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Bad Guys: Episode 7

Wow, just wow. What a jam-packed episode of suspenseful action, heart-wrenching emotional beats, and most importantly—answers. We don’t get all of them in this hour, but each of the ones we do get carry its own punch. As Team Crazy Dogs take on their next target head-on, they must also protect those lives they cannot afford to lose, including their own.

Dealing with the past is never an easy matter, but it’s remarkable what confronting those issues can do for any kind of relationship. It seems that airing out dirty laundry can be the best way for our crime-fighting crew to resolve their misunderstandings—not only with each other but with others as well, even if some resolutions come one step too late.

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EPISODE 7: “In the Line of Fire”

Back in the van, Goo-tak assures Tae-soo that they’ll find the guy that killed the pawnshop owner since they’ve found the weapon. But Tae-soo recognizes a fellow assassin’s work when he sees one—an expertly-placed stab wound caused Pawnbroker Im to die from massive blood loss within seconds.

The professional they’re dealing with is among the best of the best: a completely emotionless assassin, whose work leaves no trace of evidence, no unnecessary wounds, and lastly, no sense of guilt.

Team Crazy Dogs heads back to HQ where Prosecutor Oh is already waiting for them. He’s delighted to meet everyone in person—Jung-moon in particular, to whom he says it’s been three years since they’ve last seen one another. A quick flashback reveals that Prosecutor Oh had chuckled at Jung-moon’s high psychopathy score in the interrogation room years ago.

Prosecutor Oh is all, So how’ve you been? and cheerily brings up the Hwayeondong murders (the ones Jung-moon was prosecuted for), semi-apologetic about the consequences of that case. His mention that everything that happened is in the past now elicits a reaction out of Goo-tak, so Prosecutor Oh drops the subject… for now, anyway.

He changes the topic to relay that forensics called while the crew was away: fingerprints were found on the murder weapon, presumably the murderer’s.

Those prints belong to Hyun-woo, but Tae-soo and the crew arrive at Hyun-woo’s place to find his body being hauled away in a body bag. Aw man, I’d hoped he’d stay around for longer. It was nice knowin’ ya, kid.

Something about how Hyun-woo could have killed Pawnbroker Im, and then hung himself out of guilt sounds too convenient to Goo-tak’s ears. Hyun-woo’s fiancee doesn’t believe that story either, insisting to Tae-soo that Hyun-woo was looking forward to their upcoming marriage.

It was Hyun-woo who wanted to build a happy life together, yet felt sorry to her about the possible shame of marrying a man with a limp. Tae-soo is careful with his words, but he tells her that if there’s a chance that someone murdered Hyun-woo, then he’ll do anything in his power to hunt down the culprit.

In regards to Hyun-woo’s leg brace, she’d been told that there was a firearm accident at the shooting range not too long ago, but Hyun-woo wouldn’t disclose any further details. We know that Hyun-woo had warned Tae-soo about the mysterious “Jong-seok” before, which presumably must be the man in the pin-striped suit and goatee in the next flashback.

Good god—Jong-seok had stuck a target onto Hyun-woo’s leg with a knife, then admonished him for leaving the assassin biz in such an dishonorable manner. Hyun-woo’s one good leg will always remind him of that decision, Jong-seok had told him, before firing the gun at his target.

Tae-soo is certain that Hyun-woo is innocent—Hyun-woo’s weapon of choice was a firearm, since he was too clumsy with a knife. I always appreciate that Goo-tak always hears his crew members out, and repeats Tae-soo’s theory that someone else murdered Pawnbroker Im, framed Hyun-woo, and made his death look like a suicide.

In that case, Tae-soo must have some idea of who’s behind it all, and Tae-soo admits that he’s familiar with the flawless killing method because he used to kill in the same manner. He warns Goo-tak against getting involved in this case, because Goo-tak will be in way over his head when it comes to this brand of killers.

Tae-soo seeks out an elderly baduk player to ask about Jong-seok’s whereabouts. He’s told that it’s been some time since Jong-seok started working for another courier: Kim Do-shik.

