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W–Two Worlds: Episode 5

I feel like there are no rules in this drama, which is terrifying and thrilling all at once. Is this the story of a hero, or a monster? Is this drama about creating your own happy ending, or is it about discovering that real life has no such thing as neat narrative arcs, or meaning, or purpose? Really, depending on which side of the bed you woke up on today, it could feel like either extreme. Maybe happily-ever-after is just what you make of it… or maybe happy endings are a construct that never existed in the first place.

 

 
EPISODE 5 RECAP

Kang Chul’s entire world literally comes to a grinding halt the second he becomes aware that he’s a manhwa character. After stepping through the mysterious webtoon frame connecting the manhwa world to the real one, Chul comes out on the other side and walks down the street in the pouring rain, still in a haze over the earth-shattering events he just witnessed.

Across the street, something catches his attention: It’s an ad for W the webtoon, with a giant image of Kang Chul plastered to the side of a bus, asking if he’ll finally catch his family’s killer. Chul is so shocked that he crosses the street in the middle of traffic, not even registering all the honking cars.

He comes face to face with his own… face… and looks stricken to see the proof so plainly, that he is a fictional character. He reaches out a shaky hand to touch the sign, like he’s still not sure that it’s real.

And because he’s smart, Chul goes straight to the nearest bookstore to track down his own manhwa. What he encounters is more shocking than he anticipated though—an entire display filled with volumes, all featuring him on the cover.

It takes him a moment to work up to it, but he rips open the first volume and sees character introductions for him, and the people closest to him. The story opens the way we opened the drama, in the Olympics shooting match where he won his gold medal. As Chul reads the part about his family’s brutal murder, he wells up with angry tears.

He rips open volume after volume, and we get clever exposition on Chul’s intervening years this way: Prosecutor Han got elected to the National Assembly, and though his public face was charismatic, behind closed doors he continued to hunt Kang Chul ferociously.

Chul sought out top fighter Do-yoon for martial arts lessons, saying that he had the feeling that he’d be gaining more enemies soon and wanted to protect himself. Chul only wanted training from the best, and the boys developed a natural friendship as they trained.

Chul went after the city’s biggest criminals himself, fighting crime lords and their henchmen with Do-yoon by his side. That’s how he regained the public’s favor—by using his crime investigation show W to clean up the streets.

The more Chul’s popularity grew, the more people turned on Assemblyman Han, accusing him of orchestrating a witch-hunt on Kang Chul all those years ago. But still to this day, Assemblyman Han believed that Chul killed his own family and deserved to rot in jail.

By that point in his own story, Kang Chul has caught up with all thirty-three volumes of the manhwa, and he throws the last one down onto the pile with a thud. He sits there numbly on the floor of the bookstore for a long time, until the employees finally ask him to leave because they’re closing.

He asks dispassionately if this manhwa is popular, and the employees say it’s been a bestseller for over five years. He scoffs at that, calling it funny. I have no idea how he has the presence of mind to find humor in the irony. He gets up to leave, and when the clerk offers to bag the books for him, he says, “I don’t need them. It’s a story I already know.”

At the hospital, Yeon-joo stares at the webtoon image of Kang Chul on his plane, saying to himself that he might be shaken if she said she loved him one more time. (I love that she gets to see these private moments after the fact!) She relives their kiss as she thinks of him.

Su-bong calls and says that the technicians checked all the equipment at Dad’s workshop, but everything is in working order and the server is fine too, so they don’t know what caused the sudden freeze-out. Su-bong is so freaked out that he couldn’t stay in the workshop alone, and tells Yeon-joo that he’ll return when her dad shows up.

When she’s called in for a surgery, Yeon-joo scrubs up as her friend Seok-bum comes by, asking randomly if she has a fiancé that she never told him about. He says that someone is here looking for her saying that he’s engaged to her, and Yeon-joo says he must be mistaken since she has no guy in her life to be engaged to.

She’s about to go into surgery when it dawns on her that there IS someone who goes around saying that he’s her fiancé…

She comes out to the lobby where Seok-bum is talking to a man in black, and when she arrives, the man turns around. It’s Kang Chul, of course, and Yeon-joo gasps, her jaw practically hitting the floor. Chul winks at her, ha.

Seok-bum asks if they really know each other, and Chul answers yes before confidently marching up to Yeon-joo and leading her away by the hand. She’s so stunned that she just watches everything he’s doing like she must be imagining this, and when she finally finds her voice, she asks if she’s been sucked back into his world. She stammers that no, this is her hospital with her friend Seok-bum, and Chul says, “I came here, to your world.”

He tells her that his world stopped—everything but him. He doesn’t know why he’s the only one not frozen in time, and wonders if it’s a perk of being the lead character. He says he left it all and came here, and spent all the cash he had in his pocket to read all thirty-three volumes of his manhwa.

He understands now how Yeon-joo knew him so well, and guesses that she was a devoted reader who’s followed him for seven years. “Do you know how much I regret it now? I should’ve listened to your warning then,” he says without bitterness. He thinks back to her warning in prison that he’d be unhappy if she told him the truth, and says he never could have imagined that the truth would be this.

But he adds, “I know now, how much you were thinking of me with your silence then.” He says that’s why he came, to say goodbye one last time. She gives him a quizzical look, and he smiles faintly and thanks her for being so considerate to the end. He says that she’s a really good person, and is qualified to become a really good doctor.

Yeon-joo searches his face, not knowing what to make of any of this, when she’s interrupted by a phone call asking her to come down to surgery. She asks Chul to wait here for her and not go anywhere or do anything, and to just think of her as his guardian.

He laughs and asks if she’s mimicking him, and she points out that here he has no money, no ID, and no house, which is a predicament she understands well. She says she’s not rich like him, but she’s a real doctor here, with money and a home. Aw, he looks genuinely touched by her words.

She pleads with him to just stay right here and wait for her, and he manages a faint smile to reassure her that he will. Why does it look like his eyes are crying though? Satisfied, she turns to go.

But at the last second Chul pulls her back towards him and leans down to kiss her, this time slow and soft and lingering. Humona.

When he finally steps back, Yeon-joo still has her eyes closed like she doesn’t want to wake up from this moment. It’s incredibly endearing.

She does eventually open her eyes again, and then she starts to panic, wondering why he’s suddenly being like this. Chul says that after reading the manhwa, his unhappiness increased about ninety-nine-fold, but there was one good thing that came out of it. He says that he felt like he was always the one at a disadvantage, but then he got to see Yeon-joo’s true intentions too: “So it’s probably best not to act coy.” Embarrassing!

Yeon-joo gets the second call from the nurse and has to go, but urges Chul to wait for her, and to seek out her friend Seok-bum if anything happens while she’s in surgery. Chul says that Seok-bum acted prickly when he said he was her fiancé, and makes sure that he isn’t her boyfriend. Yeon-joo reminds him that she already told him she didn’t have a boyfriend.

I don’t like the way Chul’s face falls when Yeon-joo leaves…

Yeon-joo is on edge all throughout her surgery, and Professor Crazy Dog is doubly annoyed at her tardiness because her name is Oh Yeon-joo, and he’s currently mad at all Oh Yeon-joos of the world because his favorite manhwa is being ruined by one.

Kang Chul doesn’t stay and wait for her, of course, and seeks out Dad’s workshop instead. When no one answers the doorbell, he breaks in. Despite knowing that he’s about to enter his creator’s workshop, it’s overwhelming when he sees his face pinned up on every wall. There are conceptual drawings of every detail of his life, from his car, to this penthouse suite, to his best friends.

