Rating:
Average user rating 4.1
74

On the Way to the Airport: Episode 2

Following the tragic events of the premiere, our characters have to figure out how to adjust back to normal life. For some, that could mean allowing themselves to forget, while for others, it could mean allowing themselves to face reality head-on. And for Do-woo and Su-ah, it could just mean finding comfort with the presence of another person who happens to be going through similar pain.

EPISODE 2 RECAP

Do-woo is floored to find out that Su-ah is Hyo-eun’s mother, his eyes widening first with shock, and then understanding. He starts to ask about Hyo-eun, but Su-ah has to maintain her professional composure when the passenger sitting next to Do-woo returns. Do-woo reads her apologetic expression and decides to keep his mouth shut for now.

They arrive back to Korea and the two exchange another polite look as Su-ah sees Do-woo off the plane. She watches him as he shuffles the rest of the way down the jet bridge, lost in thought.

Do-woo’s stuck in his trance all the way to the terminal until a familiar figure walks up to him. “Suk hyung,” Do-woo says in surprise.

This must be Annie’s uncle, Min Suk, and he’s here to pick Do-woo up. As they drive back, Suk berates Do-woo for coming empty-handed and wonders if Hye-won is in her right mind in asking Do-woo to bury Annie in Malaysia. Or if Do-woo is in his right mind for actually listening to her.

Do-woo instructs him to just head to the hospital, but Suk says there’s no need. Hye-won isn’t there since she’s too busy with a big event at the ornaments shop, which she insisted on carrying on with.

Suk drops Do-woo off at the shop, and lo and behold, Hye-won really is keeping herself busy – she’s demonstrating how to tie one of the traditional knots, looking rather elegant and poised. From afar, Do-woo stares at his wife in concern as she smiles for the crowd.

Ji-eun (Do-woo and Mi-jin’s mutual friend) finds him and drags him off to talk in private. She too doesn’t understand Hye-won’s behavior since Annie’s death. Hye-won hasn’t told anyone and she just acts as if it’s nothing. Do-woo looks up at that, asking, “Did that seem like it’s nothing?”

The two return outside to find everyone waiting for Annie’s grandmother, the star of the show. Do-woo watches Hye-won excuse herself, and mere seconds later, he gets a call from her. When he answers, Hye-won quietly pleads with him not to look at her strangely. Do-woo insists it’s only because he’s worried about her. He knows how much she’s hurting after all.

“Don’t say anything,” Hye-won cuts him off. She doesn’t want him mentioning whatever happened in Malaysia. She tries to change the subject to bringing Grandma out, but Do-woo won’t let her. Do-woo: “It may be hard, but our daughter is dead. Let’s accept that she’s gone.” Hye-won doesn’t reply, and the two both turn towards the front when the crowd starts clapping at Grandma’s entrance.

Before beginning her demonstration, Grandma announces sadly to the entire party that her granddaughter has passed away, sending a wave of gasps through the crowd. It all ricochets back to Hye-won and she just stands there, looking as if she really can’t bear to hear this right now. As Grandma has everyone bow their heads in respect for a moment, she turns to Hye-won, who avoids her gaze.

After the event ends, Hye-won hastily clears up a table, but when her intern tries to help her, she snaps that she’ll do it. Do-woo comes rushing towards her, and she pushes him away too. Hye-won spits out that she knows everyone thinks she’s crazy, but she’s going to keep working like this – it’s her only way to cope. “I’ll live as I always have, I’ll work, I’ll forget, and I’ll accept it,” she says, her voice rising, “I’ll accept that she’s not in this world anymore! So please, just watch over me.”

Jin-suk and his crew arrive back to Incheon Airport, and as Jin-suk chats with his co-pilot, one of the flight attendants keeps watching him from behind. Hm.

The crew goes their separate ways, and almost immediately, Jin-suk gets a call. He turns back to see that same flight attendant, but ignores her call, muttering that she’s not too sharp. The flight attendant gets frustrated and sends him a text instead, asking if she made some sort of mistake. He ignores that too, only to see that he has another text from Su-ah saying she and Hyo-eun have arrived too. His expression darkens and he whirls around, going back the way he came.

Su-ah and Hyo-eun reunite happily, though their smiles fade when Jin-suk comes into view. He sits them down for a stern talk, never forgetting to smile pleasantly whenever a co-worker passes by. Hyo-eun tries to lighten the mood, but Jin-suk only gets more upset to learn that they didn’t even bring any kind of proof of enrollment from the international school. He urges Hyo-eun to just go back.

Instead, the three drive home, with Jin-suk still rambling about the school. Su-ah calmly tries to convince him that it was best to get Hyo-eun out of there since a close friend of hers died. Jin-suk gets a little agitated and argues that Su-ah shouldn’t be so emotional in raising their daughter. He says that with Su-ah’s mother’s incident and the New Zealand incident, they keep dealing with the same thing over and over, and that the international school was the best option.

From the backseat, Hyo-eun cuts in, trying to ease the tension again. She smiles and says that she wants to eat ddukbokki right now. Jin-suk firmly tells her to go back after eating, prompting Hyo-eun to say in the exact same tone that she won’t eat then. Ha, these two.

At home, Su-ah suggests the three of them go out and have fun when all of their schedules are free, earning an incredulous look from Jin-suk. He tells her to take Hyo-eun back after one week. Su-ah braces herself before saying quietly that Hyo-eun’s name has already been taken out of the school.

Another fight ensues, with Su-ah wanting to take in Hyo-eun’s opinions and Jin-suk wanting to do that when she’s older. Su-ah doesn’t hold back this time and insists they need to work together to raise their child, but Jin-suk won’t budge. He walks away from the fight, leaving Su-ah pounding her chest in frustration.

Meanwhile, Do-woo sees Hye-won sitting alone in the bedroom and places a comforting arm around her. Hye-won leans into him and, her voice strained, she tells him not to bring Annie back to Korea.

The next day, Do-woo comes back from a morning run and overhears Hye-won on the phone with the host mom, Mary. He hears her tell Mary that she’s not ready to see Annie’s belongings yet as it would be difficult for her. Do-woo leaves after hearing that, and we see that Hye-won knew he was standing there the whole time. Once he’s gone, she tells Mary to just get rid of all of Annie’s things. Curiouser and curiouser.