Meanwhile, Goo-tak and Mi-young scour Hyun-woo’s apartment for any possible evidence left behind. Unfortunately for them, Hyun-woo had already taken it upon himself remove any trace of him living here, which leads Goo-tak to the conclusion that Hyun-woo knew that someone was coming for him.

Goo-tak decides to perform a more thorough search via UV light, and from there the scene intercuts between the present (Goo-tak) and the recent past (Hyun-woo) in the apartment. Hyun-woo hadn’t caught onto the sneak attack from behind until it was too late; the tie around his neck, Hyun-woo head-butted his attacker and drops of blood fell to the floor.

These are the same drops Goo-tak sees in the present, while in the recent-past, Hyun-woo struggles against the ever-tightening hold on his neck. Hyun-woo desperately tries to reach for a photo that’s fallen under a stand, and Goo-tak follows the bloodied trail until his eyes fall upon the photo.

It’s unclear from whose pocket the photo fell out of, but the subject is all too familiar: Jung-moon. Er, does everyone have a copy of Jung-moon’s picture ’round these parts? Despite his initial shock, Goo-tak stuffs the photo into his jacket before Mi-young sees, and confirms that Tae-soo’s theory was true.

An unidentifiable car was caught on video leaving the apartment complex around the time of Hyun-woo’s death, but the faces of the three people in the car couldn’t be made out. So there’s a possibility that two different people could have killed Pawnbroker Im and Hyun-woo, Goo-tak guesses.

Elsewhere, Woong-chul wonders why they’re going through all this trouble just to prove Tae-soo’s theory when the story of Pawnbroker Im’s murder and Hyun-woo’s suicide could be true. Jung-moon agrees, though he notably adds, “because a knife always stabs from behind.”

Those are the same words Boss Lee spoke to Woong-chul, who asks Jung-moon what the hell he means by mentioning that. “That somebody could be killed by someone they trust,” Jung-moon answers, then tells Woong-chul to go ask Boss Lee who wants him dead.

Woong-chul murmurs in frustration as he steps out, and Jung-moon turns back to the CCTV recordings he’d been poring over. His ears pick up on a presence outside and several gangsters wielding pipes let themselves inside. “Did [Boss Lee] send you?”

Just then, Woong-chul sees the men standing outside and knocks out each and every one of them. That show of loyalty isn’t enough to convince Jung-moon, who decides that he’ll go ask Boss Lee himself. Woong-chul places a hand on his shoulder to stop him with the request to let him take care of it.

Tae-soo tracks down Kim Do-shik at a nightclub and shows up at his hotel room later. It turns out that Do-shik is none other than the gangster who approached Tae-soo about killing Jung-moon, and tying him up in the bathtub is an easy peasy job for Tae-soo.

Spraying Do-shik with scalding hot water, Tae-soo says that’s a sneak preview if he doesn’t answer truthfully. A mysterious man—the same one who spoke with Boss Lee—had approached him a few days ago about offing Jung-moon’s head, Do-shik says, coughing.

The hitman that man had recommended was none other than Tae-soo, but since he had refused, Do-shik was put in contact with another skilled assassin: Park Jong-seok.

Do-shik is sure that Jong-seok is behind the recent deaths—moreover, he also received an angry call from Pawnbroker Im on the night of his death. There’s no need for any other people to die apart from Jung-moon, so they may as well wait until Jong-seok finishes the job.

Tae-soo finds the idea utterly ridiculous, but Do-shik believes Jung-moon will eventually end up dead anyway. But if Tae-soo insists on saving his life, then “don’t ever leave Jung-moon by himself.”

Little does Tae-soo know then that Jung-moon has been left outside while Woong-chul speaks with Boss Lee in person. He asks how Boss Lee could try and kill the man who saved his life, demanding to know who gave the order. But Boss Lee says he never sent his men tonight because he’s walked away from the job.

