Rating:
Average user rating 4.1
56

On the Way to the Airport: Episode 3

As Su-ah and Do-woo try to adjust to their new lives, they increasingly find comfort and understanding in each other. But when you’re used to following a procedural instruction manual your whole life, it’s not easy to adjust to new changes. Su-ah starts to feel more and more uneasy with her own emotions, but what can she do when the only person who can ease her troubles is the one who is causing them?

EPISODE 3 RECAP

The morning brings a new day of business at the airport. Jin-suk briefs his crew, including the young flight attendant who keeps eyeing him, about their next flight to Kuala Lumpur. At home, Su-ah checks on sleeping Hyo-eun before receiving a text message from Jin-suk: “Planning to send you a manual re: Hyo-eun.” Su-ah can’t stop thinking about Do-woo’s expression at the river, however, and finally has to bury herself in chores to shake away the memories.

Meanwhile, Uncle Suk is waiting at Grandma Eun-hee’s shop for Do-woo to return from Malaysia. Do-woo unloads the suitcase that Su-ah packed for him from the trunk, holding Annie’s belongings. When Uncle Suk asks who was kind enough to take care of Annie’s things, however, Do-woo just smiles secretively to himself.

Inside the house, Do-woo checks on a sleeping Hye-won. Just like Su-ah, however, Do-woo can’t stop recalling the night before. A flashback shows us that the drive back from the river to Su-ah’s house was awkward and silent, and only when they arrived did they break the silence. When Do-woo had asked if they could see each other again, Su-ah had agreed, thinking that he meant with Hyo-eun as well—but he’d looked straight at her when he said decidedly, “I’ll see you again.” Now, both Su-ah and Do-woo sit in their respective homes, thinking of each other with conflicted expressions.

Do-woo checks on Grandma next, who asks if he brought Annie’s belongings back safely. He assures her he did, and Grandma expresses her gratitude at the kind person who packed Annie’s things for them.

Later, Hye-won notes the umbrella Do-woo left outside to dry and asks him about it over breakfast. She muses absently that it didn’t rain at the house, before suddenly realizing where it did rain—Incheon.

Realizing that Do-woo went back to Malaysia for Annie’s things, Hye-won rushes to the room to find Annie’s ashes and luggage. A flashback shows us Hye-won and Annie’s conversation on the phone, when Hye-won ordered her not to return. Annie had whimpered: “I want to go home. I did well. I can do well. I won’t make any mistakes.”

Frantic, Hye-won digs through Annie’s suitcase in desperation. Do-woo watches her sadly from the doorway, telling her that he had to bring it back because of his promise to Grandma, but Hye-won demands that he throw it all out—she doesn’t want to go through all of her belongings for fear of what she might find. “What if she wrote that she hates me?!” she demands.

Hye-won tells him that she knows she wasn’t a good mother—she’d given birth to Annie when she was barely twenty and was forced to juggle school, work, and childcare all at once. She’d taken Annie to her father’s, then brought her back multiple times, both sobbing at their hardship. “What if she wrote that she hated me—how do you expect me to live then?” She begs for him to end this at bringing back Annie’s ashes, and to throw everything else out.

Do-woo listens carefully, then tells her he wants to make one thing clear: “Annie’s father abandoned her—but you raised her.” Even if Annie did hate her, Hye-won did nothing wrong; she has no reason to feel guilty. Do-woo promises that he’ll throw out her things if she wants, but this time Hye-won stops him: She’d like to go through Annie’s things alone. Do-woo places a hand on her shoulder in comfort.

At the airport, Mi-jin overhears two flight attendants gossip about Su-ah, calling her the “Ironing Woman” (darimi-nyeo) because there’s a rumor that she irons everything. Mi-jin calls Su-ah to inform her of this nickname, but Su-ah misunderstands her nickname as the “Woman with Beautiful Legs” (dari-minyeo), LOL. Mi-jin is quick to clarify that the ironing rumor stemmed from the iron Su-ah had in her bag.

Su-ah is unperturbed, telling Mi-jin about the truth of the rumor: The iron belonged to Do-woo’s daughter, who died. Mi-jin demands details when Su-ah mentions that she already delivered the iron, but Su-ah only looks out the window, wistful and distant: “The airport, the rain, the dawn… It was only a few hours ago, but that’s all I remember.”

Do-woo places Annie’s ashes in a columbarium and pins her baby pictures to her grave, lamenting that he has no recent photographs. At the same time, Su-ah unpacks Hyo-eun’s things, where she finds piles of pictures of Hyo-eun with Annie. She texts them to Do-woo right away, and he immediately prints them out, writing back: “You must be able to see me. You always seem to know what I’m struggling with.”

Later that day, Su-ah and her brother watch Hyo-eun practice dribbling a soccer ball. Telling Su-ah that he’s working hard to make up for the easygoing life he led when their mother was still alive, her brother asks for 55,000 won per day to babysit Hyo-eun. Su-ah adds in free soccer lessons and agrees to the price.

Su-ah’s mother-in-law, whom we’ll finally name as KIM YOUNG-SOOK, goes to visit Grandma’s ornament shop, upset that there isn’t a lecture scheduled. Once she learns that the lecture schedule is dependent upon how Grandma feels that day, she scoffs, accusing the shop of having irresponsible business practices. When she finally leaves, Hye-won’s assistant fumes at her irreverence, but Hye-won muses that people never appreciate things when they’re free.

Young-sook speaks with Jin-suk over the phone, but her face falls at his next statement. Su-ah, who also gets a phone call at the soccer stadium, reacts similarly, and we soon find out why as Su-ah and Hyo-eun chase after a moving truck. Furious, Su-ah calls Jin-suk, who only tells her that the truck took Su-ah and Hyo-eun’s things—because they’ll be moving in with his mother.

Su-ah snaps at Jin-suk’s sudden decision, but Jin-suk shoots back that after Su-ah’s mother died, New Zealand and Malaysia fell through, and now they need help to get back on track. Su-ah demands to know why he didn’t even discuss this with her, but Jin-suk replies dryly that she never discussed bringing Hyo-eun back from Malaysia with him, either.