Later, Do-woo and Hye-won go about their morning just as they used to, though Do-woo keeps sending worried glances her way. Suk walks in and asks Do-woo when he’ll be going to Malaysia. It rubs Hye-won the wrong way, as if Suk is belittling her for not going. Suk snipes that he’s not belittling her, but as a mother, she should retrieve the body. “I am the mother! But…” Hye-won trails off and breaks into tears. Do-woo reaches out as if to touch her hand, but decides against it.

Su-ah sees if she can get any ground positions at the airport to free up her schedule a bit, but it won’t be enough to take care of Hyo-eun. Though she knows it’ll be futile, Su-ah visits her mother-in-law in hopes that maybe she’ll help look after Hyo-eun.

But her mother-in-law is in a hurry to go out for singles night with friends and doesn’t even want to consider babysitting her granddaughter. She tells Su-ah not to bring it up again, and Su-ah has no choice but to smile politely and agree.

The flight attendant that was starry-eyed for Jin-suk calls Mi-jin out for drinks. The flight attendant, Joo-hyun, knows that Mi-jin worked with Jin-suk before and wants to ask about him. Joo-hyun admits that she likes him and that they often had drinks together. She assumes Mi-jin must’ve had similar relations with Jin-suk as well and wonders if they should team up to ruin him. Mi-jin slams her drink down and calls Joo-hyun a crazy bitch, warning her not to mess with a superior’s husband, and not to spread any rumors.

Su-ah and Hyo-eun spend the night together, with Hyo-eun helping her mom pack and get ready to head off to the airport again. As Su-ah gets dressed, Hyo-eun gets serious and tells her mom not to send her back to Malaysia. Su-ah smiles and gives her a small nod.

For now, Su-ah instructs Hyo-eun to study at home to please Dad before they decide on a school. Su-ah turns to leave, but Hyo-eun calls her back to ask about Annie’s death, and if it would’ve hurt her friend as she went to Heaven. Su-ah reassures her it couldn’t have hurt too much – maybe as much as a pinch. Hyo-eun adorably pinches her own cheek and smiles that it isn’t too bad.

Su-ah looks at her daughter lovingly and says she really likes it that they’re together now. “With you here, it feels like home,” she beams. Hyo-eun excitedly agrees and sends Su-ah off with a big heart and an “I love you.” So, so precious.

On her way to work, Su-ah gets a text from Do-woo saying what he wanted to ask her on the plane before: Did she bring Hyo-eun back? Su-ah replies that she did, and that it’s nice having her back. Do-woo looks up from the text to gaze outside, saying to himself, “Of course it is.”

They continue texting each other, Su-ah asking Do-woo about the paperwork needed to transfer Hyo-eun. She apologizes and thanks Do-woo for being such a big help. And later, when she receives a reply that Do-woo talked with Mary and that Mary already has it all taken care of, Su-ah grins with relief.

Do-woo is also at the airport, on his way to Malaysia to retrieve Annie’s remains. He informs Suk of his plans and asks him to hide it from Hye-won.

Back at home, Hyo-eun prepares bibimbap for Dad, but Jin-suk just stares at the dish, muttering that he’s tired of bibimbap since it’s the most common meal on flights. Hyo-eun pouts, so Jin-suk eats it anyway to acknowledge her efforts. That gets her smiling again, and she assures him that she’s perfectly capable of taking care of herself.

When Jin-suk gets snappy about her needing to study, Hyo-eun switches to jondaemal to say that she lost a dear friend and she wishes to stay at home with her parents. She promises to do well. It seems to work because Jin-suk stops eating and offers to go out and play.

They go out to a soccer field, and Jin-suk suggests on making a deal with Hyo-eun: If she can block one goal from him, she can stay in Korea. Hyo-eun tries her very best to catch the ball, but Jin-suk is just too good, and he gets it past her every time. After a while, he gives Hyo-eun a rest and tells her to just go back to school.

Hyo-eun cries that a dad shouldn’t go that hard on their kid, and that Annie’s dad wouldn’t be like that. Jin-suk sighs and tells her that it’s fine to cry – she should let it all out and then forget about her friend’s passing. Then he yells at her to forget about the soccer game and concentrate on studying before stalking off.

Su-ah reaches Malaysia and goes straight to Hyo-eun’s homestay. She apologizes to Mary for her behavior before, and Mary just tsks that Korean parents are all the same, always checking in on their kids’ grades rather than the kids themselves. But she notes that Annie’s dad was different.

As Su-ah packs up the rest of Hyo-eun’s stuff, Mary sighs that she has no idea what to do with Annie’s side of the room – the dad wants her to keep it while the mom wants her to toss it. Su-ah recalls how heartbroken Do-woo was after Annie’s death and tells Mary that she’ll take everything and deliver it to Do-woo herself, including the iron Annie had bought. Aw, yay.

At the same time, Do-woo retrieves Annie’s ashes, finally ready to bring her home.

He’s on the same flight as Su-ah, of course, and they’re both pleasantly surprised to see each other again. She thanks him for helping out with Hyo-eun’s paperwork and tells him she’ll have something waiting for him when they land.

In Korea, Hye-won hesitantly enters Annie’s old room and then starts taking everything down, from the books to the photographs.

Once Su-ah and Do-woo are in Korea as well, Do-woo waits patiently for Su-ah’s call. After confirming her luggage will be coming in with the next flight, Su-ah calls Do-woo and notifies him that she can have it mailed to his address. He’s about to give her the address but changes his mind upon learning it’s the iron. He texts her with a smile, saying he should accept it now. Do-woo: “Let’s wait for it together.”

Su-ah rushes out to meet with Do-woo, and as she rides the escalator down to his location, her eyes search the area until they land on him. He catches sight of her too, and as she gets closer and closer, their eyes are totally fixed on each other until they’re finally face to face. Su-ah apologizes for not introducing herself properly before, but Do-woo beats her to it: “Choi Su-ah?” He smiles, pointing to the name tag on her uniform. “I’m Seo Do-woo,” he continues, “Nice to meet you.” Su-ah gladly returns the smile.

They sit down together to wait for the luggage, and Su-ah starts talking about Hyo-eun’s stay in Malaysia and how she immediately adjusted thanks to her friendship with Annie. Su-ah stops herself when she realizes she probably shouldn’t have mentioned Annie, but Do-woo urges her on. “It’s okay,” he says, “It’s nice to hear. I can’t talk about Annie at home.”

Su-ah is more than happy to comply and continues sharing the happy memories their daughters made together.

