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The Time I’ve Loved You: Episode 1

Sweet, funny, and inescapably charming, The Time I’ve Loved You premiered this last weekend on SBS, rounding out a pretty insane viewing schedule for those two days, considering the relative scarcity on the weekday drama circuit. Featuring two longtime friends who seem content to be just that and nothing more (for now, or maybe forever), there’s plenty of character drama to go around. And, if you can believe it, not one chaebol in this whole episode! Imagine that. Instead we get two normal-seeming people who live next door to each other, and a bet based on which of them will get married first. Let the games begin.

SONG OF THE DAY

Kyuhyun of Super Junior – “우리가 사랑한 시간 (The Time I’ve Loved You)” from the OST [ Download ]

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EPISODE 1 RECAP

We meet marketing team leader OH HANA (Ha Ji-won) as she leaves work for the day. Her thoughts are heard in voiceover as she strolls home, every sign or store display she passes seemingly coming alive at her presence.

“The seventeen-year-old me imagined the twenty-year-old me,” her thoughts begin wistfully. “The twenty-year-old me imagined the thirty-year old me. Now that I passed my thirties, I keep looking back at the seventeen-year-old me and the twenty-year-old me, and reality sinks in.”

Once home, she takes a peek out her window as if expecting (or hoping) the lights at her neighbor’s house would be on. They aren’t, so she goes through her nightly beauty routine, examining some fine lines she wishes weren’t there.

She’s perfectly happy to pop open a beer in front of the television, but even that only makes her feel older—the home shopping network features a product for thinning hair, causing Hana to sigh that her hair isn’t what it used to be.

To add insult to injury, another program tells its audience that women are more likely to be hit by an atomic bomb than they are to get married after thirty. Hana sighs that she didn’t do anything to warrant hearing that she could die alone, even though she acknowledges that it’s hard for just her to love herself.

Ironically, the song that takes her into the next scene is Edith Piaf’s “Non, je ne regrette rien (No, I regret nothing),” as she surveys the wares at the upscale shoe store she manages.

But she can’t resist the temptation to ditch her designer heels for a pair of high school uniform shoes she finds on the floor, though her smiling reverie is cut brief when the young owner returns to claim them. Hana’s dreams are crushed when the girl calls her “ajumma,” because surely she doesn’t look that old… does she?

Luckily it was just a dream, since Hana shoots up from bed still incensed that the imaginary high school student dared to call her an ajumma. She’s determined to return to sleep to set things straight in the dreamworld, which goes about as poorly as you’d expect it to.

Then she gets a call from a deputy manager at her company with some bad news: The celebrity they hired to endorse a line of their shoes now can’t because of the negative press swirling around her.

Hana springs into action, leaving her parents a bit befuddled by her sudden exit. Again we see Hana’s propensity to want to wear comfortable sneakers, and again we see her reluctantly put on a pair of killer-looking heels instead.

She begs and begs the station’s manager to give her some time to find a replacement actress but he declines, ordering her to remove the hundred thousand pairs of shoes she’d hoped to sell from storage. Yikes.

At least she refuses to be defeated when she returns to the office, vowing to her nosy coworkers that she will find a way to sell the shoes. Since Hana’s in a terse mood, her assistant directs her to the gift of flowers her boyfriend sent.

Hana smiles as she opens the attached letter wishing her a happy birthday, from someone named Ho-joon. Remembering that he knows the director of the department store where he works, Hana calls Ho-joon to ask if he could use that connection to request some space for her to sell her shoes.

He agrees to ask his sunbae, but gets dodgy when Hana asks where she should meet him tonight—apparently they had a date planned already that Ho-joon seems like he’d rather not do.

Hana watches a compilation video on her phone of all her friends wishing her a happy birthday, though most of them make sure to mention Hana’s advancing age. She’s thirty-four after all, which means she’s too old to be of any use to society. (I’m exaggerating that a bit, but only a bit.)

The best part of the video comes when CHOI WON (Lee Jin-wook) bows at the camera and wishes his longtime friend a happy birthday. Unlike the others, he warns her not to get too down in the dumps, claiming that she’ll always be the seventeen-year-old Hana he knew.

Flash back to when the two of them were eighteen-year-old high school students, neighbors, and best friends. They’re equal parts adorable and inseparable, talking about anything and everything under the sun—but mostly about Won’s aspirations to work in the movie industry.

During break, Hana leads her classroom of girls to meet Won and his classroom of boys for the showdown of a lifetime. They play an epic game of rock paper scissors, and when Hana loses, the girls demand a rematch. Won agrees only if he picks the game.

What he picks is like leap frog on steroids, with the men forming an interlocking line that must stay unbroken even as the girls start to pile on top of their backs. Hana and the girls end up winning by employing a heavyset girl to tip the scales in their favor. Hah.

Back in the present, Hana smiles at the fond memories before the too-simple card from Ho-joon brings her back to reality. She immediately calls Won at the airport where he works, and even her longtime friend can’t resist taking a dig at her age.

Hana playfully shoots back that he’s as old as she is, so anything he’s saying to her he might as well be saying to himself. Won disagrees on that point: “A man at thirty-four and a woman at thirty-four are two different things.” He doesn’t need to explain it to her, he claims, since she’ll find out on her own in due time.

Won’s just being realistic, and reminds Hana that no other friend would give her such straightforward advice like him. Hana sniffs that he can’t call her out on age—after all, she has a boyfriend she’s soon to marry.

By comparison, Won hasn’t had a girlfriend in three years, so his lectures are moot. He gives her that point, but then Hana brings up what was really on her mind: Should she be worried that Ho-joon didn’t write “I love you” on her birthday card?

Won is supportive but jokey at the same time, basically trying to downplay her concerns. Maybe Ho-joon is trying to make her think things are going bad so he can sneak a proposal on her, he ventures. That thought certainly excites her.

At work, Won meets the new intern stewardess, a shy but earnest girl named LEE SO-EUN (Chu Soo-hyun). As a steward himself, Won watches So-eun try her best at giving the passengers on their plane the safety rundown, though she has a few hiccups during the routine.

She even tries her best to accommodate a passenger who insists she pat his bald head to bring his fever down (cameo by Hong Seok-chun), but when Won sees what’s happening, he puts a stop to it.

Hana spots Ho-joon shopping for jewelry, and thinking that he might be preparing to propose like Won said, she does a bit of primping before getting a call from him. He has something to tell her, which has Hana all aflutter that this is going to be the moment.

“I’m getting married,” Ho-joon tells her outside. Wait, what?

Hana doesn’t quite register it at first, since they’d promised each other that they’d get married. Why? “I have another woman,” Ho-joon says while kneeling. Bang goes the gunshot into Hana’s heart.

To make matters worse, his other girlfriend is three months into her pregnancy, which means he’d been cheating on Hana from day one. Bang bang.

