Rating:
Average user rating 2.5
38

Jackpot: Episode 14

For a show that set out to be about gambling, it sure does a lot better when it’s about everything but gambling, and tends to be at its best when focusing on the relationships within the central and inherently broken family in the midst of it all. Maybe it’s also just better whenever our two brothers are in the same scene, since watching their friendship survive multiple trials only to come out stronger for it makes for some investing television. Not everything works (okay, a lot of it still doesn’t), but at least their relationship does.

SONG OF THE DAY

Nam Woohyun (of INFINITE) – “그 사람 (That Person)” [ Download ]

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
EPISODE 14 RECAP

Finding Dam-seo hovering above the gambler Golsa’s body, Dae-gil decides that it’s best if Dam-seo leaves before she can be discovered. He’ll ask her about what happened later, assuming he can find her.

As the voice of his daughter grows nearer, Dae-gil kneels down to inspect the gambler, whose final coughs spatter his hanbok with blood. That’s how Yeon-hwa finds them, which makes Dae-gil look as though he committed the murder.

At least Golsa gets to see his daughter one last time before passing on, leaving Yeon-hwa to look up at Dae-gil accusatorially, with angry tears streaking down her face. “It wasn’t me,” Dae-gil says, but his meager defense falls on deaf ears.

He’s forced to make an escape when Yeon-hwa orders her guards to apprehend him, saying only that he’ll find out who really did this. But his sword, left in a pool of her father’s blood, only confirms his guilt to Yeon-hwa.

Injwa uses the murder of Golsa to turn any would-be merchant supporters against Dae-gil, leaving himself as the only person capable of running affairs in Mapo, since Dae-gil is now a wanted man.

Having slept in, Prince Yeoning arrives late to the morning assembly, where the matter of the license ban on small merchants has already been decided. When his father tsks that Yeoning didn’t bring any evidence to prove his case, the prince looks to Chief State Councilor Kim in confusion.

The prince tells the court that he gave the two ledgers of evidence to Councilor Kim, who acknowledges that he did receive them, but found that they had no value as evidence of corruption and subsequently burned them.

Outside, Yeoning confronts Councilor Kim over his betrayal, which the councilor defends as being for the prince’s sake. If he falls, so does the Noron faction, and they can’t let that happen. “You are holding me back for my sake? Aren’t those two statements contradictory?” Hush, little prince—you’re making too much sense.

For what it’s worth, Councilor Kim truly believes what he’s saying, since the license ban wouldn’t make a dent against the Sorons or the demonic Injwa. Rather than fighting and losing, the councilor would rather the prince not try at all, and stay safer because of it.

Crown Prince Yoon joins in on Councilor Kim’s side, and tells his younger brother that this has all happened as Lady Choi willed it. She knew that Yeoning would be in danger should the license ban pass, and enlisted the help of the crown prince and Councilor Kim to try and put a stop to her son’s dangerous activities.

Under Councilor Kim’s guidance, Crown Prince Yoon received the king’s permission to reinstate Prince Yeoning to his former position in the Office of Inspector General in return for him backing off the license ban issue. Yeoning takes the badge, seemingly accepting the terms.

In flashback, we see the meeting between Crown Prince Yoon and his father, who’d asked his son what his intentions were. Why help save his younger brother from himself when he could become an impediment to his rule later?

The crown prince had magnanimously replied that Yeoning was still his younger brother and his subject, and that he would do whatever was in his power to help him regain his position and stop his dangerous activities.

In the present, Yeoning claims to be unable to accept the position or its terms, but Councilor Kim reminds him that it’s just politics—in order to gain, you must concede.

Prince Yeoning tries pleading his case to his mother, who knows her son’s stubborn streak all too well. She begs him to give up lest he lose everything, adding tearfully that this may be one of her last requests. Her days are numbered.

The royal doctors confirm her declining condition to a shocked Yeoning, but the dilemma doesn’t last long. While he would give his life for his mother, he thinks, he can’t heed her wishes and stop now.

While the king asks Councilor Kim how much he thinks he knows about Injwa, Injwa boasts of how he engineered the events preventing the license ban lift from passing to the ministers on his side. He also refuses to acknowledge that Dae-gil hindered him by beating Golsa, since he still took over the merchants under Golsa’s control.