At his mother’s house, Jin-suk searches for boarding schools online with no luck. His mother thinks it’s about time Su-ah just quit her job, but Jin-suk absently reminds her that they can’t live on his salary alone.

When Mom keeps pressing the topic, Jin-suk looks up from his laptop to defend his wife: “There are many flight attendants in their forties, and Su-ah is a capable woman.”

Mom changes the subject and suggests he and Hyo-eun leave since he has a flight out tomorrow. Before they go, Hyo-eun tells Su-ah over the phone that she and Dad are hanging out at Grandma’s. She also mentions the soccer match earlier and how it was the first time she had seen her dad look so determined.

Su-ah ends the call when she sees Do-woo approach with coffee. He asks how Hyo-eun is doing, smiling to hear that she’s trying her best to prove she can be independent. Su-ah admits that she’s always feeling sorry towards her daughter. She thought the international school was the best option, but now she feels like she just took the easy route, letting someone else take care of her child when she was exhausted. She notes that a mother’s selfishness can really hurt her child.

Do-woo says that his wife probably feels the same way. And that Hye-won’s guilt over her selfishness is why she doesn’t like bringing up Annie. Su-ah wishes she could offer words of comfort, but she doesn’t know what to say.

Do-woo thinks for a moment. He says he’s fine, but she can offer comfort to Annie. “‘It’s good you came. You worked hard. Rest in peace. Thanks for what you did for Hyo-eun.’ Wouldn’t this offer comfort?” Su-ah nods, and folds her hands to pray, but Do-woo motions to his backpack.

“Here,” he says, “She’s in here. I brought her back.” Su-ah lets out a shaky sigh and places her hands on top of the bag, reciting Do-woo’s words in her head and thanking Annie sincerely. Do-woo watches her gratefully, seeming touched at Su-ah’s teary-eyed prayer.

At last, the luggage comes in and Su-ah gets Annie’s belongings into Do-woo’s hands. He offers to drive Su-ah to her mother-in-law’s house, telling her it’s okay mooch off of him since she did give up her plane ticket that one time.

By now, it’s pouring down rain, so Do-woo has Su-ah wait by the entrance while he gets his car. When he comes back with the car, he peers through the rain to see Su-ah clutching the backpack with Annie’s ashes tightly to her chest. My goodness, that is incredibly sweet. Do-woo definitely seems to think so too, as he can’t take his eyes off of her.

He runs up to her with an umbrella, wanting to escort her to the car before he loads the luggage. He walks her through the rain, and smoothly closes the distance between them so she won’t get rained on. She looks up at him for a brief moment – perhaps flustered by the closeness?

They keep the conversation casual in the car, and when it gets silent again, Do-woo asks her if they can see each other again. Su-ah hesitates before saying yes. Do-woo quickly adds that she should bring Hyo-eun too, making Su-ah purse her lips as if she had expecting something else.

Soon, the rain slows to a stop and Su-ah states that the sun should be rising soon. She reveals that she’s had plenty of special memories while being a flight attendant, like views of the night sky and the sunset from various places. Do-woo: “Are those places you miss?” Su-ah: “It’s different from that. I would say that they’re my precious memories. Like my own secret assets that no one else knows about.”

When the car comes to a stop in front of Su-ah’s mother-in-law’s place, they both turn towards the backseat for her bags, with their faces only inches away from each other. They pull back, and Do-woo suggests they get out first. He gets her bags out of the car and Su-ah grabs them, saying a hasty farewell before hurrying away. I guess someone really is flustered.

Once out of sight, she lets out an exhausted sigh. Her phone rings, and it’s Jin-suk calling from his plane to ask where she is. She answers that she’s at his mother’s place to get Hyo-eun. Exasperated, Jin-suk says Hyo-eun was at his mom’s place, but now she’s at home.

Su-ah immediately turns around to head back and notices that Do-woo still hasn’t left yet. He walks up to her, wondering if she needs another ride. Su-ah insists she can just take a taxi, but Do-woo’s already got her bags in hand. “You can be five minutes late, right?” he asks.

Do-woo drives them to the Han River, just in time for the sunrise. As they look out at the horizon, Do-woo remembers his last happy memory with Annie by the river in Kuala Lumpur. He comes to a decision and exits the car, taking Annie’s urn out of his bag and scooping out a handful of the ashes.

He walks up to the water and opens his fist, letting the wind carry the ashes away. Knowing this is really his last goodbye to Annie, his eyes well up with tears. Su-ah watches the entire scene from within the car, Do-woo’s shaking shoulders bringing tears to her own eyes.

It takes him a moment before he’s ready to turn back, and when he does, his eyes go straight to Su-ah. They stay like that for the longest time, just gazing at each other as the sky brightens around them.

 
COMMENTS

I am so conflicted. Lee Sang-yoon and Kim Haneul are lovely together as Do-woo and Su-ah, and their small moments together are an entirely different level of precious. From the very beginning, their interactions have felt warm and comforting, to the point where I get all the warm fuzzies every time they do voiceovers for their text conversations. And it’s so gratifying to watch them break free from their troubles and find some kind of peace by just being around each other.

But they’re both married. I’ve been getting a strong friendly vibe from them all this time, but the last few minutes of this episode were when I was starting to see some signs of romantic tension. I want to be giddy, but then I get this overwhelming feeling of guilt, just like Su-ah seemed to get when she was in Do-woo’s car. It’s not the best feeling, but as a viewer, I love the kind of conflict that brings to the table. Is this really a sign of romance? Or is it just a special connection our leads have managed to form? I was already interested before, but now I’m even more eager to see which route the drama will eventually decide to take.

With the negative way second leads Jin-suk and Hye-won were initially set up, there is a possibility of villainizing them further, thus leading to two divorces. But I don’t think Airport wants to take that route – it would almost be too easy of a way to get the lead couple together.

Because, honestly, our second leads don’t seem like typical drama villains. Like hanshimi mentioned in the last recap, they seem like real people who just happen to have their own flaws. Sure, in the first episode, I personally didn’t like Jin-suk for wanting to ship his daughter off to boarding school in such a harsh manner, but after spending more time with his character in this episode, I realized that he’s just a dad doing what he believes is best for his family.

And you know what? Jin-suk is absolutely adorable with his family. His scenes with Hyo-eun are actually pretty funny, cute, and realistic. I thought the soccer scene was especially well done in showing us how their relationship may be strained, but they still love each other and can still laugh together. And I have to believe that the sweet, loving Su-ah married this guy for a reason. So, with that considered, I really hope they’re able to work through their problems together and make their marriage work. Su-ah is great with Do-woo, but I think they could also be great simply as very close friends. I guess we’ll have to wait and see how it plays out.

