263

Descended From the Sun: Episode 3

Intro time is over now that everyone’s gathered abroad, and with our medic team now set up in Uruk, everyone will be forced to make some adjustments to their comfort zones. Mo-yeon, for one, is going to have to let go of some of that rigid self-reliance and let Shi-jin help her out a little, and they’ll both have to realize that neither can afford to stand alone, as they will need each other to survive this literal war zone.

EPISODE 3 RECAP

Mo-yeon and her team are finally joined by their military escort, which just so happens to be Shi-jin and his men. Mo-yeon’s scarf flies down the tarmac, so she chases it and finds herself facing Shi-jin as he approaches. But he doesn’t acknowledge her, and just walks past her without a glance.

He introduces himself to the team (as Mo-yeon is left watching his back) and Dae-young issues them duffel bags to transport their belongings. While the men are occupied helping the medical team, Shi-jin picks up the scarf lying at his feet, and finally turns to look at Mo-yeon. Neither of them says a word as he returns the scarf.

So cute — the rest of Shi-jin’s unit greet the medical team with a little song and dance, and the women are each given a wreath of flowers Ha, Mo-yeon’s friend Sang-hyun looks so disappointed not to get flowers, and he and babydaddy doctor Chi-hoon break into a random booty-shaking dance.

Former thief Ki-bum takes a minute to say hello to Mo-yeon, who totally doesn’t recognize him in uniform. She’s thrilled to see him here doing so well, as is nurse Min-ji who helped treat him that day.

Mo-yeon is snubbed by Shi-jin again when she accidentally runs into him, but once Shi-jin is out of sight, he stops to peek at her unseen through a window. Awww, he’s definitely not as unaffected as he’d like her to think.

He brings a package to Dae-young and tells him to open it now, you know, in case it’s cookies. Dae-young deadpans that it might be a bomb, but Shi-jin insists he open it now anyway, “Like a man.” While backing away, hee.

It’s a care package for the officers from Myung-joo, though it’s noticeably missing anything for Dae-young and Shi-jin. There’s a note, and Dae-young’s face goes carefully neutral as he says that his package is coming later — Myung-joo herself is on her way.

We see her back in Korea saying goodbye to her father, Lieutenant General Yoon, and he asks if she really insists on going. She betrays a small smile and she says that yes, she can’t wait to go. He makes it clear that it’s Shi-jin he wants as his son-in-law because he’s general material, not Dae-young, and oooooh, so that’s why they broke up.

But Myung-joo is a tough cookie, and she informs her father that treating Dae-young badly because of his personal feelings is wrong. He chose to stay and serve underneath him, despite their personal issues, and Myung-joo says that he’s a real soldier, which is why she loves him. She tells her father in no uncertain terms that if he stops her pursuit of him again, he will lose her as both a loyal soldier and a daughter.

Mo-yeon calls her friend Dr. Pyo Ji-soo to tell her that both the guy she briefly dated last year and Myung-joo’s ex are here, though she denies being happy to see them. Their call gets dropped and Mo-yeon looks up to see that she’s wandered near some children in a field.

She jumps the fence to trade one girl a tool she’s found (and is licking, ick) for a candy bar, and finds herself swarmed by begging kids. From behind her, Shi-jin chastises that she shouldn’t do that unless she’s got enough for all of them. In their native language, he sends the hungry kids to find one of the officers to ask for food.

When Mo-yeon asks what he said, he tells her dryly, “I said I’d shoot if they didn’t leave.” Ha. She calls him out for lying, and he just calmly says that he calls it a joke. Frustrated, Mo-yeon starts to stalk off, but she stops short when she hears a sharp click under her feet.

Shi-jin tells her carefully not to move — she’s just stepped on a land mine. He’s totally pulling her leg, but she falls for it and starts to freak out, especially when he says that he’s never seen anyone step on a land mine and live to tell the tale. Mo-yeon shrieks at him to disarm it with a Swiss army knife like men with his training are supposed to be able to do, and he says he’s only seen one guy do that: “The guy in the movie you saw.” LOL.

She still hasn’t caught on, even when he starts to saunter off and leave her there. She yells at him to come back and do something, and his answer is to get all up in her personal space and offer to step on the “land mine” instead. Of course he’ll die, he says, but that just makes Mo-yeon even more frantic.

She shoves at Shi-jin hard, and he’s so close that it tips them both off their center of balance, and they fall to the ground. Mo-yeon huddles on Shi-jin’s chest waiting for the boom, while Shi-jin just lies there enjoying it. When she finally peeks and asks why there was no explosion, Shi-jin just says, “How have you been?” Oh, you cheeky bastard.

Angry-crying and embarrassed, Mo-yeon stomps through camp and declines the food everyone is enjoying, with a sheepish Shi-jin trailing behind her. I love that Dae-young’s response to the news that he made Mo-yeon cry is just an unsurprised, “Already?” It’s obvious that Shi-jin genuinely feels bad, though.

He catches up to apologize, explaining that he’s used to joking with guys, and Mo-yeon reluctantly accepts his apology. He snaps to sudden attention at the sound of the national anthem, then breaks salute to gently turn Mo-yeon around to face the flag. As they both pay their respects, Shi-jin softly says in her ear, “It’s good to see you again.”

The ladies admire the soldiers on their shirtless morning run the next day, and Mo-yeon quips that if they do this at night too, she’s moving here permanently. Ha, she even shamelessly waves Shi-jin out of the way when he stands in her line of sight (deliberately, no doubt). Annoyed, he sends the men away, but the rear view is just as nice and he has to work to keep blocking Mo-yeon’s craning neck.

The men have noticed the pretty doctors too, and jostle to be first in line to give their blood samples. Mo-yeon gets a little payback by insisting that Shi-jin go first, being their leader and all, and he’s hilariously wimpy and flinchy about it. But then he grabs her hand and confidently shoves the needle in himself when she can’t find a vein.

Everyone jumps at a loud boom, which turns out to be a UN truck which has gone off the road and flipped. The driver didn’t survive, but there’s a passenger who seems suspiciously okay. Shi-jin takes the truck keys so that Dae-young can inspect the cargo, and while they’re distracted, the passenger pulls a gun.

But Shi-jin is ready and quickly disarms him, having noticed the men’s foreign legion tattoos and badly-fitting UN shirts and realized they’re smugglers. Dae-young finds a shipment of guns in the trucks cargo hold, and the surviving smuggler is turned over to authorities.

Back at camp, Dae-young informs Mo-yeon that the wi-fi isn’t for civilian use, but there’s an internet cafe in town. And hey, the Captain is on his way there now and can give her a lift, how convenient! I just love how he casually throws Shi-jin under the bus with a straight face.

During the drive, Shi-jin overhears Mo-yeon’s call with a landlord, and she tells him that she’s arranging to open her own clinic when she gets home. He asks if it’s because of “that scandal,” and she’s surprised to hear that he knows of it, but apparently her team are blabbermouths, ha. Shi-jin sighs that he didn’t give up so she could date guys like that, and Mo-yeon snaps that it’s not like that.

Instead of an internet cafe, he takes her to a little store where he says the internet is faster. But even he’s surprised to see the girl who bought the gun in the bar, who claims to be half-owner. She’s not any more friendly than before, though she does seem happy to see a doctor here.

Shi-jin introduces her as RI YE-HWA, a nurse with Peacemaker Emergency Aid. Ye-hwa defensively barks that she just runs this store for fun — she doesn’t need the money. HA, I love Mo-yeon’s Okay sweetie, whatever you say face.

Shi-jin makes his report regarding the black market gun smugglers, and his commanding officer warns him not to take these guys lightly. They’re well-connected, and those are no BB guns they’re toting around. They go by the name “Merchants of Death,” and his advice is to lay low until their service term is over, and get back home alive.

Sure enough, the survivor is taken straight back to his smuggler boss, and the police who took them in warns them that they need to find a new way to move their cargo. The big boss doesn’t seem too concerned, and tosses the lead cop a wad of bills, then shoots him. Damn.

Meanwhile Dae-young gets some bad news — he’s being transferred. Seems Myung-joo’s father is doing an end run around her and trying to get him out of the way before she arrives in Uruk.

We see in flashback that back when Dae-young and Myung-joo were dating, Lieutenant General Yoon had joined the enlisted men for lunch and sat right across from Dae-young. Dae-young had refused to eat, and the two men sat there long after the rest of the men were gone. Yoon had finally spoken, and told Dae-young that he was worried about his daughter’s future — he says he’s not ordering them to break up, but he will if Dae-young doesn’t do it himself.

Mo-yeon notices Shi-jin’s subdued mood on the ride back to the base, and he tells her about Dae-young’s transfer. She asks if he’s sad or jealous, and he clarifies — he thinks the transfer is unfair, because it came not from a commander, but from a father. Mo-yeon knows exactly what he’s talking about, and asks how Myung-joo and Dae-young met.

Another flashback — Dae-young’s unit were on a thousand-mile march, and Myung-joo was the supporting army surgeon. She’d witnessed Dae-young taking on a fellow soldier’s pack so that the soldier wouldn’t give up, and had ordered him to stop.

She’d made the point that helping his comrades was great, but would ultimately do no good if he were discharged due to injury himself. He’d refused, determined to come in first, because the reward was a day off, and he planned to use it to crash an ex’s wedding. That’s… delightfully human, for our stoic Dae-young.