Dae-gil’s blind search for Dam-seo brings him to Injwa’s manor, and for once, Injwa actually doesn’t know the answer to the question Dae-gil poses about her whereabouts. He hadn’t even known she was back.

And though Dae-gil suspects Injwa was behind Golsa’s death, with no way to prove it, Dae-gil has no choice but to leave. But Nameless, who wants to know what Dae-gil knows about Dam-seo, approaches him to ask if he’s seen her.

He tells Nameless that Dam-seo killed Yook Gwishin and Golsa, and somehow gauges from his reaction that Nameless does know where she is. He tells him of a temple Dam-seo liked to frequent, which is where Dae-gil ends up finding her.

Meanwhile, Yeoning learns of Golsa’s death and goes to investigate. When Yeon-hwa swears repeatedly that she saw Dae-gil commit the crime with her own two eyes, Yeoning uses his newly regained powers to assume control over the case. He meets no resistance, since Injwa ordered the officials under his control to let the prince do as he pleased.

A sullen Dam-seo tells Dae-gil to just get on with whatever he came here to say, only to accuse him of coming here only to confirm his suspicions that she killed Yook Gwishin and Golsa. “Would you believe me if I told you?” she asks.

She doesn’t deny killing Yook Gwishin, claiming he deserved it, but she denies killing Golsa, although she’d meant to. Dae-gil asks who could’ve done it if not for her, but Dam-seo just glowers at him: “I’ve told you the truth, yet you don’t believe me.” Dae-gil must look awfully small when you’re on such a high horse, Dam-seo.

Dae-gil rightfully asks what happened for her to be like this, though she seems to have inherited her former teacher’s knack for being deliberately vague as she tells him that he’ll soon find out why his father died, and why Injwa hasn’t killed him.

And, like Injwa, she tells Dae-gil that he’ll find himself at a crossroads just like she did when she left Injwa. He can either choose to stand beside him, or fight him. (Is the “him” in this scenario Yeoning, or Injwa?) Once he’s gone, she thinks to herself that he’ll find out he’s the king’s son soon enough.

Grandpa tells Dae-gil of Seol-im’s disappearance based on the straw shoe and letter she left behind, and we find her as a prisoner/guest in the angsty gambler Kejakdu’s home. He gifts her a new pair of silk shoes, wanting only for her to stay close to him. Nearby guards make sure she does just that.

Prince Yeoning personally oversees Dae-gil’s arrest for the murder of Golsa, which Nameless reports back to Injwa. Knowing that Dae-gil won’t be able to escape death if he’s found guilty, Injwa wonders how Lady Choi is receiving the news. (Answer: not well.)

Since Injwa knows that there’s no way Dae-gil can actually die, it’s really just his way of testing how the king will react. At least the king, for his awesome part, knows that this is all a ploy on Injwa’s part to provoke him.

Yeoning confronts Dae-gil over the serious accusation leveled against him, and when he denies being the murderer, Yeoning asks him to swear it on the sword the king gave him. “I can swear it even without that sword,” Dae-gil says, which seems more than enough to convince Yeoning.

If Dae-gil’s telling the truth, then it means someone else killed Golsa and framed him for it. Did Dae-gil see anything or anyone strange? Of course, Dae-gil says he didn’t in order to protect Dam-seo, leaving Yeoning to find the true killer on his own. “Even without this sword, I believe you,” Yeoning adds, which, aww.

He goes to investigate the crime scene, where Yeon-hwa admits that while she didn’t see the murder itself, she’s still dead certain Dae-gil did it. He guesses that the unlocked window might’ve been a point of entry for the intruder, and posits that Dae-gil might’ve been framed, which isn’t what Yeon-hwa wants to hear.

She offers the bloody tujeon card she found clutched in her father’s hand as evidence that Dae-gil was the one who killed him (just go with it), and all Yeoning can do is promise to bring the one who actually killed her father to justice.

Dae-gil is saved from torture by Lady Choi, who cries as she sees the state her son is in. “Tell me, did you truly commit this crime?” she asks, her eyes brimming with tears. Though Dae-gil can’t understand why she’s so concerned for him, he tells her that he’s innocent.

As for why she’s so emotional, Lady Choi claims that it’s because she knows he’s Prince Yeoning’s only friend, and demands to know who he thinks could’ve framed him. She recognizes Injwa’s name, obviously, and remembers all the horrible things he did to her.

“I will never forgive him,” she grits through clenched teeth. “No matter what it takes, I will end his life.” Then, collecting herself, she takes one of Dae-gil’s bound hands in her own, bidding him to be patient. As his mother, she will protect him. (She doesn’t say that last part aloud.)

Witnessing the exchange, Yeoning is reminded of the birth date his mother once looked into. He asks Dae-gil when he was born, and finds out that he was born in the same year and month that was on the slip of paper. Having never seen his mother fly into such a rage, Yeoning can’t help but be suspicious.

His mother’s grief, coupled with the unlikely coincidence that Dae-gil was born the same year and month of his supposedly deceased older brother, leads Yeoning to wonder if Dae-gil could truly be his brother. Huh. That was easy.

Nameless reports that the king’s been gathering all the highest officials to ask them about Injwa, a subject they’ve been purposefully silent on thus far. Injwa knows that the king’s riling up ministers against him because he knows he framed Dae-gil, and takes his classic wait-and-see approach to whatever will happen next.

Lady Choi entreats the king to save Dae-gil, which he notes is the exact opposite of what the Soron ministers want him to do. People get tried for murder all the time, he claims, so it should hardly be a matter for her to personally interrupt an interrogation for.

When she protests, he gently shuts her down by reminding her that Dae-gil is a grown man now, and he got that way without her solving his problems. He knows she knows this. “Whether he lives or dies, I will take care of it,” he adds.

Kneeling before her, King Sukjong looks her in the eyes as he warns her against taking any more action: “You will get hurt. If you involve yourself any further, you will get hurt.” He knows she’s not well just by the touch of her hand, and advises her to stay locked in her quarters. She agrees to do as he says, touched by his concern.

The king meets with Prince Yeoning next, and as always, gets straight to the point: “Do you want to catch Yi Injwa? Go and catch him, then.” He doesn’t need to hear reasons or specifics, since he can’t very well involve himself in the matter. But by tasking Yeoning with it, he’d hit multiple targets with one arrow.

“I’m giving you a chance,” King Sukjong adds for clarification. He even gives Yeoning permission to bring Dae-gil to the palace to help him, and wonders privately where martial arts master Kim Chae-gun is. (He’s where he always is, but hears the telepathic call to arms.)

With great fanfare, Injwa declares that the time has come for he and his comrades to rise up and fight, since they’ve all been in hiding for the last twenty years.

The seal he breaks out of a locked chest and stamps on his questionable artwork spells the Hanja characters for Musin, which he treats with great importance. He sends it and Nameless to the shamanistic madam with the message: “I have returned.” (The seal is referencing the Musin Rebellion of 1728, where Injwa would play a heavy role.)

Yeon-hwa, as single-minded as ever, confronts Dae-gil in prison in an attempt to hear him confess to her father’s murder. Instead, he tells her that it must’ve been someone who would’ve profited from his death (Injwa), someone who works for him (Nameless, Jin-ki), or someone who stood to gain from imprisoning him.

She proffers the tujeon card her father was holding when he died as supposedly indisputable evidence that Dae-gil murdered him. But Dae-gil sees it another way—the card points to Kejakdu, the only gambler to ever beat him at cards.

A flashback reveals that it was Kejakdu who paid an unannounced visit to Golsa the night he died. Telling Golsa that he didn’t want there to be any resentment between them for what he was about to do, he then attacked him and slashed his throat.

Yeon-hwa challenges him as to whether he has any evidence to support his claim, causing Dae-gil to wonder if she would rather believe he was the culprit. She would prefer that option, because she is afraid of Kejakdu, who she describes as an assassin for hire.

Until Dae-gil has concrete proof that Kejakdu is indeed the killer, Yeon-hwa says, she’ll continue to assume he is. She then finds herself at a loss on how to respond when Prince Yeoning comes to release Dae-gil, who cheekily reminds her that he’s always been lucky like that. He’ll hear her apology after he finds her father’s killer.

In a handy bit of exposition, Injwa mentions to Kejakdu that gaining control of the port of Mapo wouldn’t have been possible without the gambler killing Golsa, and framing Dae-gil for it in the process.

We see how the deal went down in another flashback, with Injwa trading a chest of silver for Kejakdu’s services as an assassin. He was the one who told Kejakdu where Seol-im was the night he found her at Dae-gil’s house, which may explain why Kejakdu was harboring a Dae-gil-shaped grudge.

Injwa warns Kejakdu that Dae-gil might pay him a visit later that night, having known ahead of time that the king would have him released from prison. He also hands him a mysterious letter, claiming that he summoned a few spectators for what will inevitably be tonight’s entertainment.

Dae-gil is escorted straight from prison to meet the king himself, who tasks him with arresting the real murderer before midnight. He turns to Prince Yeoning to ask how he’ll take responsibility should Dae-gil fail, and Yeoning wagers everything.

King Sukjong wants to make sure that when Yeoning says everything, he really means everything, bringing to mind the last conversation they had about friendship and sacrifice. Yeoning remembers, and stands firmly by his promise.

The king seems mildly surprised by this, and considers both his sons for a moment. Then he issues the warning that should Dae-gil fail to catch the killer, he’ll be beheaded at sunrise.

Prince Yeoning escorts Dae-gil out and asks him if he really thinks he can pull such a task off. He’ll have to do it all alone, which Dae-gil notes as being mildly unfair to him, but great from the prince’s standpoint. The two share a smile as Yeoning returns his sword to him and reminds him that he can’t be even a minute late in delivering the murderer.

Before Dae-gil leaves, he remembers that Yeoning wanted to know his exact birthdate, and tells him that he was born on the sixth day of the tenth month in the year 1693.

The revelation hits Prince Yeoning hard, since that’s the exact year, month, and day his older brother was born. “Baek Dae-gil… are you truly my older brother?”

Cut to: the king reading and waiting, Injwa holding the Musin seal and waiting, and Kejakdu just waiting inside a room surrounded by his armed guards.

But then Dae-gil appears behind him, which Kejakdu senses before he sees. “You came quickly,” he says, turning to face him.

 
COMMENTS

I really like Kejakdu, so I can only hope that he won’t just become another mini-boss to overcome next week. It’ll have to come sooner or later, of course, but would it be too much to ask that he stick around for a bit? I’ll admit to having a certain fondness for villainous crushes, which tend to manifest themselves in sageuk in the form of quiet assassins with longing stares, so I’m already predisposed to like Kejakdu’s archetype. But even without that, one-sided crushes are humanizing in and of themselves, so he garnered a certain sort of pity from the first few moments he was on screen.

And it’s kind of powerful how far that little bit of pity can take a character, even though it will only get them so far—the rest is up to the performance, and Kim Sung-oh is just knocking it out of the park. I didn’t know what to expect from him, since his introduction frankly came as a surprise to me, but I should’ve remembered that he’s taken bit roles in some really terrible shows (Age of Feeling, Records of a Nigh Watchman) and made something out of them that couldn’t possibly have been on the page. That being said, I should probably start tempering my excitement now, in case next week really ends up being the end for him.

Speaking of characters living on borrowed time, we’ll probably need to start preparing ourselves for the eventual exit of King Sukjong, now that Injwa’s brought up the rebellion that’s set to take place years after he vacated the throne. I’ve been more than happy the show’s drawn it out for as long as they have, and would be happier still if he stayed until the last possible second. Not only is he a magnetic presence of epic proportions, he’s the voice of reason and logic in a sea of vagueness, and it just wouldn’t be enough even if he were in every scene. (But you could put him in more than one each week, Jackpot!)

What’s been especially interesting about the father-son dynamic as presented with King Sukjong and Prince Yeoning is just how much Sukjong tries to guide Yeoning’s way while staying as hands-off as he possibly can. Every conversation with his son is a lesson, and he teaches in such a way that Yeoning comes to the correct conclusion without it needing to be spelled out for him. And in that way, Yeoning actually absorbs and applies what his father has to teach him, enough to where we can see Sukjong’s hand in the way he’s grown and the man he’s shaping up to be.

And while it’s much too late for him to be a father to Dae-gil, there’s something to be said for the way he treats the relationship between his two sons. Though Dae-gil’s freedom didn’t come about due to the kindness of his heart, King Sukjong used events as they played out to create an opening that would benefit Yeoning for the task at hand and Dae-gil, as well as himself by proxy, since he needs Injwa gone as much as anyone. Or everyone.

 
RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , , , ,

38

Required fields are marked *

Whatever happened to "Innocent until proven guilty"? Just because someone is at the crime scene doesn't mean that he committed the crime!

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Innocent until proven guilty is a modern concept. Most older civilizations had guilty until proven innocent.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's "unless proven guilty" not "until." Learned that on jury duty. If it were until that implies that the person is guilty or that the state could just keep going after them until they can prove it.

Either way, it's still that not that common.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Loved this episode! Yeoning was awesome in this one. So sad because lady choi and king sukjong may leave the drama soon. And this show must go until Yeoning becomes the king right? As in jwa's final rebellion took place when he was king. Excited and curious to see how dae gil, Dam seo take part when it happens.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

We are 10yrs away from Injwa's rebellion. The show has been stuck between 1717-18 for a while now.
I know it's hard to say goodbye to some of the characters but it's time to move on.

(Spoiler?)
I think Lady Choi should be gone by next week followed by Prince Yeonryeong and then Sukjong. Yoon will reign for a few years and maybe they'll cover the Sinimsahwa massacre before he dies. Yeoning will reign for 4 yrs before Injwa's rebellion.

I won't be surprise if they skip over Yoon's reign and go straight to Yeoning.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

To be honest i could do without Dam Seo and Gol sa's daughter so far they have proved to be the most uninspiring characters in this show. I had high hopes for Yeon-hwa but so far she does not seem very intelligent or even vaguely able to help anyone instead she just hangs around looking angry not even sad.....just angry

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

wow... kim ga eun performance here is sooo good its a waste that her part is so small.

and can they just kill dam seo's character already? its very hard to watch the bad acting.

seeing her remind me of an actress which i forgot her name, she acted in a really ridiculous medical drama where leejongsuk is the hero.

ahh damn i forgot the drama's title too.

what I'm trying to say is her acting is bad just like the actress in the medical drama.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

*clap clap clap* i thought writer would make her a useful character but she's like part of another story or i dont even know whats wrong with this character , she's just plain boring. What was the writer thinking ?????

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

"Until Dae-gil has concrete proof that Kejakdu is indeed the killer, Yeon-hwa says, she’ll continue to assume he is."

But lady, what concrete proof do you have that Dae-gil is the killer? Double standards, milady? Or is it the double standard virus that Lee In jwa is spreading?

I notice that those under his charge are becoming like him. Seo Dam is becoming vague and enigmatic like him, and now Yeon hwa is catching his warped sense of justice.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love Kim Sung-oh. He is abso-freakin'-lutely fantastic in this. Every scene with him leaves me wanting MORE! I hope they don't kill him off, because he is a great character. Which is more than I can say about the Dam-seo character. Really bad writing when it comes to that character. She makes no sense to me 50, well more like 99% of the time. Now Seol-im, that is a girl I love. I want her to be happy - with Dae-gil! I just don't understand how the lead female character can be so difficult to connect with, but I can connect to the supporting female character immediately. Writer-nim, I'm looking at you.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

He's also pretty dang hard core. I think he actually broke his arm - how the heck can he safely jump over a table, parry a sword, and slice a throat? I wonder what he'll do in the next ep - I hope for Kim's sake that he won't do anything TOO intense.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

P.S. I am totally ready to beat the stuffing out of Yeon-hwa. I get that grief can make us do a lot of things, but does it make a person lose all sense of reason, as well?

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

What I'm still trying to wrap my head around is the fact that Gol Sa had his neck slashed late at night but was still alive to hold the tujeon card, gaze soulfully at his daughter and cough up some blood to damn Dae Gil in the process. Who knew bleeding from the neck would keep you alive for many hours after the deed had been done. Or maybe it's because Gol Sa has a card shark has a bit more luck than regular people. So while a slashed throat would have you dead in a couple of minutes, a man like Gol Sa can last for hours. And Dae Gil? Dae Gil can survive for weeks, or heck survive it completely based on his luck. Pfft.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

How long is this series really? 16? 20? 50? 100? Episodes. ?
Yeoning there, you blew my mind. You actually got a smart brain.

Thanks fr the recaps!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

This series is gonna be 24 episodes long :)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This episode was superb. Loved the way the king handled his two sons. Mom-son scene was the best part.. Really looking forward how Daegil is going to prove this murder, how yeoning is going to react, how seol im is going to keep her relationship with daegil, how dae gil and dam seo love story is going to be developed (since she is the main lead)... even though i want my favo couple together... Lots of anticipation n its too hard for me to wait for the next.. Still loving this drama a lotttt and my JKS tooo.. Thanks Heads but you seem to be a great fan of Choi Min Soo.. He is indeed SUPER DAEBAK..

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Among the Gang of Three - Yook Gwishin, Golsa and Kejakdu, the younger guy gives me the creeps with his unkempt hair and intense stares.
How is Dae-gil going to overpower him , and make him confess to Golsa's murder? Can't wait to find out! There's a possibility Dam-seo may assist Dae-gil to arrest Kejakdu. She had admitted that she killed Yook Gwishin as he deserved to die.
It's a pity that the female lead actress is getting such a limited time on screen. We're more than midway through the drama now, and it seems like we hardly know about Dam-seo's life after she parted company with Yi In-jwa. Don't tell me the scriptwriter is thinking of swapping the role of Dam-seo and Seol-im [from female lead to supporting actress, and vice-versa] with Seol-im ending up with Dae-gil...

0
11
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am actually hoping that the writer will change his or her mind concerning the romance part of the story. Both in terms of characters' compatibility and actors' on-screen chemistry, the best pairings are Damseo & Yeoning and Seolim & Daegil.

Unfortunately, I don't want to get my hopes up. I don't have enough faith in the writer for that. He or she will most likely force Daegil and Damseo as a romantic pair on us soon enough.

0
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

Well, Dam-seo seems to have feelings for Dae Gil but she act like a total sourpuss when he's around. She seems to be worried about him since she showed up at the 2 crime scenes and killed Yook Gwishin.

Kejakdu's feelings for Seol-Im might be his downfall. I don't think Dae Gil will kill him. Seol Im might be the one to get a confession out of him.

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree. Kejakdu's weakness is definitely Seolim. I can totally see her use that to her advantage to help Daegil...hopefully not at a price!! I like her and want her to make it to the end, despite her bad fortune!!

Although I disagree about Damseo liking Daegil. I would say she shows more signs of simple interest and curiosity. But I just don't see her liking him in a romantic way right now when the two barely ever spent time together...maybe it's just me or maybe it's the fact that both actors don't really have much chemistry together (if at all in my opinion).
But like you said, it seems that's the way things are going to go with those two. We'll just have to wait and see.

But I'm actually more excited for the next episode to see what Yeoning will do now that he knows that Daegil is most certainly his older brother.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm just trying to make some sense out of her character based on her action in earlier episodes when they had more scenes together. It's hard to figure her out when she has the same expression all the time.

It's good that Yeoning knows but is someone going to tell Dae Gil the truth or are we all waiting for Injwa to do it?

0

lol true her expression is very ambiguous!

My money is on Injwa, most likely at the most random moment and most likely in a very confusing way just because he's Injwa and that's what he does

0

What about Kim Che-gun? He was the one to bring Daegil up to notch with his physical and mental capacity. I hope he plays some role in the next ep; I'd be sad to see him go, or is it just me?

0

I'm pretty sure Kim Che-gun will be around till the end. He was shown as Dae Gil bodyguard (eps 1 intro).

0

Ya, agree with Seolim - Daegil. I would be mad if the drama team did not make them as couple, haha. I mean, its really logical if Dae Gil who grows without any female figure around him ends up with Dam Seo who is cold. Dae Gil needs someone affectionate like Seol Im who does not fed up approaching him (I suspect the shaman just know the best girl for Dae Gil is Seol Im, but she just does not want it happened).

And it will be fit also if Yeoning who grows with affection of his mother and father ends up with cold Dam Seo.

Well y'all please believe that is just only my expectation and imagination, Lol!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

But I do agree that Damseo needs more screen time as a character (not as a half of a potential pair). We completely lost track of her and her motives. What is she thinking? What is she trying to do (except kill or not kill certain bad guys)? The actress is not the best but they are really not giving her a chance to improve or for us to care for her character at the moment. Hope she is not completely sideline because she had some potential to be a good part of the story...especially as a conflicted antagonist to the brothers.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree. She is the female lead after all (isn't it). She deserve more screen time even though I don't like the actress.
btw Jun Kwang-ryol showing up in two places as bad guy and good guy -here and Flower in the Prison is kind of distracting.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Jun Kwang-ryol is pretty awesome. I've never find him to be over the top when he plays the bad guy.

I can picture Injwa as a smooth criminal. He's been patiently waiting for 20+ years to carry out his plan so it's not surprising that he knows his enemies well and have 8 cities under his control.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

(Banging fists on a table) Bromance, bromance, bromance... Everything else can go away. The chemistry with the ladies is zero. The chemistry between the brothers is 10.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I can't get into any romance with this type of sageuk. I'm glad it's not the focus here. Dae Gil and Yeoning's brotherly chemistry is good enough for me.

I find these young female actresses lacking and the writing doesn't help either.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I totally agree. The actress playing Dam-Seo is just laughable and she ruins every scene she is in, and she has zero chemistry with our male characters, making their concern and protection of her just so stupidly crazy and unbelievable- they should have killed her off long ago.

The actress playing Yeoh-hwa is just as bad - overacting, no chemistry and looks like one of those dumb "idols" that think they can act but are just terrible. Seriously - couldn't casting find ANYONE better than those two.

The actress playing Seo-lim is pretty good, but unfortunately seems to have a doomed role.

The bromance is the best, and the romance is laughable.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Well just remember, the romance touch in this drama is using masculine perspective. The writer is a male. So, it is so much different with common Kdrama when the writer is female one. Therefore, the romance was soooooo almost not there and is there to soften the masculine tone.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree!!! More bromance - could we somehow include Cutter in there?!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Who is dea-gil's real father is it really the king or the other one.. I'm sorry...FF so much for this show.. I only watch it for 30 min max...

Female characters are weakest for now in the show... Its funny how the first episodes were efficiently carried by lady choi..

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Since Dae Gil is a fictional character the writer is totally playing with our minds when it comes to Dae Gil's real father.

According to the synopsis he is the king's son but being born prematurely at 6 months and as healthy as a full term baby makes us think that he might be Baek Man-Geum's son.

(History)
Lady Choi's eldest son Prince Yeongsu was born a year before Yeoning died young.
Park Mun-su was the official who put an end to Injwa's revolt.
I think Dae Gil is playing both roles here beside being a fictional gambler etc.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

You didn't miss anything by fast forwarding. I watched all the episode completely and I'm still really confused about Daegil's true heritage...

maybe it's neither, with all that supernatural luck and immortality...maybe he's some sort of half-god

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Is this omnipotent bad guy poor writing or is that how the rich seem/live in S.Korea?
It's not just this show. It's common for the bad guy to be revealed and the audience to be made aware of all their crimes by the 3rd or 4th episode and then the next 13+ episodes we watch the most nonsensical string of events keep them from being brought to justice until the final episode.

I always find myself wondering "Can they really do that over there?" On dramas corruption and abuse of power are common. Rich people do what they want. Government officials are trying to get rich and do what they want or what the rich tell them. And regular people cry or hope they get chose by a chaebol.

Even in the "good" shows, the bad guys get away with s*** that I just... Is this really how this sunbae/hoobae/class thing works?

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I nearly gave up on this drama... but glad I didn't. This episode was great!
Fingers crossed that Kim Sung-Oh will stick around for the rest of the drama!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *