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Bad Guys: Episode 8

It’s about time that the truth reared its ugly head, as this hour teaches us mostly everything about Jung-moon that we’d been dying to know. We learn what the deal is between Goo-tak and Jung-moon, but as it turns out, the story has a darker side of the coin that leaves us with more questions than answers.

Betrayal threatens the cohesiveness of our ragtag crime-fighting team, which strangely enough accelerates the hunt for the Big Bad, and why practically everyone has been working so hard to take Jung-moon’s life.

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Infinite – “Back” [ Download ]

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EPISODE 8: “Truth’s Shadow”

We pick up right where we left off, with the Scarred Man revealing that the Hwayeondong serial killer is none other than Jung-moon himself. He didn’t believe it either at first, because who would be crazy enough to ask someone else to keep record of their crimes?

But he did as he was told for the money, tailing Jung-moon without questioning why the latter chose his victims. And there was a pattern in Jung-moon’s movements: every Tuesday evening, he would follow his chosen targets into their houses and leave exactly one hour later, like clockwork. Six victims were found dead some hours later that way.

“Did you see me kill those people yourself?” Jung-moon asks. Of course the Scarred Man didn’t, since he was both too much of a coward and wished to shed any responsibility of the murders.

Assuming that Jung-moon killed those people he followed just because they were later found dead sounds like too much of a leap in Jung-moon’s mind (but… does it, Jung-moon?), but the Scarred Man has a counter-argument at the ready—why did Jung-moon return to the crime scenes then?

Something about recalling Jung-moon’s last victim—that detective’s daughter—still frightens the Scarred Man to this day. What he saw was enough for him to believe that tracking Jung-moon’s movements was part of an act just so he could plead insanity with an I-don’t-remember-anyone sob story if he was ever caught by the authorities.

Jung-moon demands to know what it was he saw, grabbing the Scarred Man in a chokehold when the latter breaks into incredulous laughter. “You… smiled,” he ekes out. “You looked at me and smiled.”

A flashback transports us to that night when the Scarred Man filmed past Jung-moon loitering in the alley where Goo-tak’s daughter Ji-yeon was found dead. Past Jung-moon had looked back and said, “I did it… Me. I killed her,” then broke into a smile.

This is a shocking revelation for present Jung-moon… and for Goo-tak, who overhears everything just a stone’s throw away.

A mystery car had been caught on camera too, but the Scarred Man assumed it belonged to Jung-moon’s accomplice, since someone died every time Jung-moon had emerged from that car.

As Goo-tak shadows Jung-moon down the street, the scene intercuts with the past as a grief-stricken Goo-tak couldn’t understand why his daughter was the only victim found outside (whereas the others were left inside their homes).

He’d been completely torn up about how Ji-yeon had died without eating her favorite dish one last time—it had been the day before his only daughter was supposed to go study abroad.

As present Goo-tak takes out his gun to point it at Jung-moon, his past self echoes, “I can’t forgive myself. This is the only way. After I catch and kill the bastard that killed Ji-yeon, I’m going to get on my knees in front of her funeral portrait… and beg, ‘I’m sorry your father is useless. Please understand… forgive me.'”

His finger on the trigger, Goo-tak trains his gun on Jung-moon, who stops in his tracks and closes his eyes. Had he known that Goo-tak was following him? But Mi-young and the police arrive just then, and Goo-tak hides behind a corner.

They’re also joined by Prosecutor Oh, who asks why Jung-moon went missing tonight. He doesn’t miss an opportunity to make a dig at how Jung-moon will justify his actions as psychological disturbance again, and Jung-moon heads back to the van. Goo-tak heaves a heavy sigh.

Mi-young, on the other hand, rides with Prosecutor Oh to ask what he knows what the deal is between Jung-moon and Goo-tak.

Prosecutor Oh discloses that he was the prosecutor-in-charge of Jung-moon’s first murder case three years ago, in September 2011, back when Jung-moon was a graduate student. We see that day in Jung-moon’s perspective: he’d come home to see a pair of burglars rifling through his family home, his parents lain dead on the floor.

Jung-moon had slowly closed the door behind him and told the intruders with a dark look in his eyes that this was his home: “Why was it my house?” Then he had taken a rock and attacked them.

This is where Mi-young interrupts to say that sounds like Jung-moon acted out of self-defense, a reasonable postulation any prosecutor would have made prior to seeing the crime scene. And there’s that image again: a bloodied Jung-moon with a rock in his hand, and this time, he chokes back tears.

However the prosecution had deemed that Jung-moon’s reaction (read: murder) was too severe compared to the crimes made against him to be acknowledged as self-defense. When the case was turned over to him, Prosecutor Oh had considered him a mental patient and let him go.

But once the Hwayeondong serial killings took place and all fingers pointed at Jung-moon, Prosecutor Oh had resigned from his post. He’s here now because he won’t make the same mistake again.

Jung-moon is brought back to his hospital room, knowing that Goo-take is already here waiting for him. Goo-tak asks how Jung-moon felt when he killed the burglars three years ago—happy? Sad? Let down?

After his daughter died, Goo-tak couldn’t bring himself to eat or sleep, living a hollow existence like a fool. But as time passed, he found himself going about his day and taking care of himself. Pulling back the curtain, Goo-tak snarls that he did all that so he’d have the strength to exact his revenge on Ji-yeon’s murderer when they’d finally meet.

Goo-tak raises his gun at Jung-moon, who turns back with a sigh. “Do I seem like the culprit? Do you think I killed your daughter?” That question triggers their earlier conversation about whether Jung-moon was the Hwayeondong serial killer or not, and Jung-moon asks why Goo-tak came to find him in the first place.

He remembers asking Goo-tak (in Episode 3) what he was getting at by recruiting him. “What do you want from me?” Jung-moon asks. “The truth or [someone to] blame? If you want the truth, help me one last time. If it’s resentment, then pull that trigger. Hurry up and kill me.”

That’s a tempting offer to Goo-tak’s ears, and his finger slowly pulls back the trigger… only to drop the gun at the last second. He asks Jung-moon what will happen if there’s resentment after they figure out the truth, to which Jung-moon replies that he’ll comply with Goo-tak wishes then.

Handing over the picture of the mysterious car, Jung-moon asks him to look into it. Goo-tak emphasizes that this is the last chance he’s giving him before heading out. “He didn’t ask what car it was,” Jung-moon notes.

Mi-young receives a shocking phone call that takes her to the morgue where the locksmith serial killer from Episode 2 now lays dead. Her observations leads her to conclude that this man died of strangulation, not suicide, and orders an autopsy to confirm.

But the man in the suit thwarts down the idea, arguing that the killer had no family. When Mi-young protests, the man in the suit claims he’s following orders from the higher-ups and advises Mi-young to keep her head down. I dunno who you are man, but I don’t like you.

Out in the hallway, Prosecutor Oh acknowledges that Commissioner Nam is a great, respectable man, yet there are instances where he can be imprudent as well. He repeats his earlier question of why he decided to work alongside Team Crazy Dogs, laughing at her naive answer that he’s here to facilitate their criminal cases.

His intentions couldn’t be that valiant, and Mi-young asks in a slightly exasperated voice why he joined them then. The answer is simple: to disband Team Crazy Dogs. He’ll leave Mi-young to figure out how to go about it, but he’ll extend a helping hand to her if she does.

Goo-tak, the three criminals, and Commissioner Nam too, they’re all nuclear bombs, Prosecutor Oh states. A nuclear bomb can stop a war but it can also incite one, and when Mi-young asks where he’s getting at, Prosecutor Oh basically advises her to join hands with someone better—him.

He has one last tidbit to share with her, however: he heard that someone paid a visit to the locksmith serial killer in prison the day before the man died.

That visitor turns out to be Commissioner Nam, who says he tried to be the better man and forgive the man who murdered his son. But the killer had mocked him instead, cackling about the day they would meet upon his release.

Commissioner Nam offers a drink to Mi-young, but she has a more pressing question on her mind: why was she selected to be a part of Team Crazy Dogs? “Because you’re smart and ambitious,” Commissioner Nam replies.

Smart people are unaware of what living in the real world is like, and the ambitious ones are too busy with their own greed to be in tune with others’ desires and wishes of them. Affected by those words, Mi-young’s eyes well up in tears as she asks if that’s the reason why she was chosen.

Commissioner Nam doesn’t see those qualities as disapproving, however—she’ll learn from under his leadership and she’ll rise in the ranks. But Mi-young cuts him off and disagrees with that logic. Keeping her tears in check, she excuses herself.

Goo-tak calls an Detective Park Chang-joon out of a super boring police lecture to look up the car Jung-moon’s looking for. The license plate number comes up as a match with a small-time criminal, and Detective Park stops Goo-tak to apologize for not keeping in touch.

Goo-tak corrects him—he was the one who didn’t call because seeing Detective Park only reminds him of Ji-yeon (since Detective Park was the cop in charge of Ji-yeon’s case), and it’s clear that Goo-tak bears no grudge against him.

Then it’s back to the hospital to spring Jung-moon out without suspicion by removing his ankle monitor. Informing Jung-moon that they’re looking for an illegal taxi driver who takes his passengers anywhere they want at a price, Goo-tak explains that there’s no need to go looking when they just call him instead.

So when they meet, both Jung-moon and Driver Cha recognize one another right away. Jung-moon pulls him into the car and beats him for information while Goo-tak stands guard outside. I know I shouldn’t condone violence, but these kinds of moments never cease to be funny.

Driver Cha insists that he knows nothing and simply followed a Doctor Kim’s orders. About three years ago, Driver Cha had been told to take Jung-moon to Hwayeondong and other neighborhoods after their sessions together. Unlike his previous customers, Jung-moon had been specific about his destinations.

Next thing we know, Goo-tak and Jung-moon arrive at the psychiatric clinic where Jung-moon allegedly used to frequent. Jung-moon recognizes the secretary at the front desk, but he also recalls that she acknowledged someone else’s presence in the past, which means he didn’t come here alone.

He relays as much to Goo-tak, but doesn’t recall who that other man was. He vaguely recalls the doctor’s face, and is surprised to see a female psychiatrist sitting in the office instead. She’s fairly new, but she knows that Doctor Kim Dong-ho used to work in this practice.

Mi-young visits the locksmith killer’s wake alone, recalling the day she’d been appointed as inspector. Commissioner Nam had told her that this responsibility makes them a team now.