Shi-jin makes a stop, and invites Mo-yeon to walk with him to a beach some distance away. When she argues that it’s a long way, he flat-out admits that he wants to spend the time with her. He baits her with the information that Dae-young did make it to his ex’s wedding, and that Myung-joo went with him — he’ll tell her the rest of the story at the beach. And ha, it works.

We get to see the rest of the story as well, which is that Myung-joo totally crashed Dae-young’s wedding crashing, hee. She’d argued that interrupting the wedding would only make his ex glad she got rid of him, but showing up with another woman would make her regret it. Okay, I like her spunk.

As she changes in the back seat, she explains that the man her father has his eye on for her husband will be his new company commander. She doesn’t know Shi-jin well at this point, but Dae-young met him two days prior. She enlists Dae-young’s help, asking him to pretend to be her boyfriend to keep Shi-jin away — she finds him entirely too pretty. Is that even possible?

Mo-yeon is surprised to hear that Shi-jin, Dae-young, and Myung-joo are actually in a love triangle, and asks how Shi-jin feels about it. He deadpans that he thought she wasn’t interested that way, but when he pulls her onto the boat he’s rented and they end up standing close, the chemistry between them fairly crackles.

Mo-yeon insists she’s not curious, not even a little, nope not her, but Shi-jin calls her out on that. She sure seemed curious.

They take the boat out to a gorgeous secluded beach, where an ancient ship sits abandoned in the sand. Determined to show how very much she’s not interested, Mo-yeon refuses Shi-jin’s helping hand off the boat, but she can’t hide her enchantment at the location.

Shi-jin tells her the local legend, that you can return to this beach if you take a stone when you leave. He hands her a stone and says they can come back, and Mo-yeon goes to explore the shipwreck. She asks how it came to be here, and Shi-jin says it’s bewitched. “It’s the end of something, when it’s been bewitched by something beautiful.”

Mo-yeon asks if Shi-jin has ever been bewitched — he says that he has, and that he thought she’d know. Swoon.

He asks again how she’s been, recalling her words and asking if she’s still sexiest in the operating room. She makes it clear that she’s not here out of the goodness of her heart, but because someone in power is punishing her. She doesn’t even do surgery anymore, and when she gets home, she’ll have to climb back to where she was.

Sang-hyun makes a giant bowl of bibimbap for the medical team, and Chi-hoon is hilariously prissy about sharing the bowl. He goes outside to call his girl, and gets ten years scared off his life by a tiny local boy. He’s upset about the fingerprints on his white shirt, until the little boy begs for food, then throws up — he’s obviously sick.

Chi-hoon forgets about his clothes and switches to doctor mode, carrying the boy inside just as Shi-jin and Mo-yeon arrive back at the base. They have trouble determining what’s wrong until Shi-jin suggests lead poisoning, and Mo-yeon remembers the child she saw licking the dirty tool.

Shi-hoon confirms that the boy was licking his fingers earlier, and Mo-yeon deduces that his malnutrition would have caused his body to try to absorb anything he put in his mouth quickly, leading to sudden lead poisoning.

Shi-jin offers to come translate when the boy wakes, and when Mo-yeon tries to draw a line between the medical team and the soldiers, he tells her that it’s okay to just be grateful. She said once that nothing is more precious than life, but he notes that she seems like a different person now.

Mo-yeon argues that malnutrition and lead poisoning aren’t common in Korea, and Shi-jin agrees, frustrated with her — it would have been better for a doctor who was familiar with these things to come here. Mo-yeon says that they can’t all be Albert Schweitzer ( a famous Nobel Peace Prize-winning doctor who established a hospital in Africa), and Shi-jin snaps back that yeah, some doctors go on television. Oh snap.

As Shi-jin leaves an alarm sounds, and Dae-young reports that a Force Protection Condition has been issued to all medical areas. The soldiers and medical team all prepare for a VIP patient arriving at their clinic — President Mubarat, the chairman of the Arab League. He’s third in line in the Abu Dhabi royal family, and is known for his peaceful works in the surrounding countries. He’s a good man — and a terrorist target.

Mubarat’s medical records are delivered to Mo-yeon, but the team are dismayed to see much of his information blacked out or changed. Chi-hoon wonders what kind of doctor would lie on a patient chart, and Mo-yeon says pointedly, “Doctors like me. The poor need doctors like Albert Schweitzer, and VIPs need doctors of their own.” Well played.

So they’re working blind, and when the patient arrives with high blood pressure and pulse, they have to start from scratch. Mubarat’s attendant gives them a vial of medicine from his doctor, nitroglycerine, which is used to treat heart conditions.

But the man’s heart rate drops too quickly when given the medicine, and an examination of his torso has Mo-yeon startled. There’s blood accumulating in his abdomen, and Mo-yeon orders immediate surgery.

But the attendant stops her, saying that Mubarat’s personal doctor will be here in an hour. Mo-yeon argues that he won’t last twenty minutes without surgery, and her insistence has the man pulling a gun on her. The entire room of soldiers goes on alert, and even Shi-jin has his hand on his own gun, but Mo-yeon tells them all to put the weapons down.

She stays calm, telling the attendant that she’s only trying to save this man’s life. Shi-jin (who’s been in constant contact with his superior officer) gets a message that the important thing isn’t to save the President’s life, but to determine who is at fault when he does die. He’s ordered to let the men have their way, and they can place the blame on the doctor who didn’t operate. He’s given a clear order not to interfere.

Shi-jin sends a small nod to Dae-young (who also heard the order), then asks Mo-yeon in Korean if she can save the President. As his commander demands an answer, he waits for Mo-yeon’s response, and she says confidently that she can save him.

At that, Shi-jin removes his communication equipment, quickly barks, “Save him,” and pulls his gun. Everyone in the room raises their weapons at the same time, and Shi-jin carefully stands right in front of Mo-yeon, protecting her.

COMMENTS

Now that we’ve been thrown right into the thick of the conflict, we’re already seeing some of the ways that Shi-jin and Mo-yeon are starting to affect one another, and I’m guessing this standoff is only the first of many situations where they’ll find themselves debating whether a life for a life is a moral stand they’re willing to take. All Mo-yeon wants is to save her patient, but now she’s seeing firsthand what Shi-jin argued all those months ago — sometimes you have to decide if it’s necessary to use deadly force in order to save that life. But her words apply here too, and we could practically see Shi-jin weighing her determination to save the man — not the President, but just this sick man — against following orders unthinkingly. In the past I have no doubt that he would have done as he was told and let the man die, but Mo-yeon’s words have clearly made him think about whether that’s always the right decision to make. I do like that their convictions, which have always been so black and white because they could afford to think that way, have now been challenged, and I expect them both to learn and grow as they realize that life isn’t always that simple.

I wasn’t sure what to think of Myung-joo last week, since we got to see so little of her, but I have to say that I’m impressed with her spine of steel. Standing up to a parent isn’t easy under any circumstances, much less when they also happen to be your commanding officer. But she was able to do so in such a way that she outlined her boundaries clearly, yet respectfully, and let him know that she would be going to get her man, no matter what he thought. Now that we’ve seen more of her, I really like her spunky personality and her calm, logical way of getting exactly what she wants. I know Dae-young is determined to be a good soldier and stay away from her, but I almost feel bad for the guy — he doesn’t stand a chance. That is, if they can keep Lieutenant General Daddy from throwing his weight around at every turn.

The “love triangle” between Dae-young, Myung-joo, and Shi-jin is an interesting one, being entirely constructed by Myung-joo’s father. None of the three legs care for his plans, and I love that the men are good friends despite this problem between them. It says a lot about the kind of men they are, that they like and respect each other outside of the personal conflict, and don’t let it affect their friendship. It’s a tricky situation, because Myung-joo’s father is clearly using his authority to push his agenda, and can literally ruin the lives of any one of them with just a word. I have no doubt that his transferring Dae-young just as Myung-joo will be arriving in Uruk is just the first push we’ll see from Lieutenant General Daddy, and that he’s got a lot worse up his sleeve.

I do find the balance between humor and seriousness mostly well-done, because it keeps us from betting bogged down in any one emotion and gives a little lightness to some pretty dark subjects. From what I understand from my own family members in service, that brand of dark humor is par for the course, especially with deployed soldiers. So things like Shi-jin’s land mine joke aren’t anything unusual — though for certain it’s not something a civilian would find funny right out of the gate. The show does take itself a tad seriously in places, and I find myself laughing in moments where I’m sure I’m not supposed to laugh (“Merchants of Death,” really?). I agree that it can be a bit emotionally overwrought at times, but overall I think the tonal balance is struck quite well. I did think this episode was much less pushy about trying to force us to feel things we as an audience may not be ready to feel. I’m hoping that once the central romance transitions from initial attraction to real love, the intensity we’re being given prematurely at this point, will match up with the emotional moments more appropriately.

I make no secret that I can overlook flaws in a show if the characters are well-written and compelling, and I do think that Descended from the Sun is giving us some pretty rich characters to follow. Aside from the main four, I find even the smaller stories, like Ki-bum and his journey into manhood, and Chi-hoon and his impending daddyhood, just as interesting. They all seem layered and human, and I like that we are being allowed to learn about them naturally, as the story progresses, instead of just giving us their character profiles in one lump sum. It feels like there’s so much to learn about Shi-jin, Mo-yeon, Dae-young and Myung-joo, and I at least am very much looking forward to getting to know them all better.

RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , , ,

263

Required fields are marked *

Thank you for the recap! I am glad that the ratings for this week are going up for this drama, hopefully the writing will stay this good, so that pre-producing dramas will be an endeavor that production companies would be willing to take, more and more.

With this week’s episodes, I am in love with YSJ. I liked him a lot in the 1st two epis., and now, as of this week’s epis. I am in love with this character. He elicits in me the same feelings I had for ESK of the K2Hs. I find him to be cocky, but not arrogant, and I feel that at times, his cockiness masks the longing he feels for a deep and meaningful romantic relationship. I SOOOO love how SJK has been portraying this character, so far. For me, it is all in the little things that YSJ does: the way he acts distant when passing by MY at the beginning of the ep., to only watch her once he is in the building, sighing because (I imagine), the feelings he has for her have not died, and he will have a hard time with her being there. It’s in the way he put his hand behind his neck, when she fell on top of him, probably thinking, “this is nice, let’s stay like this for a little while.” It’s in the way he looks at her often, when he is not smirking. I see longing in his eyes, and l see his longing in how he acts (around her) at times.

I have more to say, however I will quickly say that I LOVED the ending scene: I loved the way it was written, and the way in which it was executed. I LOVED that YSJ’s men stood by him (well, at least by the end of this ep.). I am looking forward to the recap of ep.4. And I have said it before, I do welcome the international cast, so far the writing and the execution of the drama are working for me. things don’t seem not plausible, and because the characters are not supposed to be native English speakers, I am perfectly fine with how they sound in English, since I have been able to understand them, so far. I can only imagine if I had to rehearse some lines in Korean, I would definitely not sound like a native speaking Korean. We all have an accent, as opposed to someone else.

0
58
reply

Required fields are marked *

one of the things i love most is song joongki's gaze.... it's so powerful and his little expressions and actions, like you said, really get to me. idk how many ways and times i can say this, but he is SOOOO doing it for me. i think i'm in love. i can't even express how happy i am that he's back in dramaland.

also re: english in this drama! yes i agree! they did quite well in casting and executing these aspects, i'm impressed. and song joongki's english, though not fluent sounding, is much better than i would expect most actors to do. his acting carries through the language, i would say.

0
15
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes! The gaze and his longing expression hits home for me...so mesmerizing :)

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

And his voice! I don't remember his voice being so rich and deep. It's great!

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hey toodles,

I LOVE his voice as well. To me, SJK sounds as if he talks with a lisp (a slight one), however I TOO LOVE listening to him talk. One of the many reasons why I love watching dramas with headphones, so I can hear the actors and actresses voices better. And when he is not barking orders, he has a soft way of speaking to MY at times, like when he tells her that he likes her. I love how he can indirectly tell her how he feels about her. He does it smoothly, but in a very convincing way. I totally buy it :-)

0

Yes, he's one of those guys who's voice doesn't really match his baby face, it's deep and manly rather than boyish.

0

One of the reasons that got me into kdramas is actually the voices of the male actors, I'm always flabbergasted how boyish some of them look but then have these deep and sexy voices, swwooooon.

0

song joong ki is on fire hes been oozing sexy soldier coolness and its geting better every episode

0

@ michelle,

+1, 000 about what you said in your 1st paragraph. I am there with you.

RE: SJK's English, I will respectfully disagree and say that to me, he sounds fluent enough. When he has needed to express himself in English, he has done so, and he has done well, for someone whose first language must not be English. He went to the Military Academy, and to Seoul university (his character, that is). I don't think English was his concentration, so to me YSJ is doing well English-wise, considering.

I do agree with you that SJK is doing better than some of the Korean actors I have heard speak English. I am not sure how many years of English he has had himself, and how much time he might have spent in an English speaking country. Korean is very different from Western languages, so my hats off to them for the effort they put in, trying to sound clear and be understood. I would imagine that they might also feel self conscious when speaking in another language (while being filmed, on top of everything else). So I applaud their effort.

0
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

Song Joon Ki's english is better than Lee Min Ho's in Heirs.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I don't remember LMH's English in Heirs (my memory is a little fuzzy on that, it has been 2 and 1/2 years), though I remember thinking at the time that his English was not as bad as I had expected it to be. I thought that he actually said some of the phrases well in English.

I actually love SJK's and SHK's English in this drama. I personally think that both are doing well. Some people sound the way they do in real life, or worse. English is a different language for them, with different sounds so it is not easy. And I don't believe that a language has only one "perfect" accent, because honestly, who determines that, and why? I had a Korean friend who came to the US as an adult with her family, and her son (who came when he was really young) sounded different than his mom when speaking English. Well the boy started learning English when he was very young, and so he was not self conscious, whereas his parents learned and had to use English when they were adults, so they were somewhat self conscious. My friend explained to me that as much as they try, there are certain sounds that Koreans have a hard time pronouncing or making. It is not because they don't hear it in English, or because they don't know what it is, I think they don't have a frame of reference, so it is harder for them to sound it out like a native.

I have experienced the same thing. I remember during the MLFAS days, I would ask those kinds of questions here, about some of the words I would hear, and how they were pronounced. I was told and learned that certain words would start with a letter that was between a "D" and a "T" sound. So it wasn't a full "T" or a full "D" sound, but something in between (which sounded quite delicate to me). I could hear it, but I didn't have a frame of reference to sound it out as well as someone who speaks Korean really well would or could. That takes practice, a lot of it I think.

From my days of studying phonetics in college, I learned that phonetics was created to help have one (or close to one) way of speaking in a particular language, that most people would agree on. I don't know if it makes it "the perfect accent," because I personally believe that we all have an accent. People from Nigeria, Liberia or Ghana (West African countries) will sound different from people who grew up in England, the US or Australia, for example. The people in those West African countries could be well educated, articulate and have proper grammar and diction. Their accent could be different though, and strong.

So when they speak, do we tell them, "you don't have the perfect English accent?" But they are native English speakers, English is the official language in their country, and they did their education all the way to university in English.

0

I know the same goes for Francophone speaking and Spanish speaking countries. There might be one accent people try to model, though I don't know if should be the only one. Even within one country, people have different accents, the US is such an example, and I know it is not the only one. So I am really OK with foreigners having "an accent" when speaking in English. Heck I have one, and it is one that people seem to like, but it is still an accent...

0

@Ivoire. I really like everything you are saying! Not only because you are saying them so articulately but because you are talking about ACCENTS in English which is different from FLUENCY...

I think whenever the Koreans deliver their English lines, they do so with enough FLUENCY but they will have an ACCENT because they are not native English speakers.

I think it would be too much to expect them not to have an ACCENT when they are speaking English unless they have lived in a Western country and have adopted that ACCENT.

That said, SJK and SHK's English accents in DOTS are actually pretty good! Their pronunciation and enunciation are on point. Lee Min Ho had a problem with his pronounciation and enunciation in Heirs...which made it hard to understand his English...

SHK esp.. And SJK too are doing a good job of delivering their English lines so I can't hear a Korean English accent with them as much as I did with LMH in Heirs...

Bottomline... I'm really enjoying the English in this show this far.

0

@Ivoire. Plus, I'm a West African, Ghanaian, to be exact :).

0

Ah, I'm afraid you've misunderstood me! When I said his english wasn't fluent sounding, I meant the accent wasn't perfect-- and of course I didn't expect it to be, he's not a native speaker; I guess I just didn't want to give the impression that I thought his english was flawless or something? Oops, probably should've worded it better. He is doing well english wise, I agree, the flow doesn't seem awkward and it fits his role. I'm constantly amazed by his acting/efforts/everything, I don't think I've ever been disappointed by any of his works before.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Can someone tell me the title of the song when mo-yeon and shi jin goes off to a secluded beach??? Please :)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

i swear i could seat all day staring at ma computer screen to see those longing gazes of his... song joong ki oppa infact u need an award for those gazes.... lol!!!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The land-mine scene was completely bizarre. The music and SJK's expression cued us in pretty quickly that it was going to be played for laughs, but... A land mine? Seriously? Those things turn people into a fine mist (and large chunks)! What was she standing on, then? Should we be worried that, judging from the sign on the fence, all of the Koreans are INSIDE the danger zone?

I appreciated that she both got incredibly pissed off, and that Shi Jin very quickly realized what he'd done and apologized appropriately, but it felt a little like they shot the scene and then when they layered dramatic music over it, realized that it made Shi Jin seem massively cruel, so tried to lighten it with a comedy music cue and ended up with... weird.

Also the love theme song needs to be made instrumental and dialled down by half. Nothing quite like a quiet, romantic moment being blasted to smithereens by the bellowed opening stanza of a ballad.

0
40
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes! Yes! YES!
This scene, followed by this uber-kitschy national anthem scene, was so horribly written and executed, I had to stop watching for a while. Ugh.

And please, they carry medical experts into a foreign country, a disaster zone !!! to help and what do they do? They take selcas, prance around and ogle bare chested men. Guys you're there to WORK not to enjoy the scenery and go on dates on exotic locations.

How can anyone in his right mind think this show has quality writing? I am truly puzzled.

0
25
reply

Required fields are marked *

The scene saluting the Korean flag was a random insert. It was executed badly. Why would KMY just stand there instead of turning around to see who/what YSJ was saluting?
The medical experts are sitting jobless because the production team doesnt have money to spare on 100 extras to populate the clinics.
But these are minor issues.