Ho-joon makes the mistake of inviting her to get angry with him, which is all she needs to stomp the tip of her heel on his. Twice. Now she’s angry, and demands to know who his other woman is.

Cut to: A shoe design presentation given by a younger woman, who Hana glares at the entire meeting. As if Hana hasn’t had enough potshots taken at her age today, the girl Ho-joon was seeing on the side claims the shoes she designed are supposed to capture the beauty of women in their twenties.

But Hana’s opinion matters as team leader, and she shoots the design down. She cites legitimate reasons why it wouldn’t work, but you can bet part of her reasoning is based on the fact that this is the girl Ho-joon cheated on her with.

Won and senior stewardess CHOI MI-HYANG (Jin Kyung) are close, so he asks her to buy him dinner that night. She can’t, because it’s Mir of MBLAQ’s birthday and this noona fan has some celebrating to do. Haha.

This leaves just Won and newbie So-eun, who thanks him for helping her out with that weird passenger. No sooner does he advise her to have more courage going forward that she works up the courage to mention dinner…

…But Hana’s mother calls to tell him she’s made a feast, and he leaves for home without a second thought. So-eun looks disappointed.

Won finds a very drunk Hana outside his home, and can only guess that something happened to her. She begins to imagine a story about the two of them surviving a plane crash and ending up on a deserted island (like the story he pitched in high school), leading to some deliberately cheesy shots of them clinging to each other as their plane goes down.

She slurs as she asks if he remembers telling her the story, and he does. He finishes the tale in voiceover: “And we live on that deserted island together until we die.” Then he flashes back to a young Hana holding out a heart-covered gift to him, standing in the same place.

Of course, Won gets no closer to a true explanation from her when she points at him and says, “This is all because of you! The Oh Hana known for being smart and pretty has been dating jerks and getting dumped by them!”

Flash back to when they were eighteen years old. Hana hears rumors that Won likes her from her friend, but doesn’t believe it. So what if he dotes on her and they hang out all the time? They’re just close. Besides, Hana insists she doesn’t like him like that.

Her friend is happy to hear that, since she’s interested in Won romantically. Hana agrees to help her without reservation, even agreeing to give Won a gift on her behalf—the same one Won saw her holding in his flashback.

Young Won, by comparison, seems to be struggling with an impending decision. He keeps telling himself that everything’s going to be okay. What is?

So Hana hands him the gift, and Won, thinking it’s actually from her, breaks into a story that inspired Hana to retell it in the future. “We’re on a plane right now heading to Venice,” he begins the tale.

He continues the story of how their imaginary plane met turbulence and crashed onto a desert island. Only he and Hana remain alive, and they live on that deserted island until they die. “But I will never date you,” he adds, taking Hana by surprise. “Even if we were on a deserted island, I wouldn’t love you. Ever.” Ouch. What brought this on?

Hana asks why he could never love her, but he just hands the gift back instead. He disappears into his house with Hana calling after him that she wouldn’t love him either, no matter what. Ever!

In the present, Hana cites his harsh words then as the reason she’s cursed with love today. “Why? Why can’t you love me?” she asks. “It’s not that I’d like it if you loved me, but what’s wrong with me that you can’t love me? Why? Because I’m picky? Because I have a strong personality? Because I’m mean? Or am I just unlucky?”

Won sits at the table with Hana’s family for her birthday feast, even though they’re missing the guest of honor. Hana’s little brother OH DAE-BOK (Lee Joo-seung) tells them why, having found out through social media that Ho-joon got engaged to someone else.

Everyone gets awkwardly quiet when Hana shuffles into the kitchen for a drink before shuffling right back out. Once Won returns home, he wishes he’d known about her troubles sooner.

After trying her darnedest to get a word with the maligned actress that was supposed to endorse a new line of shoes, Hana herself can’t bring herself to attend Ho-joon’s wedding alone, but luckily she doesn’t have to—Won’s taken the day off to be her date. He even made sure to look nice so she’d have the most handsome arm candy possible.

“I’ll pretend to be your new boyfriend,” he whispers conspiratorially. Awww, how supportive. Though she’s reluctant to go in and see her ex-boyfriend get married to someone else, Won confidently and cheerfully takes her hand and leads her into the venue.

Hana looks like she’d rather be anywhere else, but leaves Won so she can greet the bride. She gives what sounds like sincere congratulations, though it’s definitely an awkward moment when she’s left alone with her.

Ho-joon gets a frantic call that Hana’s alone with his new bride, unaware that Won can overhear him in the bathroom. He’s not the only one who hears him mutter about Hana either—his future father-in-law does too. Not good.

The bride is unafraid when confronting Hana, and casually says that she knew about her and Ho-joon. Hana falls to the ground in shock, staring up at the bride with wide eyes…

Except that’s just what’s going on in Hana’s mind. Though she refuses to congratulate the bride, she gives her solid advice on how to improve her shoe design. They part amiably.

Ho-joon tells his father-in-law that he definitely wasn’t two-timing, promise. Once he thinks he’s alone he mutters more about Hana ruining his life, at least until Won calls him out.

No sooner does Hana go looking for her missing “date” that she sees him burst out of the bathroom with Ho-joon, the two of them locked in a brawl. Won punches him once and is ready to go in for more, but Hana intervenes.

Ho-joon doesn’t help his own case when he figures out that the man who punched him is with Hana, claiming it’s no surprise that she’d be the root of all this trouble.

Won doesn’t like the way he’s talking to her and grabs him by the lapels, telling Hana to stay out of this. He only lets go when the bride shows up, and Ho-joon calls Hana out publicly for bringing her boyfriend to their wedding for revenge.

The crowd begins to murmur about Hana, with the bride scandalized that Hana came to ruin her wedding. Won grabs Hana’s arm when she apologizes to the bride, but Hana pulls away, asking him to just stop.

She’s mortified and apologetic as the wedding party leaves them there, and Won knows he has nothing to say that can fix things. He just follows her instead, knowing her well enough to guess that she’ll stop three times—but only on the third one will she turn around.

When she does, Won zips around her so that she has to turn around again to be able to see him. He’s just trying to cheer her up, but it’s not quite working. She gives him what-for about the stunt he just pulled, nearly in tears as she explains how she went to try and salvage her pride.

“You embarrassed me in front of all those people!” she adds, hitting Won with her purse. “He’s the one who embarrassed you, not me!” Won defends. Hana maintains that she never asked Won to take revenge for her, at least until Won claims that she didn’t have to ask—if she didn’t want him to, she shouldn’t have cried in front of him because of that bastard in the first place.

So Hana takes that to the extreme and tearfully vows that she won’t ever go to him with any of her troubles from now on. Won leaves her with a piece of advice: She’s thirty-four years old and should act like it. Hana turns around and gives Won the universal signal to go screw himself.

Then it’s time for both of them to act like children, with Won following her into the bus and shouldering her out of the seat she wanted. She spends the ride behind him, finding that she can’t stay mad when he looks so cute trying to sleep on the bus.

