyu), and he did an interview with Cine21 about his post-army comeback project and his past roles:

When did you start filming Secret Door?

“Two days after my military discharge, I did a script read, and about a week after, we started filming.”

Around the time you were discharged, we heard about you being cast in Secret Door and Detective Hong Gil-dong. Even before the army, you never took a break, and as soon as you got out, you were ready to go again.

“Now that I think back on it, I do regret not taking 4 to 5 more days off.”

Just 4 to 5 days?

“Because I still have to film. I thought it was really lucky that I could meet viewers again right away. [Secret Door] is a project I really believe in, so even though I didn’t have much time to rest, I’m really joyful.”

You chose a sageuk drama as your first post-army comeback project.

“I was curious about how I would do in the sageuk genre, and I hoped it would be a chance to connect with viewers again. I thought if I could do a drama again, I would be able to make up for some of the regrets and shortcomings I felt after my last miniseries, Fashion King.”

In Secret Door, you play Yeongjo’s son, Lee Sun. We know him better as Crown Prince Sado. How is Prince Lee Sun different from/similar to the Sado we know well?

“According to the various historical records, translations can be different. The Lee Sun we are trying to show through the drama is a crown prince who has a huge heart and a great love for his subjects. Rather than an interest in personal benefit, he cares deeply for the people and worries about the future. It’s sad that his life ended before his thoughts and desires came to fruition, but I believe that his intentions were carried out by his son Jeongjo.

“People just remember him as having had a tragic life, but I think everyone’s lives are filled with all kinds of human emotions. Depending on what period of a person’s life you focus on, several stories can be created. The drama covers Lee Sun’s life from his early 20s until his death in his late 20s. I think we’re able to show, in an interesting way, why Lee Sun was destined to live a tragic life, and how he dealt with that destiny.”

Coincidentally, a movie is currently being produced about King Yeongjo and Crown Prince Sado. In Director Lee Joon-ik’s Sado, Song Kang-ho will play Yeongjo, and Yoo Ah-in will play Sado. You acted with Yoo Ah-in in Fashion King — that’s a fun connection.

“We haven’t traded messages since being cast as the same character, but I would guess he’s aware that we’re both playing Sado.”

You collaborated with Han Seok-kyu in your last project, Paparotti, before military service, and now you are working with him in your first project after discharge, Secret Door.

“I’ve never really been someone to believe in ‘inyeon’ [a complicated Korean word that sort of means fate, but in the context of human relationships], but now I’m learning that inyeon is inyeon. I thought that I would really like to work with him again one day, but I didn’t know that day would come so soon. From master-pupil to father-son, we met again, and not in a trivial fashion. I feel that before, I built up a lot of confidence while acting with sunbae-nim. I don’t know if it’s because I’ve already witnessed his acting style and preparation methods, but this time, there is nothing awkward about our actions and reactions to each other. It’s comfortable.”

Beginning with Three Sisters, then Fashion King, Secret Door is your third drama. In Fashion King, you played a second-generation chaebol character, and I don’t know if it was because of the character, but you didn’t seem as relatable to audiences.

“You need time to understand and adjust to the drama system, and Fashion King allowed me to experience those things. The scenes you shoot that very day get broadcast, and I wasn’t used to the immediacy of the reactions. After the project ended, I had ideas of what I would like to do differently if I were to do a drama again. Because I experienced Fashion King, I was able to select Secret Door.”

It also appears that you want to experience a variety of genres.

“I realized that if I don’t take risks, at some point, the pool of projects I’m able to select from could get smaller. That’s why I wanted to experience a diverse range of genres and characters early on in my career. I have my own set of standards, but regardless of whether my project choice or acting is considered a victory or failure, through the process I gain experience, and I can use that in the future to help me select projects with care.”

Your next project, Detective Hong Gil-dong, with Director Jo Sung-hee looks exciting.

“I met Director Jo for the first time while shooting Bleak Night. He is close to Director Yoon Sung-hyun [who directed Bleaak Night], so I had heard a lot about him. It had been some time, but when I met Director Jo again, he was the same as he was before, and I liked that. I really enjoyed his movies Don’t Step Out of the House and End of Animal, so I’m looking forward to Detective Hong Gil-dong because it feels like an extension of those movies.”

About two years ago, you met Jo Sung-hee in his office, where he was preparing a new project. There wasn’t even a working title at that point; all you knew was that it was a dark detective story.

“A private investigator is the main character, and it’s about a bad man chasing an even worse man. The lead, Hong Gil-dong, seeks revenge on a target. But for 20 years, he can’t find the man, and he flounders. The time finally comes when he is able to exact his revenge, but he gets kidnapped. The story is about Hong, who now has to take along two young women, as he searches for his target all over again. We will begin filming at the end of November.

“Interestingly, this movie’s cinematographer and director of lighting will be two folks I worked with on Bleak Night. In between, I found that the two had gotten married. We struggled together filming that indie film and I’m thrilled that I can work with them again on a commercial film.”

Your character in Bleak Night was definitely special.

“Definitely. Bleak Night was the first feature-length film in which I lived and breathed the main character from start to finish. I still talk to Director Yoon regularly, and he is someone I’ll always support. And my first big role in a commercial film was The Front Line. I felt a burden to pull off my performance and I didn’t want the movie to get the best of me, so I felt a lot of pressure. When my character Shin Il-young first appeared on the screen, I remember momentarily being moved to tears. It was the first project I didn’t have to audition for, so it is special to me.”

What’s the source of your burning passion and limitless energy?

“I think it’s the result of wanting to watch good work. I personally want to see good projects, I hope audiences will like the projects I’m in, and I hope the work will have lasting power. I don’t want to make a project I’m ashamed of, so I work harder, and because I have the passion to make a good project, I think that allows me to keep working at this pace.”

I’ve seen a lot of actors say they are happiest when acting, but I think you go beyond that, as an actor with a militant sense of duty.

“I’m doing the type of work that is acknowledged by how much attention people give to it. It’s not work I can keep doing forever just because I like it. So as much as I receive, I need to pay that back even more.”

How were your two years in the army?

“[Prior to the army] I was like a blindfolded racehorse who only sped forward. I didn’t have time to think about anything but work and characters. I didn’t have time to look back and reflect. The appropriate time to step on the brakes presented itself to me. If I didn’t have that time, I think perhaps I would have continued full-speed ahead, seeking momentary results. The timing was really good.”

And it seems as though the timing really was, as Lee still seems like a wriggling puppy of thespian energy, albeit a littler wiser from having had some time to reflect on his career and to think about where he wants to go from here. We shall see if Secret Door lives up to its hype, but for now, it seems like the perfect comeback vehicle, and because of his unusual ability to juxtapose strength and weakness, good and evil, and joy and sorrow in his characters, I’m eagerly looking forward to Detective Hong Gil-dong and any other projects the actor chooses to take on.

Via Cine21

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when viewed from certain angles he kinda looks like kim so hyun!

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I've always thought he had a striking resemblance to Tablo (Epik High) and Henry (Super Junior M/Real Men).

Thanks for the interview @awcoconuts! I've always loved him as an actor, and particularly his film projects, but it's nice to see him back on the small screen in Secret Door; he's been fabulous so far, and the rest of the cast is pitch-perfect. :)

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I loooooove him. Thanks for the wonderful article.

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Thanks awcoconuts for translating the interview. I really loved to know what inside his head. Hope he will grow more in Secret Door and other project. Hwaiting!!!!!

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Im just... Really in love with him. Heh. Charming, magnetic, and crazy talented in acting.

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Me too! I hope Secret Door takes off the way it should because he really deserves it.

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Wow. What a thoughtful young man. Thanks for posting.

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HEY GUYS!!!!

I need some homework help....

I'm a grad school student doing the initial stage of what will be a research paper on the information-seeking behavior of the foreign drama community, particularly East Asian dramas (Korean, Japanese, Taiwanese, etc)

Could I get a few of you to give me some brief statements on
1. How you got into dramas
2. Where you get your information (besides here ;) ),
3. What information you look for (Actor gossip? Release dates? Filming photos? Reviews? Language learning help (to not need subs, or to help sub etc)? Where to download/buy subbed versions?
4. How the language barrier (if you have one) affects your experience searching for information

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE :)

Thanks! this is just the initial info-gathering stage, I'll probably have a more official survey I'll send out to a bunch of sites later on...

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Good luck with your paper! I'll answer:

1. I first got into dramas via Japanese drama after seeing that one of my favourite manga had been adapted as a live-action drama.....started watching Korean drama after going to the northeast of my country where it was really popular because that's the only way people there got to see people who looked like them on tv.

2. Soompi, usually.

3. Info - I usually want casting information and news on upcoming productions, including info on writers, casting rumours etc. And post-project, interviews of actors and writers/PDs on their dramas.

4. It's a pretty big barrier, we're pretty much entirely dependent on translators because it's not always clear when something is just a rumour, or confirmed. Which is why I'm so grateful to those who do translate.

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just now u mentioned northeast of ur country..?
did u mean india??
have heard tht its quite popular in manipur or probably nagaland where indian movies n soap operas are permanently banned?
p.s: m indian 2..!

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1. The first Korean drama that led me into addiction was Dae Jang Geum (2003).It was showing on cable and Ji Jin Hee's chiseled bone structure hooked me in.

2. I'm almost always on Dramabeans, sometimes I visit Dramas ROK and The Talking Cupboard for the cultural aspect of dramas, especially sageuks. Basically, I visit blogs that specialize in Korean dramas.

3. I look for everything that you listed except for actor gossip, it messes with the separation of real-life personalities and on-screen personalities for me.

4. The language barrier is extremely difficult for me to overcome especially when it comes to soundtracks. I use Shazam to identify OSTs but it tags the songs in Hangul, which I don't understand and so I just end up with a list of all the songs I wanted and all the information concerning where to get it etc BUT I can't read Hangul so yeah to number 4.

Hope that helps!

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you guys are awesome! Thank you so much! :)

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Cool topic!

1) I got into dramas when I was couch-ridden with a foot injury. Couldn't find anything good on tv, started browsing Hulu and Playful Kiss popped up. I think it was 2010.

2)besides DB, usually Soompi, sometimes Allkpop or Kpopstarz but not as often as first 2. Also other blogs like eatyourkimchi, couch kimchi...

3)I like reading recaps/reviews, actor gossip. I don't really care about film/drama stills. I watch dramas (streaming) subbed on Viki or dramafever or kdrama.com, depending on who has subs out first since I tend to watch simulcasts. As far as language learning, I use livemocha and talktomeinkorean.com to pick up phrases (and learned Hangul that way too) but I don't find them so useful for grammar. I find I learn more from watching subbed dramas, lots of phrases get repeated so I have learned a lot of short sentences!

4) the language barrier makes it very difficult to get info, as Pogo mentioned, we are at the mercy of the translators, for whom I am also very grateful. I find eatyourkimchi is great for discovering music, and I often download songs of the day on DB

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Hi, it's fun talking about our obsessions so I will share the following and hope that it is helpful.
1.I think that I first started watching kdramas in 2006 when my sister on the East Coast sent me links to Kim Sam Soon and Coffee Prince. Back then I found most of my dramas on dramacrazy and mysoju. Now I subscribe to some sites in order to avoid commercials.
2.I started reading dramabeans at about that time (mid 2006 or 2007)and continue to get most of my info from here although I have visited Soompi and some other blogs.
3. I visit blogs to share the viewing experience and to find out what new dramas will be coming out.
4. I have not found language to be a big barrier.

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1. How you got into dramas
I was in-bed, recovering from surgery and Netflix kept pestering me to watch Faith. I clicked, loved how different it was from American shows, and the rest is history. Well, spending those pain-pill addled days watching endless hours of LMH didn't hurt either...LOL

2. Where you get your information (besides here ;) ),
What interests me most right now is Korean dynastic history. So usually Google.

What also interests me is analysis of story structure. Haven't found any good source for that other than the limited information presented here in the recaps. *hoping DB gals set up something...even if it's something I have to pay for* Usually the most help you find online is commentary that goes like this: "Although this drama has it's flaws...blah, blah, blah." I say 'blah, blah, blah', because no analysis is presented about what the flaws actually are.

3. What information you look for:
Actor gossip? No
Release dates? No, but similar: 'what show airs tonight?'
Filming photos? No
Reviews? Recaps only.
Language learning help (to not need subs, or to help sub etc)? No. I wanted to do this, but then decided that - even more - I want to be able to enjoy dramas with idols. Not being fluent keeps me blissfully ignorant of their shortcomings. :-)
Where to download/buy subbed versions? I subscribe to streaming services instead of downloading or buying. Why buy when they're available online? I'll use the download features from the sites I subscribe to for viewing when I'm not near a secure wifi connection. I don't download from other sites because most sites are illegal and I believe artists (and their financial backers) should get paid for their work.

4. How the language barrier (if you have one) affects your experience searching for information.

Hinders the search for historical information. I haven't yet found english translations for the Annals of the various dynasties. It would be helpful. An indexed version would be golden.

Good luck with your project!

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Also, re: #4
Another example, for the 'Interesting-Korean-History' category:
Information on the kings and queens is hard to find. Wikipedia only offers limited content. Other sources are usually simplistic and repetitive (think cut-and-paste). Sources of uncommon information aren't adequately footnoted to the source texts; or the links to the source texts are broken; or the source texts aren't available online. Much of the source information isn't translated.

And an example from the 'Ooh-that's-pretty-I-want-to-travel-there" category:
There are so many places I've seen in dramas that I'd like to visit in person someday. But trying to find information on these travel destinations is nearly impossible. Oddly, I've encountered a huge language barrier when searching for travel and tourism information.

I dream of the day when the content providers can give us interactive links to information about the places and products we see in dramas.

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I glad I am not the only one with this passion. Hope this helps and good luck on your research:
1. My girlfriend gave me Glass Slipper DVD to watch, but the conclusion was unplayable. Frustrated, my son said,"Don't worry Mom, you can find the ending on the computer and you might enjoy IL Mare and My Sassy Girl movies too." My husband thought I had gone nuts, crying and laughing at the computer screen. I was hooked..that was 9 years ago and I've watched over 1,000+ Korean, Japanese, Taiwanese, and Chinese dramas and movies.
2. Two of the sites I used to watch were taken down. Now I watch Dramabeans, Dramafever, and Viki and some others.
3. I go to some Asian stores that sells DVDs with English subs, but some DVDs have really bad translations and do not make sense or have anything to do with the story. Luckily, I've seen it on the computer already. I do not download because it is too tedious and time consuming.Sometimes, my girlfriend and I trade DVDs.
4. For some reason, I was ignorant and thought South Korea was like North Korea when I first started. The actor and actresses names confused me and I was totally ignorant of the historical monarchy. I started trying the Korean dishes which my sons introduced to me and tried to learn more about the culture.Because I've watch so many, I have remembered some Korean words and phrases through osmosis; however, I still have to use the Hangul characters cheat sheet in trying to learn to speak Korean.

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1. Mine started way back with the Endless Love series, specifically with Son Ye Jin in Summer Scent. I watched on cable then (Arirang, I think). Then I went to college and some friends suggested films which got me to look up other projects of those actors. Yoon Eun Hye, Son Ye Jin, and Ha Ji Won were some of my eternal favorites. I didn't follow as actively for some time until I stumbled upon mysoju(dot)com and Boys over Flowers got me started in watching through streaming since.
2. Aside from dramabeans, I also read koalasplayground, couchkimchi, soompi and at times, allkpop. Add to that some drama streaming sites.
3. Reviews mostly. if I'm completely inlove with the actors, I look for past and upcoming projects and fashion spreads to supplement the craving. :D
4. I've always preferred subs over those dubbed in our local language since a lot already gets lost in terms of cultural context and nuances. For some dramas where actors are criticised for slurring their lines, I get to appreciate it better since I don't get affected by it and only focus on the actors performance along with the production work.

Hope this helps!^_^

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Ok, Beanies are the best ever. You guys have been totally awesome, and this is perfect! Thanks so much!!!! :D

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My answers:
1. I got to know it when Korean dramas first aired in my country. My first kdrama is Autumn In my Heart. But I didn't get addicted. Rather, I just recently got addicted, since 2 years ago.

2. I get info from soompi, other blogs, twitter, many others. I become quite active on soompi now so I get many news on the threads there

3. Actor gossip, reviews, recap, filming BTS, video, etc. I download the raw version from IDWS (an Indonesian forum). Then I download the sub separately. If not available, then I try to look for engsubbed video on Youtube or other sites.

4. I wish I speak Korean. But well, at first it's really hard to learn Korean. But slowly I learn hangul and the language. I learn how to read it now, but it's still very hard for me to form sentence, writing, speaking and listening still need to learn. My vocabs are limited to my experience during watching kdramas/movies. My major difficulty is when I want to search or read the news/notice, etc but it's all in Korean.

Good luck for your homework!

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1. I got into kdramas cause i was into anime. It lead me into falling in love with foreign movies or at least keeping an open mind about them. Then Netflix went online and it just blossomed. i also had excellent internet. I would search specific actors or directors and watch what they had made. i specifically can remember watching I'm a cyborg but that's ok and looking up rain to see what other stuff he had done. and i got suckered into watching at least a few episodes of most of his dramas. Then i branched out into other dramas that had no connection to actors or directors. Soley on recommendations of others- i never would have watched Full House or You're beautiful. As i got more comfortable i was able to pick out ones i liked by myself, mainly crime or historical and the occasional romance. This was about the time dramafever and hulu came out so there was instant access for my new interest.
2. of course i get the majority from dramabeans. i also use modern korean cinema, asianwiki, askakorean blogspot, yahoo, and a few of my friends work in movie theatres so they have stuff on their facebooks.
3. its usually reviews and release dates and photos. i usually get my stuff from amazon, yesasia, or netflix, i havent bought any kdramas though but a ton of korean movies. i do watch on hulu, kdramas. com, netflix, dramafever, youtube, viki, and some other websites that probably are not legal.
i was trying to learn korean so it woud be easier for me to understand but its way too hard for me. i still have some books and notecards that i'll go through but im not as into it as i once was. digitaldialects.com was really helpful. and besides swear words i could probably order at a restaurant or for alcohol but that's about the extent of my knowledge
4. i usually just focus on the english websites like the ones i mentioned and dramabeans. if i do stumble onto a foreign language site i'll just look at the pictures.
I hope this helps you. this was fun to do. :)

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I've once said to myself that if I am in college or grad school and if I have to do a paper on East Asian dramas!
1) When the local stations in our country aired a dubbed dramas. For me its not actually East Asian actually but Mexican. We got tired of watching never ending local soaps so watching a drama that ends in 3 months is a breather. So when the East Asian dramas were dubbed I am so used in watching what I hear doesn't match what I see they say.
2) soompi, wiki
3) I look for pictures only! No, I look for the actors' works especially if I find them haha! I remember buying 15-20 CDs for one drama from my Chinese student. Now I download in d-addicts subs in subscene. Of course learning the language helps. First you don't have to wait for the subs, plus if the subs that you use didn't have translations of the OST it will be a sucker. I'm still in the early stages of learning Korean.
4) There is no way that I'll go to naver and use that as my search engine in looking up for information and use google translate after. I will still go to sites that shares the news or any information in English.
cheers and good luck!

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Hi, I would also like to help :)

1. In 2009 my friend was obsessed with twilight, one day I decided to show her Vampire Knight and she loved it. She started doing research and discovered Korean dramas and she loved them. She would try to tell me about them but I would only listen but I never really was interested. One day we had a sleepover by the end of sophomore year and on the sleep over she showed me the first two episodes of Big. During the summer I finished the series searched for more and well here I am. :)

2.I usually get my information from Soompi, Koala's Playground, and the only English Korean free channel, Arirang Tv. I watch Showbiz Korea every day.

3.Yeah I usually research for everything I can, I like to learn about new actor the upcoming tv shows and sometimes the gossip. I have been watching Korean dramas for about 2 years now, it has been really helpful with learning the language. This is not really in your question but I will tell you. I have lived in my neighborhood for 14 years since the age of five and after watching Korean dramas I payed more attention and noticed that I live in a Korean community. We have about 5 Korean markets within a 5 mile radius, also about 6 Korean churches, and we have about 10 Korean restaurants within a 10 mile radius. Maybe I was ignorant and I was but I didn't even know my high school piano teacher was Korean, I knew she was Asian mind you but not Korean until I heard her speak one day. My mom and I we have this Korean friend who knows us because we visit her store really often, I also knew she was Asian but I didn't know her nationality and it seem rude to ask. I know now she is Korean because she sells hanboks and Porcelain dolls with hanboks, also her language. My point is that it really helps you understand the different Asian cultures and not just make the stereotype of every Asian being Chinese, which I am ashamed to say I use to do :/.Also is kind of cool to walk into a Korean Market and understand some of the words they are saying :).

3. Spanish is my first language and English is my second one. The language barrier it's somewhat big, I sometimes depend on subs and I definitely depend on written translations since I can't read Korean. Sorry If it's long :)

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1. Taiwanese dramas were pretty popular during 2000s and there's my first exposure w/ asian dramas. My interests for asian dramas were high that time and kdramas started appearing in 2004 in my country and got exposed to their own simplistic style of storytelling that's the start of my journey.

2. Soompi and asianwiki
3. Almost always... It's the plot and the casting infos. I read reviews too after watching drama. I have a dowmload app in my mobile for dramas. If unavailable, I stream them.
4. I just totally rely w the translators and english based sites for infos.

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1. I was feeling lonely (at home), when I immigrated to U.S.A. last year and was searching for something to fill in the "void". I came across a Kdrama in Hulu and was hooked up, right away :-)
Another important reason was that the Korean language kinda resembled my mother tongue, Tamil and I love how Kdramas walk a fine line between the strict Asian and a more liberal Western (U.S.A) cultures.
2. Asiawiki, Hancinema, Dramacool and private bloggers like
http://jediprincess.wordpress.com/tag/best-korean-romcom-movies/
3. I usually surf about new drama/movie releases, their trailers and ratings. I surf for subbed versions in viooz, youtube or dramacool.
I learned korean in the old fashioned way (books and internet). Talktomeinkorean.com and mangolanguages.com were of great help.
4. I do not perceive a language barrier as much as a marketing barrier. I mean without viki.com or dramacool.com, I cannot follow my favorite dramas as soon as they are broadcasted, in SK. Imagine buying a cable connection to all the Korean TV stations!!
And if I wanted to buy a DVD, it takes me forever (mostly because I cannot find a trusted website- It would be great if someone suggests a good website)

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This is the first time I'm responding to a comment in DB(though I've been lurking around for over 5 years!!). Just thought it would be nice to help out a fellow grad student :-D

1. It was "Oshin" the Japanese drama that first introduced me into East asian dramas. (Still love Oshin to bits!) and a decade later (plus unrestricted access to internet) I watched my first K-drama "Full-House" - and was hooked up on K-dramas ever since.

I love the manga "Skip Beat" so decided to give the drama a chance. I've been occasionally watching Taiwanese dramas after that.

Started tentatively checking out Chinese dramas this year after finding an interesting review+trailer at "A Koala's playground".

2. Mostly Koala's playground and DB.

3. Not much interested in celebrity gossip (as in personal stuff etc) but rather in bit of odds and ends, and I look more for new shows,interviews, release dates, reviews and recaps.

I used to watch a lot of dramas at mysoju.com- now I use viki and other free dramasites (dramafever is not available in my country) such as dramago/manydramas/myasiantv/gooddrama/dramacool/tivee etc.

4. I'm from a south asian country so there IS a language barrier (*Sigh*-I wish I was born a Korean), but I make do with subs and recaps (eternal thanks to those wonderful people who do subbing and recapping). But I think more and more forums are becoming available in English so, it's not that frustrating to search for necessary info (plus, there is always google translate..).

Good luck with your paper!

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Hey there, I'll answer, too! :)

1. I got into dramas because it became a trend here in my country sometime in the early 2000's. They show dubbed dramas on the local TV channel and DVDs (pirated ones, sadly) of K-dramas were sold everywhere. My mom and the other adults here age were so into K-dramas that I'd end up watching with her sometimes. That's how I got hooked. :)

2. Sometimes I see updates on Soompi, Enewsworld, or even Allkpop. Other times people I follow on Twitter (who tweet about Kpop and other K-industry news) tweet links to drama information and news so I check them out, too, if they peak my interest.

3. I look for any news updates about actors and actresses that I like - be it gossip, casting offers, new projects, photoshoots, etc. Sometimes I just search up on Google whatever new thing people are talking about so that's how I stumble on news. Learning the language definitely does help. I'm into Kpop, as well, so I actually learned how to read and write (although not that well) Hangul to make my life easier. Hahaha! I usually either stream dramas online or download torrents from drama sites or even Korean torrent sites at some point if I want fast updates. :)

4. The language barrier definitely makes less popular news or info harder to find. Sometimes there are some things that I wish to know about but translations aren't available. Or translations could come up but it takes a while before they do so the info you get is not timely anymore.

Hope that helped! :D

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You know, that first picture though... For a second I thought he was Kang Ha Neul, even though the title mentioned Lee Je Hoon's name..... Whoops.... >.<

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For anyone who watched Fashion King, is it true that his character not relatable? As it stated on the interview?
I only watched bits of FK when it aired in my country.

I love him in Secret Door. He has the ability to crush your heart and give it back to you.

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Not very. He was privileged and spoiled. You never really got to see what made him the way he was so it's hard for you to connect -- rather you'd love to connect your fist to his face, lol. Still top-notch acting, though.

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what made him the way he was.....just by looking at his parents...urgh....it's enuf to guess v accurately where he came from and the cause of his insecurity and complex. Don't understand what's so difficult about being able to relate to such a character, which was rather common in most dramas anyway

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Thanks for translating this article. I'm liking Lee Je Hoon a lot in Secret Door. The only other time I've seen him act was in Bleak Night, but I didn't connect with that movie.

He looks so cute in the first photo. He doesn't even look like he's 30.

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Thanks so much for the article, awcoconuts !

"... his unusual ability to juxtapose strength and weakness, good and evil, and joy and sorrow in his characters..."

That's so true, I agree wholeheartedly.

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He is an actor I respect a lot! I can't wait to see more diverse roles. Lee Je Hoon fighting!

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Thank you for the article!
One of my favorite korean actors. I wish him luck in his career!

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I think I'm in love with him.. I think I have a thing for single-eye-lid actor like him and Gong Yoo. He was so breathtaking in Bleak Night and I will forever hate that one friend of his called Baek-Hee... He didnt get the fall like the other two..

Out of topic, does anyone of you get any access of Han Gong Ju (Chun Woo-hee) English subtitle? I am really sad that a high quality film like that still did not have even one English subtitle. I always kind of envy how fast drama and reality show got themselves tons of English sub. I already have Han Gong Ju for like months but haven't watch it because watching without subtitle will spoil the film.

Guys, please.. Can anyone help?

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I love how h speaks about han seok kyu- i think those two are a match of sorts I feel like lee je hoon will follow han seok kyuo in a way. I don;t know I fleel like he does about this working with han seo kyou. They feel like a good mentor-student match and it;s awesome to see.

Love han seok kyu, love le jee hoon but i love them together in screen somehow even more!

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