When Su-ah tries to get him to explain the situation to Hyo-eun himself, he tells her that he’s busy, but Su-ah knows her husband: “No, you’re just drinking beer!” Sure enough, Jin-suk is sitting alone at a bar, helping himself to a cold beer. Lol. Freaked out but shameless, he hangs up on her and sits back, praising his own problem-solving capability.

At her house, Young-sook sits with her arms crossed, telling Su-ah that she needs time to accept this. She shoos Su-ah away before she can ask a single question.

So Su-ah goes outside without a clue of what to do. She considers calling Do-woo, but ends up at Mi-jin’s place instead. Promising she’ll only stay for a bit, she lies down on the couch to rest. Mi-jin complains that she wanted to stay at home alone for once, and Su-ah sighs for her poor mother-in-law, who probably felt the exact same way.

Su-ah decides to call Jin-suk to check whether he spoke to Hyo-eun as she told him to, putting the phone on speaker mode. When the line picks up, however, it’s a young female voice that answers, calling out, “Choi-sunbae?” Both Su-ah and Mi-jin pause as another laughing, female voice joins in, asking Su-ah not to misunderstand—Jin-suk left his phone behind for a moment, but they’re only having a team dinner.

Su-ah switches off speaker mode and coolly assures the girls that she won’t misunderstand, and hangs up unperturbed. Mi-jin, by contrast, is incensed, demanding if the flight attendants were giggling. Su-ah: “Hm, were they?”

Unsurprisingly, the two flight attendants at the bar include the young girl who was flirting with Jin-suk before. Her friend scolds her for lying about it being a team dinner and for answering Su-ah’s call at all, but the girl just brushes it off, unable to stop grinning.

Mi-jin asks if Su-ah is really cool with the situation, and Su-ah nods that she is. That piques Mi-jin’s interest—then where does Su-ah draw the line? Su-ah says that talking at a bar and even at a hotel is fine if it’s only for a few hours. But when Mi-jin asks if even talking all night is okay, it triggers Su-ah’s memories of sitting in the airport with Do-woo. “Well,” she says quickly, “if they’re in a lobby, the conversation could get long, right?” Mi-jin lauds Su-ah’s standards, calling her level of indifference amazing.

Su-ah points out that she’s not the type to get insecure easily. Mi-jin finds this strange and asks if Jin-suk really does have something going on, but Su-ah denies it, asking Mi-jin to let her know if she hears any rumors. When Su-ah gets up to leave, too drained of energy to pack as she’d originally planned, Mi-jin assures her that their young coworkers are infatuated by Jin-suk’s charisma, but in the end, everyone knows he’s married to Su-ah.

Back at the bar in Sydney, Jin-suk returns to pick up his lost phone. He starts to ask one of the waiters for it when he spots the pair of flight attendants waving at him. After recovering his phone from them, he looks through it for any suspicious activity, although the girl explains willingly: She “accidentally” answered a call from his wife. Jin-suk, however, only checks to see whether they know that his wife is Su-ah, their sunbae. They do, of course—they just don’t care. She tells him he’s welcome to join them, but he declines the offer and leaves to pay his bill.

Annoyed, the girl whips out her phone to text him: “Did I do something wrong?” Jin-suk reads the text and ignores it, right in front of her. Later, he receives another text from her, which he ignores.

Back in her hotel room, the girl fumes at her phone. We flash back through their relationship: On their first flight to Sydney, they happened to see each other at a bar. Their eyes had met as soon as she’d walked in, and his unfaltering gaze had pushed her to talk to him. They’d bantered flirtatiously, shared a few secretive smiles, and she’d even ended up at his hotel room a few times for extra drinks. They’d gotten to know each other, with her sharing her difficulties at work and him his emotions of loneliness, and she thought they were getting rather close—and yet, when they returned to Korea, he’d started ignoring her completely.

Meanwhile, Hye-won digs through Annie’s luggage, flipping through her diaries and books, apparently in search of something. At the same time, Do-woo pulls up to his friend’s restaurant. His friend complains that he was just about to close up, though he nods Do-woo inside.

Do-woo reflects to himself that so much has happened in just one day since his time with Su-ah; back at home, Su-ah thinks the same. Later, Su-ah sits at the edge of Hyo-eun’s bed and watches her sleeping face, while Do-woo spends the night in his office, looking at the pictures of Seoul’s sky that Annie loved so much.

The next morning, the young flight attendant appears at Jin-suk’s hotel room, but Jin-suk flatly tells her that just because they had a few conversations doesn’t mean they have some kind of exclusive relationship. He strolls out, leaving the girl humiliated and furious. As the crew checks out of the hotel, he greets each of them with an unperturbed and professional smile. Creepy.

Back at Do-woo’s house, Grandma surprises him by pushing an ornament she worked on all night toward him, asking him to give it to the person who packed Annie’s things. She tells him that relationships are precious: “Everyone is connected to each other, thread by thread.” He accepts it, looking both surprised and touched.

Su-ah, meanwhile, reads Jin-suk’s “manual” out loud to a miserable Young-sook, which instructs them to stay at his mother’s house for six months and reorient themselves. He’s already arranged for Hyo-eun’s transfer to a local school, and so Su-ah walks an uneasy Hyo-eun there for her first day.

When Su-ah turns around, a plump woman with short hair is looking curiously at her. Su-ah takes a moment before she recognizes her as an old friend: “Hyun-joo unni?” Su-ah and Hyun-joo find themselves at a café to catch up, where Hyun-joo helps herself to a waffle. She tells Su-ah that she regrets being so self-conscious about her body when she was young, and now that she has three kids, she’s sworn herself to sugar and enjoying herself for a few years.

Su-ah tells Hyun-joo about moving into her mother-in-law’s house so that someone can reliably take care of Hyo-eun. She knows that everything could be solved if she just quit her job, but Hyun-joo cuts her off to tell her not to quit—she’s good at her job. Besides, they both note that they married the right men for them.