They walk in silence to their houses, but Won stops and smiles only to himself when Hana calls him. When he turns around, he tries to act like he’s still mad, which is adorable. “Thank you anyway,” she says with a small smirk. “I felt a catharsis of some sort.”

Neither of them can keep looking angry, and soon enough both of them break into laughter. They agree to go out for spicy chicken feet and practically skip off arm in arm.

Once they have their protein and alcohol, Won says aloud his wish for Hana to find a good man next time. Hana sighs that she’ll make sure to meet a really good guy. Looks don’t matter.

Won commends her on growing up, and a moment passes before she adds, “He has to be an unconditionally nice man. A nice man is the best.” Then she plops down beside Won, puts her arm on his shoulder, and asks inches from his face, “Don’t you think?”

For a few moments it doesn’t even look like Won’s breathing, more like he’s transfixed by their sudden proximity. But before anything happens, Won pushes her away with a tension-breaking joke.

He makes another joke when Hana asks him what kind of woman he’d like to meet by listing celebrities like Suzy and IU. But then he comes up with an idea: “Hana, do you want to make a bet?”

Hana doesn’t have the ability to back down from a bet, so she’s game. She immediately agrees to his wager that whoever marries before turning thirty-five will get money. Won’s initial amount is too small, so Hana raises it to five million won (roughly five thousand dollars).

He balks at that sum, so she says he can back out if he’s chicken. He can’t refuse that challenge, all but preening as he says he’s too popular to be scared of losing.

Flash back to when they were seventeen years old, with a poll among the girls just went to prove how popular Won really was. That day, she’d walked home under an umbrella to find Won soaked to the skin.

At first all she can talk about is how he won the popularity vote, until she notices that something’s wrong with Won. After a long pause, Won says, “I will never love you.”

Confused, Hana asks him what he means. He doesn’t elaborate and just walks past her, though she gives chase and asks him to tell her what’s going on—why is he acting like this?

She doesn’t give up, even when Won pushes her and her umbrella away. “Aren’t you going to stop?” she asks. With his back turned to her, Won grips the gate to his house like he’s struggling with himself.

But he eventually goes inside without a word, leaving Hana out in the rain.

 
COMMENTS

Interesting. Won’s declarations of Not Love, Not Ever seem to coincide with especially bad days he’s having, though the details are deliberately left murky, even to Hana. Or should I say, especially to Hana. The first time he told her that he wouldn’t even love her if they were left on a deserted island to die, he’d spent the day struggling with something unseen, telling himself that everything would be okay.

The second time he looked as though he’d experienced something truly traumatic, enough to have him walking through the rain like a zombie. And the way he said it all of a sudden to Hana sounded as though he’d been thinking of nothing but that, which is even more curious. It makes me insanely curious to know what’s going on with him that he feels the need to shut down any and all hope of them being together, even if Hana gave no indication that she’d been thinking about anything else. Plus, the seriousness with which he said it both times is bizarre—and from what little we’ve seen, pretty unwarranted.

But therein lies the mystery, and one this production team seems competent enough to tease out properly. Things admittedly looked a little rocky coming in, what with plagiarized teasers, a writer swap, and a lost-and-found director. Despite all that, this first episode came out feeling assured, with a soft visual palette that adds a bit of whimsy to the more realistic goings-on happening between characters. It’s just impactful enough without being overdone on any front, and just goes to prove that you don’t need drama to have drama. With characters like Hana and Won that go way back, just their everyday interactions says most of what we need to know about them.

Interestingly enough, the premise for The Time I’ve Loved You isn’t one I would gravitate toward naturally, since I’m a cheap date that can usually be bought with a high concept—even if I usually end up sorry for it. What drew me to this show was its deceptively simple premise, which feels oddly fresh in dramaland—even though I’m fairly positive that setting a story around two longtime friends who aren’t at all involved but someday could be isn’t the reinvention of the wheel.

But the simplicity of the premise can be deceptive, especially with a relationship as complex as Hana and Won’s. What I loved immediately about this episode is that it established both their characters with speed and ease, enough to get us on board with them as individuals and as two sides of the same friendship coin. Immediately it felt like we’d just been dropped in on their already busy lives, and it’s certainly no easy feat to make a world feel so lived-in by its core group of characters. Hana and Won operate as though they really have known each other for most of their lives, which is likely due to a healthy mixture of writing and directing—but most of all, acting.

And though the focus has the potential to switch from the two of them as friends to the two of them as possible lovers, for now I’m really enjoying the dynamic going on between them. The spotlight on Hana’s age feels real, especially in today’s age, because no matter how much people say that thirty is the new twenty, there are still a whole different set of societal demands on someone in their thirties as opposed to their twenties. Plus, it varies very much by gender still, as Won pointed out when he said that being male and thirty-four is different than being female and thirty-four. But then again, he’s the one who brought up the bet in the first place, which can only mean he’s not immune to worrying about his possibly single future.

I came into this show having absolutely no knowledge of its Taiwanese source material In Time With You, other than that it was an incredibly popular and critically acclaimed show. Comparisons are inevitable with any adaptations and certainly welcome, though I’d ask that the general rules for not being a buzz killington apply here. Don’t be the guy who spoils any huge secrets, the ending, or anything else that could potentially ruin someone else’s good time. Because dramas are love, and spoilers are not.

 
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Thank you for your recap! I'm enjoying this show although the TW version still remains as one of my most favourite to date! Thanks again! :D

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I'm enjoying it, too. Although, I have only watched the 1st episode and it is a bit premature to judge how the drama will progress and end up. but just from watching the 1st episode, I'm really liking the simple premise, it captures the ITWY essence in a kdrama form. I love it! Maybe it's just the story of ITWY that gets time and time again! but, I have to give serious props to two leads for their amazing chemistry and the pd. Hope this keeps up! :)

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edit: gets me*

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I watched the TW version as well so I was hesitant going into this as I'm pretty cautious going into any kind of remake. I saw some comments saying they didn't like some aspects but I watched anyways. However, I can happily say those issues that were pointed out did seem to let themselves shown in the first episode a bit but having seen the second episode they are almost nonexistent. The chemistry, while a bit shaky at first for me, gradually got better and better and now I'm already liking how the characters are portrayed. I did notice that Won is a bit more passive-aggressive than his counterpart in the TW version but I'm loving the change. Overall, looking forward to what it brings. I hope this version stays true to the source but is able to incorporate changes here and there to make it a whole new experience!

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I was a huge fan of the TW version too, and am happy to say that this one feels fresh and fun, and just different enough to keep me watching and enjoying until the end (because with a cast like this, even if it crashes and burns, I'm in it for the long-haul).

As for Won's secret, I must admit I'm getting strong Maramalade Boy vibes here. I just can't imagine what could possibly make him so adament about not dating her, other than a faux-sibling secret, though I'm praying the drama doesn't go there. . .

