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The Man Living in Our House: Episode 16 (Final)

It’s time to say goodbye to Hong Mandoo and all those who love the cozy little country restaurant. Relationships are cemented, dues are paid, and wrongs are forgiven. It’s maybe a little too pat for my taste, but it’s nice to be able to send Na-ri and Nan-gil off into their future without any worries, after everything they’ve been through.

 

 
EPISODE 16 RECAP

Nan-gil drives home from Seoul, and tells Na-ri that he belongs at Hong Mandoo, and has decided not to leave. When they get to the restaurant, Na-ri asks how many opportunities they’ve missed to share a kiss, and Nan-gil leans in to kiss her now, determined not to miss another one.

The next morning Na-ri sleeps in, and Nan-gil has to literally carry her downstairs to breakfast. The chefs take one look at her cranky expression and beat a hasty retreat, and Nan-gil suggests he and Na-ri go visit her dad after breakfast. Na-ri reminds him that Dad doesn’t like him, but he says he’ll just tell him how much his daughter loves him and change his mind (ha, Na-ri grumps, “I never said that”).

Sure enough, Dad complains when Nan-gil shows up instead of Deok-bong, and Na-ri tells Dad that she’s definitely not dating Deok-bong. Dad orders Nan-gil not to come visit again, but Nan-gil just politely says to tell him if he needs anything.

On the drive home, Na-ri asks Nan-gil why he clams up around Dad, and Nan-gil looks a little shifty-eyed. He finally says that he’ll just tell Dad straight out not to talk about Deok-bong in front of him, declaring himself Na-ri’s man in a hilarious booming voice.

Later Nan-gil goes to see Deok-bong, handing over the original ledger detailing the connection between CEO Kwon’s company, Greenland, and Dada Finance. He asks when Na-ri’s father will be released (so he can reclaim his name and Nan-gil won’t be Na-ri’s stepfather anymore), and Deok-bong mutters that Nan-gil should have given up on being Na-ri’s legal stepfather long ago.

Deok-bong peevishly refuses to help Nan-gil this time, but Nan-gil asks if he doesn’t feel badly towards Na-ri’s mother, since he knows exactly why they got married. He asks if Deok-bong is scared of going up against his father, and Deok-bong admits that he doesn’t want to give up on Na-ri. In a soft voice, Nan-gil says that they can stay friends, but he won’t allow more than that.

Na-ri is researching marriage annulment laws when she gets a message from Nan-gil asking her on a date tonight. He prepares for the date by taking a memory photo book he made to a book cafe, and leaving it on a shelf.

Nan-gil takes Na-ri to the cafe that evening, and she peruses the bookshelves and finds the handmade book. Nan-gil says that it’s a collection of messages she wrote to her mother while she was traveling, and that he titled the book “Hong Na-ri’s Footsteps” because he was reminded of the time they measured the footprints to discover who locked her in the storeroom.

Nan-gil says that the purpose of the book is to encourage Na-ri to go back to her job as a flight attendant, because he wants her to do what she’s good at. She’s been writing about travelling lately, but it’s not going well and she’s grumpy and losing sleep. But Nan-gil thinks the things she wrote while she was traveling are quite good, and he wants her to feel fulfilled.

Na-ri asks what he likes about her writing, and he says that even though he’s never been abroad, he could read her messages and imagine it clearly. Na-ri thanks Nan-gil for the moving gift. Later as they walk, Na-ri tells Nan-gil that she’s going to see Deok-bong, because there’s something she has to settle.

Deok-bong notices Na-ri’s unusual expression when she visits him, and she says she feels sorry towards him. She remembers their first meeting and says that she’s felt bad since they met, and they both remember times when they were cranky at each other.

Na-ri apologizes for not selling the land, and Deok-bong brags that he gave up like a man. Na-ri also apologizes for making him take up law again when he hates it, and that apology he accepts. He knows there’s something more, and Na-ri apologizes one last time, calling him “Neighborhood Friend.”

Deok-bong asks if she can’t just consider the idea of dating him, but her silence is his answer. He’s hurt, but he teases that he’ll just quit his job and asks her to go for a walk.

Deok-shim finds Young-gyu moping around the restaurant, missing the feel of the boss’s uniform. Poor guy, he did the right thing protesting Nan-gil’s leaving, but he can’t help but regret losing the opportunity. Deok-shim snaps at him not to disappoint her, calling him “Young-gyu-oppa,” and that perks Young-gyu right up.

A pair of lawyers show up with a report that the Hong Mandoo building is unlicensed — apparently the tent they use outside for to-go orders is an unauthorized extension. Nan-gil casually asks if the report came from Greenland, unconcerned by the newest complaint.

As Deok-bong drives Na-ri home, he muses that he couldn’t beat Nan-gil in her heart, even after she learned his whole sordid past in court. Deok-bong says that he doesn’t like revealing his own past that way, but his family’s secrets are about to be broadcast to the world. He asks Na-ri to remain his friend, and she easily agrees.

