987

Cheese in the Trap: Episode 12

Ah, progress. Much of today takes place in the past (as in, we’re in flashback central), but it has the effect of moving us quite a bit forward—and moreover, I’m feeling hopeful about the state of our characters and their relationships. This drama has always been great about showing people as a combination of positive and negative traits, as flawed people with room for improvement rather than people branded by one trait, whether good or bad. And while I feel like Jung has receded from the spotlight a bit in recent episodes, I love getting a deeper understanding of what makes him tick. I’m mostly sure now that it’s not a mechanical power pack. Like 99 percent sure.

 
SONG OF THE DAY

Sweden Laundry – “조금만 더” (Just a little more) from the Cheese in the Trap OST [ Download ]

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EPISODE 12 RECAP

In-ho’s piano teacher surprises him by suggesting he go out for a competition, and we see in a flashback that the teacher has been regularly giving In-ho’s former teacher updates on his progress. Old Teach is pleased to hear that In-ho is gradually regaining some of his old feel, and that he’s a little less of a hothead now.

New Teach wants to bolster his confidence, and they decide that a small competition would be best for him. They chuckle at the question of whether In-ho’s ego would allow him to agree to a minor competition, but after making an initial dig at the smallness of the event, In-ho says he’s grateful even for this opportunity. He asks if it’s really okay for him to go out like he’s afraid he might not be, but looks hopeful at the thought.

On the online message board Young-gon has been posting flamebait comments to, the anonymous other poster continues uploading photos of him stalking Seol. His face isn’t clearly visible but commenters are starting to recognize the school and speculate that his identity will be outed soon.

Young-gon sweats to read the poster’s warning that photos revealing his face will follow if he doesn’t cut it out. He thinks of reporting these malicious posts to the police, but worries that they’ll ask if he really was stalking Seol. And you can’t really argue with truth, can’t you?

Nearby, Sang-chul Sunbae happens to be on the same message board and eyes Young-gon suspiciously, noting his resemblance to the stalker. He looks over to see Eun-taek crouching out of sight, quietly recording Young-gon’s reaction. Heh, I knew it was you!

Seol walks home that night still perturbed by Jung’s reaction to her and In-ho’s chumminess—he’s not answering her calls and he looked pretty upset. She sighs that she should have told him before about In-ho, but they hadn’t been speaking and only just made up.

She becomes aware of a presence and calls out for her follower to show himself—and Young-gon steps out tentatively, head hanging. He gets down on his knees to apologize that he was wrong to harass her, offering to sign an agreement not to approach her anymore. He begs for forgiveness and asks her to call off her punkass friend (In-ho) from posting online… while around the corner, the exchange is recorded on a cell phone.

Seol balks when Young-gon says he had to follow her home because she was ignoring him—again, he’s turning his actions into her fault. But that riles his temper and he says that even he hates that he likes her, and that the sight of Jung pisses him off.

Seol retorts that she sees nothing in Young-gon that can even compare with Jung, and Young-gon’s mood twists further. He asks what’s so great about Jung, insisting that Jung was the one who started everything, who acts nice to your face and gloats behind your back: “He’s really the one who’s acted wrongly—it’s him who tricked me and pulled those stunts! But why is it me getting treated like trash?”

She says that in seeking revenge on Jung, Young-gon merely used her—he doesn’t really like her. He gets angrier and threatens, “Want me to actually scare you? Make you tremble every time you go home? Make it so you can’t attend school?”

He advances, warning that In-ho had better erase his posts, “or I’ll kill you both.”

Seol tamps down her fear and declares that she was the one writing those posts, which a flashback confirms. Her friends had worried about potential blowback, but Seol had had enough.

Young-gon is stunned, hurt even. A tear falls as he asks incredulously, “You… were playing with me?”

Seol reminds him that she’d warned him, and he hadn’t listened. He removes something from his pocket and growls, “I’ll kill you!”

But Seol sprays him in the face with In-ho’s pepper spray and runs away—and around the corner, we see that it’s In-ha recording everything. She sends the video and crows, “Mission accomplished!”

Jung receives the message, then tells In-ha to send him her phone, with all the recordings she’s amassed thus far. Next, Eun-taek calls, probably with another report.

Out in the street, Seol runs from Young-gon, who persists in following despite being doubled over in pain. Thankfully she arrives at her family’s restaurant and runs up to her father, and immediately Young-gon slaps on a smile and acts friendly. But Dad is suspicious and displays, maybe for the first time ever, some solid fatherly skills by angrily giving chase after Young-gon—even if he only makes it half a block before he has to quit.

Seol updates her friends, who agree Young-gon is extra nuts for following her all the way home. Seol figures she has the files as evidence so she’s covered even if she takes down the posts. She briefly considers telling Jung, but figures that he won’t take her call anyway.

With the posts erased, Young-gon struts into school the next day and enthusiastically greets his classmates, boisterous in the face of their stony faces. He bribes Sang-chul with lunch, and Sang-chul is shockingly resistant to the offer of free meat. I’m almost impressed, except that he finally caves at the mention of galbi, and Sang-chul calls in his buddies to join in. Seol and her friends grump about how easily the boys are won over.

At lunch, the guys ask Young-gon if the story was true about him two-timing those girls—In-ha was hot, and thus now they regard him with admiration. Young-gon lies that he dated both girls, and basks in the attention.

But a classmate gets a text from Eun-taek alerting him to a new post on their school’s message board. It’s a picture of Young-gon at a computer (which Eun-taek took), accompanied by a whole slew of slanderous posts he wrote, blind item-style—not naming names, but obvious to anybody who knows who’s involved. For instance, he flames one sunbae (sitting right in front of him) for preying on young girls, and mocks Sang-chul for always mooching free meals and being an embarrassment to his parents.

Young-gon tries to insist it wasn’t him, but Sang-chul informs the others about the stalker accusations, and the guys turn against him. Young-gon(‘s past self) keeps digging his grave deeper with every slanderous post, which they read: He’d called them freeloading beggars who jump whenever Jung treats them to meals. “Honestly, guys like this should be rounded up and cleaned out,” one post sneers.

Young-gon runs out in mortification, fuming at Seol, assuming she put these new posts up. When In-ha texts him about his encounter with Seol last night, he guesses that Jung put her up to this, threatening to sue her, Jung, Seol, and punkass In-ho. In-ha texts back scoffing that he has no grounds, listing all of his crimes, which include stalking, blackmail, defamation, assault—with incriminating photos to boot. This time Young-gon’s face is clearly visible, sending him into a panic, babbling, “Don’t show it! My face!”

Then as In-ha’s next text comes in, he finally makes the connection, reading the words in Jung’s voice: “You have a lot to say for someone who can’t even see through pretense.” That triggers a memory of Young-gon himself accusing everyone of being unable to see through Jung’s pretense.

Young-gon calls Jung, who tells him to check himself if he doesn’t want that video uploaded of him threatening Seol last night. Young-gon screams futilely, crying in rage.

In-ha goes on a shopping spree with the rewards of her labor, and Jung texts that he won’t be asking any more from her.

Seol wonders who uploaded the latest posts—and Eun-taek bursts out nervously that he did it. Seol doesn’t think it’s a good idea to tell Jung about Young-gon, and Eun-taek stammers that m-maybe, a-actually, J-jung already helped out. He reveals that he’d been keeping Jung informed and shown him the evidence they’d been gathering, and that Jung was the one who told him to write the new posts. He hadn’t said anything because it seemed like Jung was waiting for Seol to confide in him.

Seol is stunned, and Bora chides her for not saying anything to her boyfriend.

She leaves with her head swirling with doubts, recalling everybody’s warnings against Jung, and those instances when he’d manipulated people to do his bidding. She also recalls In-ha telling her to leave if she can’t handle Jung. She starts running.

That night, In-ho spots In-ha with her new shopping bags and demands to know how she paid for it. She says Jung bought it for her, and as that is as convincing as a pile of rocks, In-ho takes her loot ransom and demands the truth.

In-ha cops to her deal with Jung to get rid of Stalker Loser, puffing herself up with importance for how much Jung relied on her help. In-ho doesn’t understand why Jung would sic a stalker on Seol, and then get rid of him for her: “He’s playing games right now, isn’t he? It was all a game from the start!”

Seol surprises Jung by showing up at his door, and he’s still withdrawn and reticent from yesterday’s incident. She asks if he didn’t answer her calls because he was upset about her friendship with In-ho. He demurs, saying he was just busy, and she takes that in with disappointment.

She explains that she has become friendly with In-ho, and that he’d helped her a lot and made her want to help him too, with his piano lessons and high school equivalency exam. And he already knows about Young-gon because of Eun-taek’s updates.

Jung notes that she didn’t want to talk about Young-gon, and she apologizes for not saying anything. But when he tries to brush aside the topic by saying that it’s over, she stops him: “No, we’re not done. Right now, I truly put a lot of effort into telling you everything. Now I want to hear your reply. Your honest reply.”

Moreover, she doesn’t want his usual answer—that he never expected Young-gon to take things so far, that he hadn’t intended things to turn out this way. He asks what she wants him to say, trying again to close the topic of Young-gon.

Seol grabs his arm: “This isn’t a problem about Young-gon. This is your and my problem! Don’t keep evading it.” She challenges him to answer that he sent Young-gon after her because he disliked her, and that he didn’t call because he was angry.

He asks, “Why do you want to hear those things?”

Seol says that it makes her frustrated and angry when she asks him for honesty but sees that he isn’t being honest: “I thought it was all about you, but this time I realized—I didn’t talk about my own thoughts and just asked for yours. I won’t do that now. So I’d like if you didn’t either. Without hiding anything, I want to see you, just as you are.”

Jung struggles to take it in, but only says, “I don’t know what you’re saying.” He pulls away from her grasp.

In-ho asks his sister if she has no pride, taking all these things from Jung. She counters that he has no right to act worried about her: “To me, you’re the bigger bad guy than Jung.”