Looking forward to episode two. Here's hoping it keeps up its forward momentum, and doesn't disappoint!!

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I was waiting for the recap, as I was too scared to watch this as a huge fan of ITWY. From reading this alone, I'm wondering if Won's secret has something to do with his family background, which differs significantly from the original. Maybe he saw how unfortunate his parent's marriage turned out to be, and became too scared to express his feelings for Hana, as he just likes her too much.

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I'm realllly hoping they have a good reason, and that it doesn't end up being something ridiculous, far-fetched, or soap-opera-ish. Watching his parents marriage crumble would make sense, though part of what I loved about the original was the fact that there *were* no real excuses - they just kept missing their chance, so their timing was never right. That felt realistic and true to life for me, so if this ends up going down the typical k-drama route (birth secret, illness, noble-idiocy), I'm going to be so disappointed. It seems to have something to do with that book of his though, so I'm looking forward to hearing more on that front, including who wrote it, and why. Probably his father.

The first drama I ever watched was Meteor Garden, so I have a soft spot for adaptations, and love seeing how different people adapt the same story. And like you, I always have my favorites, but it never influences how I feel about the original. Luckily, this one is distinct enough to enjoy on its own merits, without being tied down by what they did or didn't change, so I'm looking forward to seeing where they take us next! :)

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"Watching his parents marriage crumble would make sense"

That's what I thought too! They didn't show much of him at home. But what they did show made it seem like a barren and lonely place. So sad.

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Yay! I'm happy you guys are recapping this. 2 episodes in and this show is a delight, in my opinion! I liked the original A LOT but I really like that this show didn't decide to be carbon copy of it and went with a different tone. It's definitely lighter and more romcom, which I am all for. HJW/LJW are wonderful and have such natural chemistry! They make me actually buy those high school scenes, which admittedly are ridiculous because as young as LJW and HJW look there's no way they're high school looking young, just due to how great they are together!

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HA . . . JI . . . WON! As if she could ever be alone on a weekend. When she just has to gaze at a man and he's transfixed.

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I found the pilot episode a little bit unorganized but the chemistry between the two and simple, realistic plot got me.

I also happened to love ITWY so I'm definitely sticking up for this!

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Thanks for the recap! I will definitely check this out since I want so much a drama of non-chaebol, non-fantasy, non-thriller, non-sageuk right now! Just something of everyday life and normal people, please!

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Having seen the TW version, I had my reservations with this remake - I wasn't sure how they'd recapture the same essence that Bolin and Ariel gave off with the characters but I was PLEASANTLY surprised at how much I enjoyed this first episode!

Ha Ji Won and Lee Jin Wook (who, I've never watched in anything until now) bring to life the same characters in their own way. I like how the tone is much more lighter and rom-com-ish than the TW version (it also had its own charms with slower more whimsical pacing). I never thought I'd enjoy it as much as I did and looking forward to episode 2.

The only thing I have to say that realllly irks me is Ha Ji Won's "baby" voice. It's not present all the time, but the moments it comes out during the flashback scenes...MAJOR cringing happening. Other than that, I'm on board this ship! Toot toot!

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That's when she was 17...so please forgive her!

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nah, she does it in the present time scenes when she's 34. it's really annoying

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To borrow a metaphor from the show, there's always a reason the merchandise is still on the shelf. Sometimes there's a good one, other times there's a not-so-good-one that needs to be overcome.

I expect we'll see what's kept her stuck in her adolescent past while only dreaming of what the future might hold. ;-)

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Finally, a rom-com that gives off all the right feels that one'd expect from a rom-com! I hope it'll continue to be our best summer watch, cool and light.

I Love Ha Ji Won bcos her characters always have char. So it is a departure to see that in this drama, she seems to be dailing the Aigooo way up high. The char is 34 years old; does she have to be so Cutesy? It is esp. obvious in ep 2. Haven't seen her act this way b4. Is it the director's idea to give the char such a 'young girl feel'? The hair falling over her face, and her having to brush may also be part of that persona, but her doing it every 2 mins. is also a little distracting. Other than that, the show is perfect 2 eps in.

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"The hair falling over her face, and her having to brush may also be part of that persona, but her doing it every 2 mins. is also a little distracting."

So distracting!!!.. Like at a point, i started getting slightly irritated. But like u said, "Other than that, the show is perfect 2 eps in."

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i kept talking to my screen "stop it"! both of them kept playing with their hair. i won't deny that it's not realistic cuz yesterday the young girl driver in front of my car, kept playing with her hair.. I kept thinking, "keep your eyes on the road & stop flirting with your passenger".

just buy a hair pin, or tuck her bangs behind your ears.. please!! wait, second thought, it would be ok of LJW flipped his hair under a shower head.. but that's for later in the drama... LOL!

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haha...i thought i was the only one who noticed the hair-brush part.

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+1000....

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+1 thought I was the only one..

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Ah, that's: "....she seems to be dialing the "Aegyo" way up high." Brain short-circuited.

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More like a freudian slip. She was doing aegyo, we were doing aigoo.

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LOL. That makes perfect sense. ??

I think one of the commenters' name was on my mind: "Aigooo", as I've been noticing it a lot lately. ?

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they're childhood friends...
they're neighbors...
he's scolding her...(Li Da Ren have not lifted a note higher than Chneg You Ching)
She's got a brother....
I know it's early but, where is his family?
They started the story of her having a BF, in the taiwanese he only had that ex who happens to have a GF younger than her.
Ha Ji Won's Pouty girly exprssions (the taiwanese hasn't shown that side of her)

Whatever I may say, I enjoyed the drama,. I t was different and I feel like watching a whole new In time With You.

I almost teared up when Lee Jin Wook said "Just find a Good Man in the Future" while giving tat eye cream as a gift. I woul've wanted someone to say that to me.

Anyways, it started great. I hope it continuous that way, the same way ITWY did.

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So glad this is getting recapped!! I really enjoyed the first two episodes! The chemistry between our leads is amazing and I think the story is just going to be a fun and easy watch.

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I loved I Need Romance 2012 despite its flaws, but if Lee Jin-wook's character here is going the same direction as he did in INR 2012, I won't be too happy.

That said, I really like the tone of this one so far, and the two of them are so cute on screen. My love for LJW is endless, so of course I love him here, and there is something really down-to-earth about him and Ha Ji-won that I like.

I also like that the second lead girl is not the typical biatch that so often appears in dramas. Hopefully she stays that way?

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Hahaha- I agree with your hopes about Lee Jin Wook's character in INR 2012. Does anyone get the feeling that the whole "I will never love you" has something to do with a sickness of some sort? Which is VERY similar to his character in INR 2012!!!

Like his life choice to work for an airline company where he is constantly traveling reveals that he's intent on never settling down. ALSO- the poem/book he pulled out from his room before he goes plays basketball "One Eyed Fish's Love" is a poem that describes the desire to live and love like a one eyed fish- that is inseparable (meaning there are two one eyed fish becoming a two eyed fish- or one that is whole)... This makes me think there's some sort of terminal illness or serious daddy problems that prevents him from thinking he deserves true love.

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I hope the drama will not go down this usual route!

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One Eyed Fish’s Love [ By Ryu Shiva ]

I want to live like a one-eyed fish.
I want to love like a one-eyed fish.
A one-eyed fish, Bi-Mok,
that had been attached to each other for its whole life
to live like a two-eyed fish.
I want to love like them.

We had sufficient time. But,
We just didn’t love each other enough for the time.
I want to live the way a one-eyed fish lives.
When it’s alone,
the aloneness becomes noticeable.
The one-eyed fish, Bi-Mok.
I want to love like them
for the sake of my life.

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You guys are really good! Hats off to you!
Since this show is so light, I didn't pay rapt attn while watching. I missed all that. Don't even remember seeing him pull a book from his bookshelf!

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He literally played that role before in I Need Romance 2...

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I REAAALLLY LIKE THIS COUPLE!!! Their chemistry is good. I can't stop giggling for entire 2 episodes

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This is cute and well made. I'm wondering if there's enough story for 16 episodes. How was the TW version? Was it well liked?

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Yeah the TW version was very popular, though I havent seen it yet.

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Thanks for a great recap Heads! And Hi Susan, looks like we're in to enjoy another show.

What a nice light, warm show to examine the eternal question of whether men and women (especially if they are single and compatible) can be just friends.

A couple of things struck me. The name of the show is rendered differently in different places. Here it is "The Time I've (or I) Loved You" and elsewhere it is "The Time We Were Not In Love" which when taken together, seem quite contradictory, but actually reflect the Won-Ha Na relationship. They have loved each other for 17 years but they thought (or Ha Na did) that it was not the kind of love that led to marriage.

The other thing that Heads mentioned about Ha Na preferring comfortable shoes to the more stylish (and painfully high heeled) designs, but forcing herself to wear the latter anyway... I expect is a metaphor for how she chooses her boyfriends. She thinks she has to find a new, nice guy, but at every turn in her life, she consults the long-term friend. Somehow, they end up together, caring and sharing comfortably like buddies.

Except for some over-acting, I felt, on Ha Ji Won's part for the teen years' flashbacks, HJW and LJW were cutely plausible high-schoolers and very natural together.

I liked the fun 'film-roll' flashbacks and the side lighting and natural colors of the present day. However I was wondering why both the flashbacks and some present-day indoor scenes have a sepia tone.

The poem "The Love of the One-Eyed Fish" seemed to have triggered off Won's bad mood. I looked it up and it is a poem about wanting to "... live and love like a one-eyed fish. Why? Because in order to live like a normal two-eyed fish, two one-eyed fishes have to stick by each others’ side and swim about together. It’s a poem about longing for companionship in life." An interesting poem to set off his mood.

I'm looking forward to an effortless watch without too much melodrama and a discussion on the male-female divide! :)

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Wow! That's a lot of analysis. :-) It's a very fluffy light show. I hadn't really thought about it very deeply.

There's a great advantage to having seen another version - it's easy to understand character motivations. I'm just going to have to guess.

I don't think I have much to analyze here though. There doesn't seem to be a really deep premise, which is fine. Flashy and fun girl is long term friends with an unexciting but really supportive guy. Cute and well made.

And the flashbacks? Two people in their 30s without baby faces aren't credibly playing teenagers? :-) I'm shocked I tell you! Shocked!

I have a recommendation I've been meaning to give you. Have you been watching My Love Eun Dong? Beautiful beautiful acting by Joo Jin Mo and Kim Sa Rang!

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Interesting, I just read the premise for the TW version on Wikipedia. Very nice! The KR didn't really seem to set up the exact same premise - so, it will be interesting to see how it turns out.

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I too did not watch the Taiwan version. I find it easier to watch if I neither know or expect or hope for something based on a past material. I imagine that it will set me up for disappointment rather than for a pleasant surprise. However since I'm not into manhwa and seldom watch Taiwan or any other shows, I guess this is moot, LOL!.

OK I read the synopsis of the original. It makes the story understandable. However in this show... now the mystery remains about why Won is so adamant about not dating Ha Na.

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Yes, I thought the premise on Wikipedia for the TW version was clearer than the KR execution. On the other hand, they may be going for something slightly different.

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Hi Susan
LOL! the flashbacks. They appeared to be trying quite hard, but it was cute if not somewhat awkward. I did find them overall credible enough.

My Love Eun Dong - Yes, I watched the first 2 episodes properly but started fast forwarding the ones after that. However, since you recommend it, I will try to pay more attention to those actors. Definitely they express a lot more than Soo Ae and (from the last that I just saw), than Ueee in High Society. :D

Thanks for your suggestion, and even if there's nothing much to analyze, this seems like a sweet and easy watch. It sort of reminds of When Harry Met Sally. :)

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It is sweet.

I really like My Love Eun Dong, but that's just a taste factor. And, let's face it, if you've spent any time acting, you get really mesmerized by other actors' performances. It's the acting, rather than the plot (which also happens to be quite good) that has me spellbound.

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AL and CB played also as a teenager in TW drama and in my opinion they didn't look like a high schooler also.

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I can imagine. It's pretty hard to find actors in their 30s to credibly play teenagers. The pair in the TW drama are very very cute, though! :-)

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Could it be like, he decided he'll get to keep her next to him for longer as friends than as lovers, because a romantic relationship is a lot more vulnerable? Some comments above suggested that his parents may be divorced, so could that have triggered this self defense?

//for the record, I know zilch about the original taiwanese drama.

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I also know zilch about the Taiwanese drama. Only the premise I read on Wikipedia.

As far as a long friend relationship vs lovers - IDK, I had some very close male friends when I was young and we still keep in touch but, now that they're married and have kids, it's not like we chat all the time. I would think a romantic relationship between the main characters has the best possibility for long-term interaction and closeness.

I'm more interested in why he let her win all the contests.... what do you think?

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Interesting... This got me thinking about a common mistake people make in expressing love.

Our natural tendency is to express love in the way we want to be loved ourselves, not the way that makes the other person feel loved.

If he values competition/winning he lets her win all the time. If she values connection/popularity, she conducts a popularity poll for him. They're both trying in their own way, but it's unlikely that either of them feel the love the other is trying to give.

Then put it all into context. What they've shown of his home life seems dark, cold and lonely. I think his deeper and more repressed longing is in line with GB's take on the One Eyed Fish poem.

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@Gidget

What a thoughtful insight! I like it. One thing that you have me curious about - why would someone with a dark home life value competition / winning? Or do think that's just coincidental? I would have thought that he might value popularity more - only, given his background, not know how to create it for himself.