Young-gyu watches as Deok-bong drops Na-ri off, and Nan-gil sighs heavily. Young-gyu runs out to confront Deok-bong about Greenland bullying their store, and Deok-bong’s face grows stormy. He calls Secretary Kwon and orders her to send him the file regarding the illegal waste disposal (that caused the orphanage to burn down).

Deok-bong turns the files over to the authorities, and his father holds a press conference. He says all the correct words of sorrow, and Young-gyu tries to cheer up Deok-shim as she watches him on television. Young-gyu throws a little finger-heart without even thinking, and looks nervous when Deok-shim points it out. Cute.

Deok-bong brings a couple of bottles of champagne to Na-ri’s house that evening to celebrate having done a good thing. HA, Nan-gil’s face. Deok-bong suggests they all settle their relationship, offering to be friends with Nan-gil too, who scoffs at the idea.

They all get comfortably tipsy on the champagne, and Deok-bong mentions Na-ri’s negative points like arrogance and prickliness, while Nan-gil loyally spins them in a positive light. When Na-ri comes back and asks what they’re doing, Nan-gil says he’s bragging about his girlfriend and shoots her a big dopey grin.

Deok-bong stands to leave, unwilling to watch the two of them being all happy together. He barks at them to settle their relationship — they can’t stay father and daughter forever. Of course they aren’t happy either, and Deok-bong grumpily offers to help them fix it legally.

Deok-shim goes to Yeo-joo for help, and the two of them meet with Deok-bong at a cafe to talk. He asks if it’s about Deok-shim’s mom, and she does a dead-on impression of her mother’s whining, hee.

She leaves, and Yeo-joo levels a glare at Deok-bong. She tells him not to call her anymore, or to allow Deok-shim to call her. She tells Deok-bong that she likes him a lot, so she doesn’t want to be his friend anymore, and if he calls her again, she’ll consider it a sign of romantic interest. It looks like it’s killing Yeo-joo to be this honest, but she powers through.

Na-ri meets her father as he’s being released from jail, and he looks surprised that she came without Nan-gil. He even argues that Nan-gil runs Hong Mandoo well, and claims that he never said he didn’t like him. They head to the restaurant, and Nan-gil nearly trips himself to greet Dad. Dad says he wants a uniform, and promises to try learning to make mandoo.

Some time later, Deok-bong and Nan-gil head to court to annul Nan-gil’s marriage to Na-ri’s mother. Deok-bong speaks on Nan-gil’s behalf, explaining that he and Na-ri’s mother registered their marriage in an attempt to safeguard the land from Dada Finance’s pressure. The judge grants the annulment, rendering Nan-gil’s status as Na-ri’s stepfather null and void.

Nan-gil and Na-ri go to their bench by the lake, and Nan-gil crows with happiness that it’s all over. Na-ri thinks back on their first meeting and smiles, and asks Nan-gil, “So, who are you?” He says he’s the legendary Go Nan-gil, who’s loved one woman his whole life.

Na-ri asks what they should call each other now that they’re not father and daughter anymore, and grins at Nan-gil’s cutesy suggestions — but then we see that she’s only daydreaming. She giggles and walks off, with Nan-gil trailing behind her.

He stops her and turns her back to him, and she remembers all the times he was there for her when she needed him. She replays in her mind all the moments he told her how much she meant to him, and the bad times when they were separated, and the times they came back together.

Nan-gil tells Na-ri that he loves her, and they seal their long-anticipated love with… a hug.

One year later.

Na-ri is back at work as a flight attendant, and she brushes off Yeo-joo’s suggestion that they get their fortunes told together. Nan-gil comes to the airport to pick her up, and her fellow flight attendants note that he never misses a flight and he’s never late.

Na-ri mock-complains that Nan-gil dresses up too much when he picks her up, and he just gives her a goofy grin and says she’s pretty. That makes her suspicious of what he’s been up to, but he changes the subject.

CEO Kwon visits Deok-bong at the museum to complain that the company is broke because of him. But he’s not really upset, and even seems to admire Deok-bong for acting on his principles, which makes Deok-bong uneasy.

CEO Kwon says that he met with Deok-bong’s ex-fiancee and begged her forgiveness, and that it looks like the lady isn’t over Deok-bong. Deok-bong isn’t happy at his father’s interference, especially when CEO Kwon says that they’re merging with the girl’s family’s company with their marriage as the foundation.

Deok-bong realizes that this means their own employees will lose their jobs, but CEO Kwon says they need to recoup the money they’ve lost. Deok-bong snaps in desperation that he’s already dating someone.

Na-ri drags a very reluctant Nan-gil to a fortuneteller, who asks him to choose two tarot cards. The first tells him that he’s accomplished everything he’s in this world to accomplish, which excites Na-ri but makes Nan-gil scoff. The second card indicates that he’s expanding his business, and Nan-gil suddenly jumps up and drags Na-ri out of there. What are you up to, sneaky boy?

Before they go, Na-ri manages to reach out and touch one card. Once they’re gone, the fortuneteller looks at it and finds “The Lovers,” and says that those two are destined to be together.

At a cafe, Na-ri demands to know what all that expansion talk was about. He reluctantly mentions her father and Uncle, and Na-ri groans with dread. Nan-gil confesses that they signed a contract to make Hong Mandoo a franchise.

We see that a couple had come to Hong Mandoo, and been impressed with the huge crowd and incredible food. They’d met with Na-ri’s dad and Uncle, who’d spun events to make it sound as if Dad had been on a quest to find talented mandoo masters, and that the restaurant had gone on TV because they were desperate to reconnect with their mentor.

Dad even wore the chef coat he got from Nan-gil to convince them that he’s an expert at making mandoo. They’d signed a contract to open several franchises, and now Nan-gil is trying to make the best of the situation.

To his surprise, Na-ri is thrilled by the idea, and thinks that her father and Uncle did a great thing. She suggests they use “Flying Couple” as a marketing strategy, and Nan-gil sighs at her enthusiasm. But Na-ri is so excited, she even vows to learn to make mandoo herself.

Deok-bong reluctantly calls Yeo-joo to ask for her help, and she reminds him that she will interpret this as romantic interest on his part. He says they’ll discuss that later, but he needs her help in a revenge scenario. She shows up to dressed conservatively, and carrying a massive basket of fruit. She hands Deok-bong the receipt for her outfit, HA, and cheerfully asks what he needs her to do.

Deok-bong’s whole family shows up to meet his “girlfriend,” even Deok-shim, who’s grown her hair out attractively long. Their jaws all drop when Deok-bong walks in with Yeo-joo, his parents shocked at how much she looks like his ex-fiancee. Deok-bong asks his father what they should do about that merger, smiling triumphantly.

After the parents leave, Deok-shim asks if they’re really dating, and Deok-bong says no while Yeo-joo nods yes. Deok-shim stomps out, annoyed, and Yeo-joo tells Deok-bong that they may as well date since he called her. He suggests they become friends, first.

On their lake bench, Nan-gil tells Na-ri that he’ll be extremely busy now with the franchising. He seems disappointed when she’s not that upset about it, and asks peevishly if he can see other women, then grins when that gets a reaction out of her.

Na-ri narrates that she and Nan-gil had spent that previous year getting to know one another, and we see them having silly little couple fights and talking about the past. They talk about whether they want kids (yes), and if they should raise them here in the country.

On their way home from another flight, Yeo-joo says to Na-ri that Nan-gil seems awfully busy with the ladies lately. She shows Na-ri new photos on the Hong Mandoo website, all of Nan-gil posing for pictures with new mandoo chefs. Nan-gil has become a minor celebrity, especially among women.

Na-ri and Yeo-joo go shopping, and Na-ri says that she’s happy Nan-gil is so busy and is making friends. Yeo-joo claims to be worried that he’ll be so busy that more time will fly by, and tells Na-ri not to stay lonely in the country (in case Nan-gil won’t ask her to marry him).Yeo-joo hugs Na-ri, and thanks her for helping her to mature.

Nan-gil is teaching a new batch of mandoo chefs, who seem a little star-struck by him and totally ignore Young-gyu when he takes over their teaching. A surprise visitor shows up — it’s Wan-shik! He looks relaxed and happy, and Nan-gil is thrilled to see him. He asks if Wan-shik wants to work here, and Wan-shik jokes that he’ll never work under Nan-gil.

Na-ri gets herself home without Nan-gil’s help this time, and he feels bad about missing her flight and says he missed her. He makes them coffee later, and she says she’s thinking about getting a place in Seoul so she doesn’t have to go back and forth. He forbids it, and seems oddly interested in whether she drinks her coffee, but she says it will keep her up after her long flight.

Na-ri lays her head on Nan-gil’s shoulder and falls asleep, and he dejectedly downs the rest of her coffee. At the bottom of the mug is printed, “Will you marry me?” Aww, he was trying to propose! Poor guy, look at that pouty lip.

Some time later, he puts on a party hat and holds up his phone, which is scrolling the words, “Marry me.” He decides to use a different message, which is when Na-ri walks in, ruining the moment yet again. This is hilarious.

Another time, Na-ri walks into the restaurant to find Nan-gil kneading dough and a huge white teddy bear sitting on the table. Nan-gil pokes the bear over and over but nothing happens, and finally Na-ri leaves to go to bed. Nan-gil punches the bear, which starts to chant, “Marry me! Marry me!” Na-ri hears it and smiles to herself.

One day, Nan-gil takes Na-ri to their elementary school, and he remembers all the times he would watch Na-ri from afar without her knowledge, then the special moments that brought them together to this point. They go inside to her old classroom, and look at the children’s drawings on the wall.

One drawing catches Na-ri’s eye — a man and a woman dressed in wedding attire, and across the bottom is written, “Hong Na-ri, will you marry me?” Nan-gil says that the first time he told Na-ri that he loved her, he regretted it. The second time, he thought they would break up. But now, he’s promising to spend every moment of his life with her.

He takes out a simple, perfect ring, and asks, “Hong Na-ri, will you marry me?” Na-ri says yes, and he slides the ring on her finger. Nan-gil smiles, his lifelong dream finally coming true.

Everyone seems happy in their lives — the mandoo chefs joke and laugh as always. Yeo-joo visits her father in the hospital, and he seems to be getting better. Even Deok-bong is getting along with his family, and insists on continuing to live in the country.

Na-ri’s dad and Uncle are over the moon about Na-ri and Nan-gil’s engagement. Na-ri narrates that loving someone means loving the whole person, including their family and history, as Nan-gil teaches her to make mandoo. As it turns out, she’s a natural at it.

They go out walking, hand-in-hand, and Na-ri concludes by saying that loving someone means walking the path of your lives together like family.

COMMENTS

Well, we leave Nan-gil and Na-ri happy and in love, with all their friends and family settled and looking toward the future. It’s a bit more perfect of an ending than I would have liked to see, with even CEO Kwon getting a fond sendoff without ever regretting his actions or apologizing to Na-ri for the way he treated her family (and still trying to manipulate his family for financial gain). But I’m glad to leave our characters with happy lives, at least, even if some of them didn’t pay for their bad behavior like I would have preferred. Also, I wish we’d gotten one last kiss between Na-ri and Nan-gil — it seems bland to finally be on the same page and not get a kiss, or even a mutual “I love you.” Not even when he proposed.

I guess I just wish the show had had higher stakes for Na-ri potentially losing the land, because I never really felt much urgency to save it, from anyone other than Nan-gil. It was Na-ri’s mother’s dream, but the land never represented any more than that to Na-ri herself — she never seemed to care much about keeping or losing it on her own behalf, because she never knew her mother’s dream for the land until after her death. Na-ri even offered to sell it a few times, just to rid herself of the hassle, and it was Nan-gil who stopped her. Keeping the land safe was much more important to Nan-gil, but once I realized that he was the only one who was working to carry Mom’s dream past her death, I sort of lost most of my interest in it as well. I kept waiting for Na-ri to have a lightbulb moment and take up the torch, but that never happened. So as a viewer, I was just left wondering why Nan-gil was willing to risk everything to protect this piece of land, even his lifelong love of Na-ri, when Na-ri herself didn’t seem to give a flip about it.

Deok-bong’s crush on Na-ri suffered the same way, in my opinion — Na-ri’s extreme disinterest took the claws out of any threat his feelings for her might have offered to Nan-gil’s love, so Deok-bong never came across as anything but a lovelorn semi-stalker and occasionally conveniently useful lawyer. I loved his character, but he felt woefully underutilized. It would have been more interesting to watch if Na-ri had been tempted by the handsome, successful, charming lawyer, and or even if Nan-gil and Deok-bong had been able to do their bickering jealousy thing more often. I would have even settled for the focus being on Deok-bong and Nan-gil going from enemies to reluctant friends, but even that never happened. For pete’s sake, even the relationship with Yeo-joo that was hinted at never really materialized — Deok-bong ignored her for a year and only called when he needed help, then still mostly ignored her (the show did the same thing with Deok-shim and Young-gyu, who I thought would be adorable together). And even though I don’t think many of us thought Yeo-joo deserved Deok-bong, at least it would have given Deok-bong something for the trouble of being in this show at all. Instead he got brushed to the side by everyone once he was no longer needed.

But the one bright spot in the show was Nan-gil and Na-ri’s relationship, and that I think was done pretty well. I enjoyed seeing the way they interacted with one another, mostly in the way that Na-ri was always direct and honest about everything, even the things that were scary and dangerous. She as never afraid to be forthcoming with Nan-gil, and that allowed him to trust her enough to eventually come out of his shell. Even though Nan-gil had condemned himself to a life of loneliness with his marriage to Na-ri’s mother, only allowing himself to love Na-ri from a distance, it was Na-ri’s persistence and constant gentle pressure that showed him that it was okay to love her in the open, and that she was right there with him every step of the way. I appreciate that they never separated (physically) when things got rough, but they both found ways to work together to make their relationship happen, both legally and personally.

All in all, I think that The Man Living in Our House told the story it set out to tell, and did it in an interesting way with compelling characters. It wasn’t as good as I felt it could have been, and I think a lot of that (as I mentioned previously) is because it tried to do too many things and dragged certain issues on for far too long. But the central love story was sweet and ended in a satisfying way, so for that I’ll call it a success. They were able to overcome their obstacles and make the family that Nan-gil always wanted. It’s not a show I’ll remember as being great, but it’s definitely one I’ll remember fondly.

 
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Thank you for this recap, as it saves me the need to watch! Off to read now :)

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6/10

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You know, I didn't really mind this episode, it was kind of bland, though. What really got to me was the amount of flashbacks and just how long they lasted. I agree with LollyPip and the others who say it should have just stopped at 12 episodes. They didn't even have enough material for a final episode that they decided to spend a good portion of it just looking back and old stuff.

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Dropped the show 3 weeks ago. Checked in to see the finale, but didn't last 10 mins. Didn't know that a finale could be so boring.
Liked Jo Boa in Shut UpFFB and Surplus Princess. Kim Ji Hoon was my favourite thing in this drama. What a waste.

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Same, tried to watch the final but failed watch like 15 minutes and then f/f to the last scene and got bored too.

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I didn't finish this episode. There was way too many flashbacks and fluff. I liked the show but the ending was kind of bland. I think this show would have been great with less episodes. And I agree Lollypip, the whole fight to save the land plot was flat. Na-ri barely cared and honestly so did I. I watched mainly for Na-ri and Nan Gil's adorable relationship. I enjoyed watching Su Ae. This was my first time watching her in a drama and she did a great job as Na-ri! I definitely have to look up her other dramas.

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Seeing so much of father in the last few episodes makes me think how much I preferred Duk-Shim and Yeo-Joo. I know a lot of people hated them, but at least they were better than Dad, or less bad, or something.

Maybe it would have been better if Dad had died when he was supposed to have?? We could have had more drama about whether our lead couple could ever be together; Duk-Bong might have had more of a chance and more screen time; and we would have had one less annoying character to put up with.

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I didn't hate either of them i loved them both they were the most interesting characters for me in the show and I enjoyed their scenes. Specially YJ she's the first villain that i like, she wasn't a threat to the main couple relationship.

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I really loved the theme of fatherhood in the drama. From NaRi's deadbeat dad, to DADA (short for father in English) finance's father/son farce, to Nan Gil taking on the role of step-father and DeokBong becoming surrogate father to his sister while their own father was manipulative and controlling.

The drama was far from perfect but had that 1% of anything quality - low key, easy chemistry and a pleasure to watch...even when I couldn't figure out why the lead couple couldn't be together.

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this drama has a huge potential especially with soo ae as the lead female. but it's failed miserably in ratings ...not sure why. one of the reason surely because Romantic Doctor is the king for Monday and Tuesday. but i honestly admitted after ep 6 or 7 the story is getting less interesting.

Though i understand her stand point and character, i dislike how nari always take Dungbook for granted. though i am not a fans of wishy washy female lead, but at least she can be friendlier to Dungbook or drawing the line without being that distant. if she disinterested to him, she should not use him to make Nangil jealous either (left together to the party but cancelled it on the way to the party). if i am DB i would be very disappointed either.

KYK acting are hugely improved here. and Soo ae are very good too as usual, but i dont get the story in the middle. i mean the fire, the scam of land by his dad and all, its getting complicated but not strong enough reason for Nangil to sacrifice his future or life. if in the end he choose to stay doesnt have anything to do with why he decide to stay at the beginning.

i gives this drama 6/10 as well because of the strong start but messed up in the middle and eventhough they try to save it in the end, its getting nowhere. even the actress cant save them.

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For the bad ratings, Romantic Doctor is not enough explanation.

This drama started as the ratings topper with 10 percent when it first started but then fell to 3 and 4 percent, it's their own fault that it became so dull. It's a waste of Soo Ae.

And I feel bad for Jo Bo Ah, she had to work so hard and didn't even get any rest from freaking meningitis, all for the sake of a dull drama where she's just there to be hated.

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i definitely agree that the bright spot in this drama was the romantic relationship, but i just couldn't help feeling like even the plot lines that were "resolved," never ACTUALLY FELT resolved.
maybe i'm alone in this, but so many things frustrated me. why did nari's dad accept nan-gil so suddenly after he hated him the scene before?
why did they make her dad "kidnapping" her into such a big plot point without them actually delving into the emotional aspect of it?
WHY CAN HER DAD & UNCLE JUST DO WHAT THEY WANT WITH NO CONSEQUENCES?! they were such COWARDS the whole time! uncle didn't even come back to grovel after nan-gil sent the dada finance guys to jail. i forgot he existed.

i really don't understand how they didn't even make nari a little bit angry with her dad for abandoning her mom & avoiding her for TWENTY YEARS. literally the only reasonable moment was her saying she felt annoyed at the idea she should take care of her dad now. all she did was ask him why he left them & he's like "i had no good reason" & she's like "oh ok" ?!?!

why did secretary kwon not get a bigger resolution to her traumatic past? yeah she got to reveal the corruption but she hated deok-bong, hated mom, hated nari & fiercely defended nan-gil in the beginning only to fade into the background...

i have watched so many dramas & i'm well aware there's no point to even questioning these things but it's so strange to me... because a lot of dramas bring things up & never mention them again... this drama didn't do that. they addressed them & it still seemed.... like not a solution to the issue! really weird to experience lmao

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+1

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Haha, yes, all very valid questions. At the end though, I found I didn't care that much since I was not terribly invested in the drama.

This was a solid middle of the road kdrama. Bad guys had inexplicable changes of hearts and got their unjustified redemption arcs, the use of flashbacks to pad out the end was pretty egregious but not as bad as some other dramas where they'll show a flashback to a scene that they just showed five minutes ago, and of course, everyone gets the Oprah, you get a happy ending and you get a happy ending.

Like lollypip, I'll remember the show fondly bc of the cute otp and their refreshingly mature take on relationships, but it's nothing that will stick in my head. Although I do agree with others that duk bong and even second half Yeo Joo were way more interesting than... anything else in the drama. Even duk bong seemed tired of having to pine after na ri, and it almost felt like he was relieved when the writer finally let him just let go and move on.

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i thought i was imagining deok bong's weariness hahah. i always think it's ridiculous when the second lead is in the second to last episode still not accepting that he didn't "win."

overall i do agree with you! these were my last minute frustrations but this wasn't a rage inducing drama for me so i think "middle of the road" sums it up nicely. & love the oprah reference lmaooo

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Question: what happened to the uncle? He was there as a threat and randomly disappeared only to be magically be forgiven and happily back in everyone's lives.

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"They all get comfortably tipsy on the champagne, and Deok-bong mentions Na-ri’s negative points like arrogance and prickliness, while Nan-gil loyally spins them in a positive light. When Na-ri comes back and asks what they’re doing, Nan-gil says he’s bragging about his girlfriend and shoots her a big dopey grin."

My favourite part of the episode...especially Kim Young Kwang's dopey smile!

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Never would have thought that an ex-gangster could be so romantic...scapebooking!!! Wow! That sold me!
And I also love how hard he worked at proposing to her in unique ways!

I personally think the writer must have held a session with all the female crew and cast to ask them for ways in which they would like to be proposed.

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I love episode 1-6 and then it started to get downhill...wasted such talent.
They have a good lead actors yet bland plot.
I want more but I guess my expectation is too high.
Should change the title to "the man who protect her LAND "

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"For pete’s sake, even the relationship with Yeo-joo that was hinted at never really materialized — Deok-bong ignored her for a year and only called when he needed help, then still mostly ignored her (the show did the same thing with Deok-shim and Young-gyu, who I thought would be adorable together). And even though I don’t think many of us thought Yeo-joo deserved Deok-bong, at least it would have given Deok-bong something for the trouble of being in this show at all. Instead he got brushed to the side by everyone once he was no longer needed."

Deok-bong deserves 'something' but definitely not ending up with Yeo-joo. The thought that he's even considering it is ridiculous. I'm sorry but I'm truly surprised that the show actually trivialised her abhorrent behaviour and was willing to reward her for her minuscule change for the chance to be with Kwon Deok-bong.

I'm especially miffed on Episode 15 when she told NaRi not to worry and that she will not steal Deok-bong from her. It is ludicrous. Like she could! So I'm glad Deok-bong immediately agreed in not calling her when she expressed her feelings and ignored her for a year. The writers didn't do justice with her character. She is just too shallow to be pitied or deserve better. The writers kept her in the drama because of Deok-bong. A waste of time.

This is a drama that had so much potential with it's quirky storyline but failed miserably as a Rom-Com because of inferior writing, lack of chemistry and humour. I know of another drama this year that shares the same fate and Lee Soo Hyuk is in it as well. Poor guy. Even though he did the best he could in both dramas. Better luck next time, I hope, to him.

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Yeo-joo. remains trash and I'm surprised she has any fans. She never once repented for her bad behavior.

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late comment/viewer but I totally agree I don't see why Yeo Joo deserved a happy ending when she never repented. The best that could have happened to her was to end up with the old boy friend or better yet dating rich guys again trying to get more money

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Thanks, LollyPip, for your final summation. ;-)

Call me a vindictive old coot, but I was looking forward to retribution instead of reward for the three stooges -- Dad Hong, Uncle Useless, and Chairman Kwon -- who'd done so much to make life miserable for Na-ri, her mother, and Nan-gil. Sure, Boss Bae ended up in the slammer taking the fall for his master... but Chairman Kwon's actions killed a bunch of orphans, for crying out loud, and as far as I know, there's no statute of limitations on manslaughter. He should be making license plates for the next decade.

Na-ri is entirely too forgiving of her father and uncle after all their attempts at ripping off her and Mom. They're con men, for Pete's sake... I wouldn't let them have anything to do with with my business. Deok-bong would have made a far better partner to help handle the franchising side of the business.

Whew! Had to get that off my chest.

I was really hoping for one more smooch when Nan-gil finally succeeded in proposing, but ennui won out. Writer-nim, that was downright parsimonious! This isn't a sageuk! It's one thing to be quietly joyful, but after all the obstacles this pair had to overcome, there should have been some jubilation, dagnabbit. And some wedding footage, complete with the Mandoods and Wan-shik as groomsmen. And Ran-Sook as Na-ri's matron of honor. I wanted to see it with my own eyes, not have to settle for hearing that it'll happen off screen sometime in the vague future. After all the verbal exposition that occurred in this show, I have to see it to believe it. I don't think this is too much to ask after all the Da Da Finance and Greenland histrionics.

Calm down, Pakalana... and just be grateful to have met Ko Nan-gil, an honest and upright man who stuck to his guns and overcame a rocky start in life... so he could share the rest of it with the one love of his life.

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Was it really Chairman Kwon who caused the orphanage fire? I thought it was Deokbong's grandfather who had a part in it by storing hazmat on his land. It was the grandfather who transferred the land to mom when she was fifteen for reasons unexplained till the end. Mom planted trees on the land as a memorial to the deceased orphans and Chairman Kwon had been trying to reclaim the land since way back when.

I quite liked the Nangil- Nari couple and enjoyed their interactions together but not so much the other chars. Still scratching my head over Sec. Kwon's function in the show and Yoo Joo's still a major irritant to me till the end (though not the actress playing her). The show was let down by poor writing, starkly shown when the last two episodes were mostly flashbacks, and I still don't know why the chars did what they did.

Goodbye show. You've been an easy watch and I enjoyed the OTP but you're not something I would recommend even if conversely, I won't warn away anyone from watching you either.

Thank you for the recaps LollyPip! :-)

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The first few episodes of this drama were rather good but as it progresses, i started to lose interest. There was really no struggle and the conflict was rather bland. I do love the actors because they are really good even the supporting actors. But the story was rather off.
I do love the character of Deokbong. He deserves someone better than Yeo-Joo. But then again, glad its finished. I would love to see Deokbong in another drama and with a challenging role at that!

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I wish to see Lee Soohyuk in saeguk again. *heart eyes watching him in hanbok*

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Lee SooHyuk's skin was too perfect. Did they use a gauze filter when filming him?
The last episode could have been eliminated with all those flashbacks. I fast forwarded through most of it.

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Glad that Yeo Joo doesn't get Deok-boeng. I know it's implied that he's open to friendship and a guy might give in towards an insistent pest but the drama is over, so in my perfect world he'll end up with someone but Yeo Joo, the second lead with the abstract, obscure and unappealing personality.

I didn't get why Yeo Joo's physical similarity can end Deok-boeng's 2nd engagement with the original fiance, plus the dad's plan for a merger. Oh well just one more thing to mull over.

Feeling proud for sticking with this til the end! I'm so relieved it's over! Thank you LollyPip for your recaps.

Would love to see Jo Boa & Kim Young Kwang in another production. I'm keeping an eye for their growth as actors.

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Completely agree! Yeo Joo looking like his ex was suppose to be a negative instead of a positive since she backstabbed him and I don't think she deserves to be with Deok Bong either but as you said they ended the drama with her being only friends with him and in my world as well that's all that happened lol

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Looks like it's unanimous feeling across the board. I really liked this show in the beginning and very quickly don't recall why I lost interest...oh yeah, the plot. What was it again?

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Thank you again Lollipip for sticking it out to the very end!!! :)

Just a couple of comments:

"So as a viewer, I was just left wondering why Nan-gil was willing to risk everything to protect this piece of land, even his lifelong love of Na-ri, when Na-ri herself didn’t seem to give a flip about it."

This one I understood. To Nan-gil, Na-ri's mother was just as much his mom as she was Na-ri's. And he honestly had a love that a son would have for his mother & vise versa, as she would refer to him as her son. I think in the very beginning, when NaRi didnt know the real reason they had gotten married, she had asked him if he loved her (Na-ri's mom), and he said "yes". They had a genuine mother-son relationship. So to me, it makes sense for him to honor the wishes of "HIS" mother. He was always able to separate his lifelong love for Na-ri for doing what he felt was right, and for that, I admired him. That's a rare gem of a man there. Also, I believe it when he said he never looked at another woman. He was willing to stay single for the rest of his life for his lifetime love, even if she never loved him back.

There were however, some other things that I found myself saying "Why?" - like the whole father - uncle thing. I'm not sure I would have been that forgiving. And it would have been nice to know a little more details about the history regarding the land, mom, secretary Kwon, etc. It was annoying, but not so much that I would give up watching (and believe me I've stopped watching many other shows that I was just utterly annoyed and couldn't take it anymore- even some that were popular here, but I just didn't like..T.E.H.O.)

"But the central love story was sweet and ended in a satisfying way, so for that I’ll call it a success. They were able to overcome their obstacles and make the family that Nan-gil always wanted". [and deserved ]

THIS is why I liked it, and is all I'm asking for in a rom-com. Meet that, and I'm a happy camper, although I agree about the mutual I love yous and kiss after the proposal - whats with the hugs?? ALSO, when they were in the kitchen talking about missed opportinities for kisses, and Nan-gil was saying how hard it was to hold back, I was expecting to see him kiss her like the first time they kissed. That was a MAJOR let down for me..they should have just let it ripp!! :p :) . PD Nim, You really disappointed me on that one! We already knew what these mature adults were capable of. Why go so chaise at the end??

Anyways, thanks again Lollipip!! :)

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I hate the Yeo-joo character, she started the drama by stealing her sunbae's fiance after meeting him at her sunbae's mother's funeral. This made her irredeemable and she never even apologized or regretted her hurtful actions. I started fast forwarded through when they kept giving her screen time.

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1/2 So I don’t know if anyone will read this, as I was late finishing this series. But I finished it last night and had some thoughts so I thought I would share them all anyway.

Unpopular opinion of the month: I actually ended up really enjoying Yeo Joo and her scenes in the latter half. I’m not entirely sure why but I think I’ve figured out at least part of it. Part of the reason I think, being that, while I loved Nan Gil and Na Ri together, and I enjoyed them immensely in the first half, the second half of this drama became rather flat, and their relationship rather repetitive and boring, and wasn’t nearly as fun to watch. Especially when, from about episode 8 it had been confirmed that these two were, for lack of a better term, soul mates, and yet still couldn’t work out their shit. So I think, when slogging through the last 4 or 5 episodes, I came to really enjoy whenever Yeo Joo was on screen, because she was just so funny. Not in a normal comedic way, just that the way she went about trying to be loved, and her dramatic escapades and actings to try and get her way, only to have the guy she really liked not be even half interested in her, was just highly amusing. Perhaps I should feel pity, but at least she never gave up. In the first half, she was extremely manipulative, and needy and she pissed me off so much, and even at the end, while she tamed down a bit, she wasn’t as manipulative, and I saw her needling at the end as a kind of teasing rather than straight up bitchiness, but she definitely wasn’t a ‘nice’ character. But I loved watching her. And I don't really understand it fully. Her and Duk Bong, and Duk Shim became the highlights of my episode watching. When everyone else was just mucking aboot, their antics were actually entertaining to watch. As characters, they acted shallowly, but because of that shallowness, they had this strange depth that I wish had been fleshed out more. Yeo Joo’s motivations and the reasons for why she did things, aren’t likable by any stretch of the imagination, I felt could’ve been handled in a way that made her character very interesting. There were lines that Na Ri and Duk Bong threw at her which were very true, and very deep in their own way, and I just found her quite fascinating, even if she was a bitch. I wish they had given her a better development arc, not a perfect turn around, that would’ve been unbelievable, but at least a little bit more of a realisation of how immature and petty she had been. More than was there anyway. Because they did do it a little bit.
And then I would feel better about shipping her and Duk Bong. On Duk Bong’s part, when he first entered the scene, I really didn’t like him, he was very arrogant, but again by the end, I actually kinda liked him. Well perhaps 'like' is not quite the right word, but I didn't hate him...

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2/2

Perhaps because Na Ri influenced him to be a slightly better person, or perhaps because the him behind all the bitterness was actually not a bad guy. Who knows. In the last few eps, I found his storyline with his father more interesting than the main storyline, and I wish they’d spent more time on it, making it better. (Also can I just say, whoever was the stylist for his costumes has great taste in coats, because he had some AWESOME coats. It was quite distracting)
Duk Shim, was also that weirdly interesting and funny character, who was not overly likable, and yet, she grew on me a lot. Her abrupt way of saying things, and her sass was actually enjoying to watch. And I loved all the scenes with her and Yoon Kyu, whom I have loved since day one, I know he’s supposed to just be comedic relief, but he was gold. And a tad underdeveloped but I guess I can’t have everything. I feel bad for shipping the two of them, but I can’t help it, especially when she called him oppa and he got all cute about it. Anyway. I think that was everything I wanted to say. I possibly repeated myself a lot. Oh well.

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I very much enjoyed the recaps. Thank you! I did want to mention that I loved the last episode. I've been married almost 15 years and their relationship echoes very much what a real successful relationship is like--minus the mob boss and stepfather-daughter falling in love! The scene when Na-Ri is asleep and Nan Gil comes in to wake her up to "eat as a family" could have been taken out of my life this week! Although, my husband would have poured a glass of water over my head instead of carrying me downstairs! Also, I've never had two guys fight over me at once, which is probably a blessing! I will be rewatching parts of this one for several weeks to come. I also wanted a better kiss in the finale--by the water with the sun setting--speaking of missed opportunities.

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2/2
Also, did anyone else want to see Na RI's poem in the classroom??? That would have been much sweeter coupled with the flashback of little Nan Gil! That would have slayed me. That kid was adorable! Another missed opportunity. I should write Korean dramas.

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