What haunts him the most is a sketchpad on Dad’s desk, with early conceptual sketches of Kang Chul’s face, as he worked out the facial features—more proof that he was made, not born. Chul catches his own reflection in the window and snarls at what he sees, and it sends him into a rage. He throws the sketchpad and starts tearing apart Dad’s office in a fury, until he sees something that makes him still.

He walks over to the wall where Dad has hung a series of pictures of him with his daughter, as a child, a young girl, a teen, and then a doctor—where she is clearly recognizable as Yeon-joo.

He’s stunned and thinks back to how Yeon-joo saved him over and over, how she was invincible in his world, and that she said she was a fan who wanted him to get a happy ending. He looks at that photo like it’s a cruel joke, and storms out.

Meanwhile, Yeon-joo’s surgery finally ends, and she fails to sneak out before Crazy Dog chews her out for being insubordinate lately, which he traces to the moment he told her he was her dad’s fan. As usual, Crazy Dog ends up ranting about W instead, angry at her father for suddenly turning his thriller manhwa into a romance. Hilariously, Yeon-joo argues back that a hero can sometimes fall in love because he can’t be working all the time: “He’s a person too!”

Crazy Dog is appalled that she’s arguing with him about this, and huffs that it’s not love—it’s just a passing fancy. It’s Yeon-joo’s turn to get huffy, and she asks why it couldn’t be love between Chul and Yeon-joo. Crazy Dog keeps asking for proof, and she just touches her lips and says she can’t tell them.

The staff assumes she knows some spoilers, and Crazy Dog goes extra crazy at the thought that Kang Chul might end up with Yeon-joo when he’s supposed to marry So-hee, who’s stuck by his side for ten years. I seriously love that they’re having a shouting fanwar about this—it feels like my life.

Yeon-joo gets riled up as she argues that there’s been no indication that Kang Chul sees So-hee as anything more than a friend, while Crazy Dog calls it ludicrous to assume that the story would veer from the formula. Yeon-joo: “How can you say there’s a formula for people’s feelings?! Why are you interpreting Kang Chul however you want when you don’t even know? Kang Chul likes ME!” Pwahahahaha.

Everyone in the room turns to look at her like she’s crazy, and Yeon-joo hangs her head when she catches her slip. Crazy Dog says that Yeon-joo seems about the maturity level of his tween daughter who’s currently going through her fangirl stage, and offers to introduce them so they can be friends.

Yeon-joo is so impatient to get out of there that she asks to get yelled at even more later, and just runs out with Crazy Dog screaming after her. Kang Chul is nowhere to be found, of course, and she wonders what he meant by “final goodbye.” She tries calling Dad, but his phone is still turned off.

Dad finally turns up at his workshop, and trudges inside to pour himself a drink. He checks his phone to find panicked texts from Su-bong saying that Yeon-joo has gotten sucked into the manhwa world again, and then when he reads Yeon-joo’s text looking for him, he calls her back.

Yeon-joo answers in a hurry, but before Dad can say anything to her, Kang Chul walks out from his office. Aaaah! Dad drops his glass of scotch, understandably terrified. Yeon-joo can hear Kang Chul’s voice on the other end, and realizes that he’s found her father.

Chul says that they’ve met a few times before, and that they have a lot to talk about. At last Dad stammers, “How…?” Chul says that’s really a question for him: “They say you made me.”

Chul pulls out a chair for Dad and wants to talk, not really giving him much of a choice in the matter. Dad shuffles over warily, eyeing the box-cutter on the desk as he nears. He looks pretty shifty, but he manages to grab the box-cutter and swing at Chul.

Chul dodges quickly and disarms Dad, slamming his head down onto the desk. Yeon-joo gasps as she hears their struggle on the phone, but can’t do anything to stop them. Dad continues to attack, so finally Chul bonks Dad on the head with the butt of his pistol, sending him to the ground.

He picks Dad up and throws him into the chair before lowering his gun right in Dad’s face. Chul: “Be grateful to your daughter. I’m treating you gently for her sake. While you were anxious to kill me, your daughter worked hard to save me.”

With her cell phone still on the call with Dad, Yeon-joo grabs her desk phone and calls Su-bong to hurry up and get to the workshop, because Kang Chul is here and confronting Dad right this minute. She has to say it twice for Su-bong to comprehend, and he stands up in the middle of a PC-bang shouting, “KANG CHUL IS HERE?!”

Yeon-joo urges him to get there fast, and to tell Chul that she’s on her way and has something to tell him. She hangs up and runs out of the hospital, and Su-bong sits there having a mini-freakout before grabbing his snacks (do you have time for that?) and rushing out.

Thankfully Chul really does want to talk, and withdraws his gun. He looks down at his hand that Dad scratched up in their scuffle, and muses with interest, “I bleed.” He notes that Dad isn’t invincible in this world: “Just an average person, who hurts and bleeds. That’s normal. That’s fair. It was always me dying and bleeding—unfairly.”

We flash back to the night that Dad drew him getting stabbed on the rooftop. After finishing the bloody drawing, Dad had reached for his scotch with a satisfied look, when suddenly a hand came reaching out of his monitor and grabbed him by the collar. It wasn’t Yeon-joo that he pulled in there?!

Chul remembers now that it was Dad that he pulled in the first time, and we see Dad standing on the roof looking horrified, while Kang Chul pleaded with him to call emergency. Not only did he not make the phone call, but he turned around to go pick up the killer’s knife.

Kneeling over Chul’s body, Dad had said in a shaky voice, “Let’s end this,” and stabbed him right in the gut. Ack!

Even after getting stabbed, Chul forced the bloody knife out of his gut and turned it on Dad, shoving it into his chest. Dad fell back in terror, but they were both shocked to see that he was unharmed—it was then that Chul saw he was invincible.

In the present, Chul says that Dad was the one to deliver the deadly blow, and no one seemed to know that there were two separate killers on the roof that night. He’d had a hunch that the second killer was the one who kept trying to kill him without reason, not that he knew then what Dad was to him.

Chul supposes that Dad got everything he wanted out of him like fame and fortune, and when he had no use for the character anymore, he thought to kill him off heartlessly. Chul finds it amusing how famous Dad is, because he found out a lot with a quick internet search, like how he was always an alcoholic and an unsuccessful husband and father who spent many years as a talentless no-name artist.

In flashback, we see Little Yeon-joo sitting in the corner drawing while her parents argued over Dad’s drinking for the millionth time. OMO—she’s drawing a boy holding a gun, and though it doesn’t look like Kang Chul (because it’s a kid’s cartoon drawing), it’s got to be him.

Chul doesn’t know that detail though, and says that Dad created a character who was the exact opposite of himself in every way—strong-willed, young, famous, successful—a strong man. He laughs to recount an article that said he was named Kang Chul (meaning “steel”) for that reason, and he surmises that Dad was living vicariously through him.

Chul continues narrating that it didn’t last long though, because Mom and Yeon-joo eventually left him, and Dad was such a weak person that he fell apart instantly. And because Dad didn’t have the strength to kill himself, he had Kang Chul commit suicide on that bridge in his place: “Because the only thing you can control in this world is me.” Dayum.

Chul says he’s had nightmares every night since that he was drowning in the Han River, and it’s only now that he knows—he really did die that day, until Dad changed his mind and rewrote the story.

Dad finally speaks up to argue that point, because he didn’t change his mind at all. He says that he killed Chul on that bridge, but Chul was the one who held on, like he was begging to live. And because Dad had affection for the character, he softened and chose to let him live. He says now that that was his critical error, because after that, Kang Chul became a monster.

Yeon-joo is heartbroken as she hears Dad scream that he gave Kang Chul everything—all the characteristics he wished he could have. Dad says that Chul is trying to understand the world with the brain that HE gave him: “Does that make sense? You’re nothing but a drawing!”

Dad says he thought he was going mad at first, and went to a therapist, and told his friends. But no one believed him. He even thought of running away because he was so scared, but then he couldn’t because of Yeon-joo.

He admits that he didn’t do anything for his daughter while she was growing up, but he was doing well and the manhwa was successful and making money, so he told himself to hang on a little longer. Dad decided to continue the manhwa until he made enough so that Yeon-joo could live comfortably for the rest of her life, and on the phone Yeon-joo sighs to hear this from her dad.

Dad argues that Chul isn’t the only one having nightmares, because he dreamt nightmares every night too, but held on with the belief that he could end it soon. But every attempt to kill Kang Chul has been thwarted, and then Chul even went so far as to pull Yeon-joo into his world.

That’s why Dad stabbed him, in the hopes that this curse would end. He rants, “You are an illusion. You’re not anything! You’re just a character I created! So why are you showing up in front of me and pretending to be a person? Why are you pulling my daughter into this and continuing the story however you please? You’re just a character, do you hear me?! A predetermined setting that I created!”

Dad actually eggs Kang Chul on to try and shoot him, insisting that he won’t be able to because Dad created him to be a just, righteous character who can’t murder anyone. Dad looks almost triumphant as he declares Chul a law-abiding hero with a conscience whom everyone loves, because he made it so.

Ohmygah, DAD! STOP IT. You can actually see the defiance spark in Kang Chul’s eyes, as Dad full-on gloats that even Chul being here now isn’t of his own free will—it’s because Dad created him to be strong-willed and relentless. Dad says his mistake was in making Chul so strong-willed that he kept fighting his own death, but he says even that is his own doing as Chul’s creator.

Dad: “You have never once stepped outside of my settings for you!” Dad grabs Chul’s gun and sticks it in his own chest, urging him to go ahead and shoot. Yeon-joo pleads with Dad to stop, even though he can’t hear her.

Chul struggles with the pistol in his hand, but in the end Dad was right about him—he can’t shoot, and the realization brings tears to his eyes. Aw buddy. I’ve never been sadder for someone to learn he’s not a cold-blooded killer.

He wipes away his tears quietly and then switches to Plan B: He holds the gun up to Dad and orders him to draw the ending of the manhwa that he originally intended, before making him commit suicide on the bridge. Chul guesses that his desire to catch his family’s killer was so strong that it brought him all the way here, and orders Dad to draw the killer’s face so that he can go back to his world and finish the story in a way that makes sense. Chul says his friends are still stuck back there, neither dead nor alive, and he can’t just leave them there.

Dad says there’s nothing he can do now, because a storyline has to make sense to Kang Chul for it to play out in the manhwa. Chul says the ending he wants is simple: catch the killer, bring him to justice, and live a normal life. He holds Dad up at gunpoint and orders him to draw.

Dad picks up his pen… but then he puts it down and admits that he doesn’t know, because there is no culprit—it was just a story point that he added in order to make the hero strong. Just a tragedy in a hero’s backstory, like a go-to trope.

Chul’s eyes fill with tears and he asks how that’s possible. But Dad says the crime has to be unsolved to make him a hero; solving the case would mean the end of the story. Dad argues that if Kang Chul were happy, no one would buy his story, and he doesn’t have clues because there never was a culprit in the first place.

Chul looks broken at his words, and asks angrily how there could be no culprit when Dad killed his entire family and framed him for the crime. It dawns on him that he was trying to kill him because the story can’t have a happy ending. Chul supposes that if none of this had happened, Dad would’ve continued drawing and being successful to the end of his days.

Kang Chul’s voice breaks as he cries, “And I never would’ve known the reason, running after a killer who could never be caught, suffering from insomnia every night, getting hurt and broken. Endlessly suffering and repeating it over and over. Do you even know what I’ve been through? Things that you would never be able to endure. You made me go through it all, thinking yourself a god with that tiny finger, without any responsibility, while I remember every single moment of pain.”

Dad just answers quietly, “That’s fiction. That’s a writer’s job.” But Chul argues that he’s not just a writer, because Dad saw him living and breathing and still tried to kill him. He says that’s Dad’s true nature—violent and cruel, just hidden because he holds a pen instead of a knife.

Chul raises his gun again: “Your true nature is a son of a bitch, and it’s as if you have already committed murder.” Dad shuts his eyes, waiting for the shot. Yeon-joo gasps and begs him not to shoot while trying to hurry, and Su-bong arrives outside the gate, panicked.

With the gun cocked, Chul trembles and clenches his jaw, determined to fight his nature and shoot. Tears trickle down his face and he can’t bear to do it. Su-bong cries out for Dad, and Chul lowers his arm and tells Dad to think of a way to fix this before he returns. Yeon-joo breathes a sigh of relief.

As he turns to go, Chul says that Dad was lucky today, but then Dad has to go and stick his foot in his mouth again. He says that Chul can’t shoot him, because that’s how his predetermined settings are. Are you TRYING to push him over the edge??

It works, because Chul snaps, and in one swift motion, he pulls his gun out as he whirls around again. Time slows, and Dad looks up with fear in his eyes as Kang Chul aims his gun with a snarl.

He shoots, and Dad looks down at his bleeding chest in shock. He falls to the floor… Ack, is he dead??

 
COMMENTS

Wait, did he actually kill his creator? He can’t be dead-dead, right? Where do we go from here? Does Kang Chul just write his own story now? I fully expected Yeon-joo and Su-bong to arrive just in time to save the day, like they would’ve in any other drama. But they didn’t, because this drama is crazy. I honestly did think that Dad was asking for it when he kept egging Chul on to shoot him, almost taunting him about not having the free will to act outside of the set characteristics Dad had “programmed” him with. I mean, the guy defied death by developing free will so strong that you can’t even control your own creation, and you’re pushing his buttons and daring him to rebel against you? By the end of the episode, I’m fully convinced that Chul shoots Dad out of rebellion more than revenge—it’s an assertion of his free will to do the one thing that his creator insists he can never do by design. I’m simultaneously impressed that we went that far, sympathetic to Chul, and horrified that he shot Dad point-blank like that.

Thematically, it’s the ultimate reversal to have the monster that Dad created shoot him—a self-fulfilling prophecy, really, because Dad was so convinced that his creation would devour him that he treats Kang Chul with disgust and superiority, rather than pity or love. It’s Dr. Frankenstein through and through, and I’m scared for how dark Kang Chul will go now that he’s faced with the truth that his life and all its attendant tragedies are utterly meaningless. It’s probably not that far off from a normal existential crisis, where people wonder what the point of anything is in life, except it seems so much worse to have a man tell you that he made you suffer your whole life just because it sells books, and that you were destined to never solve the one mystery that was your driving force throughout young adulthood because then he’d run out of ideas for how to continue your story. It feels so… empty.

Frankly, I’m amazed that Kang Chul could hold it together in this episode at all, given the kind of mind-boggling things he learns about his own existence. Despite it being a slower episode on the action front, I was riveted by his first day in the real world, and the slow unraveling of horrifying truths. I wasn’t expecting him to confront his creator right away like this, and I certainly didn’t expect to learn that it was Dad that he pulled into his world the first time. Stabbing a dying man with a knife is very different from drawing a character into deadly situations, and I don’t disagree with Chul when he calls Dad a killer. I’m sympathetic to Dad’s fear that he created a monster, but now he’s no different from a monster himself—he’s turned into one in his obsession to “right” his wrong, and seems willfully blind towards Kang Chul’s feelings. It’s probably the way he justifies his actions—insisting that Chul isn’t real, because if he were, Dad would have to admit to being a killer.

I thought it was so clever of Chul to pick up on his character traits as being the very opposite of his creator’s, and to understand that Dad lived vicariously through Chul at a time when his own life was falling apart. It makes perfect sense that Dad becomes obsessed with controlling this one thing (though I guess you could argue that in a normal webtoon, you often aren’t worried about your characters going rogue on you), and it was heartbreaking when Chul cried that he had to endure all the things that Dad as a real person could never endure himself—to him those are real scars and memories, and it’s ironic that Dad put him through so much knowing that he was strong enough to handle it, when he himself broke down and gave up so easily in his own life.

And then of course there’s the big twist—that Kang Chul’s true creator might be Yeon-joo, not Dad—bringing a whole new dynamic into play. It hasn’t been confirmed, but if it’s true (both Dad and Yeon-joo being able to travel to Chul’s world and change the story seems to support this), this might explain the difference between Kang Chul and the other characters in his world. Everyone else was created by Dad, but maybe Chul belongs to Yeon-joo. Maybe it matters that she created him out of love because she wanted a friend or a hero, or maybe it matters that she wants sincerely for him to get a happy ending. So despite Dad’s wishes, maybe Chul is on a path to happiness because Yeon-joo wants it that way, and what she says goes? In any case it opens up a whole host of interesting ideas, especially for the romance. If there still IS a romance left to salvage, yunno, after he followed up swoony kisses by shooting her father in cold-blooded murder. The sentences this drama makes me type, I swear.

 
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Wow. Only read the recaps for the last four episodes, but tuned in to watch this. The recap came up on the site when I was at the final scene, and it was eerie reading the thoughts as it played out in front of me.

This drama is INSANE. I love it. Like, where do you go from here! This is supposed to be the penultimate episode! SO GREAT. And the preview suggests that Yeonjoo will be picking up the pieces, which is fantastic.

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Kang Chul’s money from his world is legitimate in the real world. So Yeon Joo’s phone and card didn’t work in his world probably because it wasn’t written as so, but his money works in her world because he technically exists in her world as a cartoon character?!? He said he spent the rest of his money on buying all 33 volumes of the comic book…which meant he carried on his body about 300 dollars(about 333913.50 won) in cash given each comic book costs about ten bucks…where did his credit cards go or did they not work?!? The comics books were of high quality though, I mean they were all colored and the type of paper used were of sturdy quality if they survive the rain poured and harsh page turning of Kang Chul. 
With the super enlightening conversation between the author and Kang Chul, everything makes sense now from the characterization of Kang Chul to the lack of a true perpetrator. Yeon Joo’s father would just prolong Kang Chul’s plot and receive his success as Kang Chul doggedly search for the killer of his family who really doesn’t really exist, and Kang Chul, despite having all the things that Yeon Joo’s father desire, is not ever happy and won’t get a happy ending. In the end it seems both the creator and his creation doesn’t get the resolution and happiness they so desperately want to grasp. 
Kang Chul said he did research while he was waiting but how did he know where the author’s house was in the first place. And maybe Kang Chul is right, Yeon Joo’s father  is of a really  cruel and harsh essence- that and pure stupidity and arrogance because he finally taunted Kang Chul into shooting him. The author is a human being and of that essence, he is flawed and ultimately still wants to show off his dominance and power over his creation. Well, Kang Chul definitely proved him wrong.
Samsung is going strong with the product placement, I mean how good is the reception if Yeon Joo can hear everything over the phone?!?
And the author definitely survived the shot, he’s in a coma at worst. In the preview Yeon Joo reads the webtoon, and no daughter read the webtoon and worry about the cartoon character if her father is dead.
Again, the events are majorly effed up, but it still comes back to the emotional reactions of the characters that grounds the story back. It may have been just cold screen of photoshop to the creator, but Kang Chul felt every emotion in the world as he stands before his massacred family. And now to know that they were killed to move his plot forward aimlessly, it’s quite an insidious move on the creator. So there is no person behind the executioner of Kang Chul’s happiness in the comic, because Kang Chul was never meant to have a happy ending.

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Samsung is going strong with the product placement, I mean how good is the reception if Yeon Joo can hear everything over the phone?!?

at least, she will still hear the gunshot, hahaha

talk about Samsung's phone, I just bought a new one and it's really loud IMO. When I call someone their lowest volume can make people beside me heard what the other person (the one I call) talk,
and every time I make a call, the volume always goes to maximum sound 1st before I lowered it,

I still trying to figure how to solve this super loud call volume

ps: not a Samsung ppl but just my experience, it actually quite troublesome for me since I have to go somewhere with fewer people when talk in the phone

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But how can Kang Chul and Dad's conversation be heard so clearly over the phone while they can't hear Yeon Joo worrying?

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Yeon-joo's ears were pressed really close to her phone.

Dad and Kang-chul are meters away from Dad's phone. So it can pick up their convo, but they can't hear what's on the other side.

(Though really, this is one of those drama things I'll just have to accept. Like HD CCTVs with cinematic angles.)

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that's the magic of drama-world

it's another universe between real world, webtoon world and drama world,

tbh I just assume she heard it because they were shouting, but dad placed the phone quite far so Kang Chul doesn't know it still connected.

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the credit card should be register under someone name right?
kang chul does not exist in real world so the credit card can be fake as the person with the card does not exist in the system

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Yep. This is what I think too.

Items that are tied down to an identity (business cards, IDs, cellphones, credit cards) won't work because the identity doesn't exist in that world.

Like, ok, there will be a physical phone but how can it get reception when that number does not exist? There will be physical credit cards in Chul's wallet but if you swipe it, you will get an error or something.

Stuff like money or guns can crossover without any problems.

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he better has a stack of cash in his wallet every time he come to real world...lol.

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I think that from KC's line, "you are so famous everything comes up", I thought he must have searched for OSM like in the book shop too. And by that, he knows OSM's house just didn't dwell on read everything. After breaking in his house, basically he had some time so go ahead search and read again, I guess.
It also make sense how KC was giving one last good bye kind of kiss , if by then, he knew the next destination (OSM's address), a place where his existence can be answered or doomed; the magnitude of everything could happen. And really, this could be the last moment of he has before his life ends; thus he decide to thank her there, not after, and said good bye with the kiss of so much feel.

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Loving the Yeon Joo = creator hypothesis -> her will is the actual manhwa's will. So intriguing and it makes 100% sense as well since both the dad and Chul don't know how Chul survived on the bridge. I wonder if YJ remembers creating Chul though though... But other comments have explored this well so I'll move on.

Oh SeongMoo sshi... aasdfl. I really pity this dude. People are calling him arrogant and deserving to be shot, and I totally agree. But I feel like there's also a sort of desperation in him. Despite all of the times KC has defied him, he still refuses to accept that KC has a will of his own; after all, KC was the only thing he could control in his life. As a result, he refuses to let KC "win" and still believes himself to be superior over KC. It's his last hope, really, and so he clings on to it. So I'm not even mad at him for being so provocative. All I have is pity.

Anyways, can't believe we're only 5 episodes in and have 11 episodes to go?!? For the first time in a drama, I have absolutely no idea what's going to happen next. So excited for this roller coaster, and boy have I been enjoying the ride.

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I sometimes wonder what it would be like if this show went kind of Inception-style, and Yeon-joo and everyone else found out that this weird supernatural manhwa-character-becomes-real thing was happening because they're actually living in a drama, where these things can happen.

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@elf I though of the same things since the first episode
It's turns out to be like inception and fucks up our brains in an awesome way I mean

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The ending really shocked me. I hope dad will not die, because what will happen to our OTP if dad died.. And i like the theory that YJ is the real writer who made KC. I just cannot predict the story and we have more 11 episodes to go~

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I love this show too much for words.

It scares me and excites me and inspires me to think and makes me desperate to do right by my own characters. I'm amazed by every aspect of it - how there's always more, even when we think we have it figured out or know what's going to happen next, how it takes familiar setups to crazy new places, how there are countless tiny pieces that could be whole stories of their own (in another drama, for example, that prosecutor could be the main character - and he'd be right). It just leaves me speechless, with my mind racing 1,000 mph and changing direction every two minutes.

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I've been on hiatus fromwatching k-drama for more than 2 years because of its boring plots, but I found W recap on Dramabeans. I watched it without expectations, but W was proven to be exceptional. As everyone agrees, no one can predict what would happen next!

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What? Wait... you gotta go back and watch Signal, at least!

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I second that! At least watch Signal. And if you're tastes run emotional/heartbreaking, I enjoyed Marriage Contract too.

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Yes, Signal. Then maybe Bring it on Ghost. Now is actually a pretty good time for k-drama fans.

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Though I have been watching dramas regularly for the past five years, I have never seen a drama with Lee Jong-suk, believe it or not. I'm a huge fan of Han Hyo-joo, which was the sole reason I was super excited for this drama.

But damn, LJS's acting was on point here. The last half hour of this episode was just the two of them talking! And yet it didn't feel like it was dragging on. And when the truths unraveled and Kang Chul had to hear these horrible truths, LJS did such a wonderful job portraying complex emotions of sadness, disbelief, anger, and confusion. Kudos to him!!

As if I thought I was making sense of the storyline, they had to go throw in another interesting scene--Yeon-joo drawing some guy who looks like Chul. I can't even begin to predict what will happen because when I do, this drama turns that upside down and blows my mind. (If her dad really does die, then omg, I don't even know.. and it's only episode 5!!!)

Thanks for the recap and can't wait for the next episode! :D

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He's a really good actor, one of my favorites (the only one I'll admit I want a giant poster of). If you do want to watch another drama with him in it, Pinocchio is one of my favorites.

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Wow is this show amazing. Where do you go from here? I love that I can't predict this show at all, which is so rare in Kdrama.

So, YJ now becomes the creator. We know she had art skills before she gave it up to become a doctor. And she's got a handy sidekick to help with the backgrounds, but how does she unravel ALL of this mess because it seems like she has to find some way to write KC back into his world. Will she try to do it at a point BEFORE she interfered on the assumption that changing the comic will change the real world? What does that say about the real world then?

SO
MANY
QUESTIONS!

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Oh my poor little heart! But really poor little Kang Chul! From his to face to face moment to sitting amongst the massacred remains of plastic book covers to confronting his maker, and really most especially the moment where he was told there is no specific culprit, ugh, my heart just broke for him and I couldn't help but weep for and with him.

I can't say I was surprised to learn there is no particular culprit. It always felt like the killer existed only to make Kang Chul who he is. Classic mistake, Dad did not write knowing his ending in advance so of course he was going to write himself into a corner of an inevitable unhappy ending. Kang Chul's suffering is literally just for the sake of suffering.

I do really love the meta though of this great drama writer getting to hang a lantern on these typical writing mistakes and crutches. How many times have we watched a drama that felt formulaic or seemed like the writers are just making it up as they go along or to suit their current needs or to work in a Subway sandwich (eat fresh :) )? So it's really fun when a drama is a little unpredictable yet oddly still assured.

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What do you call a makjang that is outrageously crazy in all the right and smart and thoughtful ways, because it is what this show feels like.

The kiss was amazing, but the talk between the fictional being and his creator makes everything else trivial. How does Kang Chul goes back to his life, his world after knowing that nothing is real and nothing matters? At this point it becomes less of a surprise that he starts shooting people and [SPOILER REMOVED]. How does the story (the drama) goes from here?

And Lee Jong Suk's just upped his acting game again.

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[SPOILERS FROM PREVIEW]

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I had been typing my comment for the last 5 minutes and it is funny how when I posted it, it seemed I was agreeing to and following up on your comment! :P

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Literally MIND-BLOWN!

The writers are fantastic! Just when I think that the show will be limited by the kdramaland limitations, it goes on and proves me just oh so wrong! You think this just can not ever happen and it then just has to happen!

I love how calm Kang Chul is so comfortable in this world. He can look at the artifice of his existence and feel his 'real' world crumbling around but still has the power to confront his 'maker'. Now this is a how a genius character trope should be used!

This show reminds me so much my literature days. I still remember this quote from Paradise Lost (later used in Frankenstein) which is what Kang Chul could easily say to his creator-

"Did I request thee, Maker, from my clay,
To mould me Man, did I solicit thee
From darkness to promote me?"

I can see the theories of creator vs creation theory, free will vs determinism, the writer as God, and the rights and duties of a writer towards his/ her characters. I actually felt like going back and reading up on all these literary tropes and then critically analyse this show!

This show is just that awesome! And truth be told, even though I am a die hard kdrama fan, I never thought I would be deconstructing a kdrama ever in my life!

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OMG
Haven't read the recaps before. And those opinion sections gave me bump..... I never thought whose exactly 'Kang Chul' creator, yet i thought he was a really human there and stuck on the webtoon somewhat.
Jongsuk never made a mistake on choosing drama hoho.
Well at least ive just have to wait for the next ep less than 24 hours now.

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My jaw is still on the floor. I'm amazed. And horrified. Yes, at where this drama took our hero, but mostly with myself for wondering whether I wouldn't make the same rash mistake in that moment. Obviously, I like to consider myself someone who would never be capable of doing that...but after that kind of psychological torment? Who freakin' knows. This drama is just fascinating. I'm impressed that this confrontation happened so quickly and with such a game-changing conclusion. Well, Show. You did it. I literally have no theories on how you'll end up anymore. Congratulations. Now give me back my sanity!!!!!

I do think that if the drama can manage to bring us back from the brink (Nine did it time and again), then OYJ will have to be the bridge between KC & her father (he can't be dead. Right? Right?!?!). Getting to the heart of the Frankenstein conflict so quickly has me holding out hope that something even more amazing is in store for us. But, first, I think we're in for a lot more pain and suffering.

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I'm nitpicking here but LJS looked awfully awkward in gym shorts.. Let's stick with him wearing suits, jeans and hoodies.. ^_^

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I have to agree with that... i did go urgh.. LOL

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i like him in that gym sport attire especially the one with black and red color..he looks so cool

i ship LJS with sport attire !!!

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I ship him with sports attire, but not as much as that blue suit. He somehow manages to make anything look wearable, though.

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Throughout the opening scene in the bookstore, I keep thinking, worst customer ever and every bookstore's employee nightmare (why didn't they stop him from opening all those books?). Turned out that he already paid for it ;^^.

The shipping war in the OR is like every discussion thread / comment section of every romantic drama with 2nd lead syndrome everywhere. The slip of tongue at the end though, it made all her good argument lost all validity LOL.

The father really need to know when to stop talking. The gloating thing at the end is so unnecessary and made me lost all my sympathies towards him.

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Geez, Show. Way to be existential.

Dad's God complex and stupidly-goading-a-man-with-a-gun-pointed-at-you aside, he does have a point. KC is just fiction, a conceptual being fueled by makjang plot points to get the story going, and one cannot and should not blame the writer for all the miseries and woes he bestowed upon KC as if the latter is being considered as an actual human being.

However, being a writer who lacks ideas and direction to resolve the FREAKING MAIN CONFLICT of a nationwide bestselling story though…Now that’s a capital offense, a mortal sin, a disgrace to the profession, and quite frankly, a perfectly good reason to be shot in the chest for.

There’s a silver lining if Dad dies though. Su-bong and Yeon-joo’s Boss will probably do better developing the story than Dad had done or ever will.

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Kang Chul..
KAR GAYE CHULLLL.......!

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Lesson learned, don't poke the gun-weilding bear.

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I can't. I. This drama. Is mind blowing ?

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I fully agree !!

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Mind blown. This drama is seriously wild and one can't predict what would happen next. The plot is crazy and amazing at same time. I got so many feels! Thanks for the fast recap. Love! Love! Love!

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I gotta say that lee jong suk acting impressed me sooo much! It was up to the point that i kept thinking that the emotion that he accumulated in his drama might affect him in real life lol. He was so good by himself!

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“He scoffs at that, calling it funny.”

I think he means the manhwa must be funny.

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Plotholes will the writer address these things?? : ep 3 said 15 years for Kang chul ( age 15-30) was 7 years in the real world. Manga was serialized 7 years ago, but in the flashback, Yeon-ju was like 11 when Dad decides to continue with W instead of running away. But Yeon-ju is 30 in current time too. She should be 16???

And the first time she fell into W was on the rooftop, yet Dad said he pulled her daughter into it before. He wouldn't have known of it until after she came out & the webtoon was uploaded with story & "to be continued "

OMG--------- ....!!!! Did Yeonju go in before and AGE in the manhwa?!?!? She's supposed to be his young daughter, but because of time lag on W vs World, she is now the same age as Kangchul?!!!?!?!

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Math was bad. I mean 11 (or 10) + 7 = 18 (or around then)

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I think the age thing was addressed? Like Dad decided to kill KC when he got divorced and "he lost YJ" and in that scene (where she's wearing beanie and scarf I think) she was definitely around the teenage/adult age.

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isn't that a flashback?
when he want to stop the webtoon after the change, he remembers the memories of yeon joo that give him strength whenever he is stuck, and how her life would be better if he have lots of money
the scene has lots of scramble paper around his desk and he still lived with yeon joo,
he doesn't live with him when they divorce and he success after the divorce

probably related to kang chul's origin that from yeon joo drawing

for the dad that knew yeon joo going inside
I think he might have seen it from the webtoon, he may hided there, and he leaves after yeon joo managed to make the to be continue button

another possibility is he managed his own to be continue because kang chul is so shocked at his action.

but I still hope they address this timeline and the dad's experience inside the webtoon

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I thought it could have been just a memory for Dad, but he didn't age (no gray beard) when he accepted to continue with W for his daughter vs when he saw her as the 11 yr old.

Earlier, we saw that Mom and Yeon ju left because he had a unsuccessful artist & drunk, and that was when she was in high school (or older).

I think there is significance with Kang Chul and Yeon-ju being the same age, that Yeon-ju has consistently returned in 30 minutes, no matter how long she had been in the manhwa world.

But it's speculation on my part

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Thank you! I thought I was the only one who noticed! Either this is a major plot hole, or seriously genius writing / world building!

I hope it's the latter, but I'm really scared that it's not because this episode was the first that had me concerned for the show's future. It felt like there was way too much reused footage. Almost nothing new happens in the first half of the episode. Then there was the whole describing someone's entire life to said person - which fortunately, was acted extremely well, but really?? I think the dialogue, or rather monologue, could have been written a little better so it didn't have to sound so blatantly expositiony. Please don't let me down, W!

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11-year-old YeonJoo was a flashback Dad was having while trying to run away. It was a flashback-within-a-flashback.

KC didn't start acting up until after YJ left with her mother. Post-KC acting up, Dad gets so freaked out he tries to run away. YJ is around 30 at this time. He runs away when she's 30, but then stops the car, thinking back to YeonJoo's terrible childhood (when she's 11, and we're shown a flashback of her buying him soju). Back in 30-year-old YJ time, Dad resolves to stick it out and draw the manhwa so he can provide for her now that she's an adult.

As for the rooftop, I think there's more of the story there we haven't seen yet. :)

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This has become like ... Frankenstein??

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I think since the beginning they have been alluding to Frankenstein. At least, I hope so lol.

I really like that it's in a fresh way, though. There are some scenes/dialogue that can make the viewer reminded of Frankenstein, which I think helps show Yeon Joo's father thought process and actions more clearly. Instead of being an ugly creature, Kang Chul beautiful and very much loved in the real world and in the manhwa by many people. Yet, his creator (at least who we think he is) views Kang Chul as a monster still. Very interesting contrast :)

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YES MORE DARKNESS!

I"m just going to state a bunch of awesome things.

The conversation between creator and character. The constant thread in both of them demanding death as a sweet release. The inability by both of them to see truth or work as one. The parallel between creative process and this story. AHHH!

The best part is the constant hints that the missing puzzle piece is his daughter to all this.

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Now this drama is itching me to start imagining if I can have such webtoon that comes to live.
I seriously don't mind a bit if KC comes in real life and tells me he has entered into my world. *faints*

Jaw slacked... Lee Jong Suk, you r most welcome at anytime to my world. LOL! But to the point when he holds a gun and starts aiming at me...I think I'd be startled as well. *swoons*
Nevertheless he gives out the cool and charismatic vibe.

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By the way, so that's how he knew yj was invincible.

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found this from kkuljaem , Pinkdream (◕‿◕)♡ username

7. [+1,417, -30] What will happen when Kang Chul and Oh Yeon Joo find out that this is just a drama? ㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋㅋ

lmao Jongsuk kissing Yeonjoo and dramatically saying "You are a drama character, you are the main lead"

*clap 100x, thank you for the comment*

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Yes, please let this be true so that Kang Chul can step out of my computer screen. ♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡

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This drama is like a KTX train speeding towards unending suspense and nail-biting goosebump territory! I think this episode really made a crazy, interesting mess of things...I was gobsmacked. So Kang Chul’s strong will is so great that he breaks though into the real kdrama world where he then proceeds to kill Yeon-joo’s father to revenge his family’s murders. However, now he has just killed Yeon-joo’s father...how will she react to this? Who will revenge Dad’s murder? Will it be Yeon-joo? Also kind of confused about how Kang-Chul and Yeon-joo’s budding romance/flirtation/I-don’t-know-what-to-call-it will be affected by this...

So in the manwha world Kang Chul was falsely accused of murder and locked up in prison because there were no other suspects or context and now in kdrama world, Dad’s murder has no “real” suspects or context because Kang Chul, the actual murderer has no identity in kdrama world! It is ironically fitting that now Dad’s murder has no closure or context just like Kang Chul’s family’s murders. I am also interested in who the police will falsely accuse. Will they track down Kang Chul who has no identity or will they perhaps try to blame Yeon-joo or Su-bong for her father’s death? And who can Yeon-joo really blame for Dad’s death? It’s partly Dad’s fault for taunting Kang Chul, partly Kang Chul’s fault, and mostly the kdrama writer’s fault! LOL! ㅋㅋㅋ

I got to thinking that if Kang Chul had used his own gun to kill Dad, then perhaps Yeon-joo could have been accused, because if the gun were found, her fingerprints would have been on the gun from episode 3! It was a smart move on Kang Chul’s par to take a policeman’s gun to use before stepping into kdrama world.

As for Dad’s death, I’m not happy that Kang Chul killed him, but I’m also appalled that Dad would try to kill Kang Chul when he met him in real life and saw he was alive. And I’m super frustrated that Dad taunted Kang Chul to kill him, but I guess he believed until the end that Kang Chul couldn’t be real because to believe that would mean Dad was really a murderer. If Dad is dead, does this mean that Kang Chul is finally free from the manwha set-up of him? Will he now become a monster or will he now create his own happy ending?

I also don’t think we’ve seen the last of Prosecutor/Assemblyman Han. If his will to capture Kang Chul is strong enough, could he break through into kdrama world too? And if he does, he will now have a real murder to imprison Kang Chul for… (cue dramatic movie music!!!)

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OMG, it's hard to believe that Kang Chul really shot Dad, but I can't hate neither blame Kang Chul with this action. I think Dad is at fault for provoking him till the end.
Hope this doesn't change Yeonjoo's feeling towards KangChul.

Anyway, i enjoy this episode, especially the kiss and Yeonjoo quarrel with Crazy Dog :D

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What rule applies to Kang Chul now that he's stuck the real world? If Yeon Joo has to trigger Chul's emotions to get out of the W-verse, does the same rule apply to Chul?
He asked Seong Moo to re-write the ending, but since he got shot and all, does rewriting the scene (drawn by anyone from the team) have to be Chul approved as it was clearly pointed out by Seong Moo himself?
Where and how does that portal come out?
Or...Chul gets to write his own story since he's in the real world now?
So many compelling theories. I need some Tylenol.

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I think we all need to keep a basket of Tylenol for ourselves and to hand out while watching W!

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So he did know she wouldn't die when he shot her in the heart. He wasn't just testing out a crazy theory. Kang Chul may be cold-blooded for shooting Dad, but Dad is equally cold-blooded for brutally stabbing him. Dad just had to have the last word, didn't he? Though this is exactly what he had feared -- his creation killing him. I found it interesting that Kang Chul could bleed. After all he has suffered, it would only be fair if he were invincible in this world. I am dying to know how Dad got out of the manhwa.

I cannot believe W was such a flimsy story after all with no planned killer. If Kang Chul had not willed himself into existence, Dad would have deus ex machina'd the ending. I was worried Kang Chul was going to get kicked out of the bookstore for ripping up their books, but then we learned he actually paid for them. It was heartbreaking how he was reliving his hell as he read each volume. Did Kang Chul clean up after he trashed Dad's place? I thought Dad would be able to tell right away when he returned to his workshop.

I love Yeon Joo and Crazy Dog's heated discussion about the webtoon, especially Crazy Dog's So Hee conclusion. They're just like us. Yeon Joo is living the dream. I wish I could date fictional characters like her. Although, I would be terrified he would one day poof into thin air. I love how she was trying to convince him to stay, promising to house him and feed him.

A huge thanks for the speedy recap, girlfriday!

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In terms of the workshop, he only trashed Dad's private office. Kang Chul came out and met Dad in the main part of the office where the assistants were.

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I definitely don't want to be part of that test, for science or what not. ?

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Some things this show reminds us, beanies:

1. Never, ever leave a guy alone who just step out of a manhwa, who's actually there to say goodbye and just gave you a heart-attack inducing kiss.
2. Never, ever argue and do fanwars with your boss. It can greatly affect your professional life. Ship your OTP in the confines of your mind, your room or here in Dramabeans anonymously.
3. Never, ever provoke a guy with a gun. 100% sure nothing good will come out of it.
4. And last but not the least, if you're a writer planning to write a fiction. BEWARE! Always, always have an end in mind for your story, make sure to cover plot holes and establish your characters clearly. You never know, you may wake up one day in an interrogation room, having to explain your thought process. Be prepared. Bring supporting documents. Your life may depend on it. ?

Anyway, that was the longest taxi ride for YJ and for me. My heart was literally thumping lub dub, lub dub and was seriously watching the time wondering how long it needs for her to arrive home.

One more thing, KC really looks like a doll when he stepped out from the shadows to confront dad.

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And yeah. I maybe right about the original creator theory thing. ?

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Ha, your #4 made my day. The creator-creation confrontation idea is so fascinating but it certainly does send chills down my spine. Some great Stranger than Fiction stuff right there.

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They reveal so much in episode 5 you'd almost think this was a 6-episode series instead of 16. Oh well, they can wrap everything up tomorrow and show a blank screen for the next 10 episodes and still be better on average than a lot of other shows.

When parents were arguing, did young Yeon-Joo draw the guy with the gun because she wanted someone to shoot her & her family to end the bickering????

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now, you just leveled it up to another dimention

that's a very good theory .. . .

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And then SHE is the murderer OMG

(actually I don't think so, its just that everyone is having so much fun tossing out theories)

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Woow your comment is GOLD ! !

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First, Lee Jong Suk is an amazing actor. I have thought for quite some time that he nails the emotional scenes so well. School 2013 anyone? This was a step up even from there. I have never watched such and long exposition without getting bored!

Now, gushing done, on to the episode. Is is just me, or did Kang Chul suddenly look totally different when he suddenly straightened, turned without hesitation, and shot? In the last episode, he explained how he did things without rhyme or reason, no logic. He couldn't understand why. We, as the audience, attributed all of that to Writer Oh. In turn, Writer Oh and the audience have attributed Kang Chul's self determination to his strong will.

These may all be true. However, maybe there is a yet unseen entity/person at work. Maybe there really is a culprit who is responsible for far more in both worlds that anyone is aware of, as of yet. As many people have pointed out, it is very early in the series for such confrontations to have already happened.

One mind blowing possibility would be that the "real world" isn't actually real. What if it is also a fictional world? What if there are layers of fictional worlds yet to be revealed.

Owww, my head hurts....

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No, no, no, I thought about your idea of the "real" world also being fake and that just gave me a headache so I gave up. That's too much! Although at this point I think anything is possible.

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I was thinking about it as well (real world being fake) that this might be some kind of Inception meeting The Truman Show insanity. Then stopped right there to remain a little bit of my own sanity. Lol

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That is a super description! Inception + Truman Show, everything about Kang Chul's life was manufactured to make him a hero/give fame and money to Oh Seung Mo, BUT are there MORRREEE layers?!?!?

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Watching KC go through each volume of W and showing more and more pain after reading each book broke my heart. He lived through each of those. He felt the joys and the pains, but to learn that all those were fabricated (even the precious friendships he formed)... man, that has got to hurt.

LJS did well in conveying all sorts of feelings in this episode like disbelief, shock, pain, anger, and appreciation. I especially loved that scene when he told YJ that amidst all the bad things, she's that one good thing and how grateful he is that she tried her best in saving and protecting him from the truth. And that kiss finally they both had their eyes closed.

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I noticed they both finally had closed eyes too. Not that you always have to close your eyes to kiss, but still.

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It feels unnatural and forced when eyes are open imo. I dunno, but for me, I don't feel the emotions of the characters this way, which is why I detest wide-eyed kisses. BUT for the first two wide-eyed kisses here in W, they were necessary for the scenes since one was a surprise to escape and the other one was for a scientific test. :D

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This episode literally poking at all those irresponsible writers with all their nonsense storyline where they force their main character through tons of suffering just so they can continue the story for several more episodes/chapters. And actually I expected Kang Chul to shoot Dad since he already showed a streak of cold-heartedness when he shot Yeon-joo back then. Though I didn't his bullet will work in the real world. So, is Dad really dead? How can they save the webtoon world then?? Though I suppose, Dad isn't the best writer out there...

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I guess the worst part for me personally was when unknown killer stabbed KC and then author got pulled in and KC asks him to save him. By now, I am so fully invested in KC that I want that author to save him, instead he tried to stab him
....

I am like quivering in this corner asking the author, why did you have to stab him? What did he do? you created him....save him..
..
Yeah, So i really do not like the webtoon writer.

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that part shocked me as well, you literally stabbed him after he asked for help,
oh I am done, you purposely did it. . . .

I am indifferent towards animal, we live in our world but if they asked with their eyes, no matter how scary it is, I'll help them

how can you so cruel to your own creation

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All I can say is "Wow!" I was riveted. Lee Jung Suk was amazing. And it's only Episode 5. Where are we going from here?

I do now understand why Kang Chul was reasonably confident that if he shot Yeon Joo she would not be hurt, having been unable to wound her father.

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I...was not expecting that ending. The whole time Kang Chul was holding the gun, I thought he'd shoot but it'd be a fake out like when he'd shot Yeon Joo, but this time because the gun he brought was from the comic world. I thought it'd be a fake gun, one that wouldn't work. He's really dead? There's blood and he collapsed...

This show is twisting my mind so much, how do I make sense of anything

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This show has no boundaries. Lead male shoots father of lead female in ep.5 of a 16 episode drama and they've already answered half the questions we might have had..what the heck is going to happen by ep.10?

This is the rare drama where you can literally say you don't know what happens in the future eps. There's no guaranteed happy endings or ships here.

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I was binge-watching Lee Jong Suk's dramas while waiting for Episode 5 and I just finished I Hear Your Voice before watching this episode.

So when I was watching this ep, I was in the mind that Chul can read YJ and SM's minds and thus came up to these so many revelations instead od going through Dad's things in a short time haha

LEE JONG SUK IS INDEED A CONSISTENT AMAZING ACTOR (and a super goooood kisserrr at that)..

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"(and a super goooood kisserrr at that)..."

18:54 - 19:22 will take you right there for 28 luscious seconds, rewind, rewind, and rewind (*ahhh, sigh...*) rewind, rewind...

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Suddenly rethinking everything I've done to my characters... 0_0

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OHMYGASH, this drama is killing it. And I love everything in this recap and all the things you mentioned. Great analysis.

I really can't believe that Kang Cheol shot Yeon Joo's dad, I mean how can she ever forgive him? I can't believe it. I can't fathom it. Kang Cheol is a scary character and I'm afraid of what he is capable of.

I love the idea that Kang Cheol might be created by Yeon Joo and that she wants him to be happy despite the obstacles that her father writes for Kang Cheol. This means that she was his true creator and that she controls how his story is written. This would be the sweetest and saddest story. In some ways, Kang Cheol can never be real.

This drama is unpredictable and wild and I cannot wait for the next episode.

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Heh, killing it. Too soon?

I'm not totally trusting KC either. I know a lot of people think he was totally sure when he shot YJ that she'd be fine, but I still don't know. I'll probably decide in episode 6. And yeah, I love that YJ might have created him. I hope he doesn't mind.

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So then maybe Yeon-joo saved Kang Chul at the bridge because it was the only way she could save her depressed, alcoholic father from committing suicide. As a young girl, she may have unwittingly intervened (rather than actually being the creator of KC) and saved KC because she saw her father ending the story as his own good-bye. By saving KC she saved her father so that he had to stay alive to write more of the story. Every time her father wants to kill of KC in the manhwa Yeon-joo must intervene to save him (and her father). She interprets her father wanting to kill of KC as his own suicide note. That's why she was pulled in to save him when he got shot and that's why the father didn't save him. KC's death is his own suicide and Yeon-joo works hard to prevent that. Poor girl has been burdened since childhood with making sure her father didn't do himself in through alcohol or otherwise.

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...and the rest of the webtoon staff said those drawings were different than the father's in the changed scenes. So I think Yeon-joo fixes the scenes where her father will kill off KC thinking that each time, her father is writing his own suicide note. She saves her father from himself by saving KC.

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Ha! the fanwar really feels like the life of drama-fangirl. especially for the drama-with-the-so-called-husband-hunting. #reopen the wounded heart

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i knew from episode 1 that oh yeon joo is the creator,i was like thatsy shes connected to all this.I was telling my husband,that his father just borrowed her idea

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I don't know what to say about this episode... but here i go:

Dad's character is close to being my fave here. Well, not a favourite, but I'm so drawn to the complexity of his character. He's been slowly losing his mind as his character takes the reigns from him. As a writer, I can sympathize with that, because most of the Mary Sues we see here in novels and dramas are just a projection of what we wish we could be - a perfect being who never deserved anything they got and will ultimately succeed.

But at the same time, there is a part of the writer that's screwed up. There's something about making your character kill itself that is disturbing, like you want them to do what you couldn't try. And as your pen smoothly cuts their thread of life, a part of you dies too. There's a feeling of cruel irony inside of you as you realize that killing them might have been realistic. That real life won't forgive you, so why should your character's world forgive them?

I'm rambling a lot here, but after going through some stuff this year I can understand Dad's attempts to kill KC (NOT THE ROOFTOP THO. NO WAY IN HELL.)

Because while you write your story and watch your character struggle, you feel like you have a twisted mind. Your depression, your suicidal thoughts just pour out onto paper and you see it and think, 'Oh. So that's how I am.'

It's a spiral of self-hatred which must have built up within Dad during his early years. And then, to see the very manifestation of your darkest thoughts come to life? To see a character who, through their struggles, knows your insecurities better than you do?

That- that is what's terrifying.

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I like your analysis! Especially having gone through a darker phase as a writer myself, it does make it easier for me to still connect a bit with dad--not only is there the horror that something you thought you controlled gone wrong, there's also the guilt for what you've put them through and yes, the self-doubt that maybe you really think like that somewhere deep down.

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Thanks for your reply! Tbh whenever I kill off a character in my story my friends always say that i'm cruel XD

But the fear that Dad feels is quite genuine - and quite disturbingly so, because he's battled with this for 5 years. I wouldn't be surprised if he's in need of therapy.

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