That means that Jong-seok sent those pipe-wielding thugs to Jung-moon tonight, as Do-shik whispers that Jong-seok will do anything to create an opportune moment to attack Jung-moon alone, and then kill him without a trace.

And just outside the entrance, a man stabs Jung-moon from behind while bumping shoulders with him. Jung-moon staggers.

Thank goodness this stab wound is treated promptly, as Jung-moon is wheeled into the ER and is prepped for emergency treatment. Goo-tak is already at the hospital when Tae-soo arrives, explaining that the stab wound was three inches from Jung-moon’s lung.

Goo-tak has heard the whole story from Woong-chul already, and recognizes that this was a master hitman at work. However, the perpetrator dropped the knife that had Woong-chul’s fingerprints on them, which means that Woong-chul could have faced murder charges if Jung-moon had died.

Goo-tak can’t dismiss the similarities in these attacks, and he confronts Tae-soo about who’s responsible for the attacks on Jung-moon’s life. Tae-soo admits that he also received a request to take out Jung-moon, but he doesn’t know who was behind it yet. He might know someone who does, though.

Too bad Do-shik is dead by the time Goo-tak and Tae-soo head back to the hotel room. It appears Do-shik overdosed on sleeping pills (though he was handcuffed in the bathroom when Tae-soo saw him last) and his phone holds one outgoing call. Hmm.

Tae-soo repeats what Goo-tak said earlier: that if Jung-moon had died, Woong-chul would have been blamed for his murder, and those who valued Jung-moon would have resented the wrong person for the rest of their lives. It’s time for Tae-soo to go and face Jong-seok (though he doesn’t say his name outright), and Tae-soo tells Goo-tak to take good care of Jung-moon.

And now it’s time for us to get a look at Jong-seok himself, as he carefully wraps a tie around a lackey’s neck to show him the proper method of strangling someone to death. Doing it incorrectly leads to a struggle, Jong-seok says patiently, tightening the grip until the lackey falls.

Tae-soo buys a lottery ticket using the string of numbers left on Do-shik’s phone, and a few quick calculations leads him to the dock, where he meets Jong-seok himself. Tae-soo wastes no time to ask who called the hit on Jung-moon’s head, but Jong-seok says he doesn’t know either—he only received the order from Do-shik.

Jong-seok supposes that he won’t be able to carry out the hit with Tae-soo hanging around, but then chuckles that Tae-soo’s with him right now. So Jung-moon’s going to die soon—no, he’s probably dead by now. Oh crap, you called Tae-soo out here on purpose.

And sure enough, we see someone enter Jung-moon’s hospital room and take out a syringe. Back at the docks, Jong-seok can barely bring himself to laugh at the detectives Tae-soo’s working with: an aging cop and a female inspector.

But there’s something Jong-seok doesn’t know, Tae-soo says: how strong Woong-chul’s fist is. We see Woong-chul stop Jong-seok’s lackey from inserting the syringe, and the two go fist-for-fist until our strong man finally takes him down.

At the question of why Pawnbroker Im and Hyun-woo had to die, Jong-seok discloses that there was an added condition to the order in the event that Tae-soo refused: that Tae-soo also be eliminated. And now that job is up to him, Jong-seok finishes.

Aha, so it turns out that I’d been wrong about the subject of Pawnbroker Im’s conversation with Hyun-woo that they need to strike “him” before “he” does (curse you, mysterious pronouns!). They’d been talking about attacking Jong-seok, and were unable to get ahold of Tae-soo. Were you trying to warn him?

So when Jong-seok had stabbed Pawnbroker Im, he warned Hyun-woo against attacking him out of retaliation, because really, who’s the faster hitman between them? Hyun-woo had no choice but to run out of fear, but we know what happened to him next.

Jong-seok is sort-of-but-not-really sorry to Hyun-woo’s fiancee, but killing is a part of his work. Tae-soo points out that they all worked together once—him, Jong-seok, Hyun-woo, and Pawnbroker Im, but that hardly fazes Jong-seok, who remembers what Pawnbroker Im always told them: “Although committing murder might be easy, it’s the sense of guilt that’s difficult.”