As for Hye-won, I’m not quite sure what to think of her yet. I believe that there is anguish buried deep inside her over Annie’s death, but there’s a secret we’ve yet to find out that’s keeping us from sympathizing with her wholeheartedly. I want to feel sorry for her, I do, but she keeps giving me reasons to remain suspicious. I’d love to get more backstory on her and Annie, but in the meantime, I’ll be content with the amazing mother-daughter moments we’re already getting with Su-ah and Hyo-eun.

RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , , , ,

74

Required fields are marked *

Botched baggage and the flight that is supposed to finally bring it is delayed!? (at least in the subtitles for the version I saw) If I were AirAsia, I'd be so thrilled at that PPL.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Not entirely in love with Air Asia, but as far as I know, flight stewardesses or airline employees because of their benefits and discounted service fees and stuff, my guess was her luggage was pushed out of the current flight to make way for a full-paying passenger's luggage.

I happened to my relative who happened to be an airline employee as well...

I think the subtitle may have been botched too.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recap SailorJumun. I was all prepared to totally hate on Jin-suk and then they went and made him human this episode. A bit jerk-y, but human nonetheless. I'm curious to see what they will do with him in future episodes.

The thing that haunts me from this episode is that backpack. What must it be like for a parent to carry the remains of their child in a backpack? When Do-woo and Su-ah got outside and it was raining and Do-woo had to set the backpack on the ground - oof. Su-ah did exactly what I wanted to do through the tv screen - pick that sweet girl up and hug her tight. All Annie wanted was to come home - what a bitterly sad way for it to come about.

It will be awhile before these scenes leave me - and the sadness they evoked.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oof.. The moment Su ah picked up the backpack, i was bawling like a baby for no reason..

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oof, I know right!!! They didn't show the scene when he put the urn in his bag, but when he asked Soo-ah to say those things to her and pointed to his bag..; my heart just shattered into a million pieces!! And the topping on this emotional-roller-coaster of a cake was when she picked that bag from the sidewalk and hugged it!!

I just can't believe how beautiful this drama is!!! It is at par with Marriage Contract (maybe even better than that and that is saying something because MC was a beautiful drama and I loved it so much!!), and definitely one of the best of this year..

2016 truly is a year of stupendous dramas!!!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I loved Marriage Contract as well. I don't cry easily at shows but I ugly cried pretty much every episode of that show. But it was so well done.

I'm loving this one as well, despite the difficult subject matter. It is simply done beautifully so far - the acting, the filming, just everything.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recap. I am also conflicted about this series so far. I really don't like adultery dramas. I also noticed the more romantic feeling between Do Woo and Su Ah at the end of this episode. I would like it if the two leads realized they were starting to feel that way and then backed off. How refreshing would it be to see two adults become close to each other because of their shared trials, but then to realize that they need to hold a certain distance so as to not set themselves up for adultery.

That being said, there are definite hints that Hye Won has something potentially very bad going on in her life, something being tied to Annie. Also, there are hints that Jin Suk is a chronic cheater. Should both of these be the case, I would then be fine with the marriages dissolving, and a new romance forming only after that has happened. Also only if the divorces are not a excuse for the new romance. More that the new relationship comes as part of the healing process for Do Woo and Su Ah.

The drama I would much prefer to see, however, is one where Do Woo and Su Ah are able to help each other and support each other in such a way that they are both able to strength and heal their marriages to Hye Won and Jin Suk. I'm fine, and would even like, if they show that there has to be a conscious decision to remain faithful to their spouse and develop only supportive friendship to one another.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am in love with this drama! Initially I was going to watch it because I adore the leads, but after watching these 2 ep I can't wait to discover more about the plot.

I also have the same doubts as everybody, how far will SA and DW relationship go! I have read some news about the plot and I was never sure if the leads would be romantically involved. And now, after getting to know them in these 2 ep I just can't see them having a romance being married. They seem too invested in their family to have an affair. Maybe the idea of the writer is to make them help each other overcome the difficulties without being in love.

As far as the relationship btw DW and his wife, I am still waiting to discover more about it. I mean apparently she is an awful mother but we have not seen them long enough to have an opinion about their relationship. However when it comes to SA and her husband I ask myself why she is still married. I mean I don't think divorce is a good solution but he doesn't treat her well! He is always using harsh words, we never saw him being nice to her and from the last ep it is clear that he might have had affairs!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

For now, I will not start the feel uneasiness for the potential romance between the main couple. I'm more curious on the story with each spouse.

Su-ah is like too obedient with her husband in everything. The decision by her husband is final and her opinion will not be counted. This kind of relationship -I don't think it is a happy marriage. But her husband cares for their daughter to get the best education, but the method used is quite unacceptable.

Hye Won - she is not normal. But I want to know more about her.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I re- watched both episodes and all I can say is I want to chop Hye-won's fingers, for now. Maybe I'll get to understand more about her in the next episodes, I don't know.

I work with children-they're not even related to me and all, but I worry for them all the time, even love them to death.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hye-Won is so broken. I think there was commentary in the previous episode recap about people disliking herbut after this episode all I can think is that poor women. She has got ot be in the most extreme amount of pain to react that way. There is a lovely movie with Mary Tyler Moore acting in it as a very uptight WASP women who loses her son from the 80's. This reminds me of that women. The movie was called Ordinary People.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

OTW to the Airport had some steady start but the preview for Episode 2 shows things are gonna run quite fast and I agree, totally, Shin Sung Rok's character is not all bad plus I only see the fact that he cares for his daughter the only way he knows how. Parents can be like that, you get irritated at them but it sure doesn't count as unlovable. I'm quite rooting on their relationship and I think there inner struggles and questionings of life are the ones driving them towards the edge not that they find flaw in their partner or whatever. This is why I dont think Im gonna buy the "probable" cheating premise that easily. BUT also of course, we still haven't touch on SSR's flings here and there, if that's what the other attendant is hinting at. So we'll see^^ But right now, yes, Im quite satisfied with how conflicting it makes me feel and how real everything seems to be so can't wait for the next ep!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

*their inner struggles
omg haha

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Annie must've been so fond of the Anne of the Green Gables series by the collection of books on her table, chosing it as her English moniker.

I can't wait to find out what's the matter between Hyewon and Annie. The Seo family sure has some kind of odd family dynamics.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Nah! Have to disagree with you. If Annie was a fan of Anne of Green Gables, she would not call herself Annie...but Anne. Anne of GG hates being called Annie and Anne has to be spelt with an 'e' at the end. That's how I named my daughter - Anne, with an 'e'. As you can see, I'm an Anne-lover.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

She might've adore Anne, not wanting to become Anne. I love the series too. This is just my observation, seeing the books being the first thing Hyewon picks up when she's packing up Annie's old room.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Actually my daughter was named after Anne Shirley and while her name is Anne (with an E:-) I always call her Annie. I also noticed the books which made me smile since my favorite series ever.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Im really curious about mother-daughter relationship between hye won and annie. At first I thought hye won is annie's stepmother but in this episode her husband refering annie as our daughter and hye won said ''i am the mother'' so i just assume that she is her biological mother. I really want to knoww the backstory between these two. And for Jin Suk, I dont really think that he has an affair but maybe its just a short fling or just flirting haha but still i dont think that he is unfaithful to his wife. The way jin sul character represented is just reminding me of a strict, ambitious, but loving fathet to his kid

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I wonder if Do Woo is not the birth father, though he considered Annie his daughter as he is that kind of openly loving person. If the biological father was someone Hye won came to hate, perhaps those feelings were projected onto the child.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think based on last tele conversation between Annie and Hye Won in epi 1

'Annie tries to ignore the repeated phone calls from “Mom,” but finally gives in and picks up before she enters the gate. Through the phone, Hye-won tells her: “Don’t come. Do as you promised. Why do you think your dad sent you to me?'

I think it is implicitly show that Annie is not his biological daughter.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Annie is not Do-woo's biological daughter. This fact is explicitly mentioned by Ji-eun in episode 1 (the recap missed out on that part though).

What Hye-won said about Annie's father sending Annie to her makes me think that Annie was once under her biological father's care, and her surname was following his. And then he abandoned her to her mother Hye-won, Hye-won sees her as a burden but have no choice other than taking her in. And since Hye-won is now married with Do-woo, Annie's surname is changed to Seo, which makes it coincidently very similar to Do-woo's name.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Do Woo is her stepfather. From Mi Jin - Ji Eun conversation at party, Mi Jin said that she flirted with Do Woo 5 years ago, then finding out that he was not only married but had a daughter as well. Ji Eun replied that at that time, Do Woo was single.

So it means that Do Woo married a woman with a daughter.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Glad you mentioned this cause I didn't catch it in Ep.1 Thank you! To think I was going to pass on this one but so glad that I did not. I'm digging it so far ...!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I feel like my views on some of the characters are quite contradictory to the general consensus.

Personally, I don't believe Jinsuk is so much a villain as he is a realist. When Suah drew out her and her husband's flight schedule for her daughter, it showed quite clearly how rarely the two are home, much less home simultaneously. And with Jinsuk's mother being opposed to babysitting, even a little bit, the parents don't have a reasonable, viable option to protect and raise their child while they are in the air. Why not send her to a boarding school where she won't be home alone all the time?

I think I can explain it better. Jinsuk critiques Suah for being too emotional in her decision-making and asks why a young child's opinion should have such heavy sway in those decisions. I'm certain that his sternness is supposed to be viewed as cruel, but he brings up a good point (though not in the best of ways.) There are college-age children in this world who don't know how to cook, clean or how to operate a washing machine because their parents stick to them like glue, doing everything for them and letting their children's fickle wants and needs dictate what they should be allowed to do. I know this because I've shared dorms with them. Because I've been in a room full of parents who are ready and eager to continue doing busywork and chores for their children even when their child is in college and SHOULD be independent and learning basic life skills (in my opinion, they should already know this anyway.) I'm sure we've all gone to a store and seen an exasperated parent sigh and give in to their screaming child's demands. It's just a short-term solution to get the child to stop crying but that's also how children develop impatience, greed and selfishness as they think they are entitled to all that they want just because they want it.

Jinsuk can see that Suah is ready and willing to jump to the moon for her daughter which is honorable but not always helpful. It's a pretty heavy mindset to impose on a grieving child, yes, but I seriously think Jinsuk is just preparing her. The show may want to paint him as a villain, but I'm not sold on that, yet.

Parenting is a unique challenge because the obstacle course varies based on the family. I know that what counts as "too much parenting" and "not enough parenting" can differ as well. I don't particularly think Jinsuk is inherently bad just because he's stern and wants his family to follow through on decisions, but I also don't think Suah practically going behind his back and undoing those decisions isn't all too good, either.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hi Bee, just wanted to agree that Jinsuk is trying to do what he considers best, but I don't think Suah is too emitional. It's true that some parents have trouble letting their children grow, but in this case we are talking about parents who hardly ever see their daughter. I can understand Suah's wish of having her daughter in her country, close to home, even if she spend a considerable amount of time abroad. I don't think her situation can be compared to that of parents who do everything for their children even in their twenties.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I totally agree w you. Jin suk seems to be more of a strict-Father-Husband type that even though he plays around outside. He still value his family and ultimately his Wife.

E fact that he stand up for Su-ah in front of his Mom speaks volumes on where his actual loyalty lies. However he is not the loving doting Father that Do woo is. And I don't think he can be either. His love is tough love! Reality hurts and he try to prepare his child e best he know how to survive.

The genius part of this show is in e CASTING!! When we see Shin Sung-Rok and Lee Sang Yoon tgt who are we gonna root for?? Isn't e answer obvious?

Also the actress playing Hye-won is also spot on! She seems to be someone who was hurt before and has to continue livin no matter what. Therefore she tries so hard not to crack!
Amazing acting!! She is doin so many bad stuff and yet I still try to understand her.

I'm looking forward to see how the story unfolds. And how e drama Goin to play around w my heart (╥﹏╥)

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

"When we see Shin Sung-Rok and Lee Sang Yoon tgt who are we gonna root for?? Isn’t e answer obvious?"

Haha, so true! Looking at the Air Asia uniforms, if I see SSR in any kinda red jacket, I'm gonna have to call the cops!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

She is her only daughter, why let her stay away from home, when she or her daughter might die anytime.no one can predict death. The best example just happened in front of her.
I was also in boarding school for 5 years, stay at home for 2years before going to unversity, again away from home. And my mom passed away right after that I finished my degree.I really hope I have more time with her . And yess, i wont sendiri my child to boarding school.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I contemplated waiting until this drama was finished to marathon it, but my LSW loving heart wouldn't let me.
I hope that the mothers problem with Annie didn't stem from her being jealous of abilities to make "knots" as the grandmother suggested she was talented. Ah although I hate the premise of an affair the chemistry between our leads is too overwhelming for them to remain "just friends". The preview for episode 3 was just wow and I can't believe the attraction is already recognized by them.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love the actress acting as Hyo-eun. She's too cute.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I still think Annie was the secret daughter of some big-shot who ordered her hidden. Either that or the result of a rape. Or rape by a big-shot who ordered her hidden.

Then, if I'm right, who is daddy? Specifically, which k-drama character from other dramas would you nominate???

Among shows I'm watching now, it could be Chairman Kang from Cinderella (solves the organ donor problem) or the assemblyman from K2 (aka Yong-Pal 2.0). *****Wrong-show spoiler alert*****: We already know assemblyman has a hidden daughter named Anna, in another country -- what's one more? And we even know his wife's aide is willing to consider "accidents" for inconvenient daughters.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I TOTALLY agree - I feel guilty too for wanting them to be together.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think I'll have to wait until the run is done before watching because I feel the same way. But I'll be reading the recaps to see me through.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recaps! :D

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

OK, Beanies - at the risk of starting another contentious conversation about names like I did after a Jealousy Incarnate recap (which continued when the original conversation was replays in DB Staff's What We're Watching) I have to let all of you know that I'm very likely one of the oldest Beanies in this BeanBag - just about to turn 65 - but I'm a young and vivacious senior in love with k-pop and k-dramas...so I feel the need to weigh in on the potential adultery theme that seems to be bothering most of you. I have lived a full and happy life, including one short first marriage and a long 15 year one followed by lots of dating. I've sen divorced for 20 years and am happily single. SO - please know that as you approach your 20's and 30's and even 40's and 50's, the potential for unexpected romantic relationships exist just around the corner and you will not see it coming. Despite saying vows and being determined to stay committed sometimes it just doesn't work that way when you suddenly find a friend you can really converse with and you have to remind yourself that the in-love infatuation phase of your marriage started mellowing out after about 5-7 years. It just DOES happen that way and good marriages become incredibly cozy and comfortable and will last a lifetime. Other marriages - where the spouses have grown apart or communication and shared ideals have grown fuzzy, will indeed be vulnerable to a new person who might come along. All you can do is decide right away to get away from that person, despite how much you want to be with them again, or decide to explore the relationship knowing that it must end - or your marriage will end down the road. For my part, after 10 years of marriage, the deterioration of communication, the rumors that were getting to me that my husband was cheating, we separated for six months. The separation did wonders. I met someone dear. Six months later my husband was o desperate to get me back he threatened to take our daughter away from me. I relented and went back and we did our best to make it work. Cue the following five years of misery for both of us and finally - divorce. Now, 20 years later I won't regale you with how glorious my life became after the two- year drawn out agony of divorce, but life overall got amazingly better and my ex and I are great friends. Everybody is good.
Now, this long missive is just to let you know that you MUST say YES to life. Yes - hold onto your marriage and fight to make it better but it is not in any way shape or form the end of the world if it falls apart. Do not be afraid. Find your inner strength. The love of family, friends and more loved ones to come is all there waiting for you. If you're in a rocky marriage now, I say 'FIGHTING"!!! TO YOU. If you are deciding to dislike this drama because of the very real possibility of adultery, just take in the information and store it away. I love you all and wish you all love in all of its forms!!

0
10
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you for your story. Part of me feels uncomfortable at the adultery topic but I realize I'm just going to treat it as fiction and nothing more.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Agree so much. 40 something here and despite my own life not being so I know that life can be complicated and its not you and me forever and forever and adultery is the worst.

And I hope they don't make it an ethereal unacted romance as K dramas can do when it is the A word and inject at least some realism.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@lunatic4kd Thank you for sharing your experience with us.

I hadn't found a calm way to express my feelings to all those who seemed either uncomfortable or at least mildly condemned the drama as if it normalized adultery. I've lived a much shorter life but I've learned that nothing about relationships is easy or simple. Despite the constant attempts by media to portray love as eternal and forever it doesn't work that way. The only relationships that can never be changed or break are the ones in stories. It's a rough lesson and seeing it represented as if it is not something to run from is important.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you for the life experience shared here! Yes, totally agree with you. Kinship, kindred spirit, serendipity. However you name it, there is always someone better that comes along once in a while who totally bowls you over and this person is not your beloved/spouse. It is totally normal and should be viewed rationally and with maturity. It is important to remember that we are not the involved parties and not every detail is available to us, thus judge not because we are not in full possession of all details.

This is a brave topic and one that leads to much interesting discussion. Like what @lunatic4kd said, watch and learn. You may discover something about yourself in the process. I can't wait to see what everyone thinks.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks @lunatic4kd! It's truly brave and generous of you to share your experiences with us!

I've seen relationships/marriages which "ticked all the boxes" and were considered by everyone as a good match, but which didn't last long; and marriages which were hopelessly incompatible but they've managed to trundle along for many years; as well as a marriage where both parties still loved each other and were willing to do just about anything for each other, but they were just (no longer) compatible as a married couple.

I think the thing about "adultery themes" is that no-one knows the whole story about a married couple's lives except the couple themselves, and it's hard to predict what you'd feel is right or wrong in a particular situation, let alone what others around you would think.

I appreciate that this show seems to be willing to explore these areas in a sincere and complex way. Two episodes in, and it's shaping up to be a very promising drama, for me!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@lunatic4kd thank you for sharing your life with us. I'm in my 30s, never married, and everything is still black and white, so your perspective is really illuminating.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks so much for your comment! I have learned over the years not to judge anythg from outside, even things are that are socially "unacceptable" like adultery. I dnt think the goal of this series is to normalize adultery like many seem to think. This is a very realistic, warm story about human relationships, marriage, expectations and parenting which are all very complex. I just have a hard time understanding why it is uncomfortable for some. No one is saying that when marriage is hard adultery is the answer but it could happen. And this is reality. I guess that's what I love abt this: it is very realistic in the portrayals of characters, which we are not used to in Kdrama land. I am very excited abt seeing the characters grow, and if adultery is part of it, fine with me: life happens!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love lunatic4kd's words but just as she calls for understanding, maybe we should also understand that some people just find the adultery topic too painful. Perhaps they've seen up close how adultery can break a family.