Now she calls up Commissioner Nam to provide a response to his metaphor about how a master doesn’t die when a dog bites him: If that dog leaves his master, it’ll find a new one. Oho, is she thinking of switching loyalties? It must be, because Mi-young says the old owner will be sad then, since there’s no beast that will do his bidding.

With that, she ends her ties with Commissioner Nam and calls Prosecutor Oh to ask if his offer still stands.

So when Mi-young sits down with Prosecutor Oh, she agrees to join forces on the condition that Prosecutor Oh actively works with her to break up Team Crazy Dogs. He chuckles and tells her to keep up because he won’t look back if she falls behind.

All they need to do is widen the cracks in the feeble trust the Team Crazy Dogs members have in each other. Prosecutor Oh is already aware of the hit on Jung-moon’s head; there are no secrets in this world—the guys they’re after just think there are. Because he knows that both Tae-soo and Woong-chul received orders to kill Jung-moon. Where do you get your intel?

When Mi-young pays a visit to Woong-chul, he replies that he doesn’t know who ordered the hit either. The only thing he does know is that Boss Lee had told him that a hyungnim he knew lost a child in the Hwayeondong murders. Wait a minute, but Boss Lee and Goo-tak knew each other. Could it be?

In any case, Prosecutor Oh is pretty confident that knowing who issued the kill order on Jung-moon will ultimately result in Team Crazy Dog’s dissolution. Tae-soo admits that he also received an order to kill Jung-moon when they were imprisoned together two years ago. Although he doesn’t know who instigated the operation, he points Mi-young in the right direction.

Mi-young is in no mood to deal with unanswered questions from the elderly baduk player, flicking his book away to let him know that she means business. She reports back to Prosecutor Oh of what she’s told: that the man was one of the Hwayeondong victim’s fathers who wanted Jung-moon dead.

They’ll need the Hwayeondong case files to learn who, and all it takes is for Prosecutor Oh to pull rank with a hoobae prosecutor to get him to infiltrate the police station and seize Goo-tak’s previous case files. Detective Park, who had also been Goo-tak’s former partner, gets pulled in for questioning.

Elsewhere, Goo-tak and Jung-moon drive to the countryside to Doctor Kim’s residence. It’s certainly suspicious that a successful doctor would suddenly resign and go into hiding, but that’s what they’re here to find out.

Jung-moon stumbles upon a cracked portrait of Doctor Kim, the image triggering memories to when the doc gave him medication to put him at ease.

But that’s when a scraggly-looking Doctor Kim turns on the light, asking who’s out there. He reels in shock to see Jung-moon in the flesh, and then takes off. Goo-tak and Jung-moon both give chase, but the latter tires easily, his wounds still fresh.

So Goo-tak makes a quick decision and takes a shortcut to ambush Doctor Kim and take him down with a flip. He gets a few good punches in and tells Jung-moon to sit it out, but Jung-moon whips out his stun baton and uses it against Goo-tak, asking, “Why were you following me that night?”

Aha, so Jung-moon had seen Goo-tak that night, catching a glimpse of his reflection behind him. He asks how long Goo-tak has been tailing him and adds, “I can’t trust you anymore, Goo-tak.”

“You can keep resenting me. I’ll find out the truth.” Jung-moon declares, then grabs Doctor Kim with him. Goo-tak can barely writhe in his temporarily stupefied state, let alone speak.

Jung-moon throws Doctor Kim into the car, only to belatedly learn that he’s been stuck with a tranquilizer. Doctor Kim slurs his words—he knew that Jung-moon would come looking for him eventually, and cackles devilishly that he knew everything before Jung-moon passes out.

Which mean Goo-tak is unable to grab ahold of him, and when he arrives back at the church, he launches into a rage. Grabbing his head in his hands, Goo-tak lets out a long scream before breaking into what sounds like sobs but is actually laughter.

This is how Mi-young finds him, and she comes right out with it: “The one who killed your daughter is Jung-moon, wasn’t it?” She’s astounded by the great lengths that Goo-tak would go to lure his daughter’s murderer into his vicinity.

She knows everything now: that Ji-yeon was the final Hwayeondong murder victim, what Goo-tak did to Jung-moon afterwards, why Woong-chul, Tae-soo, and Jung-moon were chosen for this team and what past they all shared.

She has one final question for him: Is he the one who instigated these chain of events by contacting Boss Lee to have Woong-chul kill Jung-moon, the one who had Kim Do-shik approach Tae-soo, and then issue the order to have Woong-chul and Tae-soo killed as well?

“Was it you?” she asks. “Say it. Oh Goo-tak, did you call out the order? Say it. Oh Goo-tak, are you the culprit?”

And Goo-tak look up and breaks into a wry smile. Oh shit.

 
COMMENTS

How disturbing is that smile? And could it be true that Goo-tak is the Man Behind the Man? Because the idea of revealing your protagonist as the man who ordered his daughter’s murderer killed and assembled a crime-fighting team just to keep him in sight takes some serious balls on the show’s part.

It’s the execution in the story that makes all the difference, and Bad Guys has done a good job of keeping us on her toes thus far. Now the little clues and initial questions asked are coming together, though a few eagle-eyed viewers out there have picked up on some minute details to connect the dots. But even then, I feel the show built up to this climax rather well, taking individual storylines from Woong-chul’s gangster background to Tae-soo’s hired assassin connections to play a part in Goo-tak’s central revenge plot against Jung-moon.

Speaking of whom, I’d hoped that the show would go darker with Jung-moon’s psychopathy and the motivation behind his serial murders. Don’t get me wrong—a shrink that manipulates a client’s predisposition towards violence in his psychiatric sessions is totally messed up, and it’s suggested that Jung-moon went to go kill after taking this odd medication. Yet at the same time, the pill that presumably explains the memory lapses with Jung-moon also then exempts him from the responsibility of his actions, namely murder. Or the fact that he’s been puppeteered by a seriously disturbed psychiatrist actually has him digging for answers. We’ve still yet to know so much about the Hwayeondong murders, what happened between then and Goo-tak’s suspension, why Ji-yeon’s body was found outside unlike the others, and so many other questions to explore. Even with all the information we learned here, it still feels like the beginning of learning about a rich, complex world.

I wasn’t sure what to make of Mi-young’s decision to join forces with Prosecutor Oh in this episode and turning her back on Commissioner Nam. Then again, Commissioner Nam has held several secrets from her, especially those about Goo-tak and his past. But what confuses me more is that while I understand Prosecutor Oh’s motivation from making the same mistake in letting Jung-moon go free three years ago, I don’t understand what benefit Mi-young would gain from disbanding Team Crazy Dogs, with criminals she’s been begrudgingly working with and also recently warmed up to. I see the point in how her cooperation with Prosecutor Oh drives the final confrontation with Goo-tak in this episode to happen sooner than later, yet I wish she didn’t have to switch masters in order tow do it. And honestly, where does Prosecutor Oh get all his intel that he knows everything there is to know even before some of our team members themselves?

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Oh no, Ajusshi better not be the one behind it all! Or, even if he was, how can he still want them all dead? Especially Woong-Chul and Tae-soo? Why isn't episode nine out yet?? AAHHHH!

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Where the hell did Jung moon get that stun baton? Is that an standard issue? I don't think Goo tak even carries that, maybe from the doctor's house? Whatever, the recap comes first before the subbed episode so I can't read it until after I've watched it with subs. Well, patience is virtue.

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the stun baton was from that time they where trying to fight off boss lee (or was it his right hand man?) 's minions. ep 5 or 6 I think.

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YESSS!!!
I kept refreshing the page for this recap.
Gummimochi I love you!!!
I wonder why it takes so long to sub Bad Guys compared to another drama.

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My thoughts exactly. Gummiochi is keep my alive with these recaps since subs take FOREVER

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I agree… it does seem like the subs take quite a while (although, I am endlessly grateful to the subbers!)

I am SO, SO happy for the recaps! Thank you, Gummimochi!!! You are keeping us in the loop! Thank you! Thank you. And again, Thank you.

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Ikr, I'm thankful for the subbers so I could enjoy the drama. Maybe they lack of dubbers compared to another drama. Take Pinocchio or What Happens with This Family, the sub is almost finished in about 12 hours after airing time, For bad guys... I have to wait for days.
I really hope whoever sub this drama live happily, like really, if they don't sub it i couldn't watch it

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In answer to a wish, a couple of magical fairies came to sub this drama. They're just little fairies who love dramas but also have other stuff to do. They don't work for big corporations who have hundreds of subbing fairies. They work as fast as their little wings can flap, but they're old fairies from way back in the past - about 3 years ago when everybody had to wait at least a week for subs to come out for every episode - and they can't keep up with subs-in-hours fairies. They could always go back to sleep instead, unless you clap very loudly and say you do believe in fairies..........

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ClapClapClapClapClap
i love fairies!!!!!

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Clap clap clap
I believe in bad guys subber fairies ! The fairires must be really badass to know all those gangsta terms though xD

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clapclapclap
I believe in fairies too!!!
clapclapclap

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Love the deranged smile of Goo tak. You can write a 1000 word about it. Yea. Deadline by tomorrow. Oh,shit.

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I've been looking forward to reading the recap all weekend. Thank you gummimochi! Off to read :)

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I seriously LOVE this show, and I appreciate that the writers (and the actors! Oh, the actors!) are able to take us to dark places. The humorous bits are so fun to bring some light back to the story, but it is the haunting murder mystery that keeps me coming back for more.

Loved that last smile. And the sob into laughter bit. Great, great, great.

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This once a week episode business is not fun

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I agree. Wish they would release 2 eps/week

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Wish they would do like 10. lol. this show is so good it makes the waiting terribly bad

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I get now what Boss Lee meant when he said back in epi 6 that "everything that has happened until now was no accident". But Goo-tak trying to kill Jung-moon after hearing what the scarred man said slightly confused me. Why didn't he kill him these past months they were working together? Obvioulsy he didn't need any confirmation since he has been trying to have Jung-moon killed for 2 long years now. (If he's really the mystery man, that is) Or he just probably didn't want Jung-moon to die by his own hands hence Tae-soo and Woong-chul. (I just answered my own question.) ^^

That you gummimochi! And yeah, that car scene with Jung-moon beating the taxi driver was so funny. :)

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I get now what Boss Lee meant when he said back in epi 6 to Woong-chul "there is always a knife behind you" or "betrayal always stabs from behind." He was not talking about Jung-moon. Which I incorrectly deduced, but Goo-tak.

As for the taxis scene, I find it believable that Jung-moon used a blunt candle-like object to hit the driver on the thigh as I remember that he hammered 2 burglars to death with a STONE. I never underestimate a blunt object in Jung-moon's hands.

My poor puppy. If Goo-tak is not on his side, who is on his side? Please please please let Woong-chul and Tae-soo be on his side.

I don't think I can forgive Goo-tak for wanting to kill all 3 of the bad guys.

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Boss Lee actually said that (...no accident) thing to his driver, when the latter asked his boss if he'd be okay after letting Woong-chul live. He was probably talking not just about killing WC but also about the Crazy Dogs Team and why Goo-tak chose them 3.

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Goo-tak is not the hire others to avenge his daughter's murder type. He's the personally pistol whipping the killer to death type.

He already told us that once he founded his daughter's killer, he would kill them and go ask his daughter for forgiveness.

The only reason he had not killed Jung-moon was because he had some doubts regarding the car.

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Thank you for the recap...
I don't see any logic behind Mi-young’s decision. I don't understand why she took offense at Commissioner Nam's reason to select her for the Team Crazy Dogs. What was she expecting? Commissioner Nam is her boss, he has every right to hold secrets from her. No one is defending the Crazy Dogs, and they are a team which is useful to her job, you know, fighting the crime (there is always a limit for the Law, but not for the criminals). And it's a delicate situation to handle the Crazy Dogs, so Commissioner Nam trusted her enough for this risky job.
If it is what it is, and not a trick, then this is a very weak turn for the story.

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You really think a boss has the *right* to use you? I think she has every reason to question her boss as selecting her because she won't see the bigger picture and notice that bad things he's doing.

I still hope she's using Oh though. I want her to be trying to get the inside scoop. There's absolutely nothing good or trustworthy about Oh and he definitely can't be the one to win in the end.

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Prosecutor Oh gives me the creeps. We still haven't discover the man who took him to these psychiatry sessions. I put my bid in the hat for Prosecutor Oh.

Although, I'm also kind-of hoping he will be a good guy in the end. The one who has to mop every thing up after the world turns upside down.

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Thanks for the recaps, Gummiochi!!

Wow, who knew that the cop would turn out to be in some ways the biggest "monster" of them all? So many great questions out of this episode!

I'm not sold on Prosecutor Oh just wanting to right past wrongs - he seems to get a not-very-healthy enjoyment out of pushing everyone's buttons.

And just what is Mi-young's role amongst all these bad guys? Is she literally there just to play the straight man (woman) to a bunch of misfits and outcasts? She must have been chosen for a reason, but does she have a couple of hang ups as well?

Looks like Jung-moon's doctor did some kind of sick Frankenstein experiment on him to induce the murders, but JM's no innocent victim, either - after all, why did he smile like that after killing Gu-tak's daughter? Was there any part of him that was aware that he was effectively licensed to kill? If his doctor was the one behind the Hwayeondong murders, even providing transport and stuff, then did the doctor target the victims (and Gu-tak's daughter) specifically?

And I agree - want everyone to make it out the other side, and have a S2 reunion! Wish I could go to the flash mob meeting! :)

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I would assume the doctor targeted the victim's since the driver said Jung-Moon always knew specifically where he wanted to go.

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This may just be wishful thinking on my part, but I don't think Goo-tak is behind the hits on Jung-moon. That would be a good reveal, but I don't think so. I think Prosecutor Oh, who knows everything about everyone, is a little suspicious. Everything about him screams creepy. So, I'm holding out on pinning it all on Goo-tak until next week.

Thanks for the recap!

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I don't wanna believe Goo-tak is behind it either!

He put his life on the line alongside all of these guys back in Ep 4 when they took out Mme Hwang's operation- in the face of certain death, no less! So surely it ain't him...!

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I feel the same. I have my doubts. It's not really his style to be a shadow puppet master.
Besides, it's too early. And we still haven't seen the face of the whiskey drinking instigator of hits.

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I agree with you. All the evidence so far points to Goo Tak, but I wonder if the show can make a believable twist and the real person behind the orders is someone else.

I don't like Prosecutor Oh. Despite his reason of trying to fix his mistake with Jung Moon, Prosecutor Oh still looks shady as heck.

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I agree with others that it is hopefully not GT. I think there were too many signs pointed towards him and it feels like more of a setup. He seemed fairly surprised when he overheard the photographers confession and his reaction was immediate - an odd one for someone who's been plotting his assassination for years. I also agree that all signs so far have pointed to him being the kind of person who would only be satisfied with doing the killings himself.

On the other hand, I don't know why he picked the other to members for the team. I mean specifically those two.

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I have a theory.

The guy who brought Jung-moon to the psychiatric hospital is Prosecutor Oh. The back view of that guy looks like Prosecutor Oh in his suit. Prosecutor Oh told Mi-young that he released Jung-moon when Jung-moon killed the 2 men who killed his parents as he believed Jung-moon is a patient. Hence, it is likely that Prosecutor Oh brought Jung-moon to the psychiatric hospital for treatment.

To continue my theory, Prosecutor Oh could be the real psychopath behind those serial murders. (He seems more like a psychopath to me than Jung-moon is in the show.) He could have worked with Doctor Kim Dong-ho to get Jung-moon to suffer from memory lapses, drop him off at Hwayeondong area while Prosecutor Oh did the real killings. Jung-moon will be blamed for those killings.

Or maybe, Prosecutor Oh had a deal with Doctor Kim: bring patients who score real high on the PCL-R test to the hospital for experiment.

Or maybe, Prosecutor Oh FAKED Jung-moon's PCL-R with his own results to make him believe he is a serial killer. Just so he gets his scapegoat. (BECAUSE seriously, after 8 episodes does Jung-moon seem like a psychopath to you? Episode 5 shows great evidence that he is not. He ask the killer to kill him instead as 'he may as well kill someone who inflicts damage on others'. Unless the term psychopath was redefined the Jung-moon so far portrayed isn't one.)

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Oh. I must also mention that the guy who brought Jung-moon to tho psychiatric hospital is a guy who wears a suit AND glasses. Which character in this show wears glasses except Prosecutor Oh? Unless the show intends to introduce some totally unknown new bad guy behind Jung-moon's predicament, it most probably is Prosecutor Oh.

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I hope your theory is wrong, because so far for me the great thing about Bad Guys is the fact that our heroes are bad guys.

They're guilty of the crimes that they have been convicted of, and yet they are not soulless demons.

These are very flawed men who desperately hope that their may be some small hope of redemption despite all of the things which they have done.

Personally I hope the Dr. did something that fragmented Jung-moon mind amplifying his violent tendencies. Oh maybe his parents were part of a government super baby experiment gone wrong and Jung-moon is the end result. However, to make him a victim, I think I would feel like the show coped out.

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Well, He is a murderer.
I mean, He found his parents killers, closed the door an proceeded to bludgeoned them with some decorative rocks, (great chilling scene by the way).
That should warrant extensive psychiatric work, and a couple years in the joint doesn't sound amiss.

Prosecutor Smartypants sunds good for a manipulative maybe-murderer, although "government super baby experiment gone wrong" is a theory I´m allways behind :-D

For a moment there I was drearing the "evil twin" angle, for realies, this show man.....

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Totes agree with you

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I like your theory. I could totally see it happening.

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I don't think he just has amnesia and so is being blamed...he turned and smiled and said "I did it". I mean it is possible that the photographer is lying...after all he actually didn't seem that concerned during his tale that Jung-Moon might kill him. However, the other possibility is that he really has some sort of induced multiple-personality/Jekyll & Hyde bit.

I honestly found this episode frustrating because I feel like the story behind all of it is going to be unbelievable.

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+1 for your theory!

Pros Oh seems far more manipulative than the others - it's like he's playing a game with everyone - remember the way he taunted Commissioner Nam when they first met?

I can't see what anyone would gain from doing something as vile as enticing people (even if they're criminals) to repeatedly put their lives at risk for the sake of a sentence reduction, with the intention of killing them off anyway in the end. That's really treating lives as disposable rubbish.

Commr Nam and Oh Goo-tak and the rest of the gang have all lost people they loved, or shown signs of a remorseful conscience. I'm keeping my fingers crossed.

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Where do you guys watch this?

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You can watch the raw on either (myasiantv) or (dramacool) and the subs usually follow later

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I watch it online at darksmurfsub.com. ^_^

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I'm starting to suspect Professor Oh...

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Wow. This episode is epic. I really love the twist. And I don't think I like the prosecutor oh that much. Thanks for the recap.

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The writer is slowly giving us pieces of the big puzzle from now till the finale episode; however he has actually given us a few hints about why Gu Tak is NOT THE ONE behind JM's contract hits. For one thing, as some has pointed out, if he wanted to terminate JM, he could have staged it already, well before the scarred dude gave some circumstantial information.

When you examine the character of GU Tak, you know he's an intelligent cop, street-wise, well-seasoned ... he may not know who's the killer but he knows who didn't do it. It's as simple as that.

Similarly the reason why Mi Young sides with creepy prosecutor Oh is that she's simply fed up at Commissioner's Nam irritating & lame attempts at spouting Yoda logic - every time she asks him a simple question, he gives her a cryptic answer which boggles even the ceiling gecko. Sure she gets the message that the things she wants to know are way above her pay grade but surely he knows the way he's treating her will alienate her from him more and more, precisely because she's not dumb and she has the instincts of a cop - she didn't rise to her position based on her sultry deep voice or luscious lips, yes, no? Speaking in metaphors is never advisable because at best, nobody understands what the heck you're trying to say and at worst, they misunderstand you.

Or it could be Commissioner Nam's or Gu Tak's idea to plant Mi Young as a living breathing bug to spy on the creepy Prosecutor Oh, and report on what deodorant he wears and brand of toothpaste he uses for his pearlie whites.

"Use your drop dead gorgeous body and pretty face to suck as much info and intel as you can from prosecutor Oh ... I want to know his next move and who is yanking his strings... arroso"

Now remember from the moment the mad dogs were teamed up, Mi Young knew from police files, that there is a connection between Gu Tak & all 3 convicts ( but of course ... in Kdramas cast members are not chosen through a lucky draw or for their baby-face looks - ability to memorise scripts is essential however) ... and most of all, there is a connection between Gu Tak & psycho JM that gives Mi Young that delicious tingly sensation everytime she confronts Gu Tak ... Do you think it's a coincidence that both Gu Tak & Jung Moon sport the same drop-down frontal fringe hairstyle? Even Brown Eyed Girls Narsha of Abracadabra could not have done hers better.

As for Jung Moon's memory loss over his supposed serial killings, well, we know know he actually consulted a head doctor who runs away as soon as he sees JM's groovy fringe ... this is the writer's way of telling us that most probably this head doctor has done things to JM that he shouldn't have - mind-altering drugs, hypnosis, endless hours of watching Hannibal Lecter TV series, sleep deprivation, etc. JM "I can't remember" is who he is today due to the tinkering by that head doctor "I KNOW EVERYTHING" ...

Lastly the title BAD GUYS...

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Omg u're so good with words! Lol
i'm so gonna stalk ur comments from now on. Ur ideas make sense and i like how u put it.
Nah. Here's a jungmoon as a welldone gift!
xx

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Hahaha, I love your commentary!!! ^^

Where's the like button when I need it?! xD

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Heol....nice..
Write again for next ep..i will wait for u.

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Wow so fast you guys, I didn't read the recap yet but before i do I must thank you so much, I watched the raw last night and now it's time to understand what they were saying.

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thanks gummi for the recap! this show is totally ruining my life with my mind working on overdrive throwing out theories. love how the writing has tightened up. :) my biggest fear is that the drama may sink in the next few eps if the mystery is not tied up well, and it might be too clever for its own good as is the case for many kdramas. but i have faith in this production crew and writing, and especially the acting - they shouldn't disappoint!

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Oh my God, what Mi-Young discovered this epsiode was exactly what I've conclude from the last epsiodes especially eps 7, but now I'm. It so sure that Oh Gu Tak is the culprit, why?
Simply because 'the mysterious man' who gave the order to kill jung Mun was not uncovered to be Gu Tak just yet, so when mi-Young accused Gu Tak to be the culprit its still unclear whose the man Boss Lee and Kim dealed with we just saw his hand playing with the whiskey glass, so I'm beginning to suspect Prosector Oh more and more, though I realy like him quit a lot.

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I am seriously wondering if Prosecutor Oh is the second man who followed Jung Moon to the crazy shrink's office, and if his efforts to disband the team is just his way of ensuring that the truth of the serial killings never gets found.

I can understand why Mi young changed masters. Commissioner Nam treated her like crap and there is something to be said about treating your subordinates respectfully. At least she's with someone who can give her answers instead of slapping her down and giving her oblique answers.

I am more and more convinced that Jung Moon isn't the serial killer, only a patsy for the real one. There are so many reasons for this. First of all, the two thieves he killed were done with a rock and in passion, not premeditated. However the serial killings were premeditated, well planned, done with a knife, which means the killer had to refine his technique. You'll have a hard time convincing me that it was done by a man under the influence of a pill. Surely more thought and effort went into planning and committing these murders than a man under hypnosis is capable of. I hope I'm right. But the last two episodes will show if I am right or not.

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Oh YES! i forgot! In the first murder case that our bad guys solved (Episode 2), during the interrogation of the locksmith serial killer at the very end of the episode, didn't the killer say one of the murders was not committed by him? It was left unsolved. Your comment about the killings being done by a knife reminded me of that one unsolved murder.

MAYBE the REAL serial killer continued killing even after Jung-moon was arrested. Except this time he choose to cover up his tracks. Anyway, we still don't know how Jung-moon was caught and arrested for those killings.

Btw, in which episode did they say the killings were done with a knife? I think I missed that part.

Even if Prosecutor Oh isn't the serial killer, it is highly likely that he is the one who brought Jung-moon to the clinic.

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Someone's been watching Criminal Minds. Yeah, you are absolutely right on the period between killing the thieves and the serial murders. He needed time to refine his technique and switching from one type of weapon to another will take a few more victims. Why didn't they find other victims that showed the transition between the signature? Yeah, I am not buying it

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I totally do not trust Prosecutor Oh - he is evil going in and coming out.

Mi-young ended up living up the reputation that the Commissioner gave her - just because she was not in the full know she jumps ship. She never believed nor liked the convicts and the team concepts - thinking that she was above them. Yes, they are criminals, but I do believe that since the team was formed and she did join them - she could have treated them more humane.

I think Goo-tak - smile was, " are you on something you friggin nut case?" Just my translation of his smile - what are your thoughts?

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Am I the only one who love the ending song? So far I only heard the first line. Where can I find the entire song with translation?

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Inspector Yu is officially on my sh*t list

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it kills me to wait till Thur for the subbed episode (but really, thank you so much dramafire!)

Oh GU Tak being the mastermind behind this is just too easy. i dont believe it for a minute. As many have pointed out, even if he did do all that to get the team together to kill Jong Mun, he could have done it at any time. Stopping short of pulling the trigger pretending to give him the benefit of doubt and then running around town trying to solve the mystery is just too nutty.

Prosecutor Oh maybe the main guy but my sense is, it could be someone higher up than even him.

What remains unmentioned till now is Commissioner Nam's murdered son. Surely thats going to come up again, rgt?

On a whole other tangent - i've a serious crush on Lee Jong Mun. No no, not Park Hae Jin, but Lee Jong Mun.

Maybe i need a psychiatric evaluation of my own.

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Me too!!! He is a lost puppy. So lost in his identity. I'm a sucker for those. Trying to find himself. Totally needing love. That's why I want BROMANCE! Please please please let the other 2 bad guys stand on Jung moon's side. Please. If not, it's just too sad that he's all alone with the whole world wanting his dead.

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What about Commissioner Nam's son? I believe he was murdered by the locksmith serial killer during the beginning of the serial killings. The same guy who was in the morgue in this episode. This makes me wonder if the Commissioner ordered his death as a part of revenge and he was able to order no autopsy or further investigation.

Not a fan of Commissioner and all his metaphors. He hasn't impressed me in any way.

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Lee Jung Mun is the killer after all? Man, I don't know if this show really has the guts to go there, but I hope so. I would love to see the cold fact that not everybody can be fixed.

But clearly we're meant to understand that Psycho was interfered with (and the post office killer, too, I guess?), and the back of his leader looked an awful lot like the Straight-Arrow Prosecutor (I hope it's not him, but I fear it is). I would like the Prosecutor to be trying to break up the team to keep Oh Gu Tak from killing a prisoner, but he's coming off as a bit sinister.

I am dying for the next episode, here. ::fidgets impatiently:: Why haven't I learned my lesson about waiting for finished shows?

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I can't believes there will comes a day when I'm rooting for the bad guys. It only happens in kdrama land I guess.

Prosecutor Oh is creepy. I suspected he is that guy who was always with jung mun when he visited the clinic. Jung Mun did killed those thieves who killed his parents. And prosecutor oh was the prosecutor who was in charge of the case at that time. He also knew Jung Mun scored 38/40 on that whatever psychopath test he took. He knew Jung Mun is not very well on the mental side and easily be manipulated. So he released him and freed him from the murder charge of the thieves (who deserved to die anyway since they killed his parents).
Prosecutor Oh is probably the one who brought Jung Mun to that clinic afterwards, and he and that evil doctor gave him some medication to make him do the murder without even remembering that he kills the victims.

If this is true, I feel pity for Jung Mun. He is the victim of an evil manipulation.
But still, looking from another perspective, even tho Jung Mun is under medication that makes him do the murders, he is still the person who did the killing (oh, how irony). and this put things really complicated between gu tak and jung mun. Because jung mun did killed gu tak's daughter with his hand, even if he didn't remembers it. Oh gawd, i really hope it wasn't jung moon who killed gu tak's daughter.

Also, Inspector Yu is really annoying. I can't stand her prejudice and self-proclaimed righteousness since episode 1. I thought she will get better but she is still ever so annoying and useless in the whole plot. The actress playing inspector yu character is not up to par to any of the actors in this drama. She is always skeptical of the team. the commissioner and gu tak always said she only cares about reputation and ranks, and truthfully, i agreed with them. Even when it obvious they look down on her, but she did look at that. never cares about anything and all she does is suspecting the members of the team, instead of putting her trusts on them. it keeps getting annoying and now she betrays the team by helping prosecutor oh.
oh gawd, even the way she speaks is so soft it annoys my ears.

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I agree with you about that soft..whispering voice. Seems she's acting a princess/Queen in some joseon drama type. A detective should hv energetic & 'offensive' voice.

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I agree. Her voice annoys be greatly. I actually stopped watching the show just because I couldn't take her voice any longer. I also don't like her character. She doesn't seem to add much to the group. I know there's a reason for her being there but wow, I would love it if we could have done without her.

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I wonder if Inspector Yu is on Pros. Oh's side just to gather more info or does she really believe his reasoning. There's something lacking with her character. I want to see more individual actions from her. I just see her jumping from one ship to another.

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I'm honestly super disappointed with this episode. Maybe it's just my limited brain but I really cant figure out how any of the possibilities with the psychiatrist would actually be possible. First JM does not seem like he's actually a psychopath (but I suppose that might just be a bad writing job?) but I would assume based on his test that's what Prosecutor Oh saw in him (assuming again that Oh is the one who went with him). And then what? He has Jeyll & Hyde because of some drugs? He's hypnotized into being a serial killer?

He had clear cut targets so naturally it must be someone who is associated with GT. I do think Oh showed up too late in the game to not have significance in the overall conspiracy. And I really hope that Yu is using her apparently massive intelligence to actually be getting the behind-the-scenes information.

While I had been hoping that JM was not the serial killer, I had also been prepared to accept it if he was. This turn of events I was not prepared for. It honestly feels a bit like a scene in a soap opera or something. I was waiting for JM to secretly have an evil twin or something. Sigh.

I'm also still waiting to see how the other two were chosen.

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Maybe the test is forged. And Jung-moon is NOT a psychopath.

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Can I ask why in almost every kdrama I watch where guns are involved, why do they always use revolvers? Why not another handgun?

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After watching episode 9, I must say I can never forgive Oh Gu Tak.

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I am a bit confused about the timeline : When was it that JM hire Scarred man to follow him and take photos about his killings? It should be after he was arrested and freed the first time right? Else why would he suspect himself to be a serial killer ? But if that was so, how did Scarred man take all those photos of him entering and leaving the houses every Tuesday when they have all already happened earlier???

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Hi, I was just wondering if anyone knew the ending song for this episode.

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