0
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

Well, if I want to tell a story like that, then I need the kind of money to sell it. They had plenty of it, went to exotic locations and now they don't have the money to pay some extras?

I don't think that's the reason. I think the writer doesn't care about the background she gave her story. She wanted it to be new and exotic and then forgot to work with it, because she repeats typical drama tropes to please the audience. And apparently it works.

They chose to show a barbeque party and the patriotic flag scene instead of medical staff putting the stuff they need into place. That only came later. Also they didn't explain the clicking sound from the supposed land mine. Why?

That's sloppy writing. She is a master in creating big scenes around events you better shouldn't question, because the foundation is weak.

0

No, the PD seems like didn't care. They used "exotic location" and DANGEROUS (insert music cue) "war zone" as the mere background of the cheesy, over the top and (un)real romance in DOTS.

There is not much besides de otp "romance", and sorry, but the main couple has 30 yrs old but, they act like if this was highschool love in the war and dangerous (insert music for reasons) zone!1!!

0

You do what you can within the budget you have. This is not a Hollywood movie (like Constant Gardener) that you can have quality extras in that quantity. Even the ones that are there are barely passable. Crowd scenes are tough when you are on a tight schedule. Crowd scenes in a foreign country are tougher.

All of you have forgotten the premise that the medical team is not there of their own violition. They have been forced to go there. And who says you can't have fun? It has only been one day since they got there. This might be the lull before the storm.

As for disaster zone, the disaster still has to strike. From what I understood of the premise, there is no active war going on in that country. Otherwise they wouldn't send peacekeepers there, they would have sent the military unit.

Please judge this from a "Korean drama" standpoint. Don't compare to Band of Brothers or Constant Gardener or any of the other excellent US productions.

0

@KDramaNewbie - There are MANY Kdramas out there with far better production values and writing (Secret Love Affair, Misaeng, Grapevine, Signal and so on).
She is the queen bee of script writing in Korea, she should be able to camouflage those difficulties. Sorry, I don't buy the excuse it's 'just' Kdrama. I don't need tons of extras, but I want to see her at least make an effort to fit her story into the exotic background she chose. No one forced her to go to Europe to shoot a military story, she wanted this grand scale, so treat it accordingly.

0

@Cafe. Lol. Why do you consider the romance (un)real?

It looks real enough to me! There's enough Chemistry between the leads... They did not first meet in a war environment... They broke up and fate brought them back together... So what about their attraction is so implausible to you?

The above would be a rhetorical question...

0

And also on this thread I see that the theme is the expression of dislike for the landmine joke scene...

I don't think anyone has said that the level of writing for this drama is stellar...

I actually agree with most of the criticism of the writing this far and I was also concerned about what I would be signing up for, given the credentials of the writer at the helm.

When it comes down to it though, we need to recognize that there are some writers who can spin yarns and some who cannot.

And they are some who get crowd approval whether they can or not... I think that is what we have here.

I actually found the landmine scene ridiculously funny, not necessarily approving of it, but it told us a tale...

Did it fit in seamlessly with the rest of the drama? Not exactly... But it got our leads' narrative going again...

0

You took the words right out of my mouth, Miranda and Newbie. The land mine bit was SO not funny. Even in a context of "oohh, they are constantly under pressure in a war zone and need pitch black humour to lighten the situation" it was UTTERLY cruel and unprofessional. Like, dare I say it, Level 7 Civil Servant- levels of unprofessional. What's she gonna do when she steps on something chunky the next time? Laugh it off and get blown to smithereens? As Newbie said, no "quality writing" there! If you cannot think of ways to get your characters to cuddle for a bit without making them seem like complete douchebags, then you seriously lack skills.

On another note: my baaaabyy Kim Ji-won!! She better not be sidelined again like in that travesty Heirs!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Agree with you Newbie. The situations concocted to generate drama in this show are so unrealistic. Can't stand the female in the secondary romance who is a
Supposed to be an officer and a doctor but behaves like a teenage brat. Ugh.

I am to,erasing all this to watch beautiful joong ki's face and the location. But don't know if I can make it till the end.

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I meant tolerating all this for song joong ki

0

Without SJK and a little Jin Goo I wouldn't be here anymore, but like you I wonder whether I can make it to the end or not.
I'm totally willing to leave my brain behind (and ep 4 worked better for me), but this ep was horrible. HORRIBLE.

0

I have real issue with the 2nd lead coming in and smacking her ex-boyfriend every time she sees him. And yelling at him, when its her dad causing the issue. Not to mention she's Kim Tan level stalking him.

0

@ lemondoodle,

I feel the same way about MJ. I found her to be unprofessional in the first ep. If you are going to act like his superior, then act like one. If if you are going to act like his ex-girlfriend who desperately wants to be back with him, then act like one. Please do not mix both. It makes it hard to take you seriously MJ, and this is when I do not like how KES writes her female characters (well some of them). So I am really hoping that MJ improves, as a character. To me KJW is a good actress who can act the part, but she needs a well (or good enough) written role, so I would want to cheer her on, and hope for her reunion with DY.

0

I totally forgot that this is the same scriptwriter who gifted us with the wonder that was Heirs as well as AGD. And to think I thought there was something wrong with with me for having issues with this drama when so many have lost their minds over it. KJW's character is really giving me AGD flashbacks. Me Ah Ri was such a pain in AGD. She spent the whole drama acting like a two year old because she couldn't have the man she wanted. I like KJW as an actress, but if her character whines for episodes on end because she's been shut down by her ex, DOTS is going to rank right up there with Heirs and AGD for me.

0

I agree Newbie. The writing is not great and tries to create conflict where there is none. Like that scene with the lead poisoned boy. How did a simple "Just let me know if you need help translating" escalate into "OUTRAGE. Stay out of the medical team's business!", which escalated into "OUTRAGE. I thought you valued life...you're not the doctor I once knew!", which escalated into "OUTRAGE...you're just a doctor on TV...hang your head in shame!"

I also think the whole "theme" of "she thinks he's a soldier who kills people, but she comes to realize that he's actually doing important work and cares about saving lives" is really blah.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

+1

0

+1

0

Completely agree! They are supposed to be in a war zone but act like they are vacationing on some exotic island. The only time I glean some semblance of the war zone they are supposedly in are the poor children begging for food -roll eyes-. I find that incredibly annoying and kitschy, and speaks to how the writer loves to use contrived TV tropes instead of really researching the roles/places that she is writing about.

Like some readers I also didn't really like the landmine scene. I usually like how writers can turn any kind of situation into some kind of skinship play (think refrigerator kiss, candy floss kiss, etc.), but the landmine one is distasteful.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

landmine humor is the thing korean used to in movies.
there has been many famous comedy scenes
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nFNVg2rfqDw
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L73bAQysS6Q
there are milions mines in DMZ of korea
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jvVYFEPlwY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bywZYdAxJ7Y
YSJ's unit certainly investigated the mines at the disctrict. he knew there's nothing or they must get rid of them. and the local kids are playing there. She could think it's safe.
he just reproached her that she violated the rule.
the region is dangerous but not a hard-fought field.
his unit was sent there for rest (like vacation).

0

I do think the medical team being silly is there for a reason. They didn't want to be there, and are fancy hospital doctors. They aren't hardened war zone doctors. Some of the medical team did not know what they were getting into. Onew (don't know his character name) seemed to think it was a vacation. For MY it was a punishment she was going to endure for awhile. So, I think in time the medical team will be more serious/realize the situation they are actually in and grow from it.

And there is always time for ogling bare chested men. Them running around with perfect toned and oiled up chests is more laughable than the women enjoying the show.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@ lemondoodle,

I like your perspective, and I agree with you. I especially hope for this, " So, I think in time the medical team will be more serious/realize the situation they are actually in and grow from it. "
From some of the teasers for the upcoming weeks, it seems as though that is what might happen actually. I guess I will find out soon.

0

For most people out there or here, quality (writing) = hot guy. Period. You can see that 97% of the comments are about the hot male lead and his intense gaze, his abs, his macho attitude, his cool side, did I mention his hotness?

And his hotness of course.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

There is no dearth of "hot male leads" in korean dramascape, but how many of them can actually act? SJK's talent is so far out there as to mask the inconsistencies in the plot. That he has managed to overcome the handicap of his pretty face is an achievement in itself.

0

@Cafe, a lot of people do watch dramas just for the eye candy, but in this case I think SJK is legitimately doing better than his looks merit here. He's a very pretty man, but a pretty man stepping into a soldier's role is not a guaranteed lock - in fact, it can totally undermine the whole show.

But SJK is managing to pull off the soldierly/authoritarian pieces of his character - not just pull them off, but genuinely embody them. I wasn't expecting that from him. I mentioned upthread that I used to think he had a shelf life, and by that I meant once he got past 35 and his elfin looks start to look worn, I thought he might not have much to back it up with. But it turns out that he's compelling and charismatic beyond his appearance.

0

The parallels to MASH are astonishing, aren't they?

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hello Miranda,

I will admit to being confused by the land-mine scene as well. At first like MY, I honestly thought that she had stepped on a land-mine, and the reason was that there was a clicking sound, when she stepped on it, so when YSJ let her think that she had stepped on one, I believed him as well. However, based on his behavior, especially the way he bit on his 2nd finger, I realized that he was pulling her leg. I didn't think that it was well done either, and I later understood that it was the writers' way of bringing in/writing in the skinship scene that would follow.

