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The Good Wife: Episode 1

Adaptations are nothing new when it comes to dramas — webtoons, novels, and manhwa have all been popular sources, and every year there seems to be a remake of a Japanese or Taiwanese drama. But American television shows have been notably left off that list, at least until now.

The Good Wife is the first direct Korean remake of an American show — one that was wildly popular and, according to reports, the reason that tvN was able to convince the queen of the silver screen, Jeon Do-yeon, to return to dramaland (although the hefty record-breaking salary they gave her probably didn’t hurt, either). As a fan of the American version, I’m eager to see if this one will live up to the hype — and my expectations.

 
EPISODE 1 RECAP

A man and women hold hands as they walk towards a set of doors that open to reveal a group of reporters, their cameras incessantly flashing as pictures are taken and questions are shouted. At the press conference, LEE TAE-JOON (Yoo Ji-tae) calmly tells the reporters that while he was the chief prosecutor, he never abused his authority by accepting bribes or sexual favors. The so-called scandal is just a personal failing for which he apologizes to his family, but it’s nothing political.

Standing next to him, his wife KIM HYE-KYUNG (Jeon Do-yeon) dazedly starts to reach for a piece of string on her husband’s jacket, but he grabs her hand as they walk off-stage. Once they’re alone, she yanks her hand from his, telling him never to bring her to something like this again.

He promises he won’t — he just needed her to show that they still have a good relationship. One of the other prosecutors appears and hands Tae-joon a copy of the investigation report, and as Hye-kyung watches him talk on the phone to one of his superiors, she remembers when, three days ago, Tae-joon’s scandal first erupted.

She was at home, the happy house-wife getting dinner ready for her family, when a frantic Tae-joon called her, ordering her not to answer the phone or open the door for anyone. As prosecutors pounded on her door, declaring they had a search warrant, she turned on the television to see the video of him in bed with another woman while the news reported on the corrupt prosecutor who accepted sexual favors.

Tae-joon begs Hye-kyung to give him a second chance. He may have made a mistake, but he’s not a coward. He asks her to believe in him one more time. Hye-kyung: “Why should I?” She turns on her heel and walks away.

Eight months later. Hye-kyung sits in an empty conference room. She keeps glancing at her watch as she nervously fidgets. Finally she asks the only other person she sees in the office if the staff meeting has been cancelled, but the other women tells her it’s upstairs. Panicking, she gathers her things and hurries up the stairs to the main conference room.

The meeting is well underway, and SEO JOONG-WON (Yoon Kye-sang) tells his staff at the M&J law firm that they’ve landed a new client and case that will require their utmost devotion, so if anyone thinks they can leave early or arrive late, then they don’t belong at this firm. That’s the moment Hye-kyung arrives at the conference room, but instead of reprimanding her, Joong-won opens the door for her and quietly tells her to find a spot.

Afterwards, Hye-kyung is apologetic, explaining that she thought the meeting was downstairs. She’s grateful, too, that her old friend was willing to hire her despite being out of work for fifteen years. Joong-won is the grateful one, though — it’s hard to find good lawyers these days, and he welcomes her back to the legal world with a friendly handshake.

As he walks her through the labyrinth of offices at M&J, he starts to explain the pro bono murder case she’s been assigned. Just then Hye-kyung’s phone rings — it’s the “Jaws” theme, a special ringtone for her mother-in-law. Hee!

They’re further interrupted by the flamboyant arrival of DAVID LEE, their expert lawyer for divorce. He proves his stuff by asking Hye-kyung if she’s planning to divorce her husband, wondering how much alimony they could get from Tae-joon and offering her a discount for his services since she’s now a coworker.

As they watch him walk away (the outfit is because he’s in a community theater production of Faust), Joong-won admits that he wishes he could fire David, but the divorce lawyer brings in the most money to the firm.

Just then, the other head of the firm (and Joong-won’s sister) SEO MYUNG-HEE (Kim Seo-hyung) calls down to Hye-kyung, asking her to stop by so they can discuss the pro bono case. Joong-won gives her the tip to appear confident, knowing Myung-hee is the type to judge by appearance.

Myung-hee wastes no time in telling Hye-kyung that she’s too old to have been hired on as a new lawyer, but she only agreed because Joong-won spoke so highly of her. Even so, Hye-kyung hasn’t had any work experience after leaving the Judicial Research and Training Institute. Hye-kyung explains that she got married right after she finished her training and thought she should spend her time and energy on being a wife and mother.

Myung-hee point-blank tells her that she was against Joong-won hiring her, but if Hye-kyung is going to be successful at M&J, then she’ll need to work harder than anyone else. Her age, lack of work experience, and her husband’s scandal are all hurdles that she’ll need to overcome.

But first is the pro bono case, and Myung-hee quickly briefs her on their client who was arrested for killing her husband. Myung-hee tells Hye-kyung to argue for manslaughter, saying their client was acting in defense due to domestic violence. Despite the evidence stacked up against her, their client says she didn’t kill anyone, so it’s up to Hye-kyung to convince her to accept the manslaughter charge. Oh, and the trial is in just a few hours.

As Hye-kyung leaves to find her office and study up for court, Joong-won and Myung-hee bicker about their choice of new lawyers. When he grumbles that she gave her choice an easy real estate case and his choice, Hye-kyung, a difficult murder case, she defends herself, saying that someone who’s starting her career so late needs to go through more difficulties first. Or maybe Joong-won is just being protective of his ex-girlfriend?

He insists that they were just friends at the training institute, and that Hye-kyung was considered a genius back then. At any rate, by the end of six months, they’ll have decided which of the two new lawyers will be worth keeping on permanently.

Hye-kyung arrives her office only to find the firm’s investigator KIM DAN (Nana) waiting for her. As Hye-kyung introduces herself, Dan says that they’ve already met at the Prosecutor’s Office where she used to work — until she was fired by Hye-kyung’s husband. It could be an awkward moment, but Hye-kyung wryly admits she’s not on the best terms with her husband, either.

As the women walk into the courthouse, Dan fills Hye-kyung in on the details of the case. Their client is claiming she’s innocent and that a thief attacked and murdered her husband, but her fingerprints were found on the murder weapon and she has a motive: her husband cheated on her. He was living with his mistress at the time, and then died the day after he and his wife fought.

Hye-kyung hesitates just before entering the courtroom, feeling nervous since it’s been fifteen years since she’s finished her training and passed the bar. Dan matter-of-factly remarks that fifteen years ago, she was in elementary school. That’s just the wake-up call Hye-kyung needs and she confidently enters the courtroom.

The prosecutor is the same one who met with Tae-joon after the press conference. PARK DO-SUP (Jun Seok-ho) is amused to discover the defense attorney is Tae-joon’s wife, and seems to think that this case will be a shoo-in for him. It definitely doesn’t help that the judge is the same one who sentenced Tae-joon to prison.

When Hye-kyung’s client, Kim In-young, is brought in, Hye-kyung quickly explains that Myung-hee won’t be there and she’s taking over the case. She asks for an extension so that she can have time to get caught up on the details of the case, but the judge just gripes that she’s unnecessarily wasting his time — what is this, her first day in court?

Prosecutor Park leaps up, thrilled to reveal to the judge that, yes, it is her first day, name-dropping Tae-joon. Hye-kyung petitions the court for bail because there’s no one available to take care of In-young’s daughter. When he asks the two lawyers to step up to the bench, Hye-kyung assumes it’s about her case, but the judge points out that while it’s true he does have a grudge against Tae-joon, he also found Tae-joon guilty by the letter of the law.

He also informs Prosecutor Park that bringing up Tae-joon’s name just to get a rise out of him will not work — he’s going to judge this case by the evidence, adding that Hye-kyung is not to change In-young’s lawyer again. He finally rules in judgement for In-young’s bail, much her and Hye-kyung’s relief.

When Hye-kyung arrives home to her recently-moved-into apartment late that night, she finds her teenaged son watching the news, which is all about his father’s scandal. Her daughter sadly asks if they can transfer schools again because all her classmates won’t stop talking about the scandal. Hye-kyung says that Tae-joon is the one who should be embarrassed about what happened, not them. Easier said than done.

Hye-kyung visits Tae-joon in jail. He jokes that when they told him a lawyer was waiting for him, he thought it was his lawyer, not his wife. She’s not there for a pleasant chat, however, and gives him the papers he needs to sign to sell their house. As he flips through them, he sees the divorce papers, which she snatches back.

He takes her hands, asking her to hold off on any decisions, promising that they’ll turn things around on the appeal. Annoyed, she tells him she doesn’t care if the scandal was manufactured or not — he’s still a bastard in her eyes.

As she starts to leave, he congratulates her on her first case. He still has friends on the outside who keep him in the loop. Hye-kyung: “Do they perform sexual favors for you, too?”

Instead of reacting to her barb, he tells her that he’s heard the case she’s working on is a little strange, and rumor has it that the police erased some of the original evidence. Hye-kyung doesn’t want his help, though, and tells him, frustrated, that she only came to see him because everything they own is in his name. He still promises that it can go back to the way it was before, but she wearily tells him that will never happen.

She meets with In-young, who insists that she didn’t kill her husband. She did meet with him, and he asked her for forgiveness, wanting to go back to the way things were. That was when the thief suddenly came out from hiding and attacked her husband with a knife. The CCTV doesn’t show footage of a thief running the direction she says he did, though.

Hye-kyung studies the evidence for hours, frustrated that she can’t find any proof that In-young is telling the truth. But when she remembers her husband’s statement that the police erased evidence, she goes through all the copies until she comes to the police report, which is one page — except that the photocopy has the image of a staple in corner, implying there was a second page.

Hye-kyung and Dan go to the scene of the crime where they track down the owner of the CCTV. While Dan works on the security guard, winning him over with her best aegyo, Hye-kyung finds an elderly cleaning woman who’s constantly berated by the security guard. She grumbles that he’s lazy and normally sleeps or watches porn when he’s supposed to be out patrolling.

Hye-kyung stays late, studying the new and boring footage until she finally reaches her limit. Gathering up the box of evidence, she heads out only to find the other new hire, LEE JOON-HO (Lee Won-geun) working late, too. He escorts her to the elevator, pleasantly introducing himself and then sighing that he’s jealous of her pro bono case. But they have to take the cases assigned to them, and really, all that matters is who wins in the end.

She doesn’t know what he’s talking about and Joon-ho doesn’t enlighten her as he wishes her a good night. As she reaches the parking garage, she runs into Joong-won returning to the office. He tells her to follow Myung-hee’s original plan for the case, revealing that she and Joon-ho are currently competing to see who stay at the firm in six months. If she wants to win, she needs to stick with Myung-hee’s plan.

But Hye-kyung has played it safe all her life. She doesn’t want to live like that any more.

She visits In-young at home, amused that she’s embarrassed to be caught reading about Tae-joon’s scandal. In-young is worried about what will happen to her daughter if she goes to jail, but Hye-kyung counsels her to only think about what is happening to her right now. She tells her to wear her best clothes and put on makeup — to do whatever it takes to make herself look and feel more confident.

She speaks from experience when she tells the worried In-young that you just get used to wearing a metaphorical mask in public, not caring what anyone else thinks.

That moment of woman-to-woman realness is enough for In-young to trust Hye-kyung to handle the case however she thinks best. At the next court date, Hye-kyung astonishes everyone by declaring that they do not accept the guilty charges, and further points out that there is evidence missing.

Prosecutor Park seems a little unprepared by Hye-kyung’s confident attack, and he blames her husband as the one who would hide evidence. But the judge rules in Hye-kyung’s favor, giving him forty-eight hours to get the missing page.

Afterwards, Prosecutor Park warns her that this “newbie” doesn’t know who she’s messing with, but she simply tells him that she’ll win — her client is the only person that matters. With a little jibe about his graduating late from the training institute, she confidently walks away.

Myung-hee is none-too-pleased that Hye-kyung is blatantly ignoring her orders, but Hye-kyung calmly explains that she changed the strategy per her assessment of case. Yes, but she should have at least notified Myung-hee of these changes.

Joong-won defends Hye-kyung, pointing out that she worked hard to find missing evidence, but Myung-hee snarks that she wonders who told Hye-kyung about the evidence in the first place. She knows that it’s just going to make the prosecutors their sworn enemies, and it will just be easier to replace Hye-kyung with a lawyer who will follow her orders, aka Joon-ho.

Hye-kyung studies the evidence late into the night when Dan calls her with the proof of what’s on the second page — it was dog hair. Seems she called in a favor to get that information, though, as she slips out of a bedroom where another woman sleeps.

At Hye-kyung’s apartment, Dan reveals that the dog hair isn’t the same type of dog that the victim owned, and the fur contained a medicated lotion for joint issues. The all-knowing Dan also tells Hye-kyung that she’s no longer the lawyer on the case and will only have one more day in court before Joon-ho replaces her.

In preparation for the trial tomorrow, Hye-kyung studies the CCTV footage over and over, and then suddenly realizes she’s got the proof she needs.

Prosecutor Park shows the CCTV footage in court, revealing that there wasn’t anyone else around at the time. But then Hye-kyung has three monitors brought in, and as she questions the security guard, he affirms that he does the same walk-through each night. She queues up the CCTV footage on the night of the crime to a moment when a plastic bag flies across the video.

She then plays the exact same time frame on the CCTV recordings of the nights before and after the crime, revealing a plastic bag flying at exactly the same time, in exactly the same pattern. The security guard admits that he copied the CCTV showing him on his rounds when he actually never left his chair. Prosecutor Park is looking mighty worried, but Hye-yung smiles proudly at Joong-won.

Later that night, he tells her that, for better or worse, she’s the lawyer assigned to this case. But she still has to refute the fact that In-young’s fingerprints are on the murder weapon. He has faith in her, though, having been reminded of all the late nights they spend together at the training facility, working on mock trials. Hye-kyung wonders how the victim’s mistress would have reacted to In-young’s husband deciding he wanted to reconcile, and Joong-won suggests adding her to the witness list.

Before the trial, Prosecutor Park tells Hye-jung that Chief Prosecutor CHOI SANG-IL (Kim Tae-woo) wishes to see her. He’s the one who took over Tae-joon’s position, and it’s their first time meeting since Tae-joon’s scandal. He offers her a plea bargain — In-young will only get two years in jail if she accepts the charge of manslaughter.

Hye-kyung is surprise by this sudden offer, but Chief Prosecutor Choi tells her that everyone knows she got the information from Tae-joon. He warns her that there are people watching her closely, figuring out where her loyalties lie. After all, it can’t be easy providing for her children and worrying about their future. Sounds like a threat.

She informs him that her most difficult day was when her children saw the video he leaked of her husband. He’s not the one she should be cursing, though — she should be cursing Tae-joon. Oh, but she does — she’s the one going through divorce. Besides, his tactic of bringing up Tae-joon in order to break her makes her assume that he knows nothing about women.

Chief Prosecutor Choi’s attack definitely seems to have backfired, as Hye-kyung confidently interrogates the victim’s mistress. Prosecutor Park is no longer sitting back and keeps popping up to object every few seconds, but the judge allows Hye-kyung to follow her line of questioning about the dog.

She makes it clear that the greyhound that required a medical lotion was the mistress’s brother’s dog, and that the victim had put a hefty life insurance sum in her name. The mistress might have had an alibi for that night, but her brother didn’t. Prosecutor Park looks defeated.

As they wait for the judge to deliberate and declare his verdict, Hye-kyung downs the traditional shot of alcohol that Dan says is to give her good luck in the ruling — and then she laughs at Hye-kyung’s gullibility. Dan doesn’t understand why Hye-kyung hasn’t divorced Tae-joon yet and taken him for all he’s got, but she says that her husband actually doesn’t have much.

Hye-kyung admits that she thinks about it every day, whether or not she should just cut and run, starting a new life. She knows at least that she wants to begin her life as a lawyer. But first she’ll be cautious as she decides if her husband is worth forgiving or not, and then go from there.

The judge has reached a decision, and based on Prosector Park’s acting like he has the worst headache ever, it seems like the judge has ruled in Hye-kyung’s favor. Or, rather, due to an investigation revealing that the mistress’s brother can be placed at the scene of the crime, the prosecution has decided to drop the case — Il-young is free!

Once Hye-kyung is outside, she does a cute little victory dance. As she tells Il-young the good news, she also watches Chief Prosecutor Choi angrily drag the mistress out of the courthouse.

Tae-joon’s lawyer visits him in jail, filling him in on Hye-kyung’s win and that Chief Prosecutor Choi is determined to find out who told Tae-joon about the missing evidence in the first place. Tae-joon ask him to keep an eye on Joong-won — after all, he should know who his wife works for.

Joong-won finds Hye-kyung working late, wrapping up the case, and presents a bottle of champagne as a way to congratulate her on her first win. They’re ready to break into it right then, but her phone rings — she assumes it’s her kids calling, so she asks for a rain check. As he leaves, he tells her that she did really great.

Except the phone call isn’t from her kids — it’s Tae-joon, who informs her that the court date for his appeal has been set, and he’s going to fight as hard as he can. The only person he needs to apologize to is her, and by the way, congrats on her win in court. After she hangs up, she pulls out the divorce paperwork and then stuffs it in a drawer as she stares at pictures of her kids, back when they were one big happy family.

 
COMMENTS

Ahhhhh, I love it! It’s very much like the original (much to my satisfaction), but it has its own flavor that it also seems fresh. This is largely due to Jeon Do-yeon, I believe, who hasn’t made me want to compare her to Julianna Marguiles and her portrayal of Alicia Florrick — although now that I stop to think about it, there’s something at once both softer and harder about Hye-kyung than there was about Alicia. Hye-kyung seems more sincerely gentle and compassionate than “Saint Alicia” ever did, and yet I loved watching how fiery and stubborn she was with her husband.

How marvelous it is to watch Jeon Do-yeon and Yoo Ji-tae together, though. You’d think that their scenes would be more static since they take place just at the prison table, but there’s an incredible chemistry that crackles between them. There’s something to be said about a drama filled with actors who typically work in film. Or, uh, almost filled. While Nana is doing better than I thought she would, it’s pretty clear she’s a rookie and I’m not sure if my inability to figure out where she’s going with her character is a conscious choice (since that character is supposed to be mysterious, anyway) or if it’s because of her acting skill. I think she’ll grow on me — I might just be stubbornly clinging to how much I love the American counterpart, Kalinda.

That said, I’m still going to treat the show like it’s the first time I’ve ever watched it. Or at least I’ll try to! It helps that it’s been some time since I first watched the American version and so I was only recalling details barely before they revealed in an “oh yeah, now I remember this case!” kind of way, but I definitely got a kick out seeing them bring back all the little moments that I loved from the original (like the ringtone for her mother-in-law).

But it is a relief to know that the show is sticking close to the source material, at least so far. Having said that, while it can be fun to speculate, please, please, please keep any comments about the show spoiler-free! Respect those who will be watching it for the first time and will have no basis of comparisons. Discussions about the similarities and differences in each specific episode is fine, but refrain from possibly spoiling someone about the general plot or characters. I’ll do my best to do the same (although I know how tempting it will be!).

All in all, it’s a very satisfying start and should keep both new viewers and fans of the original happy. Now it’s just a matter of seeing how it sustains itself for the rest of the drama.

 
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Jean Do Yeon is absolutely crackling. Her face can show a multitude of rippling emotions. It is a jackpot of a trifecta: Jeon Do Yeon, Yoo Ji Tae and Yoon Kye Sang. The first two episodes were really good. The rest of the ensemble are well casted. I am really enjoying the variety of dramas that is playing right now: from Doctors to Mirror of the Witch to The Good Wife. Who can ask for more when you have a breezy romance, a magical fantasy saeguk, and now a legal eagle of a drama and all wonderfully casted. They are dramas at their best!

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This show though...simply perfect so far!

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i never watched the original but i heard about kalinda's bisexuality. i'm glad kim dan is at least implied to be bisexual~~

nana was much better than i expected, given she's only acted in one other thing i don't even know the name of. there are still some awkward parts but her facial expressions and voice are on point. i hope she keeps improving! i was wondering how she landed such a major role but she really did earn it.

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I hope so. Kalinda was so well done by Archie Punjabi there is no real way for nana to match. I'm hoping she will take the tack of letting her rendition simply be free wheeling. I'm not sure she can pull of the kind of mysterious Archie did.

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I heard she passed a few stages of auditions among many candidates if i'm not mistaken.

TvN really knows how to pick the new actors, most of them that i have watched are doing well.

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Director Lee probably wet his pants when she agreed to do the drama. No one was really expecting her to return to the small screen. She is second to none in Chungmuro and she has nothing to prove.

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Ooops I was talking about Jeon Do-yeon.

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I wonder, what important milestones from the original they are going to focus on. It can't be easy, to determine what to fit into a 16 (?) episodes.

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They do have a lot to work with (156 eps) but I think 16 eps is perfect for a first try.
I doubt they will cover everything in 16 eps. They are probably testing the water first with K-viewers and go from there.
If it does well, they will probably go for another season but the problem will be getting Jeon Do-yeon to do more than she signed up for.

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I thought about it too. And it seems to be impossible for the drama to have a 2nd Season coz it means that all the actors & actresses schedules should be available for it. As long as they can wrap this up nicely in 16 Episodes, I think we can be left satisfied.

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I really hope they flesh out the female characters other than JDJ. The original show rested a lot on the power of the performances from Archie Punjabi/Christine Baranski in early seasons. You needed those counterpoints to the amazing work put out by the male leads (well Chris Noth wasn't super but still). I think if they take the cue from that and retain that layered strength within an ensemble you will get something really special.

I was really impressed by the fact that TvN even went to the point of making the kalinda character not straight!! It was a throwaway shot but damned if it wasn't there.

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I miss the slap though. That set the tone for everything so well. I can understand the reason they didn't though. JDj is playing the Good Wife as more decisive less repressed. She seems more in touch with her emotions then Alicia Florrick was.

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I feel the same, and I am hopeful that they will do so - flesh out the other female characters, that is. To me, it seems as though they're setting up the main character first, and will go into a bit more depths with the other woman when Hye-kyung comes to know them better.

(I'm doubtful about the kids, but something has to be relegated to the background if you only have 16 eps, and I am fine with the kids remaining less three-dimensional as characters.)

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Haven't seen it (yet), but what is the magic attraction of murder weapons that makes the first person on the scene always pick them up?

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It's called rule of dramatic revegenence! You pick it up to protect yourself/gain revenge. My name for it and yes the exclaimation point is necessary.

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That's right, it is Drama Law - just like the Law governing that Secret Confessions Are Always Overheard by Various Third Parties, wearing glasses instantly makes a beautiful woman ugly (also known as Clark Kent's Rule), and that fleeing people will always run into a Dramatic Cart Spilling Stuff Everywhere.

(Also the law that if anyone has been stabbed, someone will always go against every medical advice to pull out the knife as soon as possible, and then stare aghast as - surprise! - a lot of blood happens. Who'd have thought!)

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dear lawd, i love me some nana :)

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Where are others watching? I haven't see on Viki or Dramafever.

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DramaYou is where I found it. Not sure where they got it from.

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Thank you!!

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It's currently available on Indonesia via VIU.

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I found it on Good Drama.

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I watched on Dramafire

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Wooooowwww I love this drama! I saw some people were disappointed with it on other sites but I can't see why-- I'm obsessed!! I love Jeon Do-Yeon and she definitely lives up to expectations~~ so gooodddd can't wait for the next episode!

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Awesome, first Dear my Friends, now The Good Wife, two dramas I didn't expect to be recapped on DB at all, thank you odilettante!

I really really liked the first two episodes. I'm in the lucky(?) position of being able to go in with zero expectations since I've never seen the original version and don't know anything about its characters or storyline (which is perfect for me since I always compare any remakes with the original). Looking forward to the next two months. :-)

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yay! It will be nice to see what a person without the ability to compare thinks.

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Jeon do Yoen is an amazing actress! I've not seen OG , the good wife but I don't think I need too really! I'm so hooked already and can't wait to see new episodes!!!

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Jeon Do Yeon oh how I love thee! So natural with every role she takes. This cast is fantastic along with her. I am sold! So many thoughts that I can't put into words yet.

I think 16 episodes is just perfect. This would easily be all over the place if longer.

Thank you so much odilettante for picking this up <3.

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I loved this too! I thought that the show did a great job of sticking to the main plot points of the original show, while at the same time creating something very different in terms of the characters and their relationships. It feels fresh and original, not like a copy at all but like something entirely new - the same basic situation with different people in a different culture. That means everything changes! There's really no telling where this will end up in terms of the cfharacterization, and I love that. I look forward to finding out.

I love Jeon Do Yeon's version of the good wife, who I also read as more immediately assertive, decisive and combative than Alicia - while also not lacking heart. She seems like an amazing character, and I completely believe that she will be able to climb to the top in short order; she has that air of scary competence (powered by anger and the burning need to establish herself as an independent person) just waiting to be unleashed. ;-)

My only slight disappointment is that the investigator is not as strong a character as Kalinda was in the original show. This is by no means a criticism of the actress, who is doing an amazing job! I even think the character herself is interesting in principle, and I assume that the changes are probably inevitable because Korean society won't allow a woman to bulldozer through the way Kalinda did in the US series (I'm only assuming this, though, so please do correct me if it isn't true!). This investigator gets her way with cute wheedling and aegyo, but at her core she is just as calculating, ruthless and competent. I like all this.

But... the outwardly conventionally pretty and soft-looking, initially unremarkable-seeming woman doesn't stand out from the other characters so far, at least not to me. I hope that will change, though!

And David Lee! :-) Oh, show.

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Oh David Lee is perfect translation! Incorporates all the tropes the American version used but kept it uniquely Korean. God the utterly smug satisfaction on his face while wearing a ridiculous theater costume is just friggin perfect.

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Oh, I like this version of David Lee! He did seem like a very different character to me, but I didn't mind at all. :-)

I should say that the only things I know about Korean culture, I learned through kdrama, so, yeah. *g* I can't really trace the way US tropes have been adapted into their Korean counterparts. I just liked the result in his case; he is already a very strong and unique character, despite not having had much screentime at all.

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"Just then Hye-kyung’s phone rings — it’s the “Jaws” theme, a special ringtone for her mother-in-law. Hee!"

That cracks me up and I was on serious mode.

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It's so much fun comparing and contrasting the Korean characters to their American counterparts. I didn't really watch The Good Wife, most of what I know of the show comes from Tvline.com since they are HUGE Good Wife fans over there so I was able to start this without really knowing what to expect. I have a feeling that I will be enjoying this drama a lot.

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I was a fan of the original series for the first five seasons. It went downhill rapidly midway through season 6, but when it was good, it was really good. So I watched the first episode of this adaptation with interest, especially since I love Lee Wongeun (hee).

It was weird when I first realized that I already knew the solution to the case, but this is an adaptation, after all. I found it interesting that all the women in this drama, true to Korean drama tropes, seemed really soft and sweet. This was especially true for the accused.

I've never seen Jeon Doyeon in anything before, so it was interesting to be a newcomer to her work while not being a newcomer to the world of "The Good Wife." I like her here. She seems to have lots of emotion simmering just under the surface. And she's beautiful in an austere way.

I like Nana here as well. I loved Kalinda in the original, though I was always more of an Alicia fan. I agree with Alex who said that the adaptation probably can't have Kim Dan bulldozing over all obstacles as Kalinda did, but she's still an effective character. And I love that they threw in a hint that the character is not straight (I'd say bisexual, but we haven't seen her sleep with men yet, haha).

When Seo Joongwon first referred to the guy in costume as Mr. Lee, I knew right away that we were looking at the adaptation's version of David Lee. I loved that they put him in a (devil? demon?) costume. It's so appropriate and clever. I'd forgotten that the David Lee character was into amateur theatricals.

Joongwon is cute, but a bit too enamored of Hyekyung already, a bit too encouraging, just a bit too much.

Taejoon is a powerful character, and I like Yoo Jitae. I read all the recaps for "A Star's Lover" but have never seen him in anything before this. He really has presence.

And of course, Lee Wongeun, I'm looking forward to seeing more of you!

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Yay for recapping! Thanks Odillante XD

The first two episodes were so so so good i almost regret watching it now and not marathoning instead as the waiting is an absolute hell. Haven't watched the original so i have the luxury to watch this with fresh eyes.

And the quality!! I almost forget how good Yoo Ji Tae is until that scene in prison with her wife. That scene is such a delight to watch. Jeon Do Yeon really makes my eyes all hearts tbh. Never saw any of her works since i don't follow kmovie but wow, now i know why she is regarded as Queen. And everyone is well-casted & intriguing. I look forward to Lee Wongeun doing more than being smily hardworker newbie though lol.

Question time!!
Why chief prosecutor knows that husband told wife about the missing evidence? It's supposed to be secret the husband got from his underlings and the convo done in prison so why?

And, is it only me or [SPOILER REDACTED]? I know she is supposed to be smartest lawyer and everything but this makes me worried. If they already show us rainbow-and-unicorn part so early, i wonder what kind of catastrophe conflict that will arise later ?

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Ah i don't know if i made spoiler-y comment T.T Sorry guys!! :(

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Yay!
It's an impressive and solid start for me. I was surprised that the opening scene was absolutely the same with the original and the cases too. I love the cast (they're killing it!!!) and I'm happy to see Jeon Do Yeon back in the small screen. The original didn't end well for me so I really hope that the writer will just use the same set up at the start and deviate the plot in the middle until the end to maintain the momentum..

Well, I'm happy to see this : The director explained that the Korean version of the drama has been adjusted to fit the mood and sentiment of the Korean viewers. Lee further explained that the ending of the Korean version may not be the same as that of the original.

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Fantastic. It is wonderful, it is delicious, it is glorious! I loved this episode! It's so tight and so packed with information it's as if it's about to burst with goodies and rainbows like a piñata.

Odilantte, I must give you applause for a job well done with this recap. I know just how hard it is to recap this episode, because I did too and then I went *glug glug* "saavee meeee...~"

To think that you'll be continuing with recaps for the rest of the series! Here, have a standing ovation: clapclapclapclapclapclapclapclapclapclap!

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First two episodes and I'm sold!!! Never seen any of jeon do yeon works but wahh she's amazing!!!

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She's the master when it comes to portraying the roles of fragile women with finesse and natural instinct. She's totally the Queen of Chungmuro :)

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The Queen of Cannes' title has never wrongly being given to her. She is just awesome. Many young actresses also made her as an idol.

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@ Sera The Ms Temper
I remember when I first saw her in Secret Sunshine , I was blown away by her impressive acting that I immediately became a fan. That was raw and very realistic acting there. I wouldn't be surprised if she drained most of her energy after doing that film.

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That was the very role that won her the best actress (Prix d'interprétation féminine) in Cannes.

Lee Chang-Dong is an impressive writer and film maker. He creates challenging characters for talented actors like Jeon Do-yeon, Yun Jung-Hee etc.
It's been 6yrs since Poetry that won him the best screen writer in Cannes. I hope he'll be back soon with another film.

So many great talents in Korea's film industry. It's a real treat to see some of them in dramaland.

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I know that they're entirely different but when I saw the first episode, that feeling when I first saw Signal all came rushing back. Amazing pilot! I'm already hooked ♡♡♡
Thanks odilettante!

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SOLID. What a splendid comeback for Jeon Do Yeon. I'm already in love with this drama. So far, so good. This wouldn't be possible if a lesser talent was at its center.

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I watched the original show on and off and Kalinda's character was probably my favourite part. I wasn't really expecting another Archie Panjabi-level actress in the adaptation so I don't know if it's a case of me successfully lowering my expectations, but I actually like Nana in the role so far! I was most worried that they might change Kalinda's sexuality (particularly since they cast an idol) but it looks like I was (thankfully) wrong about that. She and the production team definitely broke past my expectations.

And well, I don't even need to talk about the quality of acting in the rest of the cast. Truly top-notch.

Also thanks and kudos to odilettante for coverage of this show! <3

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I never watched the original but I've heard many things about it so I know this wouldn't be easy to 'cover', but everyone did veryvery well! I can't compare but I'm really enjoying this so far.

Does anyone know if Lee Wongeun's character has an original counterpart or is he specially made only for the Korean version? I think his existence is somehow important and who can reject that smile even though his eyes twinkle with something else?

Yoon Kyesang's character seems sincere but also suspicious. I wouldn't say he's a bad person but he seems to have more under his sleeves (don't spoil me, though. I wanna be surprised)

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I think Joong-won had a thing for our new lawyer since their training days. He is acting like a protective boyfriend and he doesn't realize that it's kind of obvious.

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I noticed it too. I don't know why but the chemistry and tension in this drama seems great even though the characters are shady (except Hye-Kyung of course). Well, what do you expect with the actors in their caliber? They're nailing it.

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To be honest, I came to watch this drama because of director Lee Jung Hyo who also directed Cruel City/ Heartless City but what amazed me the most is Jeon Do Yeon. I've never seen her in anything yet but WOW!She knows how to handle emotions really well.

I don't know if the husband is a bad character or not because the drama seems to hint that there is more to it than his scandal and it might just be a facade to something even bigger...

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As a HUGE fan of The Good Wife, the Korean adaption is off to a great start. I immediately noticed that Hye-kyung is more assertive than Alicia was. Alicia tended to be very passive at first but she gained her confidence as time went on. Not that it's a bad thing though! The actress who plays her is doing her thing!

Also, Dan is no Kalinda. Honestly, there is no other character like Kalinda. She was my absolute favorite part of The Good Wife and no one will ever portray her like Archie did. But I'm excited to see Nana's depiction of the character.

I am loving it so far. Not sure how they are going to fit 7 seasons in 16 episodes but I am along for the ride!

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I'm now curious if Jeon Do Yeon did watch the original to see how the main actress played her role but I think it is better if she didn't so that she will have her Korean version and she really did make her own.

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Jeon Do Yeon is a delight to watch in intense projects like this. She's one of those actresses who are truly watch-worthy.

I was wondering where I saw the judge before. hahaha. Then I remembered that he was Park Do-Kyung's psychiatrist in Oh Hae Young Again.

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It was good first episode which does not happen often even with good shows. JDY definitely owns it. I couldn't help but thinking about the other dramas Lawyer Jo Deul-ho and Memory. All three dramas have excellent actors- and I felt Park Sin-yang(of Jo Deul-ho) showed more natural, Lee Sang-min (of Memory) showed more raw, and Jeon Do-yeon showed more polished acting (so far). All great in own way.

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Am I the only one that think the pace of the show is really weird? It was too rushed. I thought it would get better on episode 2, but no. It seems like it is a signature of the show.

The shaky camera, well, it is to show that they're always on the move, but it is kind of disturbing.

I don't know. I don't think I like the show so far. Will keep watching though.

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Interesting - no, for my part, I didn't think the pacing was off. It's an episodic drama in that I presume each ep will be featuring one legal case (that will most often also be resolved in that ep), which is a very familiar format to me. Neither case seemed rushed to me, since I'm used to the quick resolution within one episode. Is this what you meant, perhaps?

The ongoing relationship developments will be happening alongside for the entire run of the series, of course, and so far nothing here has seemed rushed to me, either.

I do think kdramas as a whole tend to linger far more over the set-up. Could this be what you mean?

For my part, I'm glad that they're moving swiftly in establishing the situation that launches the main character into her new career, and leaving the viewer to find out details in retrospect.

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I'm sure you are not the only one. This is going to be a 16 eps show so they have a lot to cover in a short time.

I enjoy Paul Greengrass's films and he used shaky cam or I should call it queasy cam cause it was a bit excessive to some viewers.
I think this is very minor in comparison. It has a reality feel to it. Maybe that's what Lee was going for.

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Thanks to the recap, I'm watching this show now :D So far I've only seen the first ep and I'm intrigued. It helps that I haven't watched the original, so I've no idea what's coming. I do wonder what they'll be able to do in 16 eps, but I"m looking forward to it.

I guess once the show is over, I could always watch the original, although I have a slight aversion to American series with its multitude of seasons, heh.

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I think i might be the only one who doesnt like the actress who plays Kim Dan. She doesnt have that strong presence and mysteriousness. She just look very very blank. She lacks screen presence.She doesnt have that acting level to match up with powerful acting of Jeon Yo Don. I wish they had cast another actress to play Kim Dan. The partners in any show should always have that connection and chemistry, which disappointingly lacks in this drama.

Anyway's i love the drama. Gives a bit of 'Signal' type of feeling. Thrilling, exciting and amazing. I have never watched the original series, but i think they have done well in the 1st and 2nd episode.

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She is pretty green so I don't want to be hard on her but I understand what you are saying.
I think she is doing better than the average idol actors. My expectation is usually at the lowest especially if they have no acting experience.

Jeon is just as awesome as Song Kang Ho when it comes to compensating for the weaker actors. They are very much aware of their co-stars strengths and weaknesses. They know when to let them shine and when to make up for what they lack in.
I have nothing but respect for these film actors. They totally deserve their place in Chungmuro.

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