Young-sook texts Su-ah just as she’s about to enter her house, asking if she is perhaps going home “by accident.” Su-ah is freaked out, but Young-sook just replies that she’s on her way there to talk to make plans about Hyo-eun, as per Jin-suk’s manual. At the same moment, however, Do-woo texts her, asking if they can meet up. Eager to get out of the house, Su-ah makes up an excuse to leave, feeling frustrated.

Su-ah runs outside to find Do-woo waiting in his car for her. He’s about to get out when she suddenly walks away, trying to get out of view of the house. Surprised, he follows her slowly in his car until she approaches him, asking what he’s doing here. In response, he hands her Grandma’s gift bag, telling her his mother made it for her for packing Annie’s things. Su-ah, however, is dodgy and distracted at the thought of someone seeing them, and even ducks behind the car when someone who looks like Young-sook walks by, though she knows that she has no reason to hide.

Su-ah reaches for the bag, but draws her hand back at the last second—if Young-sook finds out that she skipped out on their conversation to pick up a gift for herself, she’d be furious. She asks if she can accept it the next time they meet, and he agrees.

Their gazes keep lingering for too long, however, and Do-woo tells her she can join him for a drive if she feels frustrated. Once again, Do-woo has pinned her emotions exactly, and she seems to feel even guiltier. She gingerly takes Grandma’s present, telling him that they probably shouldn’t meet again. Do-woo’s expression falters, but he takes it in stride and drives away.

When Do-woo catches sight of Su-ah in the rearview mirror, however, the sight of her watching him leave gives him pause. He brakes, watching her, and Su-ah even starts to look hopeful… before he goes back into gear and drives off again.

As Do-woo drives away, Su-ah runs in the opposite direction until she arrives at the edge of the Han River. She looks over the water and talks to Annie:

Su-ah:“When I talk to him, I feel sorry to my husband and to the world. But feeling sorry gives me the strength to live on. I know it’s an awful excuse, but can I just go on a drive with your father as if we’re friends? Just one drive?”

Su-ah waits at the school gate to pick up Hyo-eun, now sporting a sour expression from a bad first day. Su-ah pushes her to try to be happy with the fact that Dad let her come back to Korea at all, and tries to lighten the mood by asking Hyo-eun about her classmates, but Hyo-eun just stomps away.

When she finally spins around, she asks Su-ah to let her return to Malaysia. School in Korea is too suffocating, and the soccer club won’t let her in. Hyo-eun even blames Su-ah, telling her that she should have convinced her to stay in Malaysia.

Su-ah tells her sternly that no matter what, Hyo-eun’s opinion will be her priority—and that way, Hyo-eun will figure out what she really wants and take responsibility for her actions. Even more annoyed, Hyo-eun tells her not to expect so much from a kid and storms into the house, leaving Su-ah to pound her chest in frustration.

Alone, Su-ah gets in a taxi and calls Mi-jin, asking her about the name of the beer restaurant they went to for Ji-eun’s party, pretending she’s just curious. She arrives at the restaurant but then feels suddenly ridiculous: “I must be crazy.” She sighs and turns around, but not before the Do-woo’s restaurant owner friend spots her walking away through the window.

In Do-woo’s office, Do-woo and Ji-eun are conversing about work. Ji-eun tells him that she made a promise with her mom that she’d become successful within three years, or else she’d have to quit. Ji-eun’s mom is giving her a hard time even though it’s only been two years since she and Do-woo started working together, especially since their first client in two years is Ji-eun’s grandpa, and especially since Ji-eun was so happy about it that she threw a party.

Do-woo listens sullenly, telling her that he’s not here just to gain experience. Ji-eun shoots back that she wasn’t, either, but she can’t live like this, unrecognized and ridiculed for her passions. Do-woo, flatly: “You’re pathetic.” She giggles cutely.

Do-woo’s restaurant owner friend, whose name we finally learn is JANG HYUN-WOO, comes up to tell them he thinks someone’s here for them. Surprised, both Do-woo and Ji-eun look over the balcony to see who it is. Ji-eun doesn’t recognize her, but of course Do-woo does; his face lights up and he tells Ji-eun to leave and leaps away in search for his phone.

Hyun-woo stops Su-ah on the street and brings her back to the restaurant; meanwhile, Ji-eun assures Do-woo that whatever he’s doing with this woman, she’s on his side, not Hye-won’s. Do-woo waves her away, still looking for his phone.

Su-ah heads up the stairs to Do-woo’s balcony, at the same time that Do-woo starts to go down to see her. They look at each other on the stairs, unable to hide their happiness.

Meanwhile, Hye-won works with a business friend wrapping ornaments. The friend mentions that Ji-eun and Do-woo’s business isn’t doing well—they need to get their act together. Hye-won’s friend then asks about Hye-won, since she’s always had a habit of bottling up her emotions.

Hye-won tries to change the subject, but when her friend needles her to spill her feelings, Hye-won says coldly that she couldn’t share something that hurt so much. She suggests they stick to discussing work instead.

Do-woo invites Su-ah in and offers her a drink, looking blatantly thrilled to see her; Su-ah, on the other hand, fidgets awkwardly and avoids eye contact. She finally opens up about her situation, explaining that her husband moved her stuff to his mother-in-law’s house, and that she’s been wandering around ever since. She really did want to go on a drive with him, she adds, but couldn’t say it then.

But Do-woo just smiles gently and tells her he’s glad she came. Su-ah says that she’s used to working like crazy and taking care of Hyo-eun. Everyone else has it just as hard as she does, she says, but somehow it’s so hard for her. And yet, she says:

“When I board a flight to an unfamiliar city, I go for a short walk. The wind blows, and my worries are gone. It makes me wonder why I was worried earlier. It helps me back on my feet. It feels like that when I’m with you.”

Do-woo listens quietly, and then smiles at her: “That’s the greatest compliment in the world.”

At the moment, Hye-won drives up to Do-woo’s office and notes his car parked in front. She calls his cell, but Do-woo ignores the call without even checking the phone, telling Su-ah that he doesn’t have any urgent business. Spotting Hye-won, however, Hyun-woo heads outside to stall for time, but he doesn’t have an excuse as to why he can’t let her in. Thankfully, Hye-won suddenly remembers that she forgot the brochures in the car and turns back for a moment.