I would compare that scene to the land-mine scene we have in ep. 1 or 2 of City Hunter, where I think (my memory is a little fuzzy here) * SPOILERS* LMH's character steps on a land-mine, AND we DO hear a clicking sound, and it turns out that he actually stepped on one. His "father" comes to save him, and he takes his place, and his leg is blown off. LMH's character ends up carrying him on his back, and crying all the way home (I think asking him not to die on him) END OF SPOILERS*. As I said, my memory is a little fuzzy, so that is what I remember. So to me, when I saw that scene, and when I heard the clicking sound, I thought "she just stepped on the land-mine," and MY freaking out reinforced that for me, in the 1st few seconds of that scene.

Like you, I wondered what she had been standing on, if it was not one, and why the clicking sound then? And this, "Should we be worried that, judging from the sign on the fence, all of the Koreans are INSIDE the danger zone?" is a valid question, to which I don't have an answer. About your 2nd #, I felt that MY went through a lot of different emotions in a very short amount of time: from being scared of dying (or being severely maimed), to being scared of having both her and SJ die, to thinking she was dead for a second (when she was on top of SJ), to realizing that SJ had been making fun of her all along, to feeling stupid, which I think lead her to be angry with him, and rightly so.

I do agree that it was an immature and very childish prank, however I brought up the scene in the grass because it told me a few things about SJ, namely that he still cared a lot about MY, and he still liked her, in spite of having been away from her for 8 months. I was not so sure of that, and to me, that scene and how contrite SJ seemed to be later on, told me that he cared about how he had made her feel. I was not defending what he did (or trying to), I was thinking more about what I felt I learned about both characters in that scene.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I have come to not expect too much from a KES drama, after having watched AGD, some of SG, Heirs, and Lovers in Paris (she wrote that, didn't she?) I have not seen City Hall yet, though I have read that it is a really good drama. So for me, I go into her dramas with low expectations, or none, curious about how they will turn out. I have not felt that I would want to date her male leads, however YSJ from what I have seen so far, I would at least think about it. He doesn't make me want to run in the other direction, and that says a lot. I am also hoping that the fact that there was another writer attached to this project will make a difference, however big or small.

I think that the way SJK portrays/interprets YSJ has a lot do with me loving that character, flaws and all. I feel that I always know (or I often know) where YSJ is at emotionally, without him having to expressly say it. SJK to me, is doing very well in that regard.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

@ Miranda,

About your last #, there is actually an instrumental version of the theme song. I have been listening to it, but I don't remember if they have been playing it in the drama so far. Here is one link:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pTpLZ9Cd1Ak&list=PLrd-QUDz2ve3a2ul3B6NMVmrlcXaLdEsi

I actually like the theme song a lot, and even if in ep.1, YSJ and MY were not in love yet, I took the song to be a prelude (a way of letting me know), how deep in love YSJ and MY would fall for each other, by the end of the drama. I watched a drama (not long ago), where a poet was used to address the themes explored in the drama. His poetry was woven throughout the drama, and it would often let the viewers know how the characters were feeling at one point in time. I see the songs do that for me here. That is just my personal experience however.

0

@Ivoire, I'd be totally good if they threw the instrumental music in there, I don't mind the theory of the music cue - just the volume and the jolt of being completely interrupted.

0

@ Miranda, I see... Thank you for explaining. That makes sense.

0

I was imagining when KES outlined this episode she just had "first skinship in Urk" written on one of her post its, then thought about how she's gonna execute it, came up with the idea of a land mine because war zone duh, but cannot make it a real one otherwise too heavy for first skinship, thus decided to have Shi Jin pull MY's leg underlined with light music because you know, without very irritating bgm us brainless viewers will not get it. So long story short...The result (here SKINSHIP) is key, who cares how we're getting there. lol

Just come and join my virtual drinking game. When I watched this episode I realized I would be already drunk after 15 minutes if I were to take a soju shot every time one of the following happens:
- illogical plot
- cheese to the max moment
- "i looooooove youuuuu" (thank god we only got that once in this ep iirc)
- cringy acting by foreign actor
(- I'm sure I've forgotten some other points lol)

0
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

arabic pronunciation in this drama is catastrophic
i’m shocking

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

@ mimi,
Wow, so it is that bad huh? I didn't know that. I wonder where those cameos are from then (those playing the Arab characters). Thank you for letting us know.

0

I know, right? I didn't even recognise it as Arabic lol. As cringe worthy as Ye Hwa's Russian.:)))))

0

@ Angie,

you know, I am still enjoying this drama, flaws and all. I love that we can come here, or on other blogs or forums to comment, rave or rant, that we can squee, and then there are comments like yours that make me laugh so hard, I have tears, literally. It is 5:11am my time, and you made me laugh this early, so thank you. Snarking about a drama is part of the fun, and I enjoy some of that as well.

I loved your whole 1st paragraph, and especially this, "underlined with light music because you know, without very irritating bgm us brainless viewers will not get it. So long story short…The result (here SKINSHIP) is key, who cares how we’re getting there."

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hehe, glad I made you laugh in the middle of the night. I've mentioned in past recaps comments that I don't even try to find a KES drama plausible or take it serious in the slightest way (no matter how serious the backdrop is), not to mention being intellectually challenging, I'm only here for the pretty. :D
I've only watched Secret Garden and The Heirs by her, was very meh about the former and hated the latter, so I kinda knew what I was putting myself into. And so far I'm just happy that Shi Jin is not another total jerk character of hers (and I hope it stays like that). I only started watching for SJK who makes me swoon every time he appears on the screen but the fact that Jin Woo is also quite swoon worthy, topped with shirtless soldiers every episode, makes this drama a winner in my book. Kekeke. XD
(Dang, do I sound shallow, but not ashamed of it at all. rofl)

0

@ Angie,

There were some things I liked about Heirs (I discovered KWB, and KHN, and the rest of the cast), and there some scenes I actually loved there (again many with KWB, and the lead girl's mom. They had two scenes together, and those were both so good. I replayed them many times). I could not bring myself to watch all of SG. I have watched some episodes of SG, but 1-I don't find HB attractive in it (please don't hate me), I don't like his character in it, and I didn't like HJW's character in it either (tough girl turns into mush for not deserving guy). 2-TYhings like what happened in ep.13 made me not like the drama, or at least some parts of it,so I have not been able to bring myself to sit thought 20 epis. of it. I would like to though, to see what the hoopla is all about, and I am not being sarcastic.

Like you, I am happy that YSJ is not a total jerk (So far). And yes, JW is swoon worthy as well, and they have chemistry with their leading ladies. You should not feel ashamed of sounding shallow :-) it is only a drama after all. Let's hope it continues to entertain us in a good way, and continues to make us swoon :-)

0

Perfectly said angie! You mentioned everything that I can't stand about the drama. Thanks!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@Angie. Hehe! I really like your 'cheeessssse to the max' Line! On point!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

i couldnt have done a better job than you. Big up for you. every episode takes us to another level. Of course there are some flaws but there can be accommodated. our main leads are now having an opportunity to learn, grow and lean on each other. this is nice cause now i can see wher the plot is going

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Watching this episode actually reminded me of something javabeans said in her comments of the first episode about the drama as a whole: “I do think it’s one where I’d be able to enjoy the more I turned off my brain.” I’m plenty distracted by the pretty enough to overlook (most of) the ???? moments I saw .The show is so so so pretty, I think I gasped during the beach scene. That water is gorgeous.

On a different note, Myung-joo’s story is revealed! And it’s totally the age old my-father-doesn’t-approve-of-you thing, but god, the reason Myung-joo gives for loving him: He is a real soldier. Augh, just break my heart, why dont you.

Also, Dae-young breaks my heart lmao baby!!! His strict adherence of the rules, persistence and stubbornness in following orders is so, so, so very defining of him as a person. It was because of this persistence that he shouldered double the backpack weight to try to get first place and get that vacation to ruin his ex’s wedding, and Myung-joo was clearly amused/drawn by it. But it’s also this straight and law-abiding personality that makes him break up with her, that makes him distance himself from her to try and be a good soldier.

Like Mo-yeon, I’m actually incredibly interested in what Shi-jin thinks about this “love-triangle” that they’ve found themselves in. Of course, it’s probable to say that he feels bad for his friend to some extent, being caught between his friend and the girl that his friend likes, but the fact that Shi-jin doesn’t seem to take it too seriously either means that he genuinely doesn’t care that deeply about this issue, or that he’s just suppressing his true feelings about how he thinks the three of them should work out. Which if so, what does he think? I feel like there’s not much he can do about the situation because her dad is the one who’s trying to keep them apart, and he’s just watching it happen, trying to cheer Dae-young up when he can by teasing him.

Mo-yeon and Shi-jin’s little pagro spat throughout the end confused me a little… It’s not Mo-yeon’s fault she hasn’t been in contact with these types of diseases/conditions a lot and it’s not Shi-jin’s fault that he doesn’t know Mo-yeon’s been out of operation rooms for quite some time now? But I guess those are just conflicts between the main couple, issues created by distance and time.

Also, the ending, god you know she’s so backed into a corner, unable to do anything because to do something would be to defy orders from the military and cause hostility, but to do nothing would result in his death and her taking the fall for it. *shakes fist @ writers!!!*

Even if I have slight issue with the obvious musical cues, I think it’s safe to say I’ll be sticking with this drama in the foreseeable future.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I rather got the sense that he didn't give a damn because General Dad isn't the boss of him. In terms of his lovelife, anyway. He doesn't get to just decide who's with who, Shi-jin isn't a pawn. He's very much his own person, as is Myung-joo, and they mutually do not want to be together, and have no reason to be. Nothing else to say. Except thank God there's no one-sided love crap in this triangle. It's not really even a triangle, SJ is more of a casual bystander, having an occasional chuckle, but mainly hurting for his friend (DY).

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

right?! im with you on the "not really a triangle" thing it actually made me think ?? when i heard moyeon bring it up as such. casual bystander seems to aptly describe shi-jin's role

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Just admire how Ji Won ( Myong-Ju aka Rachel-Heirs ) so beautiful in army uniform and then she transform into an cute angel with a long hair and a white dress...Totally In Love for her

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

How is it that SJK obliterates everyone he shares the screen with?

0
12
reply

Required fields are marked *

man forreal!! sjk is killing it. the man is a goddamn talent T_______T i love it a little too much

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think it's because SJK seems like he's actively listening to all of his screen partners, which is not something every actor does. Some just wait for their line, but SJK puts a lot of effort into paying attention to what they're saying and showing that listening through his expressions and posture.

You can watch him in scenes when he's not the focus and see him fully in-character in the background, but not necessarily inward "I am thinking about the thoughts my character is having" style. It's interesting.

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

This is a sign of a great actor! I noticed that since Sungkyunkwan Scandal and he had it down in his last few dramas.
He is fascinating to watch when he is not speaking. You can see the effect of what others say through his physical expressions before he even open his mouth.

He is amazing! I have been a long time fan and I'll gladly follow him till the end of his career. I can't wait to see him in Chungmuro where he belongs.

I can't stand this kind of show. There is a lot to bitch about but he is so worth it.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Give him a leading lady of his caliber like Han Ye-ri and I'll die and go to heaven.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I want to see him with Kim Go-Eun. Her acting is so deeply natural and his is very engaged, and that could be a really interesting combination.

0

Han Ye-ri or Kim Go-Eun, either one. They are both fantastic movie actresses.

0

I forgot that Song Joong Ki and Han Ye-ri almost star together in Haemoo (Sea Fog) but he chose to enlist in army.
Bong Joon-Ho is an incredible director/writer and producer. One of the most well known filmmakers inside and outside of Korea. I hope he'll put them together in his future projects.

0

OMG! You took the words straight from my mouth. I just can't focus when he comes on screen. I just stare at him. Its worse because I have a huge thing for men in uniform and SJK in uniform plus that gaze of his is just too much for me to handle.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Raises hand!! Me too!!! Me too!! Im adding SJK's voice---- Holy smokes even when he speaks in English. It's so deep. I can listen to his voice allllll day!! all day!! Sigh.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

+100000000000000

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

me three! i can't think of anything else everytime he shows up. I think i might be going crazy a bit here. SO MUCH FEELS for him <3<3<3<3

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

His voice is velvet to my ears. I could listen to him speak about weaving baskets on loop for weeks

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Am I the only one finding the scenes with the non-Korean cast really jarring. I don't care/mind if they can't speak pitch perfect english, but the delivery so far has been really wooden. It's disrupting the flow of the episodes for me.

0
19
reply

Required fields are marked *

They're far, far better than the usual lot, I'd say. And as critical as I am of the acting abilities of Westerners hired for foreign TV shows, the fact is we have some REALLY bad actors who are cast locally by born nationals, so I have to cut them some slack.

It will be really nice when Kdramas get a level of prominence where they can reliably get good non-Korean actors and know they're good.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I feel like I could go to Korea and get a job as an actress, just based on the fact that I speak English. No acting experience necessary.

I really, really dislike the non-Korean actors. How could it be that ALL of them are bad?

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Lol - I actually thought they were some of the better non-Korean actors I've seen in theses dramas. But I admit, they do have some rather unnaturally long pauses between words at times. :)

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Perhaps they're being fed lines phonetically through an earpiece?

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Honestly, except for the head gangster, I'm really impressed with the English speaking cast. I don't know where this was filmed, but they managed to get a huge variety of people: the special ops solider was clearly American, Slavic persons for the locals befitting the Balkans, Arab bodyguards. The acting isn't the best, except for the head gangster, but it's better than most English speakers in K-dramas and than some I've seen on American tv.

More importantly, I feel like everyone who speaks English understands the language enough to be comfortable with inflection. They're not reading syllables from a cue card, but speaking words they understand the weight of.

Unrelated note: every time Shi-jin and Mi-yeon are onscreen together, they burn with enough sexual chemistry to power the entire country of Urk.

0
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

This was filmed in Greece!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The special ops UN soldier is canadian-born Matthew Douma. His daughter is on that survival girl group show (Jeon So Mi I think her name is, she goes by her Korean name on the show)

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes! and @ fan also mentioned that he fills in for small roles in Kdramas (I think), when needed. He is a photojournalist in real life, I think. I read that on Soompi. I really liked his fight with SJK, I thought it was well done, well choreographed. I thought it was interesting how YSJ jumped on him/climbed him. I noticed that he slightly crouched (so SJK could climb him), and once SJK was on top of him, he actually held his leg, so he wouldn't fall. But it was done quickly, so it still looked like a fight, and not like he was actually helping SJK with his moves. I also kind of noticed that SJK seemed to be a little careful, when he was hitting him on his chest, with his leg. Again, it was fast, so it still looked like a fight.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

One of the guys is a Korean American actor named David McInnis. I think he might be an arms dealer or a merc in this since we don't quite know yet.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yup, he's the guy in Hawaii 5-0. He's the one who's English is perfect and sounds like he knows what he's saying the entire time AND is acting -- this is the boss guy who shot the police guy.

Anyone have any idea what the language the locals speak is? I couldn't get a fix on it at all, and I'm good with European languages.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think, it is made up. Doesn't sound like anything I know round here and I am European.

0

Hello Bali,

I have been OK with how the non-Korean cast has been acting, it makes me realize that acting is really not as easy as good actors and actresses make it look like. Probably one of the many reasons why I am not an actress. We had these kinds of discussions when we were watching the King2hearts, and one of the non-Korean cast members (in that drama) actually commented on the thread, which was quite informative.

I can't help but wonder if all of the non-Korean cameos are actors/actresses in real life, as that would explain a lot, I would think. They are obviously not the top actors/actresses in their countries of origin, if they belong to that industry. There could be so many factors as to why they ended up the drama: 1-how much was the production willing or able to pay them? This is an expensive drama, for which the top actors/actresses will be paid well (the four leads I am assuming, definitely SJK and SHK). The whole cast is not small, I am wondering how many more cameos we will have: are they all being paid?
2-We know that part of this drama was shot in Greece (the Greek government should thank them for the free tourism ad, because now I have Greece on my bucket list of places to visit before I die, hopefully. Those shots are just so gorgeous, and the drama showcases the different locations really well so far). How much did that trip, and their stay there cost? That would explain all the PPL in the drama, those companies help shoulder the costs, for having their products being shown, time and time again. So far, I do not have a complaint with how it has been done.
3-I have noticed that there has been an attention to details: the uniforms, those big white tents where they live and work, and all the equipment they have (medical, military, etc...). Are all those things donated as well, or did the production have to pay for it?

Without trying to make excuses for this drama, I can understand if a lot of the money is not going towards how good the foreign cast is, when it comes to acting. At least they try to have some of their cast look and sound like the people of the countries they are supposed to be from. I also think that the Korean audience (as far as I know), has not complained about the foreign cast not being good enough in dramas, and so I could see how the writer, the producers and whoever does the casting might be OK not investing as much (thought and effort, and money) in the foreign cast. Even though many of these dramas get bought by TV stations in other countries, I would think that initially the primary audience is Korean and Chinese, seeing as this drama was pre-produced (in great part), so that the Chinese government would be able to watch it and approved it for viewing, while the drama aired in Korea. I also think that in real life, some people could be that wooden and awkward, when interacting with foreigners.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the insight.

Yeah, when you think of the production side of things it does makes sense. I've never watched a drama with international actors before, so I guess I'm not used to it.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@ Bali,

You are very welcome! As an international viewer myself, and as someone who has often been "the other" in countries other than my own, I have often thought about why some people (or ethnicities) are represented in the media and in movies (entertainment in general) the way they are. I even went as far as writing a lengthy paper on the representation of Africa in US media (I studied in the US), choosing a few well known print magazines, and looking at the news as well. As you can imagine, it was very informative, not only for me, but also for my professor at the time, and for my class as well (we had to present and talk about our paper and topic).

I learned that I do not have to condone how and why things are done necessarily, however it does help a great deal in understanding and knowing why things are done a certain way, in any area. It might even help in approaching dealing with those issues. Just my two cents worth.

Also, my 1st comment was longer than the 3,000 words allowed per comment, hence the 2nd part of it. I hope that was OK :-)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Africa has not always been represented well (or accurately) in US TV shows and movies, and yet those shows and movies flood our TV stations, and our movie theaters (I know they do in my country). It is clear that people in African countries are not the primary targeted audience, so those who portray them do not always have to be top or even good actors or actresses, or even from an African country (except for iconic real people like Nelson Mandela, etc...). I wonder if the same does not apply here. I do wish the acting was better, don't get me wrong, however I can also see why we are getting the kinds of cameos we are getting in Kdramas. I don't think there are incentives for the casting department to give us more or better than who we are getting for the cameos. I hope this is a little food for thought.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

They're great compared to the ones in Heirs. LOL! Peace!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The only foreign "actor" that irritated me thus far was the head guy of the local authorities that got shot a bit later by the arms dealer. His acting and way to speak was rather comedic than serious and made me lol which surely wasn't his or the director's intention. Lol

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

He sounded like a Scottish guy trying to sound like he was Slovakian, or something like that. It was a very strange blend of speech patterns.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh wow! Really? Hum... Interesting.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's one thing to bring a tiny dress and HEELS to a war zone. It's quite another to then wear those heels on a beach while hopping in and out of boats. The tiny dress... Dammit. Look, they distribute guidance packets to women going to war-torn areas, and I'm pretty sure the one doctors get is similar to the one journalists get, so.... You should know better, costume department.

That said, I quite like the maturity of the relationship here. I like that neither one of them are fluttery and stupid, though obviously they can still do stupid things. And Joong Ki is knocking it out of the park - I was worried the flower boy thing would undermine his credibility here, but he is extremely assured and comes across as a legit member of the military (for obvious reasons).

As for the non-Korean actors? Sigh. On average, they're better than the usual. We'll have to see how it all pans out.

0
16
reply

Required fields are marked *

+1
Except for the non-Korean actors. I just have to ff every scene with them in it. Not necessarily for the acting, but for the cultural representation, if this makes sense in English.

0
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes, the foreigners are potrayed as bombastic buffoons, the PD did the same in Heirs. Not going to lie, i'm watching purely for Song Joong-ki and try not to think too deeply about anything else in this drama. Like trying to narrow down what country Urk is meant to resemble. I thought it was a former Soviet state like Bosnia or Serbia, now I'm just trying to think of an Arab state that's coastal...Morocco?

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

please read it without any kind of meanness or nastiness I just wanna let you know that Bosnia or Serbia never had been part of the Soviet Union, they were part of Yugoslavia ;)

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Opps that's fairly embarrassing. Thanks for letting me know!

0

you meant former yugoslavian republics, right? ;)

as for location of urk. if I remember correctly it was mentioned to be somewhere at the edge of the balkans. it was filmed in greece. and with all visible greek signs and a church in greek style it makes sense.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I don't get how it's supposed to be a war zone, though? All the locations are beautiful, all the buildings are intact and everyone is walking around like they just came out of a salon. The kids are the only grimy ones!

0

Watch "King 2 Hearts" at some point and marvel at how Americans come off.

Initially I was horrified, but I'm really interested in those scenes now. It's good to see how other countries stereotype us in broad strokes, gives you a lot to think about. And it also makes you look twice at the representation of non-Westerners in American TV and movies, you realize pretty quickly we must be doing the exact same thing, and probably worse.

One of my favorite bits of "King 2 Hearts" was that a high-ranking military role in the US Army had been filled with an actor who had stereotypically homosexual speech mannerisms. That lisp/cadence would get ironed out pretty damn fast in the military, but I realized - how the hell would a Korean casting director be expected to cast for that role and catch that small cultural nuance? he guy looked the part, spoke clearly, was not the worst day player by a long shot - how should a Korean know that the slight intonation in his speech was going to make an American viewer go "oh, hell no."?

It's good for us, though. Makes you more aware of the subconscious messages in the media you're ingesting.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

American movies have a long history of portraying foreigners and not only non-Westerners in a certain way. We Germans are still seen throughout the world as the stereotypical 'Verboten!' shouting military kind of people, because Hollywood used to portray villains like this followed by Arabic villains, who came into vogue in the 90s with Schwarzenegger's 'True Lies' IIRC (yes, I am THAT old).

As you said, it is great food for thought to realize how one's country or culture is seen through the eyes of and occasionally judged by others.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@ Miranda,

The King 2 Hearts is one of my favorite dramas. It is not perfect (how many dramas are, truly?), however I appreciate that drama for its original plot (the universe it created, Korea being a kingdom), and for what it attempted to do. I love the production value, I rewatched that drama 3 weeks ago, and so many things were thoughtfully done. I also love the OST, it is one of my favorites, and I thought the acting was really good, by all involved. I thought they did their best, considering.

One of the non-Korean cast members wrote on one of the drama recaps' comments section, and one of the things he told us was that being in a drama in Korea was not easy. He said that you had to have a working permit, and it sounded like there were some hoops to jump through. He didn't go into the details, however he essentially told us that it was a good thing to be able to see so many foreign cameos in the drama, considering that it was not as easy as we thought it might be. This was in 2012, so I don't know if, and how much things might have changed by now. I do remember some of his comments staying with me, and how informative they were.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I thought it was just me, but I was so bothered with her shoes and clothes as well.

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

In a war torn country, doesn’t the way MY dresses with all those short dresses and high heels compromise her safety?

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

The heels are flat-out stupid because she is not on a paved surface most of the time, and she is spending most of her time picking her way through rubble or walking on gravel roads. She is going to sprain her ankle or worse.

Wearing them on the beach is just insane. Who does that? Who gets on a boat in heels, then jumps OFF a boat in heels, then walks along the beach in heels? It's like strapping on snowshoes to go to the drugstore, it makes no sense, it's actively hampering you.

As for the dress... She's not in Korea anymore. Local cultural restrictions play a part in the recommended attire for women in foreign countries (headscarves, tank tops, low-cut shirts), but there's also the common-sense element of rocking up to an army base where there haven't been any women for eight months. And then on top of that: apparently there are a lot of mosquitoes, and there's a lot of sun, and YOU'RE A DOCTOR. Wear more clothes for the sake of your health!

She dresses more appropriately in episode 4, but jeez. Episode 3 was just stupid, costuming-wise, and pulled me out of the storytelling with "what is she THINKING?" reactions.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Besides...considering how Koreans (or East Asians in general) are gaga about fair skin, I'm surprised she's not wrapped up from head to toe in order to not get a tan. Lol

0

Aaaand I thought it was just me too! My first thought when I saw her in the dress (and later hopping around in what looked like heels on the beach) was "waaaait what? Isn't this a pretty run down desolate area? Are heels and a cute little dress really going to make it? Whatever happened to good old sturdy pants and boots?"

But I'll admit... my second thought was "where can I get that dress though" LOL if I ignore the fact that the clothes are quite off for the environment, all her outfits are pretty darned cute.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@Lezah

To think of it, MY was supposed to hitchhike SJ car to get to the city side.. Perhaps that is why she was dressed up like that plus heels... I also remember SJ was doing a bit of detour going back to camp, thus the mis outfit I think. Now I need to re-watch to make sure how she dress up BEFORE they decided to go downtown....

But I still think that the overall MY dress tone on her initial days at Urk was off.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@miranda

+1 (re: costumes)

I SO AGREE with your comments about the costume (SHK's)... Besides it was just not making any sense at all, given the supposed location (ie. war torn)

But since this drama is pre produced... I can only gritted my teeth everytime I see the '????' scene and bear with it...

Like one of the comment above quoting JB (sorry, scrolling up on my tiny phone to locate the name & Quote is just taking too long) , I promised my self to just enjoy the drama sans putting too much thinking in it... Specially after disappointment with CITT ending.

Suffice to say, this shall be my eye candy (yes, it's you... Joong Ki oppa.. <3 <3 ) redemption to restore my faith in kdrama.

.. *sigh*...

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I like the show well enough but i feel no emotional connect. There is a lot of pretty on the show, do they really need to have these check-me-out-i'm-so-cool moments ?

I don't think i can explain properly but there are times when i think a scene is shot in a manner that screams cool/romantic/pretty to such a point that it feels artificial... plus the slow motions ..... Gah! i'm not articulating it well

... i don't really feel vested with any character. Otherwise, its one hour of fun, visually stunning popcorn entertainment.

0
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

yes actually, i understand what you feel in your second paragraph... i couldn't articulate it either, but i think it's kinda common with this pd? heirs and her past works gave off that kind of vibe a little, and while it didn't bother me enough in this drama to think ill of it, in heirs, it was definitely another story

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's popcorn for me too. I like the humor, which was pleasantly evident from the gangster-fight scene ("If you can take this wallet from me, you can have the money" Shi Jin: "Really?!" Dae Young "Stay out of this please." Shi Jin: [sigh]).

And I admit I will stick around for SJK alone. I'm mostly aware of him from Sungkyungkwan Scandal and he's selling this character extremely well, especially the physicality, and I like his second in command too.

So popcorn, but the hot kind right out of the popper rather than the bagged kind.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

+ 10000

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Miranda, if you haven't watched Nice Guy and you like SJK, you should give it a shot -- he's crazy intense and the show itself is addictive, if flawed. He's SO intense -- nothing like the bundle of puppyness he is in SKKS. He never needs to worry about his baby-face not getting him serious roles, that's for sure.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

and his chemistry with moon chae won is amazing.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's the same for me as well, but I welcome this popcorn entertainment ever since I had my heart gutted and broken by CITT. At least I know I won't be caring too much for the characters to the point where it disrupts my real life. It's plenty of pretty and badass and I love it.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I take this show as it is and I actually enjoy these slowmotion scenes (I would loathe them in any other drama) but I guess I'm not expecting this one to be so serious? The tone is completely different from a serious military themed drama that it could also be. So I'm not complaining.

Plus, I don't really mind looking at SJK in slow-mo. lol :D I'm watching this show because it is shallow and that's that. If I wanted something serious, I'd go for something else.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think today's episode showed a lot of things that I had questioned about after episode 2. For example, a lot of us were wondering why they were fighting over simple things such as values and why such fight scenes were necessary. But as a Korean-American brought up by Korean parents, I understand that this Kim Eun Sook drama is different from her previous works. We are taught since a very young age that our values and morals need to be kept with our lives. I know this isn't the Joseon Era, but in a society where competition is fierce and people will try to bring you down, the only thing holding you up, in the end, is your values. I think the main theme here is trust and keeping your morals no matter what those around you say. Mo-yeon's values are about life; she values life itself and will do anything, even standing up to a gun, to fight for what she believes is right. Shi-jin, on the other hand, has shown some dilemma in this episode: should he listen to his personal beliefs or should he obey the command, which is everything to an average soldier? For the issue of trust in this drama, in episode 2, Daeyoung tells one of the other soldiers that the fight between Shi-jin and the American soldier was to test whether or not they can trust each other, especially in times of battles where they have to trust their lives to the other person. The world we live in today is similar to this, though not to this extent, where we cautiously approach people to see if they are ones we can trust. Because in the end, we can rely on those we trust when we are at our lowest moments. I love the fact that the characters are all adults with conflicting ideals. They must learn to trust each other in order to build upon a relationship. I love the loveline, I really do, but what I find more compelling are the choices these characters have to make when everything is on the line. I think Kim Eun Sook did a great job with this storyline that has a lot of depth. And so, Shi-jin, at the end of this episode, decides to trust Mo-yeon and stick to his personal values and her values.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hello Pinkfluff,

I really appreciated your comment, and your perspective as a Korean-American, thank you for that. About this, "And so, Shi-jin, at the end of this episode, decides to trust Mo-yeon and stick to his personal values and her values." My feelings from ep.1 have been that SJ and MY's values are not that different, their approach to those values at times might be different. I do feel that both DO value life, however in the case of a soldier, s/he might have to kill to protect some lives. And so far to me, the only times I have seen SJ defy orders is when he is trying to save lives:

1-he decided to take care of the bombs in ep.2 because he saw the children close by, and (I am assuming) writing the report first would have taken time, and waiting for the Americans to react as well. If that bomb had gone off, those children would have been endangered, maimed or killed, because his soldiers told him that the radiations would go far. And so he reacted right away, to save lives, and they probably did (save lives). I don't think he did it to look cool, far from it.

2-The same when he shot towards the US soldier's feet during their rescue mission in Afghanistan: you don't shoot a person on your team (that soldier gave him a "what the heck" look), which to me was a way of breaking some kind of rules/orders in the military. But he did so because he could not talk (at the time), and yet he had seen the bomb set to go off, which would have hurt both guys standing close to it at that time.

And here, I believe that he ended up deciding to trust MY, and support her (and her staff) in her effort to save the Arab VIP/president's life. To me, he shares her values (wholeheartedly), and I believe that he is aware of the consequences when he makes those choices. He knew he would get into trouble for disarming the bomb/taking care of it, and we will have to wait until next ep. to see what will happen to him this time. I personally love him for that.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hey Ivoire,

Thanks for your comment! I see how you would have gotten that impression. But in my opinion, while Shi-jin does want to save lives like Mo-yeon, his methods are different and even Mo-yeon pointed this out. I think I didn't say it clearly but I believe that Shi-jin, through his actions, is showing that he starts to understand Mo-yeon's values and is slowly changing his values as well. A soldier's values are listening to his (or her) superiors as Shi-jin says. So defying orders, to a soldier, is something that should not and cannot happen. Yet Shi-jin did so. Have you watched the next episode? It's really good :)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I totally agree with you. SJ and MY share the same values of saving life. He come from a point of maintaining peace which means saving lives. she comes from a point that every life is valuable. The good thing is that they are about to realise that their values are not so different after all.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think I'm gonna love the 2nd leads' story.
Seems so [and more] complex.

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

It is Heirs in reverse. MJ = LMH's character and DY = PSY's character.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

lolololol... Lee Minho and Psy. In school uniforms... dancing to Gangnam style.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

hehe oops! I meant PSH :D

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

yea it seems more cliche to me than anything. their chemistry is saving it

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

lol totally. If the genders were reversed I'm not sure people would think their story was so great. I find it pretty cliched myself.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Am I the only who love this show in all aspects? I even love the flaws and inconsistencies in the characters, because that's exactly who we are.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

count me in! :)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Count me too!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ditto! I'm totally hooked! SJK is so compelling--MAGNETIC!!! I love SJK & SHK's interactions as well as our second leads. How their entanglements will progress, well, we have 12 more episodes--3 months to wait for... Their values-convictions are quite strong & may be their downfall, we will see. Their careers/values maybe their downfall. I love how SHK-MY asks why she can't be with SJK-SJ, choked me up! So for now I'm entranced in agony when the next subs are complete.. Thanks

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love it. I hope some of the complaints go away as the drama continues. If you know what is is and are still watching, then just enjoy the show.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really love the drama. The 2nd lead story is quite cliche as well as the noble idiocy of DY. But generally speaking, the drama is great.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I want to LOVE this drama but I can't...not just yet. Nothing has pulled me into loving it but something about it makes me want to keep watching....so that's exactly what I'm going to do...

Btw, the hot soliders running shirtless scene was totally my favorite part haha I'd be right there with those ladies if that was what I'd wake up too

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I have tried to watch this because it has gotten some good comments. But "tried" is about as far as I can get. For a supposed military operation, it is about as unrealistic as you can possibly get.

I find myself saying WTF?? more often than actually being interested in any plot line.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

the villain is really good looking ?

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Shi-jin is just awesome. He says the swoony lines, but actually has a great personality and treats the girl respectfully, so I can actually swoon along as intended. I'm also enjoying the lack of love triangles (well, real ones). I do think the that will come up again, but I don't think it will in a serious way.
Mo-yeon being the jealous one will be fun to see.

And I must be too in love with this drama because I don't even notice the heavy-handed use of music anymore.

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

"but actually has a great personality and treats the girl respectfully, so I can actually swoon along as intended."

I know, right! I'm just so burned by KES and her asshole men that I'm pleasantly surprised that Shi-jin seems like such a mature un-assholey character. I hope this means she's changing as a writer.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@lemondoodle! Ikr! Same here! Suddenly, I couldn't notice the music anymore.... I was so drawn in...
Here are my live-reactions in italics to all the significant scenes (to me) as I watched this ep. of DOTS… bwahahaha!
Scene: Wind blows MY’s scarf forward… she goes after it… Chopper flies overhead and strong wind from it sends MY’s scarf flying backwards….
Chopper touches down…Military team strut towards Medical team…. SJ walks past MY…
“Oh snap!… he really walked past her… he actually ignored her… WUT! pah!”
1 min laterrr…
SJ looks down and notices the scarf… he picks it up and returns it to her wordlessly… they stare at each other…
“Yasss! Aigoo!” Fistpump goes up*… Some awesome Beanuts guessed right! Beanuts FTW! Chukhae! That what I’m talking about…!”
Scene: SJ plays a landmine practical joke on MY that results in ‘skinship’ lol … plus, he ashifts her feet off the alleged landmine (are you freaking kidding me? Lanmines are supperrrr sensitive… if there was a real landmine, they should both be smoke already…good thing MY doesn’t know this, hehe) and tells her “I’ll die instead’…
“aiggoooo, Song JoongKi, do you wanna kill me with your cheesy romantic line, lol?”
…also there’s that cliché kdrama trope of ‘oops- I-accidentally-fell-directly-on-top-of-the-one-person-I-like… oh, in slow motion… when SJ says, How you have you been? ..with MY on top of him… lest we forget.
“Daebaaakkk, I’m swooonning ….but this is really kinda cheesy… rofl…”
Scene: SJ telling MY how Myeong Ju and Dae Young first met….
“Ooh, this is interesting… very forward… frank… ooh, DY was still so stoic and restrained… ooh, cute white dress, aww, their backstory is kinda cute too!”
Scene: Foreign weapon smuggling lord meets up with his cronies and shoots that local policeman… probably for his cringeworthy shout-acting… Perfect English dialogue tho… can’t wait to see more of him.
“Hello! Great English line and awesome delivery! I don’t need subs here… Asa!”
Scene: SJ and MY at the beach and inside the shipwreck remnants …when MY says she didn’t volunteer to be there, no longer does surgical operations and will soon return to Korea. SJ looks somewhat crushed.
“Geez Louis, Mo Yeon!”
Scene: when SJ and MY have an argument over a local boy’s possible lead poisoning…
“These two saram are soo freaking conflicted…ugh”

<3

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Haha...yup and....

Scene: When MY has an English exchange with the ill Arab leader’s security …”
“Dayumm Song Hye Kyo! I’m so proud of your delivery of those lines! Also yay! No subs needed here!”
Scene: When both factions cocked their guns and had them trained on each other… the fierce look in SJ’s eyes…
“Oh snap! Sh*t just got REAL!” Lawd!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@Affie

Hahahaha...
Joah Joah Joah :-D

Keep them coming!

0