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Bad Guys: Episode 3

Hold onto your hats, everyone—because Bad Guys continues to amp up the deep and dark nature of these criminal cases with each passing week. In fact, this is one stomach-turning hour to hunt down a kidnapper who also deals in a market that even our resident criminals find sickening and horrifying. And these guys have killed people in their darkest day.

There are elements to this case that hit a little too close to home for the detective-in-charge, who gets pushed to the brink in this hour. The same could be said for any of our team members, really—but the great thing is that there’s a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel. It’s just up to them to make sure none of them gets tunnel vision first.

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EPISODE 3: “Human Market”

A woman feels her way to the door in the dark, using her phone as a light. She turns the doorknob and checks if the coast is clear, then closes it again, locking it. Hurriedly, she calls the police and tells them in a frightened, panicked voice that she’s been kidnapped.

She begs them to come and find her as the sound of the doorknob rattling behind her taunts her. A chilling moment passes when the rattling suddenly stops… and then the door bursts open. She lets out a bloodcurdling scream.

Some time later, Commissioner Nam meets with a senior policeman in his office, offering him food as a reminder that cops need to keep their strength up to catch criminals. However, that’s merely a segue into the real purpose of this conversation, because Commissioner Nam sternly berates him and his men on their incompetence.

Time was of the essence, and those four hours they lost cost them that woman’s life, Commissioner Nam hollers. He’s left astounded by the excuses coming out of the policeman’s mouth, like how murder is common occurrence in that area, and there was difficulty gaining entry to the crime scene.

He orders him out, then picks up the phone to call out his next order: “Release the crazy dogs again.”

Next thing we know, Goo-tak pays a prison visit to each of our re-incarcerated crazy dogs. Relieved to see that Tae-soo is on the mend, he figures that Tae-soo probably resents him for the whole bullet-to-the-shoulder incident. But Tae-soo isn’t the type to harbor grudges against people: “I just… kill them.”

“So, you’ll kill me then?” Goo-tak tosses back, unflinching. He warns Tae-soo against making a U-turn in life and falling back to old habits, lest he wander around aimlessly for the rest of his life. So Tae-soo cuts to the chase—what does Goo-tak want? “Keep your promise.”

With those words, we cut away to Goo-tak’s visit to Woong-chul, who bristles at the idea of being an errand boy the cops can call at-will. Goo-tak isn’t here to dance around the topic, and tells him to shut up and follow orders.

That incites Woong-chul’s rage, and he slams an angry fist against the glass, nearly cracking it. “How many people did you kill with that fist?” Goo-tak asks in a curious voice. “Save the same number of people you killed with that fist of yours. Then you’ll be [a free man].”

Goo-tak comes right out with it and says he can’t get a read on the stone-faced Jung-moon—what is he thinking about right now? Is he onboard with this case or not? Jung-moon replies that he’s never had a choice on the matter and simply did as told by the police.

Goo-tak takes that as a yes, but before he leaves, Jung-moon brings up his earlier inquiry of what he was thinking about. “You know what’s funny?” Jung-moon asks. “I have that same curiosity about you every time I see you. What are you thinking of?”

Or perhaps the better question is: What is Goo-tak getting at by gathering criminals together as a team and throwing them in and out of jail at will?

Anyhow, the question triggers memories of happier times when Goo-tak playfully bickered and bantered with his teenage daughter Ji-yeon at the breakfast table. She’d been upset that her father didn’t worry about her well-being or about the boys she’d meet if and when she’d go study abroad. Like the cop dad he was, Goo-tak had said he’d beat up any boy who hurt his little girl.

It’s cute how Ji-yeon had wished her father to go out and get remarried to a sexy ajumma out there, to which Goo-tak had laughed, saying that he’d be content enough to see his daughter happy and well.

Knowing about their loving relationship is even sadder now that we know Ji-yeon didn’t make it home that day. At his subsequent disciplinary hearing, the board had asked if discovering his daughter’s corpse spurred Goo-tak to cause “that incident.”

Goo-tak had been mostly silent during the questioning, then had a question of his own: “Are we men or beasts?” If the criminals they catch are beasts, what does that make them as cops? Caught in their own hunt by the beasts, the hunters eventually become beasts themselves. How can the disciplinary board members in their suits understand how he feels?

Turning his badge in, Goo-tak had said he doesn’t have the luxury to engage in self-reflection—not until he finds the bastard that killed his daughter.

So when Mi-young and Goo-tak arrive at the church, he’s certain that the hunting dogs will show: “They know what hope tastes like. Hope is a drug.”

And sure enough, all three criminals are waiting inside. Damn, I knew they’d show up, but that dramatic overlay music makes the moment that much more badass. “You ready to hunt?” Goo-tak calls out.

Now Mi-young explains what Team Crazy Dogs is here to do: solve the cases the police can’t figure out and capture the criminals still at large. In and out of prison whenever called, they’ll be rewarded in years shaved off of their jail sentence until they’re free men. Ha, I love the alarmed look on Mi-young’s face when Woong-chul unbuckles his belt in front of her.

Now changed into new clothes, Goo-tak gives the men a pep talk nearby the crime scene. It’s harder to keep one’s freedom than to gain it, he reminds them, so it’s up to them to guard the freedom that they’ve been given. In order to do that, they must clean the streets of the scumbags who have abused that freedom.

Tae-soo hangs back to ask after Sun-jung, whom Goo-tak promises to let him know which hospital she’s in once this case has wrapped. It sounds like she isn’t doing that well (I hope it’s just emotional shock), and Tae-soo warns Goo-tak to keep her alive, if he wants to remain alive, that is.

Mi-young gives the breakdown on the case on their walk over: the victim, Ms. Shin, was a 24-year-old university student who was returning home from her part-time job in the wee hours of the night on July 26 aka two nights ago (thanks for anchoring us to the timeline, Bad Guys).

The perpetrator attacked her from behind and dragged her back to his home in her unconscious state in under three minutes. Either he was waiting for Ms. Shin to pass by or this wasn’t the perp’s first kidnapping, she speculates. As soon as they step inside, Tae-soo discovers a phone and pockets it.

Meanwhile, Mi-young guides the others to the room Ms. Shin was trapped in while the killer prepared a knife to kill her with. I don’t know how I feel about Tae-soo and Woong-chul picking up objects in the house and possibly tampering with evidence, but hey—maybe a forensics team has been by already.

Continuing with the hypothesized account, Ms. Shin had come to, locked the door, and called the police. The perpetrator found out belatedly, forced his way inside, knocked her unconscious again, and dragged her to the bathroom, where he killed her.

Mi-young even has the name of their target: Yang Shi-chul. Woong-chul figures this is an easy job, but the other two think differently. “Something’s strange,” Jung-moon remarks. He finds it hard to believe that the perpetrator was unaware that the victim called the police in such a small house.

Tae-soo says the pieces don’t fall in place—does it make sense that Yang hacked the victim into 300 or so pieces and ran away? Goo-tak walks in just then to confirm his hunch—something doesn’t match up.

Mi-young asks if he means she’s landed on the wrong conclusion entirely, to which Goo-tak replies not necessarily—it’s true that Yang kidnapped and confined Ms. Shin in this house. But there’s an unexpected variable to this equation: the body the cops found doesn’t belong to Ms. Shin.

Goo-tak points out that Yang had left to hack up another body in the bathroom, but in that time, Ms. Shin awoke and called the police. So there’s a chance that Ms. Shin could still be alive, which means they’d have to find both the kidnapper and his victim.

Curiously, Ms. Shin’s internal organs are nowhere to be found, and Yang had chopped up the other body into so many pieces and marred the face to an unidentifiable state that led the police to believe it was Ms. Shin’s body.

Noticing an indentation in the floor, Goo-tak follows the path with his eyes to behind the refrigerator. With a chuckle, he overturns the fridge to reveal another one behind it. Oh crap, there are human body parts in that one, aren’t there?

There are—and it’s filled with dismembered body parts. As Goo-tak steps back in disgust, he explains that Yang dips in the business of human bodies, selling organs on the black market and bones to hospitals. They must find Ms. Shin, and once they do, hunt down Yang and chew his bones out.

Speaking of whom, Yang wakes from his slumber to answer a business call, assuring his client that the body is still “fresh.” That’s fuckin’ messed up, but I hope that means the victim is still alive. She is, as we see Ms. Shin come to in the back of a truck, bound and gagged.

While Jung-moon reviews the CCTV footage from that night, Mi-young walks in and asks Goo-tak if he believes the victim is still alive. He tells her that a victim’s fate usually follows the police’s outlook on the case, so if they look for her holding fast to the belief that she’s alive, then they’ll find her alive.

After Goo-tak leaves, Mi-young reviews the tapes with Jung-moon, who’s spotted one figure that stood by a street corner for over twenty minutes and calmly kept watch as the kidnapping took place, as if he knew it would happen. An accomplice, perhaps?

Goo-tak sits down for a drink with a Prosecutor Jang, who asks if he’s uncomfortable about booking a few ladies because the girls are around his daughter’s age. Prosecutor Jang proceeds to put his foot in his mouth by asking how old Goo-tak’s daughter is now, only to belatedly realize his mistake.

Time to check in on our other crazy dogs: Woong-chul pays another visit to the floral shirt lovin’ gangster boss Chul-joo, to whom he complains if he got new boys who don’t readily recognize their hyungnim. I love how Chul-joo’s like, Why d’you hit them every time you visit then?

So while Woong-chul is busy looking into a place offering loans for donated kidneys, Tae-soo follows up with the phone he found at the crime scene. He sees right through the ruffians’ flimsy claims that they run a legitimate business, and cracks an amused smirk when they get caught in their own lie about knowing nothing about providing burner phones.

Figuring that the thugs won’t talk that easily, Tae-soo invites them to come at him. He takes a literal hammer at each of them, then turns to the frightened boss to spill what he knows, and obtains the contact info of a black market dealer.

Meanwhile, Goo-tak waits until the prosecutor is liquored up to send the ladies away. He makes sure that the prosecutor is completely wasted before letting his right hook fly. He pounds the microphone at the prosecutor’s head repeatedly, then tells him to name his contact who dabbles in human organ trafficking.

Prosecutor Jang cries that those men will kill him if he gives up their name, but Goo-tak retorts that the prosecutor likely isn’t the only one those men are dealing with. Plus, Goo-tak’s given him a solid alibi (read: passed out drunk), so talk.

Elsewhere at a rendezvous point, Woong-chul tells the gangster minion to try and act natural. The black market donor contact shows up soon afterwards, and poor Chul-joo tries to dissuade the man from taking his organs, rattling off a laundry list of health issues. It doesn’t work. Aw, poor guy.

As for Jung-moon, he returns to the dark alleyway where the kidnapping took place. Calculating the man in the cap’s height and appearance, he envisions Yang beating the victim unconscious. Dare I say it but, does he look disturbed?

He retraces the mysterious man’s steps, keeping Mi-young on the line to guide him at every turn. Once the trail goes cold, Jung-moon drops the call and surveys his surroundings—this is where the accomplice is hiding.

Tae-soo meets with the black market dealer who prides himself in his expansive dealings, which include human sex trafficking. It’s sickening how the dealer describes the girls like pieces of meat, and once they’re alone, Tae-soo pounds his head against the table repeatedly, then swipes the file with Yang’s burner phone information.

So while Mi-young get to work to trace its location, Woong-chul follows Chul-joo and the illegal contact to a restaurant. Another gangster tries to dissuade him, but Woong-chul is fearless—how can they abandon one of their own to his death? The reason why gangsters are called thugs these days is because they’re always looking out for themselves.

But then Goo-tak walks up to them at that moment and guesses that they’re here for the same reason. He warns Woong-chul that he’ll end up dead if he isn’t careful in a place like that, but Woong-chul’s hardly afraid of death.

Woong-chul advises Goo-tak to stay out of it since he’s got people to protect, and Goo-tak sighs, “You’re indebted to your parents when you’re born, indebted to the bank when you’re alive, and indebted to your children when you die. A life forever indebted to others… I’ve got nothing to lose, either.”

Basically it means that they’ll be heading there together, and Goo-tak even offers to lead the way. But it’s Woong-chul who heads inside first, and given his track record thus far, you know it’s going to be a messy affair.

It doesn’t take much for Woong-chul to arrive at the hidden bathing area/operating room just in time before Chul-joo gets jutted. He’s ready to give the gangsters a little beating, and throws down the thugs who come at him with knives and bats.

Woong-chul lets his fists and strength do the work, taking a hit for every five punches he lets loose at the minions. A frightened Chul-joo literally keeps his head underwater in the pool to stay out of the fray.

But the fight comes to a ringing halt when Goo-tak appears, dragging a propane gas tank behind him. A threatening display of a lighter effectively has the rotund gangster boss stammering that they’ll all die if the tank blows, but Goo-tak’s stare remains unwavering, and so the boss gives in— what does Goo-tak want?

Why that’s easy—they’re looking for Yang, Goo-tak returns. All it takes is a few phone calls for the gangster boss to confirm that the victim is still alive. Goo-tak asks where the drop-off is scheduled to take place.

Back in the darkened streets, Jung-moon waits for the mysterious man to turn the corner before grabbing him in a chokehold and demanding in a whisper to know where Yang is.

Meanwhile, the victim inches to the truck door and bangs on it with all her might. The noise attracts a passing stranger, who happens to have a set of tools to break upon the doors. But just as he starts to undo the ties, Yang appears behind him and bashes his head in. What the fuck.

He lets out a taunting laugh and tells the victim that the man’s blood is on her hands. He raises the bloody hammer as if to strike her…

Mi-young finally gets a lock on Yang’s location, and Goo-tak and his hunting dogs rush over to the secluded location.

Yang and his men lay Ms. Shin out on the operating table, where she regains consciousness and screams in terror.

Team Crazy Dogs split up to cover more ground, and that’s when they hear her cries. Inside the slaughterhouse, Yang takes a crowbar against the victim’s skull to shut her up. Her blood splatters everywhere from the walls to Yang’s face. She passes out, presumably dead.

Just as Yang tells the men to begin the operation, Team Crazy Dogs arrives and beats down the men. Woong-chul throws a few righteous punches at Yang’s face before proceeding to dislocate his shoulder and wallop Yang further.

Seeing the victim’s still body reminds Goo-tak of his own deceased daughter. He reaches out a hand, only to retract it moments later, then turns towards Yang with a snarl and his gun in his hand.

But Goo-tak stops in his tracks when the victim moves her fingers and starts breathing again. Goo-tak lets out a deep, relieved sigh.

As the police take Yang and his men away, Goo-tak can’t help but remark how Yang still has one working eye. He evens out Yang’s wounds with a headbutt. Ha. Mi-young walks up to say that Goo-tak was right—their belief that the victim would still be alive led them to find her alive after all.

Goo-tak looks over at the victim reunited with her father, and they exchange a silent exchange of gratitude. Then Goo-tak turns to his crazy dogs and asks how it feels to save a life.

True happiness is making others happy when you are, Goo-tak tells them. “Don’t forget this feeling right now and remember it. That’s how you become human.”

Just as promised, Goo-tak gives Tae-soo the address of the hospital Sun-jung is at. He allows Tae-soo to go see her, and Woong-chul hilariously tries to follow suit, citing that he has to go pee. Jung-moon asks if this means they’re all headed back to prison again, but Goo-tak returns, “Go where? This is just the beginning.” Yay!

Woong-chul finds a secluded spot to do his business, calculating that he’s down to a 19-year sentence now (so I guess this means all three of them get a five-year reduction?). Ominous music plays as a van pulls up and drags him inside, to his alarm. Oh no!

 
COMMENTS

Somebody tell me that Woong-chul wasn’t just kidnapped—that the mysterious van was just Goo-tak and the gang taking him back to Team Crazy Dogs headquarters. Still, I have to admit that it’s one helluva cliffhanger because now I’m biting my nails and wondering why it isn’t next Saturday yet.

A gripping cliffhanger is just one mark of what makes Bad Guys a fantastic and entertaining show to watch each week. Each episode has my attention from the cold open to the case of the week, along with the suspense whenever our core characters are in potential danger or whenever it looks like they’re about to cross back over to the dark side. This might be the first episode where I found the violent bloody moments a bit too gruesome at times, but then I suppose you can’t have an episode exempt of blood when dealing with human organ trafficking. Don’t get me wrong, though—OCN shows tend to be more gory than other cable network shows (or major broadcast shows, for that matter), but I don’t think anyone can ever be fully prepared to see a pair of severed limbs, even if the rest of the fridge was censored.

Speaking of censorship, perhaps you might be wondering why Bad Guys and other dramas blur out knives in these otherwise violent scenes. I know that I once had the same question, so I brought it up with javabeans and girlfriday, whose best answer was that a moment of someone with the intent to do bodily harm with a weapon would likely be censored. Bad Guys does a pretty good job of saving us from witnessing any actual violent stabbings or attacks, but it’s still disturbing to see a person bludgeoning someone else’s head in and see the blood splatter everywhere.

Coming back to the narrative however, I really enjoy how the show chooses to take minor side characters in one particular case and incorporate them into the next chapter in the story. For instance, Chul-joo’s appearance could have been a one-off stint, but I like that he made a return in this episode as a hilarious sounding board for Woong-chul. I hope his story arc is an ongoing subplot, as well as Tae-soo’s mysterious ties to the past with Sun-jung. Weaving in these threads keep the show from feeling like a straight procedural with a new case to tackle each week and subtracting years off of jail sentences, even if counting down the days until our criminals are free men is half the fun.

It’s interesting how our supposed bad apples of society have a more sensitive moral compass than our detective-in-charge, who always seems like he’s one snarl from unleashing his pent-up rage. We’d been told of and have already witnessed Goo-tak’s violent tendencies firsthand, but it was the turn in Goo-tak’s eyes when he thought that that victim had died that you could practically see the inner beast come to life. Hardly anything has been very black and white for Goo-tak, who has his own personal reasons to wipe the streets of the scumbags that still roam free, but one has to wonder what incident might be the next thing that triggers another dangerous emotional response from the otherwise sleeping dragon.

And even though he’s a ticking time bomb, I still find myself assured with his tough leadership. Only would a show about baddies hunting down even more horrible dregs of life would have me rooting for our criminals’ use of their strength, fighting skills, and noggins to solve cases. But what I really like about Goo-tak’s working relationship with Mi-young and his hunting dogs is that as much as he spouts matter-of-fact lessons about life to break down their cynical views, his own pessimism comes down with the aftermath of these cases. Like he said—hope is a drug, and now that they’ve all had a taste, I for one, wish that they all become addicts to it.

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This is completely irrelevant to this post but i'm going crazy searching for it everywhere.

Does anyone know the song in Plus Nine Boys episode 12, min.38 (when Jin Goo told Jae Bum about his relationship with Se Young)

Big thanks

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You, could check the soompi forum thread for Plus nine boys, i think page 33. Under the spoiler sections. Someone writes out the songs for each episode so you might find the song you are looking for.

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Thank you so much!?

I found it. It's달콤한 소금 (Sweet Salt) - 고장난 시간.

Thanks!

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It's really good. I especially enjoy the tension that threads throughout the episodes. It's well written and acted. It's been a little frustrating finding access to the episodes where I reside.

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It is hard for me to see also and is always very late after airing, but is worth the trouble so far.

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Great recap and ohmygod I love this show! I'm with you, why can't it be next Saturday already?? Even though he's slightly unhinged, I feel like Goo-tak is kinda like their father figure, or mentor. I know the age doesn't really fit, but as far as the characters go, he seems to always want to teach them something that will help them later, something that they obviously were not taught from anyone else. They all work so well together and I just wish there were two episodes a week because it's really not fair only getting one.

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Agree 100%

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Whoo boy...I do hope all those people they discovered along the way and beat were arrested too

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I love this show. I can't say anymore than that. I just love this show.

I'm so intrigued by Goo-tak. I want to know more about his daughter's death and if any of the three Crazy Dogs was responsible, directly or indirectly, for her death. If I had to guess which one that would be, it would be Jung-moon. There is just something about him that is so off-putting and his relationship with Goo-tak can be described as strained at best, or antagonistic at worst. I want to know more about their past together.

Tae-soo is another mystery and I wonder if he's in love with Sun-jung. I also want to know why he turned himself in.

Woong-chul isn't that mysterious. He's actually pretty typical. Out of the three criminals, he seems to have the most firm moral center. I like him the most out of all the characters.

Mi-young is pretty bland, but I like her moments with Goo-tak. There's just something very teacher-student about them that really grounds the show for me.

Looking forward to next weeks episode and hoping for more background on all the characters! Thanks for the recap, Gummimochi!

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I love this show. It may sound weird but I enjoy watching them beat those criminals. It's just frustrating how an episode is subbed days after it aired. As if one episode/week is not frustrating enough. That said, yay for Tae-soo's perfect abs, again. ^^
Thanks gummimochi for the awesome recap. :)

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Goo-tak is such a badass character yet i couldn't resist feeling even more sad for him when i saw how he was with his daughter....
and is it just me or do i think that this 3 guys will not get their promise freedom at the end of the hunt game...i don't really think the upper guys will let them be free again...

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Even I think that they are just dangling the carrot (read hope) in front of our crazy dogs. There is something ominous about the line about hope being an addictive drug :/

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That line from Goo-tak 'Hope is a drug' was an awesome line, i'm going to use that line in the future, and yeah i also think our bad guys would never be let free at the end, it looks like they are just being used by the police, we'll see, i love the crazy dog team so much, Goo-tak, Tae-soo, Jung-won, Woong-chul and Mi-young, all are great in their own way.

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Thank you thank you thank you for the recap -- I've been watching this episode unsubbed and still riveted -- but now I know what's going on it will be easier to wait for subs.

I usually hate shows with lots of violence against women but I'm so invested in these characters already, I'm hanging in there.

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I absolutely love this show. The weekly wait actually kills me. I'm debating whether to hold off on watching and then watch/ read the recaps all at once. That way the subs should all be out by then too. But who am I kidding...I don't have the self discipline for that. Lol

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Thank you so much for your recap. I was able to understand the unsubbed videos while reading this.

Woong-chul seemed fine in the preview though (sigh of relief) :)

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thanks for recap!

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just finished episode 2 and now cant wait for episode 3 to be subbed. gripping, dark but im impressed w this production. didnt expect such quality. hope the grip continues all the way.

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Thanks for the recap.
Great show! This feels so different from KDramas I've recently watched and I so agree with the comments from earlier episodes about the quality of the cinematography and the lighting. Wow!
I'm so glad I checked this out.
Can't wait for the next episode.

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This show is really good. Kim Sang Joong is stealing the show with his stellar acting as well as his character's mysterious background. Jo Dong Hyuk (sexy man!) and Ma Dong Suk are two characters that I really like more than Park Hae Jin. I like Hae Jin but his portrayal in this drama so far isn't as great as the other two 'baddies'. There are times when I feel like he looks like he's about to cry. His character isn't that interesting too. I am much more invested into Goo-tak and Tae-soo's characters.

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Agree with you. So far Goo-tak and Tae-soo’s characters are more interesting than Park Hae Jin's.

I have seen Jo Dong Hyuk only in Inspiring Generation and he was quite memorable there. Here he shines, imo.
After the first episode I hoped to see some sparks with him and Mi-young, but I guess that won't happen...Im ok with it. Im even ok with a drama without a love line. One think I hope for is a strong female character. Even though this drama is about bad guys, I hope Mi-young wont be just "a girl on the phone."

Goo-tak is quite scary. He is more scary to me than the 3 bad guys. It's hard to "read" him. I don't understand why he treats Mi-young that way. She never gave him a reason...

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On the contrary I find Park Hae Jin's "blankness" quite chilling and impressive.

It's easier to convey passion when acting than stone cold chilling blankness - when he looks at the camera it's quite hard to figure out what he's thinking and that makes him a bigger threat than the other two criminals who are easier to read. Which was why I completely understood Goo-tak's comment to Jung Moon in the prison "what are you thinking". A serial killer that can't be read or is unpredictable is a walking ticking time bomb which is more dangerous than two hot heads beating up people everywhere.

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I do agree with you about Park Hae Jin but I don't think he's the most dangerous when it really matters, Woong Chul might be a hothead but Tae Soo is more than just a hothead, the guy is smart as fuck, trust me contract killers like him are the most dangerous, serial killers are crazy but they are not trained in anything, most of them are weak physically and target women because they think it's easy to overpower women, whereas contract killers are usually skilled physically and mentally.

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Kim Sang-joong, you're TOO hot. I just had to say that.

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Waaaah I'm always late. :(((((

Waiting for this to be up on DSS so I can watch while subbing. Then I'm gonna run back here to read this. Can't wait to (late) squee with you!

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Thanks gummimochi!!

Intriguing set-up, having the killers (re)discover their sense of morality by catching other criminals. Wonder if it puts their own crimes in perspective, and if so, whether they think they're better or worse than the criminals they catch?

I'm also nervous about them committing other crimes while they're roaming free on their investigations, but I guess that's what the ankle bracelets are for...

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The ankle brackets just track their locations, not keep track of whether or not they commit further crimes while they're being rehabilitated, so that's partially what keeps me on my toes (and biting my fingernails really). Also, I seriously think if they wanted to turn fugitive, they'd be able to find out how to shuck those bracelets and go on the run. So far, I think they haven't done so because despite how everything seems so scary about them, there's some basic moral system in the way these criminals approach life...and maybe "earning" their way out of their prison sentence may seem like a fair trade to them, for all the crimes they have committed. I think it's a fairly interesting portrayal that the drama is attempting, and certainly speaks to our fascination with understanding criminals and whether they'd be able to reintegrate into society.

One thing I enjoy especially about the drama is how because these guys are all criminals, they have ways to get to other criminals (whether it's by understanding the criminal mind, by manhandling a gangster boss, or by threatening others to get black market contacts) as contrasted to the types of methods traditional policemen would use.

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I imagine Goo-Tak has some sort of logic in choosing them. I think he's probably aware somewhat of how much of a true flight risk they are compared to others. The gangster boss has as much power in jail as out of it so he probably wouldn't risk extra jail time instead of a reduced sentence. The contract killer turned himself in which indicates probably some sort of conscience but also not likely to try and run (obviously this was before there was a hint that he'd want to get out to protect someone). But as for the serial killer....he's too much of an enigma for me to figure out. But Goo-Tak has links with him that haven't been revealed.

To be honest, I think they have a pretty sweet deal going for them. Help out on a few cases and then get out on a 20+ jail sentence? Legally? I think they'd be dumb to try anything.

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Where I can download this drama with english sub?

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This episode has taken a case that hits quite close to home...I am 100% that the writers incorporated the recent (about 2 years ago) kidnapping/murder that happened in the city of Suwon. The poor victim called the cops, whilst hiding in rooms from the kidnapper. Due to police incompetence (really bad and lazy non-investigation). The police didn't follow up on the phone call until 12-14hours later...by which time is was already too late.

I lived in the city next to Suwon at the time. It was horrible to hear of. The creatives of this drama must also be trying to make a point about the current situation in Korea (Police wise).

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It is sad to read that a case in our story actually happened in real life.
I noticed the drama depicts the police quite incompetent, weak and even morally questionable.
Is the situation really so bad in Korea?

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This show really hits with how the police are in Korea. I've lived here for over 5 years and see what this show is doing. It's giving a good drama but also shining a real light on korean police. The shown event is basically this episode. In the earlier episode it said the police are there for just a steady job and salary. This is very true with Korea. So the real police are hidden behind a lot of the garbage.

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thank you for the recap Gummimochi

I really like the pace of this drama
at first I only check it because of Park HaeJin
but now Im sucked in to it.

I just hope that Woong-Chul isnt kidnapped either...

Looking forward to more gripping recaps..

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Goodness but this show is seriously gripping. Maybe it's quite strange though but I feel like all three "mad dogs" were picked because they all have a semblance of a conscience - some line they won't cross, and some things they wouldn't have done no matter how low they sunk (in their killings) - although Jung Moon seriously freaks me out simply because he really doesn't seem to know whether or not he murdered those people they say he did. I really look forward to more of each of these folk's back stories; the narrative really brings them to life. Goo-tak's scene with his daughter was especially sad, when you see how happy he COULD have been and how bitter he is now.

Thanks Gummi, and I seriously hope Bad Guys keeps this level of suspense and taut writing (as well as excellent cinematography and direction) up in the weeks to come. Worth a little suffering to wait for one episode a week, just based on the quality of the episodes released.

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Where can I watch this show? With subs... I think it's something I would enjoy because it's a cop, murder-mystery drama with Kim Sang-Joong. I mean, seriously, they had me a Kim Sang Joong...

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i can't find this drama anywhere subbed in english :(

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I love this show soo much !!!!! and OMG Jo Dong Hyuk !!!!! I thought that i will be more intrigued by Park hae-jin character but not just yet for me Tae-soo and Goo-tak are stilling the show (in a good way). Goo-tak is scary, even more so then the 3 so called "bad guys" so hard to read and I think that makes it even more intriguing.

anyway Bad guys fighting !!

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Anyone know where I can watch this drama with sub? I only found the 1st ep ???? please anyone let me know bcs I freakin love this drama

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The subs are available at Darksmurfsub.com. If you're a member you can also watch it there.

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it eventually gets onto drama.net as well.

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Gummimochi, thanks again for recapping this! Really enjoying this show and the dedicated subbers (because the wait is okay by me...nice study break from grad school during the week).

Also, not sure if it's okay to mention the preview in recap comments, but didn't it sound like Lee Yong-Nyeo's voice (Mrs. Goh from the Master's Sun)?

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So... one takeaway from episode 3 is that even criminals have their standards. Tae-Soo's disgust was clearly evident when he was talking to the black market dealer who referred to the prostitute as a degenerating piece of meat. Ugh!

It's good that we can root for our hereos, as having some kind of integrity even though they are murderers on the other side of the law.

I love the realism of this show. Subjects which are considered taboo on prime time TV are handled more realistically here - and it's a different perspective, but quite enjoyable.

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I was kind of wondering whether he was mirroring Goo-tak's words from the previous episode actually. About how humans aren't just subjects or "pieces" of meat in this case.

Anyway, really gripping episode. The only problem is subbing is so delayed I don't think as many people are watching/commenting.

Thanks gummimochi!

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I look forward to this suspenseful show every week. Even though I don't get to watch it right after it airs, I'm glad DSS is subbing it in English.

Jo Dong Hyuk is one fine looking man. I haven't seen his acting until now.

I like how Goo Tak gives the 3 criminals some life lessons.

Looks like the next episode is going to introduce a real big baddie.

I like that this drama doesn't just show the case of the week, but we get to see some of the side characters and some more development with Team Crazy Dogs. I like that they do have a bit of a moral standard, cuz if they were all the way evil, I couldn't root for them. I don't want them to completely erase their jail sentence though. They still need to be punished for their crimes.

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Thanks Gummimochi!

It's certainly a nice perk to have access to quality subbing and video for Bad Guys. Until then, I'll just have to rely on your recaps to fill in the blanks and shed light on the storyline connections as the episodes progress.

As others have stated, Goo-Tak comes across as much scarier than Jung-Moon, Tae-Soo, and Woong-Cheol.

Imagine if Mi-Young's character was a counterbalance and had been written with as much of a Mad Dog tenacity as her male counterpart Goo-Tak when it came to pursuing criminals.

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gooddrama.net has the subs! it's updated rather quickly (a few days) but quality of the video isn't superb. Still it's a reliable place if you guys need the English!

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I finally finished ep. 3 (I had to wait for subs and buffering to be completed on DSS - not the greatest picture quality, but it was quite adequate). Another totally badass episode and the next promises to be even better. I can't wait!

What struck me were the expressions on each of the mad dogs' faces when they were able to rescue the victim alive. Certainly a moment to reflect on some life lessons which Goo tak didn't fail to bring home to them.

As someone once commented, there are qualities worth admiring in each of our mad dogs - Tae Soo seems to have a soft spot for women in general and treats them with respect. So I'm guessing he must have been an assassin in his pre-prison days, Woong-Cheol is big on loyalty and defending anyone he considers his person from harm. As for Jung Moon - he hasn't killed anyone, yet, since he's been out of prison, which makes me wonder what his triggers are. He is highly intelligent and notices what others tend to miss.

They are learning to work as a team but they're not quite there yet. I wonder how formidable they'll become when they learn to trust each other and function as a team. It's early days yet, and it's more realistic for them to arrive at that destination slowly, but surely.

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Daebak!!!
At last something intense and mad for me to be entertained. hope the story won't stalled and become mundane.
Love everyone here. I want to see more of JungMoon character.

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i think it's a matter of redemption for all who are involved, including Goo Tak.
Remember when the chief told him he would make sure he could get rid of all his anger and rage by the time they were done?

I think in teaching these criminals how to be human again, Goo Tak also is regaining his own humanity.

once you go down a certain path it is very hard to turn back (maybe that's why all killers and soldiers remember their first kill, it's the one that opened the flood gates) but given the chance and some guidance, maybe they will succeed.

As for Jung Moon, like he said, he does not remember killing people so he has no guilt about it. That also gives him an objective perspective.

Maybe in bringing him on board Goo Tak wants to observe him and find out if it is just a game he plays or if he really does not know/has split personality/dissasociation.

BTW did i ever mention how much i love DB and the beanies ? It's like a modern equivalent of a book club :)

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I think that when chief told him he would make sure he could get rid of all his anger and rage by the time they were done. He meant that it let him have his revenge and kill 1 of the 3 (who ever killed Goo Tak's daughter) This maybe about redemption for some of the characters ,but is about revenge as well.

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I am the only one that thinks that is a trap? the commissioner promised to the detective that he would have his revenge at the end. I honestly think that at the same time that he is using the prisoners to catch the bad guys he is trying to discover who of 3 killed his daughter and is planing to kill him at the end. In that case I would say that the genius guy maybe the killer ,but it could be a red herring and one of the other 2 is guilty of the detective's daughter dead or maybe all of them are guilty. Is a reason why he chose the 3 of them.

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or maybe non of them killed her, but someone else connected to all these 4 men did.

if Goo tak goes over the edge and kills someone, how would the others react?

Would they understand and cover things up for him? (wich would be a "loss" as then all 4 would revert to their "beastlike nature") ALthough i do understand the feeling of wanting revenge.

Or will they prevent him from doing it? BIG VICTORY for all of them, both as a team and humans...

can't wait to find out, this really is a very clever and gripping drama, lets just hope the writers do not end up making the classic Kdrama mistakes by adding some or all the clichés (amnesia, traitor in the midst,rushed ending, stupid non essential love lines,etc.)

That said ofc..i would not mind some more shots of Tae soo's ab..in slow mo plz...yes, i'm a little perv :) but it's ok!! he's legal right? :)

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As much as i like this show so far, there are several points that seem unreasonable to me. First whats the points of minyoung guiding jungmoon trough the streets if he could've just looked at the cctv himself and started where he stopped. Second, why didnt Gutak just feel the girl's pulse to see if she was really dead or not. Third, how is it possible that the girl got knocked out 4 times in the episode and woke up a few minutes later almost every time? She just got a bloody blow to the head the last time, I would expect like her skull to be maybe caved in yet she wakes up like 10 min later after shes been beaten so many times. Lastly, what about the poor guy that died trying to save her? They might've saved her life in the end but another guy died and its not mentioned at all.

Also are they going to keep up with having all the guys get to the same answer at the same time using different methods instead of working together because it seems like a waste of manpower, and plus they keep getting injured

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I'm grateful in this episode I get to see different angles of Jo Dong Hyuk's sexy 6 pack

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Did anyone else notice how similar that trafficker guy looked to Kim Jung Hyun? I mean if he was grungier chubbier with darker hair... and older.

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