Jong-seok would rather like this job (read: Tae-soo’s death) be an easy one, but Tae-soo reminds him of the last promise they made together: that one of them would die the next time they meet. And that promise is going to be fulfilled today.

Putting on his gloves, Tae-soo comes at him and Jong-seok blocks the incoming punches and kicks, then gets in a few kicks himself. After tumbling to the ground, Jong-seok unsheathes a curved knife to use against Tae-soo, who blocks it.

Jong-seok then draws first blood after pinning Tae-soo to the wall, slicing him across the arm. Tae-soo uses a box as defense, then uses a shard as his own weapon to slice Jong-seok’s leg. Using the momentum, Tae-soo whips Jong-seok and his knife around so that the knife stabs Jong-seok instead. THAT was a freakin’ awesome fight scene.

They stand there like that for a few moments until Jong-seok finally says in a strained voice: “Turn the knife. Kill me already!” But Tae-soo softly shakes his head: “I don’t kill people anymore. No, I can’t.”

“The sadness of taking someone precious away from them, the agony… the sense of guilt of taking a life of someone dear to them. I… I found out what those emotions felt like, so I just can’t kill anymore.”

As he speaks those words, we see Tae-soo and the others relish in happier times by the very same docks, even taking a family portrait together. “If those who remember me all depart [from this world] and die… and if I have to send you away too, Jong-seok, then… I’m truly alone. Don’t leave me alone. I beg you.”

Jong-seok asks if Tae-soo’s prepared to be the first person on his hitlist if he doesn’t kill him now. He wonders how the rest of them could have changed so much, why they tried to leave this underground assassin network behind them.

Another flashback takes us back to the moments after Hyun-woo was shot in the leg. As Hyun-woo cries in agony, Jong-seok chuckles that Hyun-woo changed too much after meeting his soon-to-be-wife. “I… didn’t change because I met her, but I had the chance to meet her because I changed,” Hyun-woo had replied.

Hyun-woo had desperately asked Jong-seok to stop things here, and Pawnbroker Im had more words of advice for Jong-seok: “In life, you can wash off the blood on your hands, but you can’t wash off the blood on your mind—the guilt.”

And now Jong-seok tells Tae-soo to turn back and run (from this line of work), but it’s too late for him now. With that, we hear the knife penetrate deeper. Oh shoot—did Jong-seok do that?

Jong-seok collapses to the ground. Tae-soo lets out a cry of despair, then bends down over his fallen friend.

Saying that Tae-soo looks like hell afterwards is an understatement, as he heads towards Sun-jung’s place with their previous conversations echoing in his head. Sun-jung smiles to see him standing there, and is slightly alarmed by his bloodstained clothes and face.

But they carry on conversation, and Sun-jung brings up how he questioned why she wasn’t receiving any money every month. It happens that a social worker came by to inform her about a bank account with monthly deposits made for the past two years—the reason she never got it was because it was listed under her previous address.

Tae-soo is glad to hear that the money (and Pawnbroker Im) came through after all, and when he can’t bring himself to say what he’d like to say, he takes a different approach by admitting that he now knows what it feels like to lose someone precious and to be truly alone. “I’m so sorry,” he says sincerely.

Tae-soo turns to leave at that, but then slumps on the staircase and lets the tears finally consume him.

Meanwhile, Jung-moon finally comes to at the hospital and checks his voicemail. Remember when Jung-moon visited the errand center? They’ve found the Scarred Man Jung-moon’s been looking for.

Jung-moon immediately gets dressed and tracks down the address, which leads him to a shabby, darkened house. When the Scarred Man approaches from behind, asking if he’s a debt collector, Jung-moon slowly turns around, his hands raised. “You remember me, don’t you?”

The Scarred Man does, and says Jung-moon’s rather late—by two years, in fact. He’s probably the one person who knows the answer to Jung-moon’s murderous activities, probably better than Jung-moon himself.

He definitely recorded something, and gives Jung-moon the short answer: “You are a killer.” A quick flashback shows Jung-moon following a pair of girls, before we cut back to the present. “You killed them, and you’re the culprit behind the Hwayeondong murders.”

Now Jung-moon finally has his answer, but he isn’t the only one to hear it… because Goo-tak is standing just outside the door, having overheard the same words.

 
COMMENTS

Be still, my beating heart—what a fantastic hour of television. I’d nearly forgotten about how Jung-moon had sought out services to find out whether he truly was a psychopathic serial killer or not, if he really is the person the world believes him to be or if there lies another truth. I, for one, am more inclined to see the photo and video evidence before any drawing any substantial conclusions, but I’d also say that fearful and shocked expression on the Scarred Man’s face to be telling that whatever he did see, it was pretty frightening.

So while knowing the validity of the Scarred Man’s answers to be true is important, the other issue is that Goo-tak has overheard this conversation, too—how will he react to this revelation? We know that the Hwayeondong murders is a sore spot for both Jung-moon and Goo-tak alike, so it’s safe to say that’s where their main beef with each other lies. Could Goo-tak’s daughter have been one of the victims? And if figuring that out wasn’t complicated enough, we now have Prosecutor Oh to deal with, because he knows of Goo-tak’s past and also encountered Jung-moon before. His smarmy behavior and words could easily be grating, but right now he holds a lot of answers in his hand, so his character tips towards intriguing.

I had no idea that the show would go this in-depth with Tae-soo’s character arc in this hour, but I’m so very glad that it did. For the past few episodes, we’d been set up to suspect and doubt a few characters in Tae-soo’s circle—Pawnbroker Im, in particular. Granted, he had a lot of evidence stacked up against him—the alleged attempts on Tae-soo’s life, the missing bank account, and what looked like preparations to off Tae-soo. I almost feel silly for falling for the untruths because of the show’s plot execution, but perhaps it’s also a testament to the show’s writing to interweave an individual character’s arc in the midst of a case of the week and build it up to a grand payoff. That isn’t to say that the writing has always been tight throughout the series, but I can’t help but be impressed by this turn of events.

At the same time, I thoroughly enjoyed the inclusion of Jong-seok, a name that could have easily been mentioned (and dropped) in passing. Keeping his face masked for half the episode had me wondering if he could have been our Big Bad who was too lazy to kill on his own. As it turns out, even he, as a skilled assassin, was too low-ranked on the evil-o-meter. Jong-seok wasn’t the first to go after Jung-moon’s head, nor will he be the last, I’m sure.

I’m of the belief that a good story should (and would) be able to introduce and inject enough life into its characters and establish their relationships with each other within minutes or an hour. And for what it’s worth Tae-soo and Jong-seok certainly falls into this category. We’d heard about Jong-seok either in passing or with sparse glimpses, but when you put Tae-soo and Jong-seok in the same scene, you could feel the acrimonious relationship burning within and between them. The fight scene at the docks spoke volumes about who they were and who they are now, and Tae-soo’s speech about why he can’t bring himself to kill anymore speaks to how he can wash off the blood from his hands, but not the blood that haunts him in his mind. Pair that with the brief glimpses into their past together, and the sorrow that Tae-soo feels is palpable and heart-wrenching. You never know how precious someone is to you until you lose him.

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Tae-soo's past makes me hurt so much. None of them deserved this, not Pawnbroker Im and definitely not Hyun-woo . All they wanted was to leave behind their dark past and start a new life. This was such a good episode with some breakthroughs about Tae-soo's past.
I really want to know who's after Jung-moon's life. The most obvious answer seems to be one of the friends or relatives of the people he (most possibly) killed. Seems like we'll get some answers about Jung-moon's past in the next episode. Fingers crossed!

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It is a testament to this series that we think "they did not deserve this".

However, truths is that there people were killers. Even if they did honestly want to leave their past behind, they had killed numerous people. Murder is a crime that cannot be set aside just because you want to leave it behind you, no matter how earnest you are. While I will not go and say these people deserved to die, I do no think they deserved to continue just like that, either. What they deserved is trial and conviction. They should have paid for their crimes - that is what they deserved. Not by death, as I said, I am not an advocate of capital punishment, but a punishment there should have been.

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And nowhere have I mentioned that they did not deserved to be punished at all. Although the fact that they even have the murders they have commited on their conscience says a lot because sometimes a person's conscience alone can wreck internal havoc and torture them, something that physical confinement only might not be able to do. Take the example of Tae-soo himself. He lives through everyday knowing that he murdered countless innocents, that he alone is responsible for the pain and suffering that their loved ones go through. Acknowledging the fact that he did wrong and that he can never undo it, eats at him everyday. A guilt like that must be painful to live with. On the other hand, some criminals who are caught and imprisoned go through their sentence, without feeling an ounce of remorse, just to be come out and commit the same crime all over again.

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They died how they lived - by the sword. The tragedy wasn't that they died - it was HOW they died.

There's something seriously messed up if one of the family can eliminate his own members like a butcher with a piece of meat. No remorse whatsoever - to your own brothers - is really messed up. That was why my heart broke for Tae soo, that, and the fact that he feels completely alone now that his family is dead.

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what if they person who put the hit out on Jung Moon is Jung Moon himself...he doesn't remember things anyway

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Ha! I snorted while reading this. It's so true though, for all we know the Big Bad mob boss, is Jung Moon himself. Split personalities seems to be a trend in dramas now, so I wouldnt be all that surprised.

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It would be a great twist if Jung Moon ordered his own assasination. But what is the purpose for this? Even if he is a psychopath or split personality (which we haven't seen ANY traits so far), why order himself dead? Guilt? Fun? Playing the police?

If the drama goes down this path, they better have a really good and logical reason. I love the idea though!

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That description for Jong-Seok ... "The professional they’re dealing with is among the best of the best: a completely EMOTIONLESS assassin, whose work leaves NO TRACE OF EVIDENCE, no unnecessary wounds, and lastly, NO SENSE OF GUILT"

That sounds eerily familiar in regards to a certain other character and their alleged murders, doesn't it?

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ahhh I know, right? Some people were saying they hoped Jung Moon didn't actually kill anyone and was innocent (seemd to be taking that approach) but personally, I'd find his character a lot more interesting if he did actually kill all those people. I'm totally not justifying it though, just saying for the drama it makes his character more deep then the typical framed-guy-desperately-trying-to-prove-his-innocence. I did really hate in GapDong when people tried to justify Tae-Oh's crimes. It was pretty sickening, since Tae Oh was well aware of what he was doing, yet people seemed to be like, "ohh, but he's so hot! I don't want him to go to prison!" Yeah....no. Jung Moon at least seems remorseful, and unaware of his actions. Still a serial killer though.

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But what I don't get is if he really is a serial killer/psychopath.....um, how is he remorseful and why would he have blackouts? Psychopaths don't have that capacity to be remorseful. Although blackouts are usually from something being so traumatic that your brain can't handle it. A psychopath wouldn't be bothered by his crimes, right?

I am not along the route of justifying him if he did commit the crimes, but I was/am hoping it's not him just because for me a lot of things aren't making sense.

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From his character, I felt he was more of a split personality. The way he blacks out and doesn't remember. With split personalities, what one person did, the other wouldn't or might not realize.

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I have to see the video of Jung-moon murdering those girls the scarred man took before I can totally believe that Jung-moon is really a killer. And if he really is, please don't let Gutak's daughter be one of his victims, it
would too hard for Gutak to handle.
What was Gutak doing in that scarred man's house anyway?
I'm glad too that Jung-mun stab wound got treated this time. And I really found it hilarious how Jungmon remained seated while Wongchul was fighting those men when his life was the one those men were after. I love protective Wongchul. I'm speechless of Tae-soo's moments in this episode. ^^

Thank you so much for the awesome and fast recap gummimochi. :)

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I think it likely that Goo Tak was following Jung Moon coz he was told (or the crazy dogs were told?) not to leave JM alone since everyone is out to kill him. So Goo Tak followed JM out of the hospital.