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@ osmanthus tea, @ Susan and @ Gidget

Love Language - Oh thanks for this reminder, @Gidget, I read about it and it was such an eye-opener about why so many couples who love each other are not happy in their relationships. They are "speaking" at cross purposes to each other so that neither partner feels loved. But each thought they were displaying love to the other. The languages or ways of expressing love, if I recall them are: 1)in words, 2)by touch, 3)through gifts, 4)in service... was there a 5th way?

I know that my love language is that of service, so if I do stuff for a person, I'd like to have that reciprocated... however it is not so I feel disappointed. However that person did not feel loved by my service. He may instead be telling me in words that he loves me, but it's just hot air to me LOL! So the big mis-comm takes place. It seems that a large percentage of broken relationships could be saved if only we are aware of this difference in Love Language.

Male friends - Yes there were and are men who are friends. Usually there is something we have in common so we have topics to discuss. I have a friend who still has a male buddy although both are married with kids. They get together for meals and help each other out. So I feel it's possible as long as both parties are on the same page about it.

Where Won is concerned, the hint given by some looks he gives and his determination to not date Ha Na shows that they may not be on the same page.

Something else that should not be discounted is that many good romantic relationships and marriages start out as good friendships. But break-ups in bf-gf/marrieds' relationships are tougher for friends, since there is seldom a way to go backwards to just being friends. (It does happen though) So @osmanthus tea's thought on the vulnerability of the romantic relationship is the more likely reason for Won's attitude.

I do like that "One-eyed Fish's Love" poem, and from Archana's blog, this is his/her comment... "In this excerpt, the poet laments there being a “distance” between everything in the world... But he soon realizes there are some things that are truly inseparable – there is no distance between fish and the water they swim in, between the ocean and its waves, between a bird and its wings. Likewise, the poet wants to exist in a place where there will be no distance between himself and his lover.

... Many of his poems are tinged with a wistfulness, a slight melancholy that makes you introspect on your own life, your own mistakes and regrets. ..."

So this could throw light on the thoughts of Won. But is it a cowardly thing to do, to choose what appears to be a secure way to keep a friend, rather than to explore how a relationship could grow?

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Haven't seen the original from which this was adapted from but TTILY hit all the right notes for me to jump into this romance-centric weekend drama. The aegyo gets cringe-y at times but it's fine. And the flashbacks just gives me Reply 1997 nostalgia, especially in E02. Hana is just charming dreamy and stunning that at first sight, you won't accept how she's a 30-something spinster and then, Won... Won lights up any grim day with that megawatt smile and the nicest personality ever. He apparently can tell, and I'm not really sure why he's vehemently refusing (except he must be scared to ruin their beautiful friendship), that he has eyes for no one but her. A one-eyed fish, indeed.

Thanks for the recap, HeadsNo2~

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Yes, Reply 1997 feels when that H.O.T song came up in the first flashback! (It was an H.O.T. song, right? Hehe)

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wht is the name of that song

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Sechkies - couple

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Many thanks for the recap!! I found the first episode a little iffy (since for me, comparing it to the original is inevitable - being a fan of it an all) but the second episode had me sold!!

A few subtle changes, but nothing too glaring, thankfully! The first episode, whilst a decent watch, was a little rough around the edges, I felt. Their interaction seemed slightly awkward; Won's response to Ha-na's plight seemed a little non-chalent after the commotion he caused at the wedding; and his refusal to fall in love with her also came across too strong, even without knowing the backstory - made it slightly jarring for me!

Still, I look forward to seeing how things unfold from here onwards, and whether or not the changes live up to expectations. I don't think it'll surpass my love of the orig, but after the second ep, I think it's safe to say that this is going to be a pretty good remake - I hope!!

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I feel like this will be my new drama fix. Away from all the secret identities and chaebol marriages, sometimes watching a simple, down to earth with a heart warming story is enough to make me happy.

Also, Ha Ji Won's shoes are to DIE FOR!!!

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when i saw Hana lil bro, i thought that ghost FD is indeed everywhere.

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true that! he's everywhere!

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LOL. Glad for that actor that he is getting so much work now.

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Thank you very much for the recap, Headsno2! As a fan of T-ITWY, I must say this version is good in the sense that it is portraying the sentiments of the original.

The chemistry between the two leads are too cute! When they are together as bestfriends, they really seem to know each other for 17 years. Good acting from both of them.

I also really liked the rooftop scene. The lighting, the mood of the characters, and LJW not breathing when they got closer made my heart flutter. Can't wait for Episode 2 recap ^_^

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Hey apparently when I opened this link your name and email is in auto-fill. I don't know about you but I think that's scary because emails are supposedly "not going to be published" but if it is auto-fill like that, it's a bit worrisome for security?

Just to prove my point your email was [email protected]

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now I changed it to my fangirling email. Thanks for the tip and concern! Btw, ca you please elaborate the "auto-fil" thing? And are we not required to put an email?

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I have just watched episode 2. I like this drama so much! I tried to watch the taiwanese drama before but gave up immediately because I hate Ariel Lin's acting.

I'm so happy about the casting of this drama also. Ha Ji Won, Lee Jin Wook <3 and I can't wait to see Yoon Kyun Sang to appear.

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I just really really like the simple and charming vibe of this drama. I have been craving for something mundane, and this one's a hoot. I super love our leads, and I super love PD Jo for maintaining the sentiments of the original.

Also: rooftop scenes never fail.

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Thank you, thank you for recapping this drama! I have been lurking here to see if there were any recaps since Saturday, but was disappointed to find none. Desperate, so I went to read someone else's recaps which was bad - biased and inaccurate - seems like the re-capper didn't understand some parts of the drama. Sooooo... I'm overjoyed that you're recapping!

Now that that's out of my chest, I LOVE this drama!!! Didn't watch the Taiwanese version, so I've nothing to compare it with. I LOVE the chemistry between the 2 leads!!! So cute and LJW is so hot!

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I watched the first two episodes and I'm hooked! Yay! Who's the cute intern? And is his character staying for all the episodes? I read in the Viki comments that his role was a cameo.

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thats Infinite's L i guess

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It's supposed to be an extended cameo of 3 eps. I love that such a cute guy as L is romancing her, but since it is gonna be short-lived, I'm also anticipating the arrival of Pinocchio's Hyung to give Won some serious reason to be jealous, cos I don't think he takes L the "Baby" at the office seriously.

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I suspected as much, but am sad. L and Ha Ji-Won have really nice chemistry.

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Loved the first two episodes ..I feel I'm going to be totally hooked on to this show for a while. I especially loved the background score. The pace seems just right and the cast is winning . My only concern is lee jin wok having a similar character as INR 2012. Even in Nine he could not openly embrace hos love ..but I hope the amazing chemistry between oh hana and won continues
#fighting

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I am usually not a fan of light fluffy romance dramas but I decided to watch this coz I fell in love with Lee Jin Wook recently after watching him in Nine Times Travel. He was so hot there!

Anyway I must say I love their high school scenes here, so cute!! I am also curious why did Won keep saying he cannot love Hana? Hmm...

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I also want to say that despite Choi Won saying that he can't love Hana, he is soooo in love with her! And she has feelings for him too. Her expression changed just a little when her best friend told her that she liked Wonnie. And she looked disappointed when he told her that he could not love her. Even angry to the point of kicking the gate of his house.

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It was better than I expected... well, I kept my expectations low after liking the Taw. version so much.

Lee Jin Wook is very charming in this one. However, as someone pointed out, his dramatic scenes were a bit jarring when the rest of the drama was fluffy.

I'm still not over Ha Ji Won's high-pitched voice. She was too cutesy for me. So far, I still prefer Ariel's portrayal of a strong, (seemingly) collected character.

Also, I wanted to sense the strength of their friendship. In the Taw. version, it was more evident that they were best friends, and thisclose.

So what did I like about it? It was very pretty to look at.

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Enjoyed the first episode! Can't help but rewatch the TW-version again (fast forwarding involved) and I'm impressed how the K-version have preserved a lot of its original material. Loving the Korean remake so far. Hopefully it'll top the TW version. Loving the chemistry between Ha Ji Won and Lee Jin Wook so far.

But no matter what Lin Yi Chen and Chen Bo Lin will always have a special place in my heart :)

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This is such a cute and fast-paced episode! Love love love HJW's everything in this episode <3 #theheels

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I wasn't too sure after the 1st ep but ep 2 solidified my love for this show..at least so far..its still so early.. I watched the first couple eps of the TW version but could not keep going..idk why but just didn't particularly like it..and actually some of the similarities here in this one reminded me of my dislike..i still have no idea what it is exactly..anyway I am loving it so far. I need some normal; too many chaebols going around driving me crazy right now..lol.

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I suggest against trying to watch In Time With You for the first time, or second as in my case, while also watching this. It makes it harder to love this. I liked the first episode but I didn't love it.

I vastly preferred how In Time With You handled the whole ex-boyfriend new girlfriend shoe designer thing to how this does. Honestly so far I like everything about Cheng You Qing more than Hana. I just feel like they gutted the character and made her weak, but we'll see. Which is weird because normally no matter how much I like Ariel Lin after In Time With You, if you made me pick between Ariel Lin and Ha Ji-won, Ha Ji-won would win in a landslide. That being said I don't think it's her fault, I think it's the cultural differences and writing.

That being said I did like the first episode so most likely I'll keep watching.

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LOL, I'd say that YouQing and Hana are like two sides of the same coin - Completely different yet similar at their core.

YouQing was prideful, confrontational and was intensely independent though of course she hid a vulnerable underbelly. A lot of things were about her-her-and-herself (or her girls, if we're talking about school-time shenanigans), but she's fiercely protective when it comes to people she loves.

Hana is (super?) happy and optimistic (no one prideful would be throwing that natural aegyo left-right-and-centre) with a lot more innocence, though she's definitely a sharpshooter and can deliver a smack-down when needed (see pregnant-boyfriend-stealing-ex-boyfriend's-fiance).

But that kind of changes their friendship dynamics too. YouQing demands and DaRen gives in (not that he is spineless). Hana and Won are a little more even in the power dynamics, given the rascal Won is.

YouQing depend on DaRen a lot because of her prickly personality that leaves just DaRen understanding her and putting up with her no matter what. Hana remains friends with Won just because he's always there - next door, a phone call away or even at her family's dining table (and also by virtue of Won's little tricks to make sure he remains in her line of sight).

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this is a pretty nice insight

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So true! Great insight, indeed.

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You're right on the spot.

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Love the way you put it.

In truth, the part that I dislike most in Ariel's character in ITWY is her strong sense of pride and refusal to lose. While I can understand and even resonate with that side of her character, it made her character a little less likable. Bolin's character was polar opposites and came across as a total pushover. While I enjoyed ITWY, both the lead characters left me frustrated.

In the K version, I like HJW's adult character. She's not quite as strong as the TW version but she's not someone you can mess with either. I love LJW's character here too. The passive aggressive persona hasn't made me feel the frustration I felt over the TW's version. All in all, I'm liking the character changes which allow for a slightly different set of dynamics between the leads but yet keeping that sense of familiarity with the original story.

Things I love about the K version so far:
- all of Hana's shoes
- Hana's office wear and the way HJW wear those clothes
- the rooftop conversations
- Hana and Won's house gates

Loving the slice of life drama and hoping that the writers will not go the usual K-drama makjang storyline.
-

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I loved that smackdown. She actually made her points fairly credibly (well, the first two at least) so it doesn't seem so obviously spiteful. d=

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I already watched the two episodes. I like the TW version but this is better than the TW version.

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Pfft! Lies, lies. Well this Noona fan knows Mir's birthday is March 10, and it is too warm on the show to be March. So I'm guessing the senior stewardess was going on a booty call. Lol.

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Bahahaha

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Thanks for the recap! So far I like this adaptation. I like how comfortable we feel with the characters and I want to know how their story pans out. The transition to the flashback scenes is a little weird and I'm not used to it.

Oh and another reason to love the show: SHOES!!! :)

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This is gonna be exciting when the second male lead pops out!

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The not proposal and wedding fiasco reminded me of the first episode of Personal Taste.

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I didn't quite like the first episode as some scenes seem to be too forced. However, like some of you, after the second episode, I am totally sold!!! Everything seem so much more smooth and natural. I laughed throughout the episode, it was that good!! Amazing chemistry between HJW and LJW. I was also very surprised to actually like HJW with L too..she is simply the best in generating chemistry with her costars!! The last part of the episode, really makes me love Won!! I was so touched with the flashback (simply perfect timing) and the background song blended in so well with the scenes...how can anyone not feel for him??! Ive always thought LJW is good looking but not hot...I beg to be differ, he was hot in the last scene of the flashback at the end of the episode, such charming smile!!! I hope the rating picks up for the next episode, fighting!!

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Will watch the TW version after, thank u very much!

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Forgot to mention, HJW just look prettier as the episodes goes. I do admit, the hair thing flipping can be irrating but I think it's to show the type of character Hana is.

Ive watched the Taiwanese version and liked it but did not loved it. I love Ariel Lin ,(it was the reason why I watched the drama) but to my surprise, I ended up loving Bolin's character more. Ariel acted really well in her role (shes an amazing actress just like HJW) but I simply didn't like that type of character. I am probably one of the few who's glad the character of Hana is not the same!!

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Loving this but missing the warm, funny, angsty feels that the original gives in every episode.

This ones pretty entertaining but i must say the tversion had me invested more in the otp from the get go.

Will keep watching though.

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The T version is unforgetable, but will track this mainly for Ha Ji Won.