Flashback. It’s high school, and In-ho is excited that his favorite pianist is finally coming to Korea. He intends to get his autograph in person, never mind that his competition is planned for the same day; he’s cavalier about the prospect of skipping out, saying that he always wins first place.

As they head to the practice rooms, they run into another piano student who’s going out for the same competition, who also receives sponsorship from Jung’s dad. Jung is nice to the kid, but In-ho’s dismissive, telling him he plays with no soul and that’s why he never wins. Jung chides him to speak more nicely, though In-ho just says he’s saying it to help the guy.

But In-ho does the competition after all, and curiously Jung misses it. Afterwards at dinner, Dad makes a suggestion that shocks Jung, In-ho, and In-ha equally: that he adopt In-ha and In-ho officially into his family registry. All three kids are stunned speechless, and Jung looks particularly taken aback, though he manages to smile at In-ho.

In-ha pouts at the idea, since she’s determined to marry Jung and can’t obviously be adopted as his sister. In-ho’s pleased to go with Dad’s suggestion, and doesn’t believe In-ha when she predicts that Jung isn’t onboard with the adoption.

A short while later, In-ho walks in on Jung talking to the other piano student, confused to see that Jung has given him an autographed CD of his favorite pianist… which he got by missing In-ho’s competition.

Jung acts like this is all very reasonable, but In-ho knows him enough to guess that he’s angry, maybe about the adoption. Jung just keeps his calm facade in place, and when In-ho prods Jung for his thoughts, guessing that he doesn’t like it, Jung replies, “It doesn’t matter to me.”

“It doesn’t matter?” In-ho asks, confused and hurt.

Soon the other piano student is eating lunch with their group, welcomed by Jung’s friendly attentiveness. Jung even starts listening in on New Kid’s practice sessions, acting like this is completely normal, hiding whatever inner thoughts he’s feeling.

Jung gets invited to join a crowd of older students at a bar that night, and New Kid says that those kids are dangerous. In-ho overhears and echoes the sentiments, but since Jung is already angry with, it stirs tension when In-ho warns him not to go. Then In-ho barks at New Kid to practice piano rather than partying, and New Kid storms off angrily.

That night, New Kid heads out to the party thinking Jung will be there, but it’s only the bullies there. The party gets raided and the students are taken in for underage drinking, and the bullies fume that they’ve been ratted out. New Kid thinks of In-ho overhearing their conversation and growls that he knows who reported them.

So the bullies drag In-ho to a secluded corner and begin beating him down. He does his best to fight back, yelling that he didn’t do it, but they overpower him and kick him repeatedly—and from a distance Jung watches with that maddeningly impassive face.

It’s New Kid who slams a baseball bat onto In-ho’s hand. In-ho screams in pain and writhes on the ground, and when he makes eye contact with Jung in the distance, Jung turns and walks away. Damn. That’s cold.

Afterward, In-ho confronts Jung, asking, “It’s not true, right? You didn’t do it?” Jung asks, “What answer will make you most comfortable?”

In-ho presses, “Did you really do it?” Jung answers, “No, I didn’t, you did. Think carefully.”

In-ho grabs his shirt, calling him a son of a bitch, asking why he did it. Jung asks, “Why do people always want what belongs to other people? Then they delude themselves thinking that’s other people’s things are theirs, when in the end they lose what’s their own.”

To In-ho, that sounds like Jung talking about the adoption, and exclaims, “It was for that measly thing?!” Jung says tersely, “Think whatever you want.”

So In-ho leaves home in the middle of the night with his arm still busted, and In-ha says in her hurt that he was always ready to leave her behind for himself. She tells him, “Go and don’t come back,” then watches sadly as he walks away.

That long trip down memory comes flooding back to In-ho, and now he runs out with purpose.

Jung drives Seol home, and she politely thanks him and leaves the car, though he looks like he wants to hold her back. In-ho texts to meet, and as soon as Jung shows up at the appointed spot, he grabs Jung and demands to know what his deal was with In-ha.

Jung says he’s tired of In-ho receiving everything and acting the victim: “How long are you going to keep hanging around Seol? It seems you’re doing it to make me mad, but don’t you think that’s pretty pathetic?”

In-ho suggests that they fight it out this once, one-on-one, and Jung agrees. In-ho gets in the first punch, Jung returns the favor, and pretty soon they’re going at each other in a full-on, knock-down drag-out brawl.

Jung growls that he’s held back as much as he could, and In-ho scoffs, “How’d a guy who’s so good at beating people hold back all this while? You should’ve been like this at the start, you two-faced bastard. If you had, at the least our relationship wouldn’t have gotten this bad.”

Jung sneers, “My fault again?” He accuses In-ho of a victim complex, and In-ho counters that Jung put a stalker to Seol and then got rid of him. “Still,” In-ho says, “I thought you were at least sincere about [Seol]. Do you even know what it means to like someone, you bastard?”

Jung lurches forward and grabs In-ho, demanding, “What does it matter to you?!”

“Because I like her,” In-ho replies. “Because I like her, it matters to me.”

Well, there it is. Jung growls, “This is what you do best—acting the friend to your face, then backstabbing.” He punches In-ho, who challenges, “Who backstabbed first?”

Jung grabs him in a headlock and demands that he leave Seol alone. In-ho kicks them both down, saying he won’t. Jung asks, “What can you do for her?”

In-ho presses, “Then say it. Can you guarantee that you won’t do to her what you did to me? Are you confident? With jerks like you, it only takes a few times to realize what kind of bastard you are.” He says Seol will figure it out, adding, “People around you all get ruined because of you. The person who really needs to leave her alone is you, not me, bastard.”

Though exhausted, they continue grappling with each other with their flagging strength, cursing each other.

Seol gets a text from Jung asking to meet, and one look at his battered face has her gasping in concern. Jung merely leans forward and leans on Seol wearily, wrapping his arms around her.

Seol tends to his cuts with exasperated concern, guessing that the fight was with In-ho. She asks why, since he’s not the type to fight, wanting to understand why Jung hates In-ho so much.

Jung’s mind flashes back to that piano competition, and how he’d skipped it to get autographs from that famous pianist. He’d pretended his name was In-ho so he could get his sheet music signed personally for him.

At the competition, In-ho had bragged to New Kid about Dad coming to see him. New Kid asked wistfully how In-ho got to be such good friends with Jung, who’s so popular and nice and rich. In-ho had boasted that Jung was actually pitiable, having all that money but no dream or people to count on other than himself. And Jung, who’d been coming to deliver his autographs, had overheard In-ho’s words.

When his father had dropped the bomb at dinner, Jung had forced a smile in the moment. Then, later he’d overheard his father on a phone call with Jung’s absentee mother, discussing his plans for adoption, which he saw as his way of taking care of the grandchildren of his esteemed Professor Baek. He’d been certain that Jung would agree, bristling when Mom had accused him of monitoring Jung too closely, using the kids.

Dad had argued, “You know what kind of kid Jung is. I’m not seeing him strangely—if we don’t take care, he could develop interpersonal problems, you know Professor Baek said that. If he doesn’t have someone watching at his side, he can’t survive. That’s why he needs siblings. Ultimately, this decision is for Jung’s benefit.”

“That’s when it started,” Jung now tells Seol, confiding the whole story to her. He thinks he could have warmed to the idea of adoption, “But the thought that people I’d thought of as friends were monitoring me—that was hard to bear.”

He describes how it felt to have his father constantly watching, constantly telling him to stay quiet, to yield, like he’d done something wrong. “Did he really think I was so strange?” he wonders. He turns to Seol and asks her, “Am I… really that strange?”

Seol leans forward and wraps her arms around him. “Sunbae,” she says, “we started out on bad terms, didn’t we? We treated each other like the other person was strange and hated. But thinking now, it wasn’t that we were strange, but different.”

She explains that people used to say she was frustrating and sensitive, and it made her worry. But ultimately she decided: “I’m just this kind of person. I don’t really know, but I think you didn’t have many chances to speak honestly. It must have been lonely and difficult for you on your own.”

She tells him not to struggle alone anymore: “Do it with me. I really want to know you.”

He admits, “I was scared. That if you found out what I was really like, you’d leave.”

She pulls back to look him in the eye, and takes his hand in hers. “I really like you a lot,” she tells him. “Much more than before.”

Jung says, “You were different from other people from the start.” She was open about disliking him, and oddly that had an effect on him. He must have been afraid she’d mess with him somehow, and he didn’t like it.

“But not now,” he says. “Now… I’m afraid you’ll leave. I like you a lot too. Really a lot.” She smiles and holds him again, blinking back some tears.

Outside, In-ho stands alone, battered inside and out. He heads off sighing, “Ah, it hurts.”

 
COMMENTS

I really loved the movement in this episode, and I don’t only say that because it brought our couple back to reconciliation. Many of the moments that grab me about this show are the little beats, the things that don’t drive the show proper but that feel true to life in a way that stirs pathos. For instance, as odd as it seems, the characterization of Young-gon as a malicious, pathetic, dangerous force whom you know could be a really destructive force but who still makes me feel pangs of sympathy.

Ultimately he just wants to be accepted, and that base desire is roots him in humanity and makes his character relatable even as his actions are completely unjustifiable. Like Copycat Min-soo, understanding a character doesn’t have to absolve them of culpability; rather, it makes them that much more compelling and interesting, while still condemnable when they hurt others or act in menacing ways. I’m always torn with Young-gon, because he’s definitely someone I wouldn’t want anywhere near me in real life, and he’s a livewire best left untouched—but you can see that he does have a charming and cute side, which makes it a shame that he doesn’t let that form the basis of his personality rather than all the scary obsessive other parts.