I'm kind of neutral on the topic myself since I've seen both sides of it: families that were broken by a two-timing parent, and families that tried to stay together despite it being toxic to everyone. I think, either way, people get hurt. :( So let's just understand that it's a difficult topic for some.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for sharing lunatic4kd! I definitely agree with you. I am in my late 20s, never married, but I too have seen how complicated other people's marriages have been. In the real world, it's not enough to simply love someone and have a happy ever after. Personality, commitment, patience, trust, heck even money play a huge part. I strongly agree that in a marriage, you cannot simply call it quits; you have to fight for it and when you've tried your best and it still didn't work out then let go instead of making each other miserable. Just don't quit before you've tried your best and given your all. I also do not agree with staying together just for the kids. I've had a few friends and relatives have that sort of marriage even if they're dying already. Do what you think would be best for you too, not just the kids. You'll know best what to do.

I've been reading the recaps to see if I should put this on my watch list cos I love LSY and after the sweetness that was Ep 2 and you and the other beanies' insightful comments, this has been added ^^

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

65?.. i know 2 person who much older than you in drama beans family, 1 is active member 1 is silent member.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Do Woo is a terrible human being and a worse father gosh!!! True, how can anyone stay married to that? Looking at the food his wife lovingly prepared and kept in the fridge and wondering out loud if "it's a home cooked meal or an in-flight meal" lol he's horrid. Thanks for the recap!

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oops I meant Jin Suk not Do Woo. Jin Suk! Ugh he almost had me fooled with that football game but he had to ruin it in the end. "if you aren't pretty at least be smart" etc comment was awful! Who talks to their child that way?

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Practical fathers. I know they pulled it off as if he is a douche (which he is) but think about what he's doing rather then saying. He spends as much time worrying about where is daughter is and what she is learning as anything else. He's a douche but still a better father then someone who doesn't give a damn.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

It is kind of hard to say eh. My god-daughter's father for e.g. is a fitness freak and polices her food intake. Publicly which imo is not good. He is a lot like this guy actually albeit without the affairs. It has had its effect on the god-daughter, those effects linger even past the point when the child grows and understands where the Dad is coming from I think.

I think the drama so far doesn't totally judge it though - even the mom who seems to want little to do with daughter. That's interesting and let's see how it progresses.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Jin-suk has less emotional maturity than his 12-year-old daughter - a lot less! The idea of being determined to best your own daughter so you could insist on sending her away again ...!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

"Another fight ensues, with Su-ah wanting to take in Hye-won’s opinions and Jin-suk wanting to do that when she’s older."

For some reason I keep getting the two character's names mixed up so I didn't realize it right away, but I think you mixed up Hye-won & Hyo-eun's names here?

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Fixed. Thanks for pointing it out. :)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Apart from the sparks between the leads, the underlying tensions of Do-woo's family make the drama intriguing. The tensions of Su-ah's family seem more straightforward.

Early days yet so we will see how it goes though I have hope it may stay on course given the writer was part of Hur Jin-ho's team.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This drama is so beautiful AND so confusing. I don't know if I want the leads to be together, but their friendship is vaguely romantic and I like it that way.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love how SA and DW silently communicate, as if they're reading each other mind. What I love about this drama is, the script really reflecting our normal daily life. How we talk to each other, how we meet new people. It was natural. Even the 'budding' romance also felt natural, for two people who understood each other. Not that Im all okay with married couple secretly had an affair. The same feeling when I watched Valid love (LSY and UTW), its wrong but such conflict occur in our society. I wonder how the drama will potray it. Cant wait for the next episode.

P/S: Cant get over my head, LSY with UEE... sob sob sob..

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I was actually crying together with him when he scattering the ashes. It was so heartbreaking T_T

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I hope that drama watchers take some time to think about what each character does as much as what they say. I know most folks see the surface but the surface is rarely enough. I'm honestly affected by the way they have portrayed each of the adults and even the children. I hope the writers/director maintain this throughout the drama. I'd love it if the drama became something of a poster child for being a good parent or good person but still failing in other aspects of your life.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Having 2 episodes so far, I could only hold my breath up.. hhhhhh...

How is that living with a glass half empty husband and has very high standards for everyone? If Su Ah and Deo Woo are considered cheating, well, let them be! Lol.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This drama is asking the viewer to examine the definitions we, as a society, hold of things such as marriage, fidelity, parenting and family. A challenge, of sorts, to reflect on what society finds acceptable but more importantly, why it does.

For example, what if two married adults, such as Do-woo and Su-ah, develop a deep, emotional relationship with each other but never a physical relationship. Is it cheating or just a close friendship?

Looking forward to the rest of this drama as it explores important questions through the lives of all the characters.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm not one of the "women and men can never be just friends" crowd, but emotional cheating is definitely a thing, and some would argue even more destructive than a "physical" affair. I don't know how that will apply to this situation though, we'll see I guess!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I seem to be in the minority here but I don't find Jin-suk a sympathetic character at all. That soccer game was painful to watch, it felt like he was being cruel. And that comment about her looks. Maybe because he contrasts so sharply with our other dad. Also, I can't just ignore his implied affairs. Ugh maybe I'm letting SSR's previous eeeeeevil charactors influence me. And does all of this justify a romance for Su-ah? I guess I'm in the majority after all - this drama has me feeling all kinds of conflicted, and it's only ep 2!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Jin-suk is not a likeable character nor is he a very good father from what we've seen so far. But at this point he doesn't seem evil - just a little too cold and unemotional. And this surprised me because I had expected him to be the classic bad guy. We may find out differently in subsequent episodes but it is interesting to see him being human, not just bad.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recaps, SailorJumun and hanshimi!

This episode really struck home for me. Losing a loved one far from home and having to fly over to bring their urn back - I went through the same thing. We even scattered the ashes in a similar fashion, in the ocean waves, so that they would remain close to us, and part of the landscape they had loved. So I was totally immersed in the plot and identified with everything that Do-woo did.

It must have been a terrible burden for Do-woo to not be able to speak of Annie, not to be allowed the relief of even grieving for her. Even apart from the tremendous secret Hye-won seems to be hiding from him, people go through grief in such varying ways and become different people afterwards, so it's not surprising that tragedies like this often leads to couples separating.