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Thanks for the recap! Love Ha Ji-won and Lee Jin-wook, awesome actors and bringing the characters to life.

BTW, anyone agree that Choo Soo-Hyun looks really similar to Kim Ga-Eun? (The girl-classmate crushing on Lee Jong-Seok in I Hear Your Voice...)

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I'm really loving the simplicity of the plot: two best friends who are on the brink of falling in love (or not). I haven't seen the TW version, and I don't think I will because of lack of time and I don't want to be comparing the two shows. However, I did skim through the recaps of the TW version and the writer seemed to go off the rails in some parts. Overall, I liked this episode and the the 2nd episode even more! Thanks for recapping!

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Thanks for the recaps, headsno2! :D

I love the TW version and I'm glad this does not dissapoint! The storyline did not really deviate much from the original (the daydream scenes are pretty similar) and Lee Jin Wook is SO charming! Oh Ha Na is cuter compared to the TW counterpart, but Ha Ji Won excecuted the whole role really really well. Plus she is so pretty! Love her hair and outfits. I also find the second female lead to be less annoying than the TW version.

Probably too early to say but out of all the shows I'm watching so far this is by farrrr my absolute favourite! <3

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But Won's dramatic scenes are supposed to jar. It's the 500 pound elephant in the room. He has a secret brewing while the happy-go-lucky demeanour is a facade for how he really feels.

I'm glad the show is being recapped here. A very promising start, hope it keeps up.

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I cant help myself comparing it to the original... which is not necessarily a bad thing, but when it comes to the declaration of "i could never love you" i think the twdrama presented it more naturally. Won's "confession" is a bit too abrupt. I'm sure something about that book made him scared of losing her completely, but Daren's reason -so far- seems more legit.

But in any case, just HOW GORGEOUS is Jiwon... I can't.... Although I really loved Jinwook in -the somewhat similar role in- I need romance 2012, something is missing so far here. Chen Bolin really had it down with Daren and maybe my love for his -admitedly imperfect- character stops me for feeling too much for Won at the moment.

Lastly... that L cameo.. he's too damn flat (I feel like Park Seojoon would have been perfect instead). Knowing the story and how not much of an importance his character really is, I can't wait for him to just exit already...

So, all things considered, I feel like the drama kinda needs to step up a little. This is truly a great story and it is blessed with a great director and leads, so I need to see more out of it.

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I agree, Park Seo Joon would have SLAYED that role. L's portrayal of character is too one dimensional - but at least he's easy on the eyes...

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I would have to disagree about L's portrayal of the intern. Having watched the original, the character of Nic, had been very flat to begin with. A lot of what he did was smile and smirk, and wasn't really a impact-ful character to begin with. Now watching the Korean version, I'm pleasantly surprised to like L's portrayal of the intern. He's really cute as Sungjae, and having read some of the comments on Naver and such, he's had really positive feedback, indicating a much more greater impact than the character did in the TW version. I think regardless of the actor who plays him, this character is not intended to be a very deep character in the first place. I think its more to warm up the audience for the second lead, and just simple eye-candy.

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I agree with you. I feel L's portrayal as Sungjae is a lot more memorable than in the TW version. So for me he's doing a great job. He and HJW also have great chemistry together. I'm actually quite impressed with his acting here. Usually I find him a bit awkward and flat but he was really charming in this. Plus those dimples are an added bonus.

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I agree on the part that they character is not someone that had an impact, and thats exactly why I wanted someone like Seojoon for the role. L is someone I can never feel for through his acting, so basically I am re-living the damn ark of that character...

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"The spotlight on Hana’s age feels real, especially in today’s age, because no matter how much people say that thirty is the new twenty, there are still a whole different set of societal demands on someone in their thirties as opposed to their twenties. Plus, it varies very much by gender still, as Won pointed out when he said that being male and thirty-four is different than being female and thirty-four. But then again, he’s the one who brought up the bet in the first place, which can only mean he’s not immune to worrying about his possibly single future."

Well said. But I would also like to say this. Its true that Won was the one who proposed the bet, although it could be because he just wanted to drive her away from the subject of being alone forever or maybe to gear her up and stray her away from the morose gloom she was in. Won is a supportive friend as its been proven many times, so I don't think that he's only concerned about himself being alone, but naturally about the two of them. Plus he hasn't dated for sometime and I don't think that he would be jostled out of the dating business. With those looks to kill, I'll date him please! ? Plus I think he has a junior already crushing on him. It won't be hard for him to grab a chick. Lol

BTW, I love Jin Kyung's portrayal. So far from her evil mum character in Pinocchio. She hilarious here. ?

Please recap the next ep as well, heads... Thanks...

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I LOLed at all the Pinocchio people in this drama...anyways loving it so far! <3

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Me too! :)) At first, I was wondering if I was watching Pinocchio. Almost everyone was from that drama. Even both of the second leads. XD We just have different leads here.

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I was cautious after the first episode but the second episode made me fall in love with this show! It was cute yet realistic. It was funny and light hearted too. Unfortunately, I like Hana and Won better as friends... Maybe because the actors sold me so well their brother and sister like friendship, I want more scenes of them mocking each other and bickering around. HJW and LJW have a great chemistry together so the rooftop scenes are always a pleasure.

Kinda surprised with L. I was expecting him to fit Nic's role but was not expecting myself to fall for this pairing. It doesn't seem HJW and L have a 13 years gap.... More like 5-6 years.

As for the hair pulling, it was explained in the first episode through the TV: a woman over 30 has to check her hair constantly as it gets thinner (BS if you want my opinion).

Can't wait to see the next ep. So far, they respected the original drama while adding their own kdrama flavour. Better than copying and pasting everything a la Cantabile Tomorrow...

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Loved the original and I'm loving every minute of this,dare I say it might surpass the original, I just want it to be just as good. I like how they are sticking to the original but it's still different, I'm glad this version didn't have the creature chasing her around the shoe store, I remember hating that and it was the reason It took me so long to finally watch it.I do wish the hair thing would stop though it's very distracting.

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I kind of get where Hana's rant about 'it's all his fault' that she's single. LOL. I mean if your best friend, the one guy who stuck with you through thick and thin, doesn't want to love you or can't imagine loving you...or keep saying that he would never EVER love her. There's gotta be a problem.

XD.

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Ouch. The "I will never love you" game is more painful here than in the Taiwanese version. You really had to say that twice, Won?
Anyway, I'm liking this so far as much as I liked In Time With You mainly because I like dramas with visible rom-com vibes and of course, the chemistry between the leads. (Oh, and also because of Hana's room, shoes, and outfits lol)
I'm also pleased how So-eun is waaaaaay more bearable than Maggie. Too much aegyo even for a 20-something lady is not cute.
I like how the flashbacks are presented in those transition frames; I find that really creative.
I'm so onboard with this. Can't wait for this weekend's episodes!!

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