I have wondered whether Jung was fading a bit from the front lines of the show, becoming more of a figure for Seol to react to than anything, so I’m very pleased with how this episode brought him around. Or rather, it brought us around, finally, to that hard-to-find angle that allows us a glimpse into his mind and heart. That’s the trick of this show, that Jung is absolutely a central character who’s undergoing tremendous growth, but our perspective of him is actually quite limited—it’s like we’re getting a hero through the lens of someone else’s eyes. It produces a very interesting effect, in line with the unreliable narrator aspect that we started out with.

Our past explorations of Jung’s character have given us some insight into his motivations and explained his reasons, but not really gotten him off the hook for his actions. He’s always been possessive of Seol, and utterly backward in how he tries to help her, and the couple’s incredible lack of communication has been a huge red flag—even if it’s been for well-meaning reasons, such as liking each other too much to risk showing their less-than-perfect sides. It has made me wary of rooting for them as a couple even through the show’s end, much less far after the curtain closes and they head off into the after-show happily ever after. Because even when I like Jung, I’m still mostly motivated by care and concern for Seol—I want her to be happy and to find what’s best for her, and I’m nervous about whether he fits that description.

I wasn’t sure the show would be able to reconcile their issues satisfactorily, but then Seol challenged him to stop hiding and Jung confided everything, and wow, what a door to the future that opens up. I was holding my breath, just as Seol was, when she asked him to be honest with her and even provided him with the words to say. And I deflated along with her when he pretended he had no idea what she was talking about. Which is why I was shocked that he ended up telling her all about his past, and really touched when Seol assured him that far from running away, she actually likes him more, seeing his real self. Tear. No lie, that made me a little verklempt right there.

It’s a wrench for In-ho, especially since I really do love his character and feel my heart twist whenever he looks at her with his heart in his eyes, or does something sweet without wanting credit for it. But the reason he’s a great second lead is also why he won’t get the girl; one of the key elements of Second Lead Syndrome is that no matter how great he is, no matter how much more you think he “deserves” her, it’s never his call to make. And that In-ho sees that and accepts it gracefully just commends him more to me.

I just hope that now with Jung’s long-repressed feelings finally expressed, the boys have a shot at repairing their friendship—and maybe they’ll even be better people individually this time, making for an even stronger twosome. And I’ll love that while they seem to be fighting over a girl on the surface, she’s really a major force in bringing them back together.

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987

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THIS EPISODE KILLED ME. I'VE BEEN READING THE WEBTOON BUT I CAN HONESTLY SAY THAT I LOVE THE DRAMA FOR MOVING A BIT FASTER (though, to be fair, that's probably because it IS a show). STILL. I'm happy to finally get some answers. I'm still hoping for a Jung-In Ho reunion where they find out that In-Ha is the reason for the whole mess (because I will bet anything that she is) and then Jung and In Ho can ride off into the metaphorical sunset.

Thanks for the recap!

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Inha has to be mental. Look at her eyes. If she isn't, then the actress is giving a nonsensical performance.

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OMG, IKR?! I have a feeling I'm going to hate her but be able to sympathize, simply because of the terrible backstory.

Even looking at the flashbacks it's obvious that her personality hasn't really changed all that much, so it'd be interesting to see where her vicious and outright cruel streak comes from. Because while I think Jung mattered/matters a lot to her, I also don't think he's the driving force in her personality or storyline.

With In Ho, Jung is OBVIOUSLY the driving force, because In Ho's life is divided into 3-4 pretty clear stages; Pre-Jung, W/Jung, Post-Hand Injury, and Post-Seol.

It's gonna be interesting to see what happens with In Ha, she's one of those characters where she's fun to hate but you just KNOW she's psychologically beyond saving.

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Urrrm, I'm loathe to say ANYONE is psychologically beyond saving and she isn't very deep or complex.
I think her hurts are deep and combined with a robust personality, it's spiraled but therapy could help her quite quickly. Relatively speaking. Jung would take years and years (and years) because it's re-training.

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Out of curiosity, what would you say his issues are?
Just plain psychopathy?

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@kai to
It's left pretty ambiguous but clinical diagnosis is a complicated process which takes a lot of one on one with a professionally trained psychiatrist (there's Grandpa Baek offhand assessment but I'm not sure he is a reliable narrator) . And even they mis-diagnose which is why I'm so uncomfortable with "I'm sure he is a..." Statements after seeing mere brief glimpses of his life.

Even if there had been nothing different about him to begin with, Therapy would help him now in order to deal with what he has become. Repression is a very bad thing.

Then again, I think most of us could benefit from proper therapy.

And thanks, I've started a game where I take a shot of soju everytime someone says psychopath. Lol. I'm hoping ppl will join me next week but then again, we may all get very drunk ?

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I was shocked I actually wanted to cry for Inha in this episode. ? When Inho is leaving and she says I forgot you were the type who would abandon me at any time.

I love how Citt can get you to sympathize for characters you previously hated.

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I'm also surprised at how nice Inha seem in that flashback. And I mean in every scene there. Though its still Inha agressive personality. But she seem more human.

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Yeah, I feel like past In-ha is a sympathetic character, flaws and all, but present In-ha is just crazytown.

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@kafanyu
It gave me hope that Inha still can improve. She need people that can order her around (rich people, naturally) but also see her worth and motivate her to dream again.

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She is something extreme. But she never actually plans something really bad if you look into what she has done. She 'rescued' herself and In-ho when they were little, when she always thinks In-ho is ready to leave her anytime. Her 'possessiveness' of Jung is quite more like taking care of little bro that had been dating only bad/pathetic girls.
Everything she has done impacts on something big, but never really bad. She is the driving force of the drama.

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She seems to have gotten a lot worse in the 5 years since Inho has been gone and Jung must've been largely absent too (and he's been getting colder and more robotic as well, I imagine). Which is understandable.

Which is too bad because personality really needs a check and balance thing happening.

I still dislike her a lot, haha. Her very casual cruelty makes me want to pull her hair out :p. But now I see aspects of myself in her too. Scary.

But it made me realize she must shop as an addiction and her low self esteem is driving a lot of the avoidance behaviors. She still needs to do better but so do we all.

CITT: Stop getting me to have sympathy for characters I love to hate ?. And by stop, I mean don't.

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+1

These few episodes marked a rapid turnaround in my feelings towards In-Ha as a character. How is CITT doing this!?

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CITT's genius.

If you told me in the beginning of the show that I would actually have sympathy for her, I'd have told you to get out.

I'm not one to excuse bad behavior just because of a sad backstory. I mean we all have hurts and pains and drastic childhoods are no excuse. However, it is a mitigating circumstance when I see a childhood trigger is driving something.

I didn't even feel that much for her after the aunt flashback but Inho leaving struck a cord with me. Maybe because I hated her for how cold she was to Inho in the first episodes.

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I know! I completely sympathized with Inha in that moment. And that was some terrific acting.

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Agreed. :)
And she is very pretty when her crazy eyes aren't on, haha.

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Yes! And great acting, too. She just looked so vulnerable and lost. She was so child-like in the way she looked at in-Ho and you could see them as they were when they were children, fighting, but always sticking together. Moving moment.

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More than the actress.. (for some reason she is going japanese comic relief way)..it is directors fault right?

The interpretation that he has given to this In Ha..

From the actresses perspective..i can appreciate the adaptation..she is serious in serious moments..( when she played sympathy card with In Ho to get money, ep 12 when she is stopping him..waiting for him...and a few other moments when she is serious)..

Thing is this character is so screwed up .. with the childhood abuse and all..no family..one brother who leaves everytime he wants to... no talent..no one who really loves her..

I think she has quite a strength to find joys in life..or to give the appearance of being happy.. she is not..she is quite cynical..

But ya..the problem is every other character is so complex and serious..that her brand of comical relief just comes across cartoonish..

still i think director's fault..not so much of the actress

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I agree! I've been telling anyone who'll listen how I think the director/team must be so carried away by how funny the actress
is capable of being that they're letting the quiet moments slide. We're missing out on depth in favor of broad comedy, which is fine in doses but gets frustrating when you want more. And the actress is clearly capable, so it falls to the direction to make better choices for InHa. I love her anyway, as I love most difficult female characters, but it would be nice to see some more of her inner feelings, like in this episode.

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Well in the Webtoon I never felt any depth from In Ha, she was just annoying and evil, borderline crazy, pampering herself, not much pride but has a huge ego (I don't know how that works). Basically a waste of space of a human being. so for me here at least she's being funny so I love the actress for that ;)

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I think so too. Kid Inha was played really boisterously too.

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Of course the interviews and bts show the director kinda lets you interpret the character on your own. Her directing style seems more collaborative than a lot of directors. So who knows?

It grated on my nerves in the beginning but I either got used to it or it's been toned down. Both?

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I suspect the one truly keeping tabs was In Ha but it would be lame if she was the only reason shit went sour and lbr she wasnt. even if Jung knew it was only In Ha doing the ratting out, it doesnt mean that In Ho didnt know about it (he might have he might not have, but Jung would never know without asking.) he still overheard those words In Ho was saying. Which makes it seem like In Ho was only pretending to like Jung all the while looking down on him in his mind.
In Ha is foolish and self serving but she DID know Jung better than In Ho, ironically enough!
Jung would've been hurt regardless of In Ho being involved in In Ha's agreement with his dad, but its not doubt that misunderstanding and his deep seated insecurity/jealousy re his dad's preference for the baek siblings that made him lash out in such a toxic way like he did. so yeah blaming it all on In Ha is really not a solution and I hope its not taken as such.
and for all her wickedness, In Ha is someone who needs serious help and i dont mean just being given money. It's obv she felt alone in her own way and thats why she turned into such a user. if she put half the energy that she puts into getting money and shopping, and used for lit anythign else. she'd prob be successful in all kinds of things. i mean am i th eonly one who felt sad hearing her want jung to praise her so bad? she obv wants money but she has lacks a clear purpose in her life. sigh i just want her to be redeemed i guess :(

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I'm sure its not that they always tattle on Jung. But more of their chat to Jung's father about their everyday live always including Jung. So thats how his father keeping tab on him, the sibling never know it themselves.

And about Inha. She always hear that she has no future, so always depend on people around her for living. When her brother left her, it got worse. She depend on more people outside her closes relation.

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Yeah I think Jung believes they were specifically observing him and reporting to his father when in actuality they were talking about school and life with Dad. Honestly, if you were Inho or Inha and Dad asks how was school, is everything going well, how is Jung doing, would you think you're a spy or reporting something? The siblings understand Jung is unstable but don't monitor him and report his behavior to their father in the way Jung believes they do. Also, I really want more Inha as in the raw side of her character. We know she's manipulative and lives with a kill or be killed mindset so she takes advantage of whatever she can but that brief scene where she says she knew Inho always left her behind and how she watched him go was interesting. We finally got to see more depth to her character and I hope we see more of this side to her.

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"The siblings understand that Jung is unstable..."? I think it's that exact kind of presumousness that Jung hates and rebels against.

Who are they to say/think he's unstable or "strange"?

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I fully believe they were reporting. Not the kind where they take exact notes for a play by play they're smart enough to know the kind of info Jung's dad wants to hear....

come on, In Ha not picking up on dad's vibe in wanting to know what Jung does at school? We've seen how observant she is. She's crafty and always knows her worth.

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I would also like to see a bit more of InHa, I find her character so interesting. She seems to think of herself as a survivor and tries to hide her sadness by being cold and cynic.
I saw a ray of hope when she paid attention to the art book that her nerdy friend had. Maybe she would be able to find some healing and comfort there. It would be great if she decides to take on art classes and paint again, and this time I think that In Ho would know better and support her. And maybe she can start dating nerdy friend for real...I would love to see her going after her dreams and growing more mature. But I guess the show will not pay that much attention to her, it's a pity...

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In the phone conversation with Jung's mom though, Dad says keeping tabs and Inho has said before, "don't worry, I won't tell your Dad."

In those contexts, Dad thinks Jung is strange and so strange that he has spies on him. I guess it's clearer in the web-toon.

Dad could just ask Jung but no, he has spies on his own son. :/ That implies he doesn't trust him enough and doesn't spend the time and attention to find out himself and etc, etc. It speaks volumes about their relationship.

Plus, prejudices Baek siblings to think he's strange, unstable etc. Even more than they normally would with a kid whose personality differs from theirs.

The same behaviors could be seen as just different or even interpreted positively by some. And sadly, ppl tend to meet your expectations.

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Well I mean it's not like Jung isn't unstable. It's fairly obvious that he does suffer from his control complex which isn't really that bad. "Who are they to say/think he is unstable?" They were best friends and essentially family which of course means they know each other to a greater extent than others. It must be really hard for Jung because his father made everything worse. I'm OCD in the sense that these minor ticks and trivial details bother me to great extents. When people around me noticed, I was angry that they thought I couldn't control how I felt about something. But what changed all this was having really great conversations with friends and family. It's easy now to recognize I have a flaw but so does everyone. It's unnecessary to think, "Who are they to judge me?" when we get down to it, what they believe is actually true. Everything just clears up once you accept this. Everyone has a flaw and it shouldn't be ignored but acknowledged and worked with. Jung needs to realize this. I relate to his character so much and I hope he discovers that what happened in the past was really understandable. It wasn't right or for the best but it happened because those who loved him thought it was best. I already see him making great progress and I hope he continues down this path. Nobody is really at complete fault per say because if we abandon any biases/prejudices, it's quite reasonable to see everything from each perspective. Everything thinks they're laying the same trap but those traps are as different as can be :)

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I posted a separate comment lower down, but I believe it quite possible Inha called the police, not Jung. How elaborate can we take Jung's schemes to be? After hearing that the Baeks were potentially reporting on him to dad, it seems to me that whole situation with Jung supposedly going to an underage party with prostitutes, and letting Inho know, was precisely Jung's way of testing whether Inho was reporting back to dad.

And because the police did come, Jung would believe that Inho did tell dad, who reported to police. He would also believe that everything that came after was indeed Inho's own fault, and moreover would be completely justified to my eyes in believing that. Jung is so forcefully convinced that Inho did this to himself that I started wondering why, given the scanty evidence of it.

This scenario seems consistent for Jung, who does set traps, but so far not violent ones. The fact that the police came was possibly the only thing Jung wanted to know, and it completely damned Inho in his eyes. Also, since he believes Inho WAS the snitch, the mauling of his hand would make the whole situation completely Inho's fault to Jung, explaining why he keeps insisting on this point.

What Jung does not know is that Inho did not report it to dad, and therefore Inho believes Jung sent the police to set him up, directly leading to the beating. But in an early scene, the Baeks allude to doing something to Jung, which Inha continued but Inho stopped. It seems quite likely to me that Inho told Inha about the party, and Inha, who doesn't like Jung messing with girls, reported it to Jung's dad or directly to the police. She would be the wrench in the whole works. But not completely to blame either - she wouldnt know it was a test set up by Jung, or that it would result in Inho's hand getting crushed. As she herself says, she protects Jung from other girls.

The crux is: who called the police (directly or via Jung's dad)? Inho obviously believes it was Jung, and that he inflenced the subsequent events towards Inho's ruined hand. Good possibility. Jung, however, if he was just testing Inho, likely believes it was Inho, and therefore Inho brought the whole situation upon himself. Almost no possibility here, I'd say - we've already received a hint that Inho was not reporting on Jung by that point.

But what if it was Inha? Then we have a situation where both Inho and Jung's actions and beliefs are completely understandable based on a misunderstanding. Even Jung's cold but furious face. And Inha is not completely to blame either.

I guess I'm hoping the scenario is something like this. A scenario we've seen in this drama more than once where a third person is the main culprit instead of Jung (like it being Sang Cheul who did the registration trick, and Inha who didnt start but certainly strongly influenced Young Gon's stalking). It most importantly leads to a place where Jung and Inho can make up, and I can accept Jung...

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Huh, that's interesting in light of how Jung hasn't even told Seol that Inha wrote those later texts. Inha seems to get away with a lot. That doesn't seem coincidental to me. Idk.

The show sprinkles hints here and there.

The hand scene seemed too pivotal to be covered so quickly and just from inho's viewpoint. I assumed there was more we haven't been shown yet but who knows?

It's a huge scene that both webtoon and drama fans have been waiting for the big reveal and what we have so far seems lacking for such a buildup.

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Yes, I too believe there's more to it. We do get Inho's version, but not Jung's. The backstory from Jung doesn't deal with the hand; it deals solely with when and why his distrust and falling out with Inho (and Inha) occurred. I truly believe there is a third story - whether Inha's or someone else's - that will excuse Jung from full culpability here. Otherwise, I don't really see how Inho could forgive him.

This doesn't address the general immaturity and assholery of either boy. Inho's jealousy, arrogance and gossip, or Jung's cold manipulation to make Inho jealous and complete lack of honest communication. These are the the issues they're dealing with now. If the hand incident and spying can be cleared up, they can likely deal with this other stuff.

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I love that part about the general immaturity and assholery of either boy, haha. Word. And I've been there too.

It really helps to understand this story when you see ALL the characters as broken and damaged.

Instead of picking sides and potentially missing out on the truth of what one side says, it helps to think they both have a part of the truth and they both have major things completely wrong.

Because, at the end of the day, no matter who was at fault for what and how much of a share, neither is presented as a saint...and they need each other.

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Oh my gosh! I love your theory! I never thought about it like that. YES YES YES YES. This.

What if it was In Ha all along and not Jung who reported to the police?

Anyways, about In Ho mouthing off about Jung, I think it was just his way of keeping Jung all to himself.

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Glad you like it! There are certainly enough shadow scenes and prior patterns to make it feasible.

Absolutely agree with your last point. Inho wears his heart on his sleeve unlike Jung, so it's so easy to see his possessiveness of his best friend and almost-brother there. We got Jung's story about the Baeks and his jealousy of them, but how hard it would be for the Baeks to know their existence and livelihood were solely dependent on being satellites and spies around Jung. I think it's really a testament to Inho and Jung that they loved each other like brothers anyway. But the cracks were there in the foundation of their relationship - the father has a lot to answer for I think.

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I agree with this theory. It's also my personal assessment. Based on Yoo Jung's past behavior with Young-gon, Min-Soo, etc, it makes sense. He always sets people up to expose their own crimes (not to get hurt necessarily). And thus far - he's never been the central culprit. He's continually misjudged, and he doesn't correct the interpretations of others.

I also wonder what Yoo Jung did right AFTER leaving the fight scene. Based on other scenarios (like the drunkard), he is more likely to leave calmly and get help (like an ambulance) before jumping into the fray.

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Exactly. While she rarely shows his inner thoughts, the author has chosen scenes that tell us what Jung likely did in this central backstory conflict. If my scenario is correct, and it was just a test, then Jung had every right to be furious with Inho thinking he was the snitch and had brought it on himself. He's still furious with Inho in that scene, and vindictive I think, but he also likely calculated the odds and called an ambulance as being the best thing to do for Inho at that moment.

Jung isn't nice, but he's not murderous either. Moreover, Inho's crushed hand would have affected him. But he's not the type to run crying to what he thinks is his traitorous friend at that moment. I would have. Inho might have. But Jung wouldn't have.

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A strong foreshadowing moment for the possibility of Inha's involvement is when Inho makes fun of her painting in the same way he makes fun of piano boy's playing. Episode 7, Inha is upset and attacks him, saying she'll crush his fingers, and actually goes to stomp on them but is stopped by Jung. We know that piano boy does the deed but it's interesting that we have a mirror situation here with Inha. Jung also steps on the hand of the landlady's fake grandson. I don't know, but this could be an indication all three were involved. Jung puts it in motion but there's choice and free will involved after that. Inha reports to police, still choice and free will after that. Piano boy tells on Inho and ultimately crushes the fingers.