Also, I don't understand WHO left the message on JM's phone informing him about scar face's hideout? Strange that suddenly a message just appeared.

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I re-read previous recaps and in episode 4, Jung-moon hired someone to trace scarred man so the text message must be from that man.

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Yes it was the man Jung Moon personally hired on first or second episode ( I forgot) to look about the previous man he hired so he can find out wether he killed those people or not

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I imagine he still has the tracker on him he did leave the hospital. I'm also not completely convinced GT isn't behind all of it.

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Such a good and sad episode. Loved it.

Thanks for the recap!

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I love how WC just has this exasperated look on his face now whenever someone tries to kill Jung Moon and he has to step in to stop them. Like he's not even surprised or angry anymore at all the assassination attempts, and deals with them like it's a household chore he does every day.

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agreed! i love protective WC.

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This was an epic episode. Thank you for the recap gummimochi.
I guess the writing deceived more of us. I thought Tae-soo's friends abandoned him in the previous episodes. But it was the opposite. They even tried to warn him.

It is kind of sad that our bad guys have to act violent and cruel in order to investigate and gain useful information, but they no longer want to.

I wonder if conscience is what sets them apart from other criminals and that is why Goo-tak chose them. A guestion that was already asked...

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I saw the last episode after I read the recap so when the subs didn't specify a certain person that Hyun Woo and Pawnbroker Im were talking about, I was hoping they were talking about Jong Seok. I'm so glad they were!
I can't wait to see this episode!

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Thank you gummi, for this wqnderfully QUICK and did I say quick? recap which helped so much in my understanding of this episode.

And I LOOOOOVE the first photo you put up of Tae Soo coz he looks absolutely GORGEOUS with that gaze and expression.

To see Tae Soo struggling with the ghost of his past, his "family" of professional killers and their death, the guilt he feels and may I say his repentence to Sung jung? All these were so heart-breaking to watch. Kudos to the actor for portraying the emotions so subtlely yet to the point.

Again this drama made me think:
1) is a murder ever forgivable? (no matter the reason for killing)
2) can we use an eye-for-an-eye : you kill my people so I kill you, to fight/solve crimes?
3) can someone who committed a murder ever lead a normal life?

I am also for the idea of Jung Moon being actually guilty of at least 1 of those murders he was supposed to have committed. That's the only reason he can stay in this team (for Season 2.... hehehe sorry!) and work for this team continuously.

Love Woong Chul the teddy, for beating up thoes guys who tried to kill Jung Moon. He's like "oh geeeez, not another bunch of you again?!" and I love it!

I don't think Goo Tak is the mastermind of all these. I am suspicious of Prosecutor Oh and i wonder what part he has to play in all these?

Really love this drama, best one in 2014, for me!

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For those of you saying that OGT can't be the one calling the hits, someone on the soompi forum compared a scene of OGT (with his face shown) from episode 1 drinking a glass of whiskey and the mystery Big Bad drinking while ordering the hits in episode 6... And they're THE EXACT SAME HAND, down to the mole, texture of the skin and the way the hand is holding the glass. What do you guys think?

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It's a very interesting theory and one I've thought of as well, but if it is so (I hope it's not, I really, really hope it's not) then what would be the point of gathering all three of them together like this? He'd already sent criminals after him in prison, why not just keep on doing that? Tae Soo didn't kill him in prison because he'd stopped killing people, by then, but I'm sure there would be others who'd do it. And why pick him for the squad, in that case? It's not like killing him would be any easier or any more difficult on the outside. Plus by having him killed in prison where he was isolated, there was less risk of him having someone to defend him.
Also, I really want to know what the story is behind the fact that the arrests of all three dogs and Goo Tak's daughter's murder happened with a month of each other. Is that just a random coincidence? Or is some giant conspiracy?
If this is what the show's trying to push towards, that Goo Tak may be behind all this, then I'm hoping it's a giant fake out like the Pawnbroker Im and Hyun Woo arc. This team's too good together for that to be the endgame.

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YESSS, I am so happy you bring that up. I can't seem to shake the feeling that OGT is the one who asked the Mobster to put a hit on JM, especially since they have some sort of relationship.

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I also think that OGT has something more up his sleeve. When I saw the picture of the hand holding the glass of whiskey, what made me recognize him was his hair, and later the pictures with his hand they are the same. If JM is the murderer of his daughter, OGT knows it. The conversation he heard only confirms it. We still don't know, this drama is a good guessing game love this drama.

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All i could think at the end was.. no.. not my puppy. Jung Munnie is not a murderer. I need to see the tape to believe it.. sigh you know a show is great when it has you siding with the psychopath.

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I do hope this show is as smart as I think it is, lol. But I won't really know until the end. I think this was the best episode yet. There was no awkward outside murder to investigate and try to tie into the main themes...and a lot of threads were brought together.

I still am very worried that GT is behind this, but I'm also hoping that it's more along the lines of the misdirection. What about his boss? We haven't seen him recently and in many ways this was started by him.

As for JM....ahhhhh! I'm not sure what to think. He could be or could not be the actual killer. If he really is a killer though, I'm surprised that the private investigator just dropped his knife and sat down instead of panicking and stabbing him. And as I said earlier in the thread I can't figure out how he could actually be a psychopath serial killer and yet have remorse and also blackouts (what would a psychopath find worrying enough that his brain would block it out?). I mean he may very well be the killer but the pieces have not come together for me yet.

I'm still overall very happy with this episode. The writers really plotted everything out beforehand and it shows.

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Also, random sidenote, but I hope the actor that played Hyun-Woo starts to get more roles. This is the second role I've seen him in now (after Secret Hotel) and I'm intrigued by him. I think he worked better in this one that SH but maybe that's also just more experience. He's not the conventional look, and he's always all sad panda face, but I'd like to see him with some meatier roles in the future.

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I hope this drama doesn't go down the same hole God's Gift - 14 days went.

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Even hired killers have family. Poor Tae Soo my heart bleeds for him, though there is a certain karmatic justice in how things unfolded. Nevertheless, seeing him at the foot of the stairs in tears broke my heart.

So Jung moon is a serial killer. Funny I got the sense he wasn't, he hasn't had the urge to kill since his release. What then are his triggers? I got the sense that evidence may have been planted to frame him, but it appears that the show doesn't want to go there. Who then is trying so hard to kill him? I kind of suspect Goo tak, but we'll see how it goes...

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Heartbreakkkk for Tae Soo. I totally did not expect the truth about Pawnbroker Im + Hyun Woo and their attempts to protect Tae Soo! They were killers, but they were still family to him.

The fight scene between Tae Soo & Jong Seok was so intense! TS used a freaking piece of wood against JS & his knife! = Badass and crazy.

I'm glad this episode wasn't just a random police case, but one that was personal to one of the team members like the previous episode.

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Thanks for the recap, gummi!
I love reading your thoughts about how they made each character a real person. Sortuv reminds me of Heartless City - especially with the mounting body count. All these folks involved in the crime world live on against the odds, and die because of them. He who lives by the sword and all.

This was an exceptionally beautiful episode to watch - especially the confrontation on the water front, while TS's friend/foe dies as the sun sets. JDH is doing a wonderful job in this. Of course watching him reminds of Inspiring Generation which tried to show us a similar reality, but lost the thread of it in all the BIGNESS of the show. That show gave us Fighting!!! but with no emotional purpose. This one gives us all the emotion plus really really good fighting.

As much as I love watching JDH's cut features and physique, I hope the man starts eating lots and lots of high fat food as soon as this show is ended. He needs more meat on his body!!

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