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Bad Guys: Episode 9

Now that’s a look from a guy who’s not messing around. I didn’t think an episode that takes us through yet even more answers would be all that suspenseful, but if there’s anything I’ve learned about Bad Guys is that it can churn out 66 solid minutes of thrills and surprises. We flesh out Goo-tak’s tragic and painful past once and for all, which also explains how he knew of the up-and-coming mob boss, the hired assassin who turned himself in, and the psychopath who can’t remember gaps of crucial time.

One of the most important questions I have to ask myself when I watch this show is this: Is Bad Guys giving me actual answers to my questions or is it giving me the answers I wanted to hear?

SONG OF THE DAY

Lee Ji-young – “돌아와 줘 (Come Back To Me)” [ Download ]

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EPISODE 9: “Tropical Night”

At the question whether he was the mastermind behind the assassination order on Jung-moon and well, everything, Goo-tak smiles wryly, “Yes, that’s right. I gave the order on it all. Is this the answer you wanted?”

He acknowledges that the events from two years ago is the reason why he sprung the three jailbirds out of prison. Mi-young’s response is mixed with both surprise and pity—what happened that drove Goo-tak to this point?

We have to rewind to two years ago to get that answer, back when Goo-tak had given an interview at the police station, chuckling over his “Crazy Dog” nickname. His demeanor was far more cheerful back then, happily telling the camera about the importance of being morally upright, especially since his salary comes out of hard-working taxpayer dollars.

Goo-tak and his partner Detective Park head out to check the latest victim of the Hwayeondong serial killings (the thirteenth victim if we’re counting) who was also found in her home. Like the others, the victim was stabbed once and the killer had presumably found pleasure in watching her die.

He had also trimmed the victim’s nails and wiped down the body to erase any trace of evidence. The disturbing nature of these murders leaves Goo-tak wondering whether it’s a corrupt, depraved society that makes people go mad or the other way around. Or that it drives him mad that the world is changing when he feels unchanged.

As the thorough detective he is, he orders his partner to look into exactly what the killer used to remove traces of his DNA.

Turning the clocks back also takes us to Woong-chul’s glory days as a gangster working for Boss Lee. Remember that embarrassing story he told about the disrespectful hoobae in Episode 6? That’s the story that plays out now, as the maknae gangster cowers in fear at the nightclub. Ha, I love how the show kept that side-story in.

In any case, Woong-chul must already be thinking of living an honest life, seeing as he doesn’t readily take Boss Lee up on his offer of what neighborhood he wants to run. Boss Lee also picks up his hesitation and grants him time to think, though he adds that Woong-chul better not be thinking of leaving the mafia underground behind.

At home, Ji-yeon’s piano teacher recommends that Ji-yeon study overseas to further develop her musical talent. Goo-tak knows that his daughter has overheard the conversation when she remains mostly silent at the dinner table, and when his attempts to gauge her interest on the topic are met with lukewarm answers, he asks why she doesn’t ever ask for allowance or to send her abroad unlike other girls her age.

After joking that he’s more ragged-looking one between them, Ji-yeon honestly answers that she doesn’t want to hurt her father. She knows how hard Dad works just to keep food on the table, and she doesn’t want to be one of those girls always whining to her parent for money. It’s a pragmatic yet heartbreaking answer for Goo-tak to hear, who looks at his sensible daughter with pride in his tear-filled eyes.

Goo-tak is called away to meet with Boss Lee just then, and he and Woong-chul briefly cross paths outside. Boss Lee freely shares with Goo-tak that he officially owns the Seoul mafia underground starting today (thanks to Woong-chul), and he’s heard that he needs to curry favor with Goo-tak himself if he wants to conduct business as usual.

Goo-tak laughs at that, knowing that this meeting is Boss Lee’s attempt to bribe Goo-tak into overlooking his shady business dealings. Goo-tak can’t help but gasp at the crisp bills Boss Lee presents to him, though his voice is filled with scorn at the kind of dirty tricks gangsters will pull to corrupt law enforcement.

He admits that he is strapped for cash these days, but then delivers his answer with a punch to the mob boss’s jaw. Hahahaha, oh that’s so satisfying

Boss Lee is well-aware that Goo-tak won’t be able to financially support Ji-yeon’s passion for music. And while Goo-tak admits yes, that’s true, he warns the mob boss against ever showing his face again, lest he chew the man out.

Unfortunately for Goo-tak, neither Commissioner Nam nor his friends are in a position to lend him the money he needs to send Ji-yeon overseas. Still, Goo-tak chuckles with pride about how wonderfully talented and filial his daughter is, and vows to Commissioner Nam that he’ll somehow scrounge up the money to fulfill his daughter’s dreams.

Commissioner Nam’s son, Detective Nam arrives to take a drunken Goo-tak home. When his father asks if he remembers their promise that he’d quit the police force once his father became the police commissioner, Detective Nam replies that he would… after his father becomes the national police chief.

A little while later, Goo-tak and his partner head out to see the medical examiner, who tells them that the culprit wiped the body down with white kerosene, which is fairly accessible. Usually reserved for heating units, Detective Park wonders if they have to hunt down every sale of white kerosene made at all the rest stations in order to find their culprit.

Investigating each sale will be arduous and cumbersome, even if the warm weather like now would mean there aren’t that many people buying it. Being thorough is all a part of their jobs, Goo-tak answers—if they check all the CCTV footage available to them, they’re bound to catch an image of their culprit.

Just then, Goo-tak receives a call informing him that Ji-yeon is currently hospitalized. Apparently, she’d responded to a sketchy ad about working part-time at a noraebang for some quick cash, only to belatedly realize that wasn’t the case, and then engaged in a fight with a customer.

Goo-tak braces himself for the worst, though seeing his precious daughter looking beaten and bruised in a hospital bed is almost too much for him to take. He still manages to maintain a calm, concerned voice when speaking with Ji-yeon.

Her father’s understanding tone only upsets Ji-yeon further, as she cuts him off and asks him why he isn’t angry with her. This is entirely her fault—why won’t he yell at her for being so naive? It takes all of Goo-tak’s willpower to say that he’s partially at fault because he knows why Ji-yeon would have tried to make some quick cash in secret.

Goo-tak promises her that he can get the money, but Ji-yeon puts her foot down and declares that she won’t go study abroad. She’s realized where she stands in this world, and holding onto her own lofty dreams only make her feel more pathetic, so she’s going to give it all up now. Oh, kid.

You can see how those words tear at Goo-tak’s insides, but he swallows back the tears and gather Ji-yeon into his arms and sobs in silence. Then he heads straight to the police station to beat the living crap out of the man who hit his daughter. The cops have to pull him off and Goo-tak screams at how the poor have to live such misery.

Next thing we know, Goo-tak meets with Boss Lee once more and agrees to overlook the laundry list of crimes on one condition: that his right-hand man Woong-chul be handed over to the police. Boss Lee isn’t keen on making a scapegoat out of his trusted man, but Goo-tak insists that he take the deal when it’s presented to him.

So while Woong-chul is arrested, Boss Lee hands over the money to Goo-tak, saying that this means they’re on the same side now. And you can see how much Goo-tak hates himself for having agreed to this before taking the briefcase without another word.

The next time Goo-tak is back on-camera, he tells the VJ that they’re on their way to hunt down a suspect for the Hwayeondong serial killers. He elaborates on how it took a month scouring through the list of those who bought white kerosene and the CCTVS of both the fourteen crime scenes and various rest stops to narrow it down to one man.

That’s how the police discover Jung-moon at home and take him in for questioning. Goo-tak reminds him that he’s been arrested without a warrant, so they’ve got 48 hours to find more substantial evidence. Or you know, he could make things easier with a confession. Pfft.

Goo-tak cuts right to the chase when Jung-moon remains silent, asking him why he killed all those people. Jung-moon doesn’t answer, but he finally does speak when he’s asked why he bought the kerosene then, replying that it was for his girlfriend.

His girlfriend Yoo-jin does oil paintings and uses white kerosene for maintaining her paintbrushes. He’s willing to prove it, but Goo-tak is more interested in why Jung-moon was found lingering outside the victims’ homes. Goo-tak encourages him to come out with it—that he went there to kill—-to which Jung-moon answers, “I… have no memory of it.”

Jung-moon doesn’t recall even going to the victims’ homes, an answer Goo-tak finds amusing and preposterous. It certainly sounds ridiculous, and Goo-tak silently turns off the camera. Oh crap, are you going to try and beat it out of him?

Slamming Jung-moon’s head against the desk, Goo-tak shows him the victims’ case files one by one. But Jung-moon insists that he doesn’t remember, which only enrages Goo-tak further and tells Jung-moon to look at the faces of those lives he took until he does remember. Jung-moon looks absolutely terrified.

With little evidence to go on, Goo-tak says they need a confession if they wish to prosecute Jung-moon. Commissioner Nam declares that this will be his last case in the field, which basically means he won’t be bothered with the grunt work. Goo-tak’s next course of action is running a lie detector test on Jung-moon.

After being told that Ji-yeon is leaving in a couple of days versus a few months, Goo-tak abruptly hangs up to speak with Yoo-jin. She confirms that she’s an art major and uses white kerosene Jung-moon buys for her to clean her brushes since the alternative is far more expensive.

Although initially perplexed by Goo-tak’s question of what Jung-moon is usually like, she insists that her boyfriend isn’t someone who’d go around murdering people.

As Jung-moon is tied up to the lie detector machine, Detective Park argues that the results won’t hold up in court. But Goo-tak is ultimately looking to get a confession out of their suspect, and so they begin.

When Jung-moon admits to have committed murder before, they present him with photos of the Hwayeondong victims, asking whether he killed each person or not. But Jung-moon says no to each one, and the machine registers his answers as truth.

At the very last photo, Jung-moon turns his head as if staring at Goo-tak through the one-sided mirror and answers, “No, I did not kill her.” Truth.

Frustrated, Goo-tak grabs the mic and demands to know who he killed then, to which Jung-moon tosses back, “What’s the answer you want to hear? ‘I killed all those people.’ Is that what you want to hear?”

Jung-moon concedes and states that he killed all those people and that he is the Hwayeondong serial killer, statements that register as lies. He’ll accept the consequences, words that only rile up Goo-tak to storm inside the interrogation room and grab a fistful of Jung-moon’s shirt.

There won’t be a need for them to cross paths again if Jung-moon is innocent, but if he’s guilty, Goo-tak assures him that he’ll kill him the next time they meet.

It isn’t long before Goo-tak digs up the case where Jung-moon killed the intruders that killed his parents, along with the psych evaluation labeling Jung-moon as a psychopath. Goo-tak plans on meeting with the prosecutor in charge of that case, not at all worried that their 48-hour window is up.

Ji-yeon pays a surprise visit to the station, excited about her upcoming trip. Seeing her happy makes Goo-tak happy, but then that joyous moment is cut short when Jung-moon chimes in with a smirk: “Your daughter’s quite pretty.” Man, we already know what happens, but who else is creeped out right now?

So then we skip to the night before Ji-yeon was scheduled to leave, when Goo-tak left a voicemail message for his daughter in order to meet with Prosecutor Oh. Ji-yeon had arrived home and just about to eat when a noise interrupted her.

She had gone to check and found the door unlocked, but in that next moment, someone had snuck up behind her and stabbed her. Which then brings us back to that tragic scene we’ve seen time and time again, where Goo-tak bends over his daughter’s lifeless body.

Unable to cope with Ji-yeon’s death, Goo-tak had turned to drowning his sorrows in soju. Commissioner Nam’s words to send Ji-yeon away already only tore at his heart, and Goo-tak had sobbed he can’t bury his daughter in his heart because she died so unfairly. Only after he finds the bastard that killed her and rip him in shreds will he bury his daughter.

His grief and pain is palpable and heart-wrenching, and Goo-tak chugs more liquor, unable to hear another empty word of sympathy.

Oh man, I don’t know how Goo-tak can endure it, but he actually stands next to Ji-yeon’s body during her autopsy, though he takes hold of the medical examiner’s hand for an excruciating minute before letting him begin.

Taking her hand, Goo-tak notices her trimmed nails, and a flashback shows us that Ji-yeon was also wiped down with white kerosene. A CCTV image captures Jung-moon in the area, and now we see the face under the hood: Jung-moon, who smirks as he lets go of Ji-yeon’s hand.

Later that evening, Goo-tak beelines it for Jung-moon’s place soon after Yoo-jin leaves. When Jung-moon answers the door, Goo-tak grabs his throat and before Jung-moon can grab a weapon, there’s a gun pointed at his head.

Goo-tak reminds him of their last conversation, that he’d kill Jung-moon the next time they meet. Jung-moon states his innocence, but Goo-tak doesn’t believe him. Detective Park runs in to intervene moments before the gun goes off, and Goo-tak hollers that Jung-moon killed his daughter.

So now we have some context as to Goo-tak’s disciplinary hearing, where Goo-tak handed in his badge. He then goes to see Yoo-jin at the club she works at to make ends meet. Goo-tak presents her with an opportunity to repay her father’s debt and let her continue her art studies.

All she needs to do is help him out with a job, Goo-tak says, adding that she’s wasting her life spending it with Jung-moon. If she helps him, Goo-tak will help her quit this job and repay her debt—this is a life-changing opportunity.

So as Yoo-jin trashes the apartment she shares with Jung-moon, Goo-tak narrates in voiceover that lack of evidence is the reason why Jung-moon hasn’t been caught yet. But what’s more important is a surviving victim, and that’s where Yoo-jin comes in.

A victim and tangible proof is all they need, Goo-tak says, and then we see Yoo-jin hobbling into the police station with a bleeding arm (the “weapon” secured in a baggie) and a story of how Jung-moon had told her that he killed multiple people.

Thus Yoo-jin testifies against Jung-moon in court and is rewarded handsomely for her services. (Is that the same briefcase of money Goo-tak was going to use to send Ji-yeon abroad?) Jung-moon is found guilty and we know the rest of the story from there.

Now we see Goo-tak sitting down with the elderly baduk player, explaining that he wants Jung-moon dead because it feels like a never-ending tropical night in his heart. And this meeting is how Goo-tak had learned of Jung Tae-soo’s name, a hired assassin who was imprisoned not too long ago.

Of course the elderly baduk player had no idea why Tae-soo turned himself in, but Tae-soo is more than capable of carrying out this hit. He asks Goo-tak what he’d like to hear from Jung-moon’s lips, if that were possible.

Goo-tak: “‘I’m the one who killed your daughter.’ I’d like to hear that. If [Jung-moon] isn’t the culprit… if he wasn’t the one who killed my daughter… I don’t think I could bear it.”

 
COMMENTS

And now we know. If I think about it, that’s a lot of information to pack into one hour, but boy am I glad that we learned as much as we did. After last week’s cliffhanger, we desperately needed to hear the truth from Goo-tak’s lips, or at least the truth as Goo-tak saw it. So while Goo-tak’s backstory fills in many of the gaps of what happened two years ago, there are still so many questions left unanswered. Even though the show has covered so much traction already, it suddenly feels like two more episodes may not be enough to dig through all the mysteries afoot, like Jung-moon’s visits with that deranged psychiatrist and the deal with suspicious characters like Commissioner Nam and Prosecutor Oh. Or maybe this is just me unable to part with this show in two weeks’ time.

What an incredible episode for Goo-tak’s character, aided by a standout performance by Kim Sang-joong. While I knew that I could rely on him to be fantastic in every character he portrays, the veteran actor still somehow blows my mind with each project. We saw so many facets of Goo-tak in this hour, from a devoted father who adored his daughter to his sorrowful grief after she died, and then to his burning rage both simmering just under the surface and the violent outbursts when the emotions boil over. My heart ached when Goo-tak looked so proud of his sensible daughter with an expression that mixed with guilt that he couldn’t provide everything her heart desired. Then my heart dropped when he saw her lying in the hospital bed and it took every fiber of his being not to let the tears come. Goo-tak’s relationship with his daughter has always been one that tugged at the heartstrings, and while I knew he was a loving father who would do practically anything for his daughter’s sake, it was never so evident than in the moment Goo-tak took the mob boss’s bribe.

Not only does that exchange explain how the detective knows Boss Lee, but it becomes the turning point in Goo-tak’s moral conscience. We can plainly see that he hates himself for succumbing to money, yet it also echoes back to his earlier question of whether it’s a corrupt society that drives people mad or crazed people that instigate deranged actions that lead to a corrupt society. That leads into a much greater discussion of nature vs. nurture in terms of morality that could never be fully discussed here, but what we see is that circumstances can certainly affect someone’s moral compass, as it does with Goo-tak.

Now we know that Goo-tak was also responsible of putting both Woong-chul and Jung-moon behind bars. And while Jung-moon is well-aware that Goo-tak wanted him behind bars (and dead for that matter), I doubt that Woong-chul knows that he was the fall guy to save Boss Lee’s ass. I, for one, do hope we get another confrontation between the two gangsters if this issue comes up in the next two weeks.

As for Jung-moon, it’s necessary to bring Goo-tak back into the fold because his desire to see Jung-moon convicted for murder is so great that you could almost call it an obsession. Despite a lack of solid evidence, he’s convinced to a certain extent that Jung-moon must be the Hwayeondong serial killer and shortly after Ji-yeon’s death, his thirst for vengeance is so great that he wishes that it were Jung-moon, if only to relieve the grief and pain. I have to say that Yoo-jin’s involvement in getting Jung-moon arrested was a twist I didn’t see coming, and one that illustrated the extent that Goo-tak would go to in order to obtain one thing: a confession.

One thing that does concern me is how the show will handle Jung-moon’s turn once it comes to light as to why he doesn’t remember killing anyone. I highly doubt that Goo-tak will absolve any blame from Jung-moon’s hands if it happens to be that a psychotic shrink was the puppeteer behind these crimes because Jung-moon is the one going around doing the actual murdering. After spending most of the hour in the past, it’s almost easy to forget that in the present, it’s open season on Jung-moon’s head.

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I am just going to patiently sit here and wait for the English subs. I won't expire from waiting, right? RIGHT?

This show has been one heck of a ride. I don't want it to end!

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It'll take two days more for the subs,I guess, and This recap is already here so might as well read it for now, then I'll go watch it if the subs are up.

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No, dearie.. You won't be expired waiting.

Only there'll be few more grey hair and nail damage (coz nail biting).. hihi

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Thanks for that great summary, now just wait until subs are out. And the rest of the episodes for more info.
I agree with all of your thoughts you mentioned and the one of biggest questions I have now is why would Jung-moon decide to work with Goo-tak after taking all that beating from him and that he's in jail because of him?

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thanks so much for the recap!!! can't wait for the last two eps, even tho I'm going to be sad about the show ending. What do you reckon the chances are of it getting a second season? I feel like there is still so much source material to detail, they can't possibly do it in two eps.

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Thank God for you, gummimochi, because just knowing how quick you are in getting these much needed recaps out to us makes it a little easier to deal until the subs come out. I'm lamenting the day (all too soon now) when we must say goodbye to this awesome show but until then, keep up the good work! We all really appreciate it!

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You know a show is excellent when you feel bad for both the psychotic mass murderer and the bribe-taking, false confession-obtains cop who may be behind the plot to kill him
Thx so much for the recap

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Ah. I was sad over last week not having enough Tae Soo. This week doesn't seem to have very much of him either. D; where did you go my lovely?

I miss the days where they were just catching criminals. I would actually prefer that even more. The storyline is intriguing but I want so much more from it... Since Bad Guys love analogies, I have one too. It's like going to a restuarant after you've been craving for steak, only to find out there isn't any, so the restaurant manager fills you up with free chicken instead. I don't mind the chicken, I love chicken, but I wanted steak!

My favourite OCN drama is Team Ten. Amazing story line and it knew exactly where it was heading and what it was. With Bad Guys I feel like it got confused mid-way. It went from a dark crime drama to a revenge drama. I had enough of those on the major channels D;

But its okay. The chicken isn't that bad. So I shall just enjoy it, and be thankful for what is being served.

Thanks for the recap! T_T I waited the whole weekend for eng subs.

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Now I am freaking convinced Jung-moon is innocent. He is totally FRAMED! There is NO absolute evidence that he killed them! Such as fingerprints or DNA. The poor guy is so tormented because of the lies of his girlfriend. No wonder his girlfriend is so frightened to see him in episode one. Because she feels guilty! To think I believe her when she told Jung-moon he tried to kill her and probably killed his own parents.
I HATE Oh Goo-tak. I hope Woong-chul finds out he's in jail because of him. I hope Tae-soo and Woong-chul beat him up for Jung-moon's sake. WHEN the truth is revealed that he is SO NOT the killer.
I've always hated the underhanded police interrogation process that's so true in this world. So many weaker people have simply confessed to crimes they did not do just to escape that room.
Anyway, we still don't know why Tae-soo didn't kill Jung-moon 2 years ago in jail.

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it is because Tae Soo can't kill anyone. He surrendered and confessed so he could be in jail, pay for his sin and avoid any murder mission

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I should watch this...

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thank you gummi! :) loved your insights about how the show touches on issues of morality.

oh, these character are so badass, and the show is so good because of that. I kinda wish they clearly answered the question of did JM commit the Hwayeondong murders and Jiyeon's murder this ep, but the show seems hell-bent on dragging this story arc out, and making people like us continue to guess. I kind of hope that JM's some super intelligent criminal out there though, because I think the show's trying to make this guy pretty innocent as of the past few eps, so it would be a total mindblowing moment if the show did that.

Kim Sang Joong is officially my new ahjussi crush. And credit goes to Park Hae Jin for making us feel for JM even if he creeps us out so much through this series (this guy needs to take a lead role in a drama next year.)

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Park Hae Jin needs to take the lead role in my life.

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park hae jin needs a girl tho. dammit, even in YFAS he walked away girl-less.

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I wonder... what the actor was thinking of, when he was portraying this heart-wrenching and AWESOME character... when the character's daugther died..... you know?

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I'm so freaking worried about Jung-moon. This was a tense hour of tight storytelling and I loved every minute of it! Now we get Goo-tak's backstory and his reasons for all that he's done, but is Jung-moon the killer? Did he kill all those people and Ji-yeon? If he did, is he aware of it, or was he under some king of hypnosis? Or is he innocent? Did killing those home invaders who murdered his parents a one time thing? It's still murder, but it was in self-defense. I really can't wait to find out.

Also, I hope Woong-chul finds out he was Boss Lee's scapegoat. Their relationship has been fraught with tension so far, and I'm looking forward to seeing where it ends up.

Also, why did Tae-soo turn himself in? Has that been said or not? I can't remember.

So many questions left! How will this wrap up in two more episodes?! Thanks for the recap!

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Thanks gummi for the super fast recap!

Wanted to comment earlier but stressed out from work so..... Here I am and here we go!

I don't think the show has "lost" its way or turned into something different (darker) from the original crime-solving kick-ass episodes earlier, like someone commented above. To me, all the stories so far all lead up to the final BIG case, the OGT daughter-murder (which could be related to the Hwayeongdong case).

Based on the story-telling, it definitely looks to me like the show knew right from the start WHO is guilty (who killed who, who didnt), WHY gather the 3 of them (seemingly random), WHAT made each guy do what they did (each criminal's back story), WHEN each event happened (all 3 went to jail almost the same time) and finally HOW the entire case (OGT case, the central case of Bad Guys) is to be "resolved" at the end.

I personally DON'T mind if there is no absolute closure on who actually killed OGT's daughter. It will make this case a little similar to TEN where there is a cerntral case right from the beginning not solved even at the end (of Season 1). However, I do want some closure on each characters and how they go back to their present lives (as prisoners or as crime-fighting trio with OGT, or without).

No matter what background stories they have, each committed murders and they will have to pay for their sins and get redemption (if they want to). I wish for a Season 2 coz I want to see them kicking MORE asses after they grown to know each other better and their "relationship" with each other. Their dynamics/chemistry should change after all that's happened here.

More ABs from Tae Soo, TEDDY Heroism from Wung Chul, deadly STARES from Jung Moon, and finally croaky voice OGT. PLEASE!

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I heard this drama is really good, I didn't read it in fear of spoilers but just saw this on my blog feed and wanted to take a look at the screenshots. My friend recommended it and I'm finally remembering to give it a try

Fancy Nancy’s YouTube

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And still no clue on the guy who took Jung-moon to the psychiatrist office. That guy could be the real murderer?

As awesome as a second season would be, I would prefer to just have answers. The problem with multiple seasons is that they withhold answers and then they are discontinued and you never ever find out. One of the biggest reasons I like Kdrama and Jdrama is simply the fact that they end.

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The death of Goo tak's daughter was so circumstantial, it had me convinced that Jung moon was the murderer/serial killer, especially after that comment and smirk. But he was totally framed into going to prison which has me believing in his innocence. Which is it? SMH. If there's one thing Bad Guys excel at, it's keeping the viewer guessing as to what the final outcome/truth really is.

Kim Sang Joong was truly phenomenal in his acting this episode. No pretty tears from him either, I had to ask myself, "wait a minute, is that really snot coming out of his nose?" Excellent acting, that blew me away with its range, intensity and genuineness. From the honest cop and doting father, to his rage that someone could harm his precious daughter, to self disgust once he made up his mind to sell his soul for money, to his utter grief and devastation after losing his daughter. It's nice to see true professionals at work.

I'm glad we got to see the past and how they were all connected. Now we get to see what lies ahead and I hope they can do justice to the plot in just two episodes.

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Does anyone else feel like someone else (creepy doc maybe?) was committing the murders and sending a hypnotized JM to clean up and take the fall? It seems like that's what it is, but then I can't figure out why these murders are happening in the first place.

There doesn't seem to be a sexual or rage factor to them, like most serial killings have. They seem very cold and calculative, and each victim was deliberately targeted. But then there doesn't seem to be any connection between them, and the stab wound was made so that the victim would bleed out slowly, which doesn't match up with a professional hit.

Also, was anyone else really confused when they explained JM's psychopathy? I'm pretty sure that's something you're born with, not something that can be triggered by a traumatic experience. But that's what Suspicious Prosecutor made it sound like, but maybe it was something weird in translation or something? Did anyone else interpret that differently?

I don't know how they're going to answer all these questions in 2 episodes, and for sure they've lost they're original premise- where they used to go off and catch criminals. I wish they'd been given more eps, so they could spread this out a bit more and keep fighting crime at the same time instead of totally dropping it to focus on the mystery instead. And mostly I just wish there was more lol.

This drama is so much darker than any other kdrama I've seen and I'm loving it. I wish there were more that dared to cross the line into that really morally ambiguous territory. I love it!

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If you have not seen the 2013 JTBC Noir/Crime drama Heartless City (aka Cruel City) yet, then check it out. It is stylish and cinematic with an unforgettable quartet of characters played by Jung Kyoung-Ho, Kim Yu-Mi, Yoon Hyun-Min, & Choi Moo-Sung.

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Hallo gummi! Finally watched this with subs!

For some reason, the scene that gutted me the most was when Goo-tak was hunched over that bowl of food, eating like a dog in front of Boss Lee. It wrenched my heart to see him lowering himself like that. T_______________T

I also think Goo-tak's last line, "if it's not him who killed my daughter, I don't think I can take it", means he very much regrets having to bribe Yoo-jin to falsely testify. Maybe it reeks so much of how Boss Lee bought Goo-tak's humanity/principles. And yet Goo-tak did it to Yoo-jin too.

If it turns out that Jung-moon still didn't kill his daughter, even after everything Goo-tak did to put him behind bars, I think it will break our Crazy Dog Squad Leader. There will be nothing left for him.

Not a good cop.
Not a good father.
Not a good human being.

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Dang, I didn't expect Jung Moon's former gf's betrayal and false testimony.

So I still feel that Jung Moon is innocent. I wonder if and how the show will reveal a twist and answer all the remaining questions in the last 2 episodes.

It was a shame to see Oh Goo Tak take that bribe. I can understand his situation though. He was desperate. Seeing his daughter hurt in the hospital and giving up her dreams pushed him over the edge. We definitely got to see his many sides in this episode.

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So. I was finally able to watch this episode. Wow.

Props to our veteran actor for acting to perfection the many facets of his character. It's the ugly truth that no one is incorruptible, and perhaps what corrupts most is hate, as with the extent that OGT went to in order to put his daughter's murderer behind bars. And, frankly, I do believe that JM is the killer. This episode only cemented my certainty. What remains to be seen is that the master puppeteer(s) behind JM's killings is revealed, captured, and tried for his crimes. While JM may be prone to kill without remorse, that doesn't mean that he will cross that line. I think if he hadn't been taken advantage of by whomever (the master puppeteer), he would have lived a relatively normal life as long as he had the awareness and willingness to control himself. It's an unforgiving business that this drama is exploring from every angle, and what I appreciate most are the shades of grey that everyone has, although some of those shades are much darker than others!

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My biggest problem with this is that someone actually loves Jung-Moon Lee, even though he's a psychopath and murderer. Like...what? Just because he's handsome and tall, someone loves him enough to risk their lives for him. I never understood this about women.

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