Regardless if this exact scenario plays out, I'm really impressed with the writers for this kind of layering. There's literary value here that I rarely if ever see in kdrama.

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Wow! Yes, very possible Jung thought Inho called the police.

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It's my speculation but I'm giving it a 50-50 chance based on what we know of Jung's modus operandi. In most cases, he sets up a trap but it's the weakness of the other person that leads him or her into it. He even gives them a warning. He tells Young Gon to get himself under control. He tells Minsoo she should know she can't be the same as Hong Seol. He tells Seol she should be more careful.And he tells Inho, in a roundabout way, that he better not be reporting the incident back to his dad.

We also know, from what he told Seol in this episode, that it was the reporting/spying that hurt him the most. But if you listen to the conversation of his father, there is no certainty there that the kids were spying - and Jung would want to make sure.

I think it's very possible Jung set up the cheese in the trap here for Inho but it was a different mouse - Inha (or another character) - that came nibbling. My money's on Inha because we actually know she was reporting to Jung's dad, and we've had a few exchanges between them to show that.

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Ah! So much feels
To start with both of our guys have their fair share of fault, problem,hurt in what happened and no one gets a clean chit..

What I'm not understanding is that characterization of inho from past and present is so different... this past is relatable to webtoon inho(who is a little bit jerk & selfish) but I think they gave too much colour to drama inho... say he learned from his fall then we have to thank jung for doing that (still didn't have to take it to that extent) if the same actor didn't potray both I would've had hard time to relate...

people exchange messages and manipulator's exchange phones one went in sink other in box..

This is a show where girls hold the key... inha can never be so innocent when all this occurred she has her hand in it...

I'm sorry but soel is one for jung.. she is his final chance for him to have a trusted relationship....
But inho's words that ..can he have the confidence for not doing her same thing as he did to inho... I have no confidence in jung part but completely confident of soel that she would never do what inho did..

Soel rocked this episode....those last scenes made me cry KGE and PHJ are awesome actors..

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I agree with a lot of what you said here but is she his final chance?

I think a lot of ppl assume If not Seol, who would take Jung but that's part of the show's trap, IMO. Everyone keeps saying it and they show us scenes which highlight his difference and so we believe it. It's a clever ruse of storytelling; the story changes based on how you cut it.

So I took a step back and tried to look at it objectively.
And I think it doesn't make sense. There are people who do not mind different ppl. And his different-ness will actually be a benefit for his role in life. A lot of CEOs and Chairman are psychopaths (though hopefully not the killing kind) though I'm not convinced Jung is one rather than someone with tendencies and behaviors due to repressed emotions dealing with unrealistic expectations.

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Nice episode..

i so agree..like YG didn't know she was following..
these guys don't know IHa was following them and keeping tabs and reporting to ajussi for the money and pampering

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Can we have a special award for Jung & Inho at the year-end reviews? Not exactly for best bromance. Was thinking of Best Fight scene. Hee. Man, seriously, that was so awesome, I was emotionally invested throughout the scene. *sniff*

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Yoo Jung & In Ho fought over Seol for REAL. I mean, like super literally. Two men used their fists & kicks, throwing punches, screamed their hearts out (loudly, i guess), strangled each other's heads, they wrestled to the ground, you can see their bruises on the faces, they took another hit from one another, fell down& stood just right back up..so intense..my o my..
I surprisingly kinda held my breath when first saw that particular scene. Which made it, in my personal view, definitely the highlight of this episode.
?

The characters are just so complicated and yet pretty much relatable. One cant be entirely negative nor be completely nice all the time. People are often mistaken by others for this certain image they created themselves in their minds the minute they saw one person they find unsual, or as Seol would put it, different. Way to go, CITT. 4 more epsodes left. ?

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Loved this episode!!

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+1

we came to understand this bittersweet friendship. i learned about jung more in this episode. his point of view about the things he couldnt say. he's a character that i hate to love and love to hate at the same time. while inho, he's just a human-being.. he's a simple-minded person.

in one sentence : loved this episode!!! (II) :D

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The problem with Jung is he sees the worst in the people who have wronged him and then he goes out of his way to expose that bad side of people without giving them a chance to redeem themselves. Because thing is people make mistakes but they can also change.

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I think Seol is going to teach Jung to give people a chance when she will forgive Min Soo.

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I wonder about Min Soo too. She was so elaborately set up by Young Gon and then Jung. Sure she was wrong but she didn't set out to hurt anyone. I wish she had received some grace.

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Urm, I see what you are saying but I'm uncomfortable with that because we have seen him give ppl chances. It's usually when they have really pushed it that he gives them a rope to hang themselves with (or someone else a rope).

Also, only ONE problem? Hur. I think his issues have issues.

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Who is Jung to judge anyone though? Or give people "chances?"
The way his mind is working right now...he can't fully understand anyone. I don't think he really gives a fig about fully understanding anyone. Too obsessed with his own hang ups to be able to do it anyway...

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Disclaimer: I AM NOT EXCUSING JUNG'S BAD ACTIONS.

@ Stephie
I don't think that's quite fair because he is trying really hard to understand Seol. He's been opening up as she asked and trying to be honest and trying to understand what she says. From what I've seen of his interaction with Inha and Inho, he did/does seem to try. And though the drama shows it less, he does have friends.

And as for judging...we all judge. We are judging right now, aren't we?
We have to to survive. We have to judge character, incidents, circumstances and how far we are going to let someone take it. Jung doesn't go out of his way to judge and punish ppl who aren't related to him in some manner. You leave him alone and he leaves you alone. He's not even Batman.

I'm not saying the way he handles things is right but, as an example, just because ppl keep saying he doesn't know what it is to love in the show, doesn't mean that it is true. Because look at who is saying them. You really have to watch whose perspective you are seeing as a scene unfolds. And who is saying certain words. What is their agenda at that moment?

I trust Seol, Bora, Euntaek, Kyunghwan estimation of Jung more than Pantythief, Inho when he is upset, seol's erstwhile neighbor who hasn't seen Jung in a long time and is now an alcoholic runaway who was initially quite mean to Seol, etc, etc.

To me, it's still too early to say whether he is able to understand or love. We've finally seen him open up and share something he normally wouldn't, so now we can see how reliable he is as a narrator. It's sad that his huge step of growth (in communicating) has been largely overlooked. And as infantile as the fight with Inho was, it was also communication. Next time, maybe they won't need to resort to fists.

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People show Jung the worst of themselves. It's not like he's able to see beyond the surface of what other people can see. He has LITERALLY seen the shitty things that these people do. That's a problem for him, but not with him.

There is nothing to suggest that any of those people would have done the right thing if not forced to do so. Has there been anyone that Jung hasn't given the opportunity to do the right thing, first?

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Me too :)) I was SOOOOO happy they covered so much!

Proud of Seol for calling Jung out, standing her ground and spelling it out for him too. Yahoo! Let's see more of that patient assertiveness :))

I also thought the fistfight between the boys was a move in the right direction for Jung...there's never been a show which has had me cheering for violent scenes as much as this one ?; not sure what to make of that...even though the two were being like little boys. They seemed so much like brothers right then. I thought it was a move in the right direction because he isn't pushing his feeling down. I didn't think it's a coincidence that he opens up after that (though a lot of that is also Seol's patient questions:) while he was previously frozen (when he tells Seol he doesn't know what she means).

And the flashbacks...wow. The feels ?

Thank you writernim, I will take back all my complaints of yesterday. Movement. Finally.

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+1

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You know you're watching a phenomenal show when a single episode is all it takes to turn the tables around (with resolutions! new plot lines! questions answered! OTP progress!).

PD-nim, Writer-nim - you're one in a million. :')

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This episode is my favourite. I do think In-ho was partly at fault for his hand, that kid broke it not only because he was jealous of In-ho but because In-ho was also constantly a jerk to him.

Jung and Seol talking killed me dead. What am I going to do without this show???

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You are right about Inho being a jerk to that kid. Inho was so arrogant about his own talent that he just looked down on others. Also, Inho simply had no business talking about Jung behind his back like that to the kid. Those were pretty damning things to say about sb you were close to. Even if Jung didn't hear it right there, imagine the kid telling it to others, and how Jung would look to the world then?
I don't blame Jung for being hurt, esp. when he just returned from getting the autographs that Inho wanted so badly.
I'd say that as friendly as Inho was to Jung on the surface, he had to be harbouring a fair amount of jealousy.

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Jung is hurt, okay, yes. But does that really warrant Inho breaking a hand over? Jung comes across as petty and vengeful. It's honestly disgusting to me now how sociopathic he is. Worse is, he acts like he is some poor, misunderstood victim in all this when he gives Inho sh^t for doing the same thing. Not only is he a sociopath, he is also a hypocritical one. After this episode, I don't feel sorry for Jung anymore.

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it wouldnt warrant breaking his hand, but u assume that was his intent. not that his reaction was appropriate but he was a teenager presumably and just had his heart crushed the way in ho's hand got crushed. (yikes to that) and in ho at taht point was hurt beyond words, which is why even when jung offered to pay for lessons or rehab for In Ho. In Ho would respond with pure disgust/rage. even tho i bet jung did feel some guilt re his hand but was still angry at in ho and shut off, to bother explaining or being open. sigh.

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I never for a sec thought it was ok for Jung or anyone to break a hand (of a piano prodigy no less). I explicitly stated that in comment 8 below, which I posted Before this one. In 3.1, I was merely replying to 1st paragraph in #3, re Inho's part in the incident.

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... how was that hand breaking Jung's fault?

Pretending not to see an ALREADY broken hand and turning his back, that I can see why it's hurtful but let's be fair and place blames and responsibilities where they really lie and not assume until it is specifically revealed that Jung orchestrated the exact sequence in mind (which is sort of a leap considering he'd have to get InHo to appear exactly the moment those rough kids just left and New Kid's concern and witness. Not to mention New Kid's numb-skull conclusion that InHo set tgem up just because he was there).

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I didn't get the sense that New Kid actually thought that Inho had ratted them out. It was just an opportunity to vent his anger against Inho, who had been so arrogantly condescending toward him for so long. He knew the bullies were angry enough to beat someone up and just wanted a target so New Kid just ... supplied a convenient target.

The tragic/hilarious thing is that even now, Inho probably doesn't even remember New Kid. Like, not just Inho doesn't understand why New Kid would do something like that (though pre-broken hand Inho was exactly that sort of arrogantly oblivious); just, Inho utterly dismissed him and at most registered some pathetic hanger-on around Jung. Absolutely dismissed him otherwise.

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@Mulberry:

Whether New Kid actually thought InHo was the whistleblower is irrelevent. Only thing relevant was that he did call him out as the one and then the rest of the pea-brains took his word for it when very obviously Jung would have been suspect number 1 - they personally invited him and he obviously never showed up. They didn't even know that InHo knew of their rendezvous until New Kid suggested so. I think the whole reason Jung was let off was not because the new suspect was InHo (though obviously because of InHo they didn't think much further) but because of Jung's reputation as a not-shit-stirrer. Here was a guy whose fountain pen they easily broke and threw back without nary a show of guilt - which of them would even think he'd go so far as to dare/bother to report them? So in response to another comment somewhere down there, I don't really accept the suggestion that Jung manipulated InHo to be there (we don't even know whether he called InHo there or if InHo was the one acting like a clingy puppy again and went himself) at the confrontation just to make him a potential scapegoat. He never needed one.

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@Peeps

You're right that in the outcome of things, what New Kid actually believed doesn't have much relevance; but I think it speaks something to Inho's character at the time, and also to if Jung is so responsible for every bad thing that happened to Inho.

It's not that Inho is responsible for his own broken hand; at the same time, I think we're meant to understand that New Kid gunning for Inho isn't like....just random malice. He had motivation (which of course doesn't justify his actions). Inho was a dick, New Kid reacted to that with disproportionate violence: there is a whole world of culpability and blame there that have nothing to do with Jung. Jung has agency in things, but so does everyone else; Jung doesn't make people do things. If anything, what strikes us as odd is that Jung can so clearly see people about to step on landmines and he does absolutely nothing about it: he's like a superhero who doesn't....hero.

However, I don't think Jung has ever manipulated people to get himself out of trouble, re: your point about Inho as not being the scapegoat. Generally, Jung's touch is light and deft enough that he doesn't seem involved; like you said, he's built enough social capital that people don't want to blame him; when accused vaguely (as Young Gon did), Jung is vaguely pitying and refuses to acknowledge the validity of any of the accusations ("What are you talking about?") rather than refute his own responsibility; and if pressed, as Seol does, Jung is forthright about his actions, no excuses.

Jung's whole thing is pretty much giving people as much rope as they need to hang themselves. He doesn't go around framing bystanders.

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@Mulberries:

Yup.

Although whether Jung gave any rope intentionally in this particular "hand case" (potential sunbae reporting not included) is debatable. I personally think that if he actually manipulated anything, it stopped right at "calling the police" (which we don't even know is true or not).

But yes, I agree with your sentiments.

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I don't think jung is playing victim ..playing victim is when you tell ur pain repeatedly like min soo did but for jung it took a lot from soel to get it out of him so no...on the other hand it was inho from start blaming ...jung did this to me without realising what he did when he was so arrogant...

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I don't think Jung arranged to break In Ho's hand. Could be proven wrong, but... I don't think that was the intent.

Given his pattern, I think Jung orchestrated things. He slowly iced In Ho out and then lined things up in a way where In Ho would likely be accused as the snitch. What was less predictable was how the combination of Jung's withdrawal of protection and In Ho's own history of arrogance would fuel that fire.

I genuinely don't know how to process the hand damage stuff - Jung is so coldly unfazed. But then again his dad does identify a strangeness to him, and he does have unusual thought patterns, so maybe he was able to show enthusiasm for music when In Ho was his friend but by severing that connection he also lost understanding of how deeply integrated that talent was for In Ho? I don't know. Part of me just thinks Jung watched it like something playing out on a movie screen - he set the pieces up, and entropy takes care of the rest. He doesn't have control over events so doesn't even think of intervening.

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I think I understand. When something devastating happens and feelings overwhelm me, I shut down. I emotionally remove myself. And when someone asks how I am feeling at that moment, I honestly do not know.

It's a defense mechanism. Survival mode. Not a healthy one.

Id like to think Jung goes and calls the ambulance but honestly, I do not know if he does or if he walks away with his cold self.

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I think Jung is so uncurious about some things. The same as when Seol told him over the phone that neighbor-guy had been taken to the police station -- most people would at least rubberneck; Jung just hangs up and continues on his treadmill. He can somehow just shut down his emotional involvement in a thing. It's like the extreme, extreme, extreme version of a lack of sentimentalism.

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@mulberries, good callback - yes, that's exactly what seems to happen. If Jung doesn't have an active role in an event (and he rarely does) he won't intervene. Most people assume a level of personal responsibility when they've coordinated something, but Jung's belief is more along the lines of "you're on your own, and responsible for your own actions". Even if he manipulated the circumstances.

The thing is, I can't say he's wrong. There's no reason for him to be particularly curious about an underwear thief. If it's a false accusation, it'll be disproven - what exactly would his involvement be here? it's definitely a fringe behavior, but not WRONG. Just unusual.

Which of course is the entire problem: his dad detected unusual behavior and rather than talking about it, tried to suppress it in some sort of out of sight, out of mind tactic. All he actually did was produce a boy who can't talk about his emotions and hides his feelings so he won't get criticized for them.

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I don't think it was meant for In Ho to break his hand, if I am going tk go overboard with my imagination, I think, who Jung was setting up was The New Kid, he wanted him to be caught by the police and not attend the recital or something and therefore not get the scholarship. I think that Jung is still loyal to In Ho even at that moment, and maybe The New Kid talked behind In Ho or some other assault I can only guess...again, this is just my imagination going wild, but I am pretty sure it was not Jung's intention to hurt Baek In-Ho's hand, like it was not really the adoption that had him angry at In-ho..

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Have we not learned our lesson yet?

Let us not make hasty judgments. CITT shows us one thing...and then it shows another part. It's like putting together a puzzle. You don't get the whole picture for awhile. (And some things you think are done and then they revisit it from another angle ?)

I do not think Jung is an innocent or misunderstood victim but I'd be very surprised if he is an all dark character.

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So much yes to your comment and the comment above about Jung's uncurious nature. We don't know anything yet other than Jung, as always, unconcern about things he decided not to care about.

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Yes. Finallyvsomeone said it. I was starting to worry about some peoples comments, even if someone talks behind your back, or looks down on you doesn't give you the right to resort to violence. An eye for an eye would leave the whole world blind.
Seriously some of these commenters responses are a little disturbing to me.
Thanks for the sanity. Cheers.

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OMO OMOi was wondering.i had the same thought.
after reading the comments i had to wonder if i was watching the same drama as others. Just like with young gon i'm sure jung setup the scene. surely wouldnt have foreseen In Ho's hand being crushed at all but a confrontation of sorts. In Ho aggravated the other pianist enough that for sure that fool would want to destroy the one thing he could think to make In Ho suffer. Savages all of them.

Jung is a master manipulator and is in no way NOT partly responsible for being a catalyst. He's dangerous because he wont do it himself so as to never be seen as less than in others eyes. Flashback to his intense dislike of Seol because she found him out.

Baek In Ho is a crude, slightly inconsiderate sort of fella who really means well and Jung took what he said badly as would anyone but had Jung been paying attention In Ho was really saying don't envy Jung because having money and access to things isn't exactly what it seems. It doesnt guarantee happiness. In Ho and Jung are both responsible for the demise of their friendship but to read ppl justify any action taken by Jung even if all he did was whisper something in someone's ear is very very disturbing.

If i were angry with someone i considered a friend I could never watch them be beaten and get their hand crushed and cooly walk away. It takes another make of human to do that and feel nothing.

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I don't think most ppl here think breaking a talented player's hand was okay.

Idk what you are reading but just because ppl think there is enough blame to go around doesn't mean anyone thinks the violence was okay or warranted or fitting to the occasion.

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Can we stop calling him a sociopath! A sociopath would not have gone out of his way to get a heartfelt gift the way Jung did for In Ho. And let's not forget this was In Ho's perspective on things; it is colored by his emotions. Granted Jung's reaction was cold and he easily cuts off his relation (which I have done and I am FAR from being a sociopath). Seriously, armchair psychologist need to make the distinction between being slightly antisocial and repressed in their emotions, and an outright sociopath. There is a sea of difference

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A sociopath would not have gone out of his way to get a heartfelt gift the way Jung did for In Ho.

Objection!
We don't know whether it was a "heartfelt gift". I very much looks like that, but when(if) you deal with a sociopath, you tend to project a lot -- especially emotions -- into his/her actions.
It's also a bit of an over-generalisation to say "a sociopath would not".

(In senior high school, I received concert tickets (to a show I wanted to see but didn't allow myself to do so for complicated reasons) as a name day present from my neighbour. Who was diagnosed to have no ability of empathy, profound emotions or remorse.)

Seriously, armchair psychologist need to make the distinction between being slightly antisocial and repressed in their emotions, and an outright sociopath. There is a sea of difference

There is no such thing as "an outright sociopath". Every sociopath is different. Because, you know, sociopaths are people too.

There is no clear separation between "normal" people with just a few anti-social traits and The Sociopath.

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In Ho was definitely extremely arrogant and harsh when he was younger. . . But I find it hard to believe that In Ho truly believed what he said about Jung to the new kid. I think In Ho was jealous of the idea of someone being as close to Jung as he was and I feel he truly thought the kid had ulterior motives for wanting to get close to Jung. I think In Ho said those things to the new kid to try and turn him off on wanting to become friends with Jung. Even though In Ho was really arrogant back then, just from what we've seen of his character, he's always been a forth-coming and blunt person. It doesn't fit his personality to say what he truly feels about someone behind their backs.. he's always said what he thought to their face. But In Ho was still wrong. . He can't dictate who Jung gets close with. . That should be Jung's choice. . But from what we've seen of Jung and how he likes to manipulate situations, I am sure Jung ratted out the bullies and made sure that new kid knew that In Ho knew about it, hoping that In ho would take the blame. I don't believe that Jung anticipated the bullies and new kid would take it that far, but that still doesn't justify Jung even setting In Ho up like he did. I still think what Jung did wasn't justifiable to counter what In Ho said. I also don't believe that In Ho was keeping tabs on Jung.. he loved and cared for Jung like a brother too much for him to betray him in that way. In Ho was telling Jung to do the exact opposite of what Jung's father wanted. I think both were wrong, but I think Jung's actions were worse. I do believe that both still love each other deeply. . That's why both are obviously still hurt 5 years after this happened. They both need to talk about what happened so they can stop misunderstanding each other and start forming their bond again.

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Your descriptive choice words for In Ho place the blame for his actions and behaviours on age but for Jung, on his true intents. Why wouldn't Jung "setting up" action (if it were him) be categorized simply as "harsh" like In Ho's action? Because it lead to physical damage versus In Ho' s emotional damages to Jung (Betrayal of trust and obvious disrespect)?

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@kalene:

I think that I share your thoughts! Well said.

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@Kalene, I share your thoughts about why In Ho said what he said to New Kid. But, I think it was In Ha who ratted them out at "Remember".

Great Show! Can't wait for next episodes.

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@kalene +1

Completely agree with you

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I think there are still some things we don't know, such as a third party involved. This situation has not been resolved and we still have four episodes to go. On the face of it, the show seems to be telling us Jung set up Inho to be beat up but gives us some reasons to understand Jung. That's not really good enough, and I don't think it's a good enough basis for forgiveness between the two brothers, which I'm hoping for, or to trust Seol to Jung. I'm hoping that something like the scenario I outlined above (re Jung's plot and, separately, Inha's involvement) will come to light.

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Barbrey I read your theory and it sounds completely plausible. I believe there's more to it still that we don't know. I wouldn't be surprised if In Ha was involved somehow as well. I hope your theory is right :)

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Jung didn't break Inho's hand, though. He didn't make the other guy break his hand either. Inho brought that on himself. Even if Jung could have helped him, it was still Inho's own assiness that got his hand broken.

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I kinda thought part of why Inho says those things is because he is either jealous of Jung's friendship with piano kid (and thus warning kid off) or because he is getting rid of someone he thinks may be a user. I think the viewer could see it but Jung cannot. He's shocked that the person who told him that he is not strange (pen bullying flashback in earlier ep) is now saying these things :/ Then to hear that Dad has written him off as strange and has had Inho/Inha spying on him :((.

It made the misunderstandings between them especially tragic. In the glimpses we've gotten, they really loved each other...like brothers. Inho looked genuinely thrilled to be part of a family with Jung upon hearing the adoption news.

Please tell me Jung+Inho ship gonna sail.

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Unfortunately, I just don't think In Ho understood how hurtful what he said actually was. While In Ho has considerable charisma, he also is an arrogant jackass, and dressed up in a tux about to go out and win a competition is the height of In Ho Awesomeness. I can completely see him getting toxically carried away and using Jung to create a hierarchy to amplify that arrogance: the competitor kid looks up to Jung, but In Ho is placing himself above Jung. So.

It is a stupid, stupid thing that a high schooler would easily do. But Jung has very few friends and is constantly being suppressed by his father, and In Ho is the one who actually encourages Jung to express himself in ways his father disapproved of - to see that Jung was off getting In Ho something that money can't buy is heartbreaking. Jung was trying, he was reciprocating, and at the worst possible time In Ho had a fit of bragging. And then Jung's father turns In Ho from a traitor into a spy.

I think if Jung explained this to him, In Ho would feel TERRIBLE and write off the whole thing. But I generally think In Ho will subconsciously try absolutely anything to get his brother back: haunting his school, practically moving in with his girlfriend, trying to fight it out.

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I agree that Inho never realize how hurtful what he said was. Not only what he said about Jung, but also to Inha and that kid.
He actually mean well (though I still can't grasp why he said that about Jung in that situation). Jung as someone who often know Inho way of speaking must know that Inho didn't mean bad and only need some time to accept Inho. But combine that talk followed by his father announce their adoption and knowledge of his father keeping tab of him by them all in one night. It's a really tragic misundertanding.

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I really think that Jung was feeling isolated in that he perceived his father loving/caring more about In Ho and In Ha than him, which I don't believe to be the case.

Further, I think In Ho's comments to the New Kid were out of jealousy for his very close relationship with Jung and feeling like he might be replaced.

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I agree that Young Inho had the personality who could make callous remarks without thought. He probably didn't realize it would sound hurtful. But there is a part when Inho comes across Jung listening to piano kid playing, and Inho gives a jealous look. Camera pan. It just rang the alarm bells in my head that Inho doesn't like new kid and Jung getting closer.

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@petra
At that time Jung already draw some line with Inho and rejected him repeatedly. So I think its not only jealousy at play, he think Jung want to replace his place with the new kid.

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Even if Baek Inho was just trying to get off another moocher from Jung's back, that still pretty hurtful things to say. If Baek Inho didn't life together with Jung & not telling him stop being a hogu, those words probably wont cut as deep. But Baek Inho was in his super small circle friend/family. You remembered & replayed it again & again and it continue to hurt.

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To me, InHo wasn't just getting another moocher off Jung's back because to me, he said that in a worse way than what the subs wrote.

First, who was he to malign Jung's reputation by saying "He may smile at you but on the inside he hates guys like you" when that may not be Jung at all (Jung could even have been trying his whole life to get rid of that impression!). And it was so plain in that sentence that InHo doesn't regard Jung well which we all know may be InHo's brand of arrogance but to the person directed at - the supposed best friend! - that contempt and disdain hurts deep.

And then he goes on to call Jung pitiful... which to InHo may not be much but to Jung it must have made him question whether their friendship was real or whther it was only pity.

InHo continues to say that Jung can't do what he want and he doesn't even have a dream, he's rich and that's why things are so easy for him (!!!). Is InHo really Jung's bestfriend?! How can he aay that things are easy for him knowing how closed odd he is and how his dad keeps suffocating him? Is he dismissing all of Jung's concern because he's rich? Is that really a best friend - being on your side in front of you but writing you off as a whiner or something behind your back?

Then finally he says "I might be the only one who understands him" though I heard and understood it as "I might be the only one who gives him understanding". WTF right now?! Right after you said what you said above? As if is a wierdo and needs him otherwise he can't function.

That was a damning speech (said to a goddamn outsider) and if Jung heard it once like that, imagine how many times he must have wondered when else InHo had badmouthed him to others. I don't doubt how bad it must have cut him but pair that speech with what Jung's dad said and I totally understand the terrible feelings and fallout that followed.

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@Peeps

I'm with you on your analysis here. I think In-Ho's speech there was terrible.

First, he claimed superior, special insight into Jung, and the right to "speak for" Jung - telling the new kid that Jung really hates him. He had no right to do that, and it was also cruel. The new kid had really looked up to Jung and Jung was also mindful of that, and In-Ho ruined any chance for their burgeoning friendship.

Secondly, when you're friends or close with someone - you not only have their backs, you also front for them. That means, you never expose your friend's shame or sadness to some stranger. Instead, you help them be strong to the world, you stand up for them. To simply lay bare Jung's most shameful inner fears and sadness - that is a huge betrayal. That means, your friend can never regain that dignity or admiration in that person's eyes.

And finally, he laid claim to Jung - "I'm the only one who understands him" - how arrogant, how un-self-aware. For Jung to hear that - this close friend who basically threw his reputation to tatters, who exposed his inner childhood shame- for the sake of self-aggrandising. How painful, how pathetic.

If I were Jung, I'd also cut off emotionally from Baek In-Ho. Teenager In-Ho's one of those friends who have exceptional talent in music and creating rapport, but who has no sense of boundaries or gentleness for the fragility of others around him.

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Yoo-Jung just used jealousy as an excuse for In-Ho when in fact he was hurt when he learned how he was actually perceived by In-Ho and his father. It made Yoo-Jung doubt In-Ho's sincerity and motivations for being friends with him and believed the worst. At the time, In-Ho's just an immature, arrogant loudmouth who thinks he knows what's best for Jung and other people.

I think the dad made an acceptable call of deciding to adopt In-Ha and In-Ho since they were all basically living like family for a long time up to that point. Jung was never portrayed as being materialistic and he was on pretty good terms with the siblings before the concert incident. Jung just didn't react too kindly to the misunderstanding.

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If only all those knowledge didn't happen at the same time.

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Whoa! I thought Jung's dad should have talked to him about it first. Instead of assuming what Jung would feel.

And then did he assume Inho getting hurt had to do with the adoption? I wasn't sure what happened at Inho bedside but that worst father of the year makes a lot of hasty judgments and assumptions.

Say your kid is "strange".... What? Grandpa Baek could diagnose that without hours and hours of talking to Jung? But even if he was atypical, send him to therapy, not to locked room (emotionally) land.

You're making it worse, not better.

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Yup. The dead Grandpa Baek saw how Jung reacted in that one incident and run to dad to tattle.

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If I deduce correctly Jung's dad also have some personality problem like Jung. And Prof. Baek is the one that help him improve before (though I'm not sure its really solved). So when he see what Jung did in that party he immediately tell Jung's dad. From then on Jung's dad monitor Jung behaviour and fix him by Prof. Baek advice.

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Right o. That is what I thought too. Why didnt the father discuss this with Jung? And the part about telling Jung to always concede, be meek and not greedy, also calling him strange is just not loving. I could totally understand how hurt Jung must have feel and he must be so mad at how Inho always potrays himself the victim. How is he going to face Jung if he knows Jung knows of his duplicity? I don't understand why Jung is blamed for hand breaking thing. There is no proof and Jung said he didn't snitch. Although him just standing there watching is soooooo cold, but we didn't see the rest of the scene though. So far this actor has perfected the uncaring unemotional face but we don't know how he really feel inside since he''s been taught to supress(sp) his feeling.

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I think I'd be LIVID if I were Jung. A dad who takes someone's assessments as bible instead of bonding with me to find out for himself? And now bringing in "extra troops" to "hel" me be "normal"??? Come on, dad.

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This is actually the emotional equivalent of what the dad did to his 'strange' kid in I Remember You - only instead of locking his son in a room, Jung's dad trains him to repress all emotions and appear 'nice'. All on the word of an outsider, instead of any real effort (that we've seen) at actually spending time with his son.

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@Vini

Yes, per webtoon, that is what happened and it just boiled my blood.

First of all, not all psychiatrists and therapists are equal. Some are just flat out WRONG no matter what their degree says.

Then they also need to actually spend time with the patient themselves. A LOT of time.

Jung's dad assumed that Baek was right. But Jung is a child at that point. Too early for a lot of types of diagnosis to be accurate. I personally think he dislikes those aspects of himself and transfers that onto his child. Who knows.

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I agree with you. I have no tolerance for Inho's arrogance although I don't wish injury to anyone, esp a gifted pianist.

I also think there is nothing to suggest that Jung orchestrated the beating and the injury to the hand.

I had experience being close to someone like Inho. If you are the quiet and earnest type who is not good at defending yourself against the verbal "assault", you are best not to react lest you are seen as the baddie. Not that I condone any of Jung's tactics.

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As someone as talented as Inho its usual to have his behaviour. Of course I didn't agree with his way of talking and think that he get his punishment by getting his hand broken, as seen that after the incident Inho behaviour improved. But Jung already know this about Inho, so he should have known better.

And even Jung didn't orchedtrated the beating and broken hand. I'm sure he made the report to police, and deliberately making new kid think Inho would do it. He knew that those bullies would end up beating Inho.

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On a flip side, Baek Inho should know better too. He know the amount of pressured Jung trying to keep up with his dad expectation, what kind of life he's been living, he should not said something hurtful like that. Calling him pitiable and all.

Stop expecting Jung to be the bigger person, the ones who needs to understand everyone, the one who always follow that straight line he expected to walk, he just human with flaws just like everyone else.

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Yup, I second Hanie, bek in ho should have known better too, knowing Jung. He keeps saying to Seol and blaming Jung, this is how he is, means that he knows how Jung is, but then he just talked like that about Jung.

it is so funny that it is Jung who always have to understand thing, while Baek In Ho seems to be faultless even when his filthy mouth get him in trouble many times

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I agree that what we have seen it's enough to say that Jung's reaction was not proportional to what happened. Paying a loud mouth statement with plotting this kind of revenge is so wrong. Even if he had nothing to do with the set up, the way he stood up there without doing nothing while In Ho was being beaten is disgusting.
Now I understand why In Ho is so hurt, I'm not sure I could forgive someone doing this to me. Even if I do a stupid thing and I recognize that I did wrong and deserve to lose that person friendship, I doubt that I would like to rekindle my relationship with someone who is able to leave me in the lurch in such situation.

On the other hand obviously Jung was hurt as well, though I cannot sympathize with him that much after seeing him being so cold in front of his friend being attacked.

Mostly because of In Ho's happiness I hope that they are able to take the right steps to be friendly again.

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First I don't think Inho sees Jung as pitiable is a bad thing. Of course its hurt if Jung heard it, but if your friend understad your hardship without you telling him? I would appreciate him, though I will be angry at first I will gradually forgive him.

Second when Inho says Jung is a bad person. All these happen after the breaking hand incident. I believe at first Inho doubt that Jung had a hand in this accident. But after hearing his father apology and Jung never defended himself when Inho confront him. It pretty much confirm his judgment of Jung in this situation. Of course Inho would think Jung is a bad person after that incident. Just like Jung would think Inho is a betrayer after hearing his father spying on him.

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man its always so disconcerting to see what an ass In Ho used to be. He's become alot less callous since then. Its good to see. meanwhile Jung just became even more closed off and vicious. Assuming that the fallout with In Ho wasnt the thing that sent Jung over the wall into the Dark Side in the first place lol.
i just want everyone to kiss and make up! now that JungSeol had their heart 2 heart at last. I hope this means jung/inho and inha can start their healing process next.

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I cheered when he took the piano recital :)) yayayaya!!!

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In Ho was accomplishing Jung's Dad's plan without even knowing he was part of the equation: he was telling Jung to express his feelings more and backing him up, and as is the pattern with Seol, once Jung gets genuine emotional expression from someone he begins to reciprocate. But then In Ho made a stupid high school braggart error, and Dad managed to make that mistake stick without hope of correction, and Jung's left feeling like his entire life is full of spies. Poor guy.

Poor guys, actually - everyone's trying to do the right thing but their own biggest flaws are fatal ones.

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That's what I love about this show. Each character has given flaws but they differ in how they approach/deal with those flaws. Also, I'm Korean and I watched the episode without subs and what Inho said was harsh but it was more blunt rather than cruel. It was a sad misunderstanding because he was explaining to the kid who foolishly believed Jung had everything going for him which Inho pointed out that it wasn't the case. Inho stated himself he was closest to Jung and realized how hard things were for him which is why he pities Jung. That may sound like a blow or an insult but when I heard it it sounded more like a justification or genuine pity, which Jung obviously didn't want. Inho was definitely arrogant and his bold personality only amplified that and he needed to be taught a lesson. Jung taught him this lesson but it was a heavy price and I'm not gonna lie, that moment when Jung and Inho locked eyes after his hand was crushed and he just walked away as if nothing happened disgusted me. However, this is Jung's nature. I really don't think Dad did anything wrong because it's pretty obvious Jung does have some mental/social disorders. He was right to believe that Jung needed people around him to make sure he didn't go off the wall but its pretty obvious Jung wouldn't take that well. It's really common, even for me. When I'm feeling sick but I'm just trying to deal with it and people keep telling me to rest or take it easy annoys me and makes me feel confined. His reaction was a given but the way he handled it showed his extreme tendencies and instability. Overall, Inho and Jung represent opposites for me. Inho was cocky and wasn't afraid to speak his mind and felt he was above everyone which was true to an extent. He learned a hard lesson and paid a big price and lived at the bottom so he knows what it's like now. Jung is different. He kept himself in control through the support of Inho but let everything go after the misunderstanding. He continued to decline further afterwards and is now starting to make some progress. I think Inho really learned his lesson. His pride and personality still makes him speak rashly but it showed his maturity when he said he was thankful for even that small opportunity. Meanwhile, Jung really has to acknowledge and accept that yes, he does have some problems and those around him are trying to help him, not control him. He feels like a freak but hopefully he can overcome this.

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Yeah, I couldn't quite figure how this past jerk resembles the In Ho of the present, even if he was more arrogant back then, and came to a similar conclusion. In Ho was just saying that Jung was not as well off as everyone assumed. I do think the reason In Ho said any of this was his own way of watching out for Jung - a warning for the kid not to latch onto Jung for his money and position.

You touched on the other points of what In Ho said. When he said that Jung has no dream, it is because of In Ho's own values - his own dream means everything to him. Jung on the other hand, feels more confined and pressured to meet expectations.

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I disagree about what dad did was not wrong. Dad should get him professional help. Dad got that from Grandpa Baek so the least he can do is get his son help. Getting 2 extroverts kids who bounce all over the place, living with them to help an introvert kid who already been confined by lots of boundaries set by dad is a weird.

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+1

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Or Dad shouldn't let ONE person's words to shape his only son's life and future.....?

Here's a thought, talk to your son and learn about him yourself....I hear parents do that LOL and guess what, your son's girlfriend does it, too!!

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haha JISG, am so happy that he found Seol, and that Seol is accepting him slowly. I am sure there are much to learn for both of them, but they love each other, and they want to make it work. So I have my faith.

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@Cia: I loved your comments on so many levels. VERY well said!

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Huh. That's funny because I'm also Korean and saw it in the raw and I thought what he said was a clear betrayal. I'm not sure Inho meant to stab him in the back but those words were a harsh estimation of Jung and even if Inho thought they were true, he should not have been saying them to piano kid. I guess it's perspective.

That scene wasn't proportionate to what happens later but certainly part of the chain of events which reinforced the misunderstandings between these two.

And what Jung's Dad did was wrong because a couple of kids with problems themselves are not how you "fix" a kid who may or may not have a mental/social disorder. They do not have the professional training or the capability for such a task. They can make it much, much worse.

Whatever problem Jung had, his father made worse. His intent may have been good but just because someone didn't mean to bash you in the head (or did it for your own good), doesn't mean it doesn't hurt.

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People more sympathize on wound that they can see: In Ho's bleeding hand. and also they can sympathize more with people that can articulate themselves, with extrovert traits. But with emotional wound, people can't see the blood, can't see much of the suffering especially with an introvert who just keep it all inside, and that's why the one who says not much don't get much sympathy. Just because you can't see blood does not mean that Jung's suffering is less than In Ho's. Emotional pain is deep engraved, while we know In Ho could have had his hand treated, while no one really pay attention to heal Jung's emotional wound. Then came Seol.

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+100 thank you for stating this wounds heal quickly while emotional trama can impact and shape a persons life forever if never attend too.

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"Did you read the article which asked Kim Go Eun (Seol) which character type she would choose in real life? Jung or Inho?

Guess who? ?"

Oh, I'm really curious! Please tell me. <3