Do-woo’s phone rings again, and even though he insists that he doesn’t have to answer, Su-ah goes to find the phone herself and hands it to him. It’s from Hyun-woo, who tells him: “I don’t know if it’s unnecessary to tell you this, but… Hye-won is here.”

Do-woo’s face freezes, but he takes it in stride. Hanging up, he takes Su-ah’s hands and tells her earnestly that she’s welcome anytime she feels frustrated. But for now, his wife is coming upstairs, so she’d better go downstairs to Hyun-woo. Su-ah is shocked at his words, and hurries down the stairs, gripping the railing. Thankfully, Hyun-woo keeps Hye-won distracted so she won’t look up and see Su-ah coming out of Do-woo’s office.

When Hye-won goes inside the restaurant, Su-ah is sitting at the bar as if she’d only come for a beer the whole time. She sits with her back turned to Do-woo and Hye-won, listening as he rejects her offer to have a drink. Hye-won nods good-naturedly and orders a beer to go from Hyun-woo, but when he tells her he’s just sold out, she unthinkingly offers up her own beer—and immediately regrets it, having drawn attention to herself. Hye-won doesn’t think it strange, however, and thanks her for the drink.

As Do-woo follows Hye-won out, Hyun-woo pours Su-ah a shot of hard alcohol. She takes a sip, and the burning reminds her of her time with Do-woo: the airport, the rain, the sunrise—and most of all, seeing the lunar eclipse in the cockpit of the airplane. She recalls the pilot’s words: “You feel like you’re going to burn up, but you’ll be fine.”

Gasping for air, Su-ah relates: “I feel like my body is going to burn up… but nothing is happening to me.”

 
COMMENTS

Oh, man, the inner turmoil as a viewer here is so real. Do I want the leads together? Do I not? On the one hand, they seem so right for each other. They understand the other’s emotions, frustrations, and fears as if the other’s needs are inherent to themselves; but at the same time, isn’t it possible that their connection is just a fleeting infatuation, grounded on nothing concrete? How can they justify giving up the rest of their families and values to pursue a relationship that is so irrational and sudden?

It’s a sticky situation to be in but I’m all for it, particularly because (1) the show does seem to acknowledge that these aren’t happy problems to have, (2) I still have hope that we can resolve this non-romantically, and (3) that weird, guilty type of nervousness that we’re feeling? It’s exactly what Su-ah and Do-woo are feeling, too. I actually think that I care more about this drama because the showrunners have so vehemently insisted that it’s not an adultery drama—if so, that must mean that they have a non-romantic resolution planned for Do-woo and Su-ah. While I expected to be disappointed in the leads’ romantic development, then, I’m surprised to find that I’m actually more invested in the story now than ever. Will Do-woo and Su-ah be able to hold onto their vital connection without romance, even though the current trajectory seems to point every arrow toward a sultry secret affair?

Interestingly, it’s that exact turmoil that makes me root for our second leads as characters as well—or at the very least, to hope that they will have a narrative competent enough to keep us interested. It’s clear from this episode that Do-woo’s friends don’t like Hye-won for some reason, though we’re also given plenty of reason to sympathize with her—she was a teenage mom, she’s a loyal and hard worker, and she seems to genuinely feel sorry for Annie’s death, though her coping methods are a little unconventional. So what is Hye-won’s deal—with Hyun-woo, with Ji-eun, with Grandma, and even with Do-woo? Is her woeful teenage pregnancy really all there is to Hye-won, or is there something more to her story and motivations?

In that same vein, Jin-suk became both more interesting and less interesting in this episode to me. I can’t really figure out where the writing is taking him—is he morally ambiguous, or just an asshole? It’s his faults that so often force Su-ah to live like she’s stronger than she is, cool and professional in all situations. She never lets herself have a victim complex, no matter how hard she has it at work or at home. But where the first two episodes began to define Jin-suk as a closet kind and caring father, this episode only served to accentuate his worst qualities almost to a point past redemption, especially when Jin-suk got really creepy and condescending with the young flight attendant (what was up with that bar scene?). I hope that the writing will refrain from making either Jin-suk or Hye-won into simplistically hateful characters, and instead work to flesh out their desires and motivations the same way they are doing for Do-woo and Su-ah.

Best of all, with both of our main leads being parents, there seems to be an implicit parallel between Hye-won and Su-ah as mothers and between Jin-suk and Do-woo as fathers. While the comparison between Jin-suk and Do-woo’s methods of parenthood seems to be a lot easier at this point in the show, it seems that the question of whether Hye-won and Su-ah are “good mothers” will resurface in the future. Hye-won explicitly states that she knows she’s not a good mother in this episode, while Su-ah makes interesting insinuations about her parenting style when she gives her first lecture to Hyo-eun after school. She loves Hyo-eun, yes, but is it better to treat Hyo-eun as an inexperienced child, like Jin-suk does, or to give her free reign to figure out the weight of her own decisions, as Su-ah wants? There’s no real manual or answer key to parenting, after all, but comparing these two sets of parents promises to provide some interesting observations about their lives and values.

All in all, I’m surprised at Airport’s addictive quality, especially as a show with relatively little action. It’s only Episode 3, but as the questions keep coming, I’m excited for the show to fly us to an unfamiliar place and reveal a new and interesting world—and I sure hope we won’t be burning up in the end.

RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , , , ,

56

Required fields are marked *

We dont know much about the story but it seems like Jin Suk is such a bad husband. I dont know if he is a cheater but so far he has shown zero support towards Su-ah. I feel so bad for her, she doesnt have anyone.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

He is a bad husband. But as a father I find his stance quite reasonable. Both him and his wife have to keep traveling, and their child is young and should not go unsupervised for so long. Its sad and miserable for the child to stay at home and take care of themselves. So him trying to send his daughter to boarding school is reasonable, though, I wish he pushed her towards the idea in a better way.

I find su ah annoying. She only complains and whines and feels insecure the whole time. And yet goes for drinks at her friends place while her daughter has to stay home w the grandmother who is annoyed by her presence. Seriously woman, what happens to you that you can't pick yourself up for the sake of your child?

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I get what you are saying but I have a totally different idea:
I see a mom who really wants to spend time with her daughter, but who also loves her job and doesnt want to quit ( I am not a mom but that would be totally me, I am a student and in love with my career but I have also a dream to become a mother)
I see a woman who has little to zero support at home. Her husband never gave her any compliment or tried to understand her reasons to bring their child home. When he decided she would study abroad, SA didnt like it, but accepted his decision, but when the girl's best friend died the captain didnt care about SA reasons to bring her home. About drinking I totally get her too. She suffers pressure from her husband, mother-in-law, and at that moment her daughter, she just needed to scape for a moment and relax. She complains? yes! But she is unheard, maybe if the captain cared a little for her, she wouldn't need to drink with a friend!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I stll don't buy the romance yet. I agreed to a certain degree that it's infatuation. To call it love is a tad too early, what's with her commitment and personal turmoil...

It's a fleeting thing. For now.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you Hanshimi for the recap.
I couldn't help but add a comment to this, cause I never even imagined I could be so into this drama.
This is so opposite of Moonlight and yet both of them are soooooooooooooo attractive and addictive, which means that my weekdays are completely ruined, Hahaha!!!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm tremendously enjoying this show and it's surprisingly the one I'm looking forward to the most amongst the currently airing dramas. There's something beautiful and addictive about it. It's quiet and gentle and allows you to emotionally connect with the characters instead of being busy keeping up with the actions and plot twists.

I already watched episode 4 and it looks there's more to this story than what meets the eye, I hope it won't be used just as a shock factor but as something that will contribute in the characters development.

It did occur to me that a non-romantic resolution might be a probable option and if the shows does it right I'm ready to accept it.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

THIS!! exactly how i feel. there's something warm about this show that just makes me want to watch it week after week to see where it'll go. honestly, whether the leads become a couple or remain great friends, i'm more interested in seeing how that's played out rather than what the actual outcome is.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Okay, I keep seeing people say they don't wantto see two married couples divorce just to get one pairing together, but let's think about it realistically. If you fell in love with someone else while married, would you not get a divorce? Would you force yourself to stay with the spouse whom you no longer love? Not only is that hurting you, that is hurting your spouse. And people who choose not to divorce ending up actually cheating, which is worse. My aunt and former uncle both fell for other people but forced themselves to stay together for seven years and they were absolutely miserable before divorcing and marrying the people they truly loved.

I know that from an outsider's perspective, divorcing someone to be with another person seems really shitty, but it's the least painful method in the end. It's best to rip the band-aid off rather than suffer for years like my aunt and uncle.

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

But honestly there are so many other issues in their marriages that they have plenty of reasons to get divorced then just I fell for someone else, I would be happy for them to get divorces and not get together right away, give it some time to get on track alone then slowly come back and see if its still what they want. It could be them strengthening each other to finally change their lives for the better.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

But if only one of them falls in love and moves on, what about the person left behind...I can't agree that its okay to leave your partner just because of one's selfish love. Most often whatleads to most affairs is whenone gets a fleeting attraction or infatuation to someone. Sometimes it might be a momentary feeling over which destroying your family and your happiness of ur partner is not worth it

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Most people will not take the plunge, and just cowardly pull the plug, as like what @Nerissa said, it might turn out to be a fleeting infatuation.

This is a catch-22 kind of situation, to be assured that the deep emotional connection with that soulmate will develop into a long lasting love worth sacrificing everything for, DW and SA will have to take time to nurture it. However, by maintaining that relationship, they are committing infidelity, as in the first place they should divorce first before committing to each other. But what if after divorcing, that love turned out to be just a fleeting infatuation? It really does take more than impetuous courage to take the plunge. How will the story unfold and with what kind of an ending? This drama really has my curiosity piqued big time!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This is my view:
Love is not a feeling. It's a will. If it is merely a feeling , people will be changing spouses like they change clothes.

Marriage is a commitment for life. In a marriage, it is not about me or him/her. It's about us.

If both spouses put the two together, I'm very sure all marriages will work out.

If a married person finds himself/herself interested in another person, the most responsible thing to do is avoid the other person at all costs. The more you give in to your feelings, the harder it is to let go. And that is what Su-ah was trying to do.

Having said that, I feel that the main problem with both relationships is the lack of communication. Su-ah didn't bother to talk to Jin suk about taking Hyo-eun back and he didn't consult her about his decisions regarding HE either. She simply made a decision on her own and he sends her a manual. If he could talk so freely with the stewardess, why can't he do the same with Su-ah?

Do-woo and Hye-won also need to communicate more. She needs to open up and tell him her problems with Annie and Do-woo needs to tell her how he feels too. Right now, I'm a little frustrated with both couples cos they are simply keeping things to themselves. It's ok to yell at each other and scream too...better than holding everything inside.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Being an ahjumma too, I beg to differ, and my rationale for rooting for DW/SA is:

Love is not a feeling. It’s a will.
- What if they married without love in the first place, particularly in the case of DW? Of course, even without love, when there's a will, there's a way, it just depends on how much effort one is willing to expend to keep up with the appearances of a happily married couple

Marriage is a commitment for life.
- Yes, marriage is about "us", but it also depends on whether both are wiling to make the effort. This is nothing DW or SA can do alone when their partners have been taking them for granted. If all else fails and the relationship could not be sustained, I think calling it quits is a better option rather than entrapping and prolonging the agony for everyone involved. Though everyone makes the marriage vow, we can see that nowadays, the notion of marriage being a commitment for life is getting diluted.

Conversely, it is very common for loving couples to live together till old age without being formally married in my part of the world. Marriage is just a formality, the commitment itself is more about the "will" of loving in your first point.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

By all accounts jin hyuk is a horrible husband, he did just about everything except sleep with the girl in terms of having an affair. He talks about feeling lonely but he doesn't even pay attention to his wife and sends his daughter away at the first chance. I guess we are supposed to think that he's not THAT bad because he didn't sleep with her and he put a stop to it but no I don't think that makes his behavior okay. Also on the stewerdess point what a nut job, she knew from day one he was married and she still thought I'm going to destroy his marriage. I know there are people like this but characters like that always make me sick. How does she even feel that right to be slighted when she was actively trying to seduce someones husband? Now she wants revenge because he "dumped" her, get a grip pyscho. Both of them make my skin crawl. Since this isn't an adultery drama hopefully Su ah will finally grow a back bone and leave her worthless husband who does nothing but belittle her and treat her like trash. Also Hyewon gives me the creeps, maybe she's just grieving but she gives me serious killer vibes, Like she's happy her daughter is dead. I hope that will be the straw that breaks the marriage between Hyewon and Do woo, its strange that the stepfather would love the child more then her own blood parent.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

i'm trying to be very patient - waiting to find out why su-ah would marry such a controlling, inconsiderate jerk and why do woo married his wife, who is so horribly twisted toward to her poor daughter annie...

i do like their connection, i would hope everyone could have someone to be able to relate so comfortably, naturally - be it a friend or lover. in this case, it's complicated... which makes it hard to be "happy" for these two people so desperately in need of understanding and support.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This drama is sooo good! Expecting the release of the ost

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Many thanks Hanshimi for the beautiful recap and comments, I now have the OTWTTA recap to look forward to upon waking up on Sunday morning!

One would be considered absolutely lucky to be able to meet a soulmate in this lifetime. So most people did not wait for that soulmate to appear but married someone who happened to come into the scene at the right time. When that soulmate eventually appears, what kind of a price has to be paid for seeking that soulful platonic relationship? Infidelity aside, the impact on the reality of day to day life can be crippling. Will Do-woo and Soo-ah take the plunge?

I love this beautifully packaged drama, the cinematography, the bgm, the emotive imagery and seasoned acting are so perfectly orchestrated to bring out the subtle yet profound difference in the perspectives of infidelity versus seeking a platonic love outside of marriage. The anguish and torment in that futile struggle against the temptation to connect with a soulmate who appeared too late is sincerely heart-rending. When someone touched your heart so deeply, illogical it may be, the stirred emotional undercurrent can be so strong that it is a matter of time before that wall of self-restraint comes tumbling down.

So far, we see that both Jin-seok and Hye-won are loyal faithful partners who just have a callous streak in their behavior which greatly frustrate Do-woo and Soo-ah. But their encounter and deep emotional connection magnifies that incompatibility with their respective partners and serves as the catalyst in driving a rift in both marriages. It looks like both DW and SA have given up on working things out with their partners and are just resigned to that kind of stagnant marriage.

I think DW married his selfish wife because he wanted to take care of Annie, who was very matured and sensible for her age to the point of breaking DW’s heart. As such, I feel quite sad that DW is now entrapped in this loveless marriage. We could see that how his wife’s handled Annie’s death, and that couldn’t wait to wipe out all traces of her kind of ruthlessness really irked DW and got on his nerves so greatly as his heart was still mourning for Annie. If he eventually knows that it was his wife who drove Annie to her death, it would be unthinkably devastating for DW.

As for SA, I’m reserving judgement, as his pilot husband seems quite decent at this point, at least he didn’t cheat on her. She probably idolized his pilot husband and married him knowing that he was a domineering and opinionated man. So she would have expected that he would be quite high-handed about the kid’s upbringing and would also have the tendency to dismiss and ignore her feelings. I sort of sympathize with her for being sandwiched among a apathetic husband, a willful teenage daughter and a selfish and calculating mother-in-law, but that doesn't seem like a good excuse to walk out of her marriage, though "taking a short walk to get back on her feet" is probably fine...

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

What is *OTWTTA recap*

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

OTWTTA is On The Way To The Airport ^___^

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@Pebble

I so love your analysis of this!

"What kind of price has to be paid for seeking that soulful platonic relationship?" Exactly why I love this drama so much!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you @Lexy_k

If the plot of the drama greatly attracts me, it makes it easier for me to express my thoughts more passionately and coherently, I love OTWTTA, it is mind blowing, just like Beautiful Mind.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Today, before I started watching an episode of this drama, I went up at the rooftop of our dormitory. I never really gave any focus to the surrounding here before and I just started to realize how beautiful the view here is after seeing the first two episode of this drama last week..

I really love the beautiful cinematography here. I close my eyes every time the hauntingly beautiful background music plays to be able to savor its entirety..Everything in this drama feels so warm, calm and subtle yet profound that it makes your heart flutter even with just a simple gaze....

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

That moment when you just don't question about the show but on your own self about what and who to root for.....

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I share that moment, An.. I really am..

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I never thought I would love this drama this much but this is my new crack ? I don't condone infidelity as I am married myself but in my opinion, the reason that Su Ah is wavering is because she was not happy in her marriage. Her husband's bulldozer attitude and her considerate nature will definitely create tension in the relationship. The reason why she is only realizing it now is because her husband has pushed her to her limit when he effectively moved them from
their house to his parents house without even telling them beforehand. A home is supposed to give you a sense of security but now that security is being taken away, you will definitely start to question everything. As for Do Woo, I think the reason he married his wife is because of his fondness to Annie. Now that Annie is gone and he could finally see his wife true colors, he is starting to question himself. I don't blame either of them as you can see that both of them is conflicted with this new found feeling so looking forward to how this drama goes ?

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am enjoying this drama because of the story and the way it is unfolding.

I wish I could participate in comments more but it is a little too dominated by the possibility of adultery and its morality for me. Drama can go either way for me - one thing I have learnt in my moderately short life is not to judge private lives - I care only about the way the story is told.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ah! I really don't know what I am rooting for... But mostly for SA and DW to get together.. I know that's probably not right from an ethical perspective but that's when the age Old questions arise that should you continue being in a loveless(?) and a marriage that makes you unhappy but keeps your life going ahead as it was versus chose the thing that makes you happy which even may cause some hurdles in the beginning!!!
Also if they decide to stick to being friends would they be able to draw a line to their newly arising emotions??

I'm so in for this ride and turmoil waiting eagerly what has been planed for the show!!

Also there is something about the cinematography that makes the show feel so subtle serene and poignant at the same time! Also I noticed that the camera tends to linger around when it is to capture subtle and poignant moments....

All in all I love this show and all set to board this plane even with the knowledge of impending storm (read : angst) inevitably Coming along....

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you for the recap!

Oh wow, great drama so far. Soooo many questions!

Given what we know up to now, Jin-suk appears to be a jerk and a half and he may well be, we'll see, but one of his main faults seem to be his abrupt, abrasive and dry communication style ....... and that's when he does communicate!

He's a follow-the-procedures type of man which obviously serves a pilot quite well but this man doesn't know when to "shut it off", so to speak. He even sent his wife and mother a "manual!!" ....... Following a manual is fantastic if a pilot encounters an emergency but here, in Jin-suk's case, it's translating as a man who steamrolls right over his family. Even his mom, whom we might describe as being independent, assertive and a bit selfish, is powerless against his whims.

As for Hye-won, there's more than meets the eye with her. I can't help but feel there's a bigger story lurking underneath.

Again, excellent drama bringing forth important issues and asking us to reflect on the judgements we make and why we make them.

Can't wait to see what happens next.

0
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

Will SA divorce manual man for being a steam roller which constantly flattens her ego? We shall see..

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Pebble -

We'll definitely see indeed! If that in fact does happen, I'm guessing Jin-suk will feel totally blindsided by it all, because according to him, he's "solving problems" and when one is a problem solver, bad outcomes aren't supposed to happen such as when a pilot solves any problem that pops up in the cockpit.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hi @Korfan, I'm quite doubtful about this happening, as it is aired on KBS and not JTBC or TvN, ;)

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hi Pebble!

Well, that's true.

0

Comment was deleted

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

No worries @Pollyanna.
A Man and a Woman OST by Bang Jun Seok?
Have a great weekend too.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Comment was deleted

0

Like other beanies, I do wonder how Jin-suk and Su-ah ended up married. Jin-suk’s highhandedly Jerkface ways are just baffling. Has he always been this much of an ass? Or does he truly believe that he’s being a good (enough) parent by doing even this much, despite a selfish mother, an "over-emotional" wife, and the demands of his work? Should I be giving him points for consistency, ’cos he doesn’t seem to treat his mother much better than his wife?!

Now I'm not sure if Jin-suk has actually ever had an affair or whether he always draws the line at flirting (which isn’t a great option either).

SA doesn't really seem the type to fangirl about a glamorous marriage to a pilot (unless she’s changed A LOT), so who changed more: SA or JS? Did they marry for convenience and timing, rather than the passion of their feelings? (I'm trying really hard to imagine Manual Man going through a romantic proposal!!)

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Jerk he might be, our manual man is a smart ass, has good eyes like an eagle (that's why he's a pilot!) when it came to searching for his life partner. He could spot the cream of the crop, that was probably why he married SA. Compared with other air-hostesses, SA seemed to party less and was easier to be bossed around, this I gathered from her conversation with her friends. So she is an ideal choice for domineering JS, while those glamorous partying type are for flirting with only. Couldn't really tell why SA married him, probably she did not have a wide social circle, so naturally, she married someone at her workplace.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

True, that. It's highly likely he married her because she's nothing like the other flight attendants. Maybe he was deeply struck by something in Su-ah that he really respected and admired, perhaps something he lacked, but now, he finds that marriage is a different thing to what he expected and marriage with her isn't what he expected (or maybe marriage itself doesn't work like a manual, the way he expects)!

I can’t see Jin-suk falling head over heels (although I’m happy to be convinced otherwise – I’d love to see a goofy Shin Sung-rok awkwardly in love).

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Personally, I think DW and SA should make their own marriage work first. If, after doing everything, the marriage fails and they are miserable with their own spouse, it's the time to call it quits. All of us only have once shot at life, and I'd wish everyone to just follow their hearts and ultimately be happy.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am starting to like this show...I was still wavering after watching the first 2 episodes but am now so curious to see the direction the story telling goes. Telling a story about adultery doesn't necessarily mean condoning it.

Definitely looking forward to each character's development. I appreciate that both leads are very much aware and were reminded of their developing feelings even if they (like the audience) are unsure how to deal with the feelings.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Already watched Airport till ep 4. Can't wait for the next episode!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Comment was deleted

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Comment was deleted

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Damn, this is such a good drama, everything just good, I can feel their emotions, and I feel really addicted. Finally, I find ny new crack, I'm not really into sageuk or history drama.

I'm officially join the party..

The best moment in this episode is when SA comes to meet DW in his workshop office, I have mixed feelings, arrgghhhh

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

What's with Kim Ha Neul and engineers/architects as her partners.haha.If I remember clearly, Jang Dong Gun was an engineer in Gentlemen's Dignity. Not that I'm complaining, coz that's my field of work as well.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This show... is making me feel sad. I think marriages which have gone bad are terrible things, and I know some never survive the death of a child, so the whole setup was so, so sad and my heart just aches for the two leads.

The feelings I have are amplified because the cinematography is beautiful - so evocative, so sepia, so yearning. The wonderful use of the actors' skills at unspoken communication -- the looks, the glances, the angst, the confusion -- all wordlessly captured on film, and then the sudden two-hand wrist grab (in the best way possible) moved this drama from "really good", to "omg why isn't everyone watching this?!"

Sometimes you live with the loneliness so long thay you don't realise -- it's not normal, it's not supposed to be this way; your life partner should be a partner and not a housemate -- and suddenly you find someone who "gets" you, the same way you "get" them; or sometimes it's chemistry at first sight... and then your stomach feels like it's burning up and you can't help but think about everything you did together, no matter how innocent, and then you realise...

... you're walking right into an emotional affair.

And you both want it, and need it at the same time, because it's that breath of fresh air that you never knew you needed until you had a taste, and then you knew you were starving (hello Hailee Steinfeld) but it's wrong to feel these feelings because you're married, right?

Omg this show is driving me crazy. I want these two leads together, but they can't have an affair, and they can't cause/instigate their divorces, or hurt others with their actions.

20 episodes right? We've still got time to go, and I like how the bartender is playing realist cupid.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

It is exactly that: you don't know what you are missing until you find out that you are missing it. SA I think felt pretty content with the way things were. She seems like a lady that easily goes along with everythg. She has never known that emotional connection and she has always thought that the way she was, was actually okay or what she was supposed to be feeling... Until she met DW and figured...hmmm, this is different, interesting, I actually would like this, I actually would like to explore it, I perhaps actually need it... But ? Am married, am I not supposed to feel that even if I am married? Is it okay? Is it not? I love how this show explores that! Seriously cant wait for nxt week -:))

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for your comment @Purebristles!

Yes, I've heard similar things, that parenthood changes you both, so that you become focused on the wellbeing of life you created together; but if the death of a child means the mainstay of the marriage is gone, it's a huge blow to your identity, as well as the meaning of the marriage itself. Grief is intensely personal and isn't easy to share, even if you're married, so maybe some couples come to feel that they're no longer the same people that they used to be, when they got married. Of course, that's when the hard decisions have to be made, to stay together or not. But that decision may be made on the basis of a number of matters, not necessarily what's right or wrong (if there is such a simple thing in that situation).

I mentioned this before, but I also like Hyun-woo (the bartender)'s relationship with Do-woo and his unvarnished advice to both Do-woo AND Su-ah. I feel like he could be one of their strongest allies ... but if not, he'll always be there to hand out shots of liquor and doses of reality!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Addictive. My crack. After a slew of huge age gap couples in dramas, middle-age age group is much welcomed. I am in the mood for mellow, and Do-woo is balancing out my solemn mood. Interesting to watch and figure some things out.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

love the writing and love the actors and their characters. Really looking forward to the development, especially if it doesn't degenerate into a makjang adultery mess.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

We're only a few eps in, but I'm hopeful that this drama can portray all the complexity of the themes in a thought-provoking but sensitive way. It's sure to push a lot of buttons, but it's a conversation worth having, especially if (as some helpful beanies have pointed out) South Korea's adultery law was abolished a few years ago, and divorce rates are on the rise (along with several other countries).

[Side note:] I'm not anti-marriage or pro-adultery, by any means, but "marriage" isn't a black-and-white concept for everyone, and I'm not the one living in an unhappy marriage, so it's hard to say. Bottom line, I'm uncomfortable with society's assumption that married relationships more sacred or valuable than other partnerships. Infidelity in any form is abhorrent and hurtful, but with the term "adultery" (which only happens if you're married), it's a loaded term, since it carries all kinds of religious and social stigmas (some of which may be obsolete), as well as possible legal punishment. [end side note]

When they said this show "isn't about adultery", maybe it's a bigger exploration of the many reasons why people get married, stay married, or decide to stop being married; as well as the impact on family and friends: the ties of affection vs the blood-being-thicker-than-water kind.

From the start, there's already quite a complex range of non-orthodox family relationships at play:

- Jin-suk and Su-ah's work means their daughter's already had to move schools several times, and they're hardly the model of stable parenthood.
- Jin-suk's mother apparently had to take care of her whole family for years, so now that she's got her freedom, she has no intention of taking on more family "burdens", like a granddaughter or daughter-in-law.
- Min Suk is Annie’s uncle, so he must be related to Hye-won somehow (unless HW's got another birth mystery), but it's Do-woo who seems closer to MS and considers him a "real hyung". It's HW who always seems like the outsider in the family.
- Do-woo's marriage itself is pretty complex: Hye-won had Annie before marrying DW, but he became a real father to Annie. Even after they were married, Annie's dad was still in the picture, as Annie was supposedly still going to meet him on weekends.

Another realistic aspect is the reaction of people around DW and SA, and how they're drawn to "take sides"- Ji-eun immediately tells Do-woo that "I'm on your side, not Hye-won's", whereas Mi-jin and Hyun-woo are a little more cautious. Uncle Min-suk and Grandma are already predisposed to like Su-ah, for helping collect Annie's belongings. I'm sure everyone will have their opinion about DW and SA's relationship, and I'll be glued to the screen to see what's in store!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I’m uncomfortable with society’s assumption that married relationships more sacred or valuable than other partnerships.

Exactly @Thursdaynexxt, I'm also not fully comfortable with people jumping to conclusions about other's marriages and are quick to judge and condemn any infidelity without a full understanding of the situation surrounding the failing marriages.

Similarly, though infidelity has the negative connotation of unfaithfulness and I agree that any form of unfaithfulness is "abhorrent and hurtful" from the perspective of those being betrayed, I think it still should not be used pejoratively as a loose blanket term to condemn everyone involved in any form of infidelity as there are different reasons and circumstances leading to the act of infidelity itself. That is the reason why I still insist that SA/DW are being infidel but not adulterous.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Sorry, this is meant as a reply to @Thursdaynexxt's post number 25 above.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Maybe they could have defined the show as "examining fidelity" instead of "it's not (just) about adultery"!

Just as a coin has two sides, a story has as many sides as the people in it: the spouses, friends, in-laws, children, employers, etc, so the perspectives of everyone around them will have a bearing on how this "in/fidelity" is going to be defined.

The show has gone out of its way to make Hye-won and Jin-suk unlikeable, so I think there's not much doubt that there will be an affair, even if it's non-physical. Guess we'll see if the writers make the outcome one of growth and personal development for everyone concerned, or if it's only about saving DW, SA and Hyo-eun.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ok, is no one bothered by the fact that the father could just force his family onto his mother? There's no way in hell that I would let my husband ship me and our child off to live with an unpleasant mother-in-law; I'd just return asap. Also, why did the mil let the son do that to her, smh?

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am with you. I would never go for that. But then I'd never have married this jerk either, so this situation would never have arisen.
The show has shown us S.A. as a pushover. She is used to succumbing to her husband's domineering ways, stomach everything silently, and maybe it was like that from the start of their relationship. As another commenter rightly said, it's probably one of the reasons why they were married: he was dominant and she was submissive.
Hopefully the show will have her character develop, slowly, to the point that she will learn how to say "no".

0
reply

Required fields are marked *