I definitely see glimpses of chemistry between Do-Woo and Su-ah, but right now, I think he's more drawn to the fact that she exhibits all the warm, spontaneous, protective maternal reactions (like bringing back Annie's belongings and hugging Annie's urn) that Hye-won shows none of.

I think they've succeeded in painting the secondary spouses as sufficiently self-centred, so I wouldn't be too upset if a romance were to develop. I seriously question how emotionally "married" either Jin-suk or Hye-won are at this point. After all, Jin-suk seems to be a player, who constantly belittles and berates Su-ah. Hye-won may be fragile and broken, but she's quite two-faced (not to mention that her words to Annie in that last phone call made the girl so upset that she rushed out into the path of that car. Yes, I'm blaming Hye-won for Annie's death, 100%). Then she started clearing out Annie's bedroom as if she could't wait to erase all signs of her existence and go back to having her husband to herself!

Even if DW and SA don't end up together, Jin-suk and Hye-won need to do a LOT of growing up, for the sake of their partners and child/ren!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Have nothing insightful to say just that I'm really enjoying the deep and honest discussion this drama has sparked with the likes of @lunatic, @Oshi, @Bee e.t.c above. Really appreciate the honesty.
I think viewers should just go in with an open mind and just look at the characters, their world and emotions contextually.
I feel like going into an adultery themed drama or movie and projecting your expectations onto the characters is kind of self-defeating, or should I say purpose defeating?
I want to believe we generally know what is right and wrong and what is ideal. But life happens and in real life, we don't always do what we know we should do or not do. That is the cause of so many regrets, pain, depression and even bitterness and misery. But that also results in learning, maturity, growth and wisdom.
I believe this is why we watch these characters. We don't want to see perfect people who have never erred or made mistakes that have deeply hurt others. We get invested in their journey. Will it lead to redemption? Will they make it to the other side? Or will they collapse and crumble under the weight of their regret and hurt, unable to move on? And this is why no matter how much increasingly complex our taste in entertainment gets, dear old Makjang will never go away, because in spite of their melodramatics and histrionics, they do sometimes reflect the basest of human emotions and desires, compelling us to them again and again.
Not that I calling OTWTTA Makjang, just pondered upon this and this. Sorry it got long, lol.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

you want it enough anything can be justified rofls woe is me

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

This reminds me of Brooklyn 99 where the guys goes on about the daddy issues and all the justified reason they had for their crime. The detective replies

"Cool motive, still murder "

That's how I feel. If these two people want to have an affair (or want the married OTP together) they (and the drama which may all too easily villainfy the characters) will find justifications for it (he's a bad father, a cheater, doesn't respect her. She was a cold mother, killed her daughter, emotionally closed off).

I know life and love (falling in and out) aren't black and white. However we make choices. You can separate, divorce, talk to your spouse about your changed feelings and reach a decision of staying or leaving, trying to work it out or this is the end. Cheating and adultery doesn't have to happen and doesn't happen unless on chooses or allows it to. So I'm with you on your sentiment about how anything can be justifies. As much as I'm enjoying the drama, all the characters, their stories, and things unfolding. If adultery does take place, cool motive, still adultery.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

You totally need to skip this drama with that attitude, no matter if they show physical adultery or not.

Usually stern moral attitudes are limiting to art (if it has to reflect reality and no it is not about "justifying" it is exploring situations humans find themselves in). But if that is your personality than its best to stick to shows that are so rather than chastising shows that don't fit your moral code.

PS: Adultery is not murder. Else our prisons would be full.

PPS: Historically as we see with Moon Lovers monogamy was not the norm, hope the people scorning adultery are also avoiding all those polygamous shows.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree with @Karuna. Just want to point out few things:

1. It was said that the theme is not adultery. Try to see it in different light will help though. It can be about friendship. We dont know it yet, since we're only on ep.2!

2. No adultery has taken place. The mood, the music, the vibes are there. But take those away, it's just two humans finding friends in each other.

3. Is your soulmate your partner? In many cases, it is not. Funny but true. Plus, even if you were started off your relationship as soulmates and then couple, you still need to keep it alive for it to keep it that way, or you grow apart and become strangers again. This show shows this well. It motivates couples to be better, with or without the presence of other people.

4. Movie is not textbook or the bible. Its mission is to capture life. Without this drama, people commit adultery, people make friends, people having arguments with their spouses, people dealing with time, etc. Life goes on. The drama merely highlight certain aspect of life. For me, it does it tremendously well.

5. Btw, since we're talking about adultery, I just need to say this: when people commit adultery, they dont really actually plan to do it on the first place. They have their war inside their mind before anything really takes place. Adultery is just one of the war's outcome. I dont condone adultery, but I understand why it happened.I dunno if Soo Ah or Do Woo is going that way, but I am happy that they found someone that understands them when their spouse is frankly speaking quite dysfunctional. I can imagine what kind of hell they're in, when their spouse is practically not present. I hope each find courage to speak their mind and communicate with their spouse like two adults and see if the house can be fixed.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

"Movie is not textbook or the bible. Its mission is to capture life. Without this drama, people commit adultery, people make friends, people having arguments with their spouses, people dealing with time, etc. Life goes on. The drama merely highlight certain aspect of life. For me, it does it tremendously well."

So agree with this and your points.

0

from Karuna
PS: Adultery is not murder. Else our prisons would be full. lol

Lin not saying adultery is murder right... its just a bad/ugly thing to do..

art? i dont understand art.. a lot of people watching drama dont understand art. should we not watch drama then?
There is moral value in the stories that be told since way back then.. if this drama justified adultery as a good or acceptable thing then its just a bad stories..
sorry for my bad english nor rambling koksey though

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

What a beautiful drama. This drama enters my watching list by half way of first episode, and by end of episode two, i wonder why i only get two eps each week. Hahaha

I am interested in the background story of each couples, but I am more interested in how they will fill out each other's gap.

Yes, annie is hye won's biological daughter from her PREVIOUS marriage. It was said in the first episode, i think. During the party, if im not mistaken.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm just waiting for that lovely lovely "justified" scene/moment *sniff* nobody understands me better than you *sniff* rofls

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Really Hope this drama works out well meaningfully. Themes of love, relationships, friendships are explored realistically and in subtle tones. I am reminded of another wonderful drama and would recommend "Alone in Love". It stars Kam Woo-Sung and Son Ye-Jim.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Love your comments about divorce -- I totally agree that I don't think (or at least hope) that the drama won't take the easy way out. I'll have faith that the second leads have interesting motivations.

Thanks for the recap!!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *