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Top 10 favorite drama writers

javabeans: So, this seems like a pretty self-explanatory list.

girlfriday: Our favorite writers? Yup. They write dramas. They’re our favorite.

javabeans: I suppose the only criteria we had for this list, other than liking the dramas these people wrote, was that we skewed toward writers with a strong overall history of writing great dramas. Rather than, say, just those who wrote our favorite shows, or those with spotty histories.

girlfriday: Yes, because otherwise this would just a list of our top dramas. And there are some writers, like the Hong sisters, that I loved for years and years… and then didn’t so much.

javabeans: That was a sad trajectory, because any other writer who had seven or eight solid hits in a row and a couple of duds would have still been considered great writers. It’s just that their weakest dramas came at the end, and all together, and made us worry that maybe they’re not so good anymore.

girlfriday: Or got tired. Which still makes me sad, but we can’t ignore the recent shows.

javabeans: Of course, there are examples of the reverse, too, where a writer we might not have thought much of over several dramas starts turning it up with great work. Those are happier trajectories.

girlfriday: There is something really gratifying about following your favorite writers and seeing them constantly trying to one-up themselves. As much as we love our favorite actors and actresses, ultimately as fans of dramas, it’s the writers who make or break a show.

javabeans: Yes, as we know from watching great actors work with crappily written material—it just doesn’t work. But as long as there’s a great story and great characters, I’ll follow you there.

girlfriday: For years, apparently. Here’s our list!

 

1. Lee Woo-jung

girlfriday: Lee Woo-jung has taken more of my tears than any other writer in dramaland; some were tears of paaaaaaaiiin, and some were tears of joy, but mostly they were tears of empathy for the way she portrays growing pains and familial love. That’s probably her greatest strength as a writer, and why her Answer Me series has become such a sensation.

The franchise began with no expectations, since as a variety writer from PD Na Young-seok’s crew on 1 Night 2 Days, she had no drama credits to her name. But with Answer Me 1997 she wrote a loving reflection on youth tinged with the nostalgia of simpler times, and she hit upon something that really spoke to viewers—shared memories of the pop-culture of that time, and the universal pangs of being young and lost. Though subsequent installments Answer Me 1994 and Answer Me 1988 borrow the same formula (a big reason why the first is unbeatable to me), they do stand on their own, and each season has her signature humor, sentiment, and heart. Love triangles may be what people discuss most about her dramas, but what I appreciate is the way she writes moms and dads, brothers and sisters, and friends who treat each other like family. Her characters hide their emotions on the surface the way real people do, but their quiet acts of love speak volumes and move me like no other.

Credits: Answer Me 1997, Answer Me 1994, Answer Me 1988, Grandpas Over Flowers, 1 Night 2 Days

 

2. Song Jae-jung

javabeans: One common criticism about K-dramas is the frequent recycling of storylines and tropes, and the general reluctance to be too risky, too adventurous, or too different. I love ‘em anyway, because to me a drama’s value isn’t only in its originality factor—I can love shows even when the outward conceit sounds completely familiar—but I certainly wouldn’t mind a more adventurous narrative spirit, either.

That’s where writer Song Jae-jung really shines, in her willingness to take her stories to newer territories, in innovative directions; she isn’t reinventing the wheel, but she’s tinkering with the spokes, fiddling with the structure, and generally open to trying new things. Queen In-hyun’s Man was a breath of fresh air as a time-travel romance that presented the problem of how a man from the past could be with a woman from the present when his vehicle between times was an ever-deteriorating talisman. Nine played with time in an entirely different way, with one person going back to purposely change a history that was resistant to being changed. And in W–Two Worlds, she ambitiously created a whole new world and mythos where two-dimensional cartoon characters could become sentient and travel to the real world—only to have their manhwa worlds evolving in response. Song’s complex worldbuilding wasn’t necessarily airtight, but her willingness to continually expand her world’s boundaries and take our characters on hairpin turns struck me as fearless in a way that dramaland very much needs. I didn’t walk away with all of my questions answered, but I was so impressed with Song’s dexterity in throwing in new twists and complicating her rules that I’m still very much looking forward to all the stories she has yet to tell.

Credits: Nine, W—Two Worlds, Queen In-hyun’s Man, Three Musketeers, Coffee House, High Kick Through the Roof

 

3. Noh Hee-kyung

HeadsNo2: Noh Hee-kyung has built her two-decade-long career on shows with deeply complex relationships and realistic characters that are never as simple as they seem at the start. She excels at getting to the heart of what makes people tick and highlighting the human connection between her characters, and her earlier dramas were characterized by a low-key, relatable appeal (More Beautiful Than a Flower, Goodbye Solo). In more recent years, she’s also tapped into a flair for showmanship with more dramatic, sometimes surrealistic stories, such as the fantastical, heart-wrenching tale of a man given a second chance at life in Padam Padam or the stylized high drama of a blind woman falling for the con man passing himself off as her brother in That Winter, the Wind Blows. It was It’s Okay, It’s Love that put all those elements together—intricate relationships, complex characters, fantasy, romance, and a heightened sense of reality—and gave her her biggest hit to date… until she penned Dear My Friends, a story of a group of friends learning about life and love through the years that found heartbreaking emotion in the everyday, and conveyed depth of feeling in the smallest gestures of love. It’s that ability for bringing us into her characters’ emotions that makes Noh Hee-kyung dramas so resonant and gripping—not because her plots are so dramatic, but because she finds the drama in ordinary life.

Credits: Dear My Friends, It’s Okay, It’s Love, That Winter, The Wind Blows, The World They Live In, Padam Padam: The Sound of His and Her Heartbeats, Goodbye Solo, More Beautiful Than a Flower

 

4. Park Yeon-seon

HeadsNo2: Park Yeon-seon has built her career around mastering the ensemble show, displaying a distinctly unique ability to bring a disparate group of personalities together in a way that’s resonant and unforgettable. It’s her ability to find tiny human moments and built characters and relationships around them that give her dramas such a rich, slice-of-life feel, which we saw in her early dramas Alone in Love and Mixed-up Investigative Agency. Her characters come to life as fleshed-out, living and breathing individuals; we see them as real people, either people like us or people we know, which all but guarantees our investment in their journeys.

Moreover, Park has shown range in style and genre, whether it’s the nuanced relationship study that was Alone in Love, the rollicking treasure hunt of Mixed-up Investigative Agency, the haunting psychological thriller that was White Christmas, or the heartwarming ode to growing up of Age of Youth. Her dramas don’t tend to be ratings bonanzas, but her work inspires mania followings—the kind that keeps fans talking years after the broadcast has come and gone.

Credits: Age of Youth, Wild Romance, White Christmas, Mixed-up Investigative Agency, Alone in Love

 

5. Kim Eun-hee

javabeans: Kim Eun-hee has always shown a proclivity for mixing procedural elements with thrills, from her early dramas onward; she co-wrote cable’s comedic mystery series Harvest Villa and forensic-crime drama Sign with her husband, Jang Hang-joon, and then worked solo as she took on cybercrime-themed Ghost and (sorta)-real-time presidential-abduction thriller Three Days. She showed a knack for creating strong premises that were sustained by a steady stream of suspense—and then last year, everything came together in the perfect storm with the massive hit that was Signal. For me, that’s what turned her from a writer I considered strong in a certain niche to a writer capable of greatness, period, because Signal was a masterpiece of tight mystery, crime procedural, complex character development (those eerie, awesomely drawn criminals!), and stirring emotional throughlines that tied the whole show together with deep feeling. I’ve rarely wanted so badly to enter my television screen to rescue characters in peril—and at the same time, feared that idea, because the dangers felt so real and present. I don’t know if she’ll find a way to top Signal with future projects, and truth be told, that’s a mighty high bar to meet, even for someone who set it in place—but that doesn’t keep me from eagerly awaiting what that next project might be.

Credits: Signal, Three Days, Ghost, Sign, Harvest Villa

 

6. Jung Yoon-jung

girlfriday: Jung Yoon-jung’s credits are an interesting mix, since she doesn’t stick to any one genre. She started out in historical dramas, with two seasons of the mystery sageuk Chosun Police, followed by the quirky supernatural sageuk Arang and the Magistrate, which is still one of the best examples of supernatural world-building that I’ve seen in K-dramas, full of gods and ghosts and a whole social order to the afterlife. While the youth music-centered drama Monstar was a departure from those projects, I remember being impressed at the way she weaved the music into the narrative, making the musical numbers feel like extensions of dialogue and the way characters expressed their true feelings, like a real musical.

Those dramas were modest successes, but then she adapted Misaeng, and took a beloved manhwa and turned it into a critically acclaimed hit that spoke to a generation. Obviously we can’t discount the power of the original work by Yoon Tae-ho, but we’ve also seen enough adaptations of popular webtoons go south to know that there are a lot of ways to do it badly. With Misaeng, she took a slice-of-life story about ordinary workers and turned it into a well-paced drama with narratively satisfying beats of human connection that still give me goosebumps to think about. What she captured wasn’t just the grind of the salaryman’s life; it was the drama of life’s little triumphs in big, emotionally compelling ways, telling us that all of our struggles mattered, and making so many of us feel like this was our story.

Credits: Misaeng, Monstar, Arang and the Magistrate, Chosun Police, Chosun Police 2

 

7. Park Kyung-soo

HeadsNo2: Park Kyung-soo is a writer who knows how to get to the deepest parts of a character’s psyche and burrow there for the entirety of a show, giving us some of the most multifaceted and deeply layered characters in dramaland. He creates masterfully complex stories centered around social issues, and manages to get to the heart of those issues in an addictively dramatic way. It was his first series as solo scriptwriter, The Chaser, that burst Park onto the scene as a writer to watch, drawing word of mouth and creating riveting drama out of a father’s desperate fight against the rich and powerful to avenge his beloved daughter’s death. He again proved his ability to create ratings hits out of intense, socially relevant conflicts with Empire of Gold, where he explored the topics of corruption and the class/wealth divide—issues he once again explored in Punch, which he built around a main character whom we shouldn’t like, but couldn’t help but feel for anyway.

The hallmark of his work is his ability to create tension through words and dialogue: We’re frequently trapped in a room with his characters speaking in long turns, but it’s a testament to his skill that watching his characters verbally spar can be just as exciting, if not more so, than a well-choreographed action scene. His dramas have a distinct, cerebral appeal—but don’t let that scare you away. The stories are relevant and accessible, even if they don’t always show the rosy side of life.

Credits: Punch, Empire of Gold, The Chaser, Legend

 

8. Song Ji-nah

javabeans: Of the writers on this list, I find Song Ji-nah’s credits list perhaps the most intriguing in its diversity; you can hardly peg her as one kind of writer or another. Her early career was marked with not one but two legitimate masterpieces: 1991-92’s Eyes of Dawn, and then 1995’s seminal Sandglass. Perhaps it seems odd to follow historical epics with a lighter campus drama, but she did so with 1999’s KAIST. Then, 2007’s grand-scale Legend took her into fantasy sageuk territory, while 2009’s sharp, smart Story of a Man gave us capers and bromance. What’s Up took her back to college, while time-traveling Faith was more sageuk, and then Healer gave us action and romance. I find it difficult to describe what kind of writer Song is without listing all the various shows she’s produced, and the only thread of commonality I can find is that her writing, for me, tends to hit that sweet spot of smart (but not overly cerebral), fun (but not too fluffy), fast-paced (but not too slick), and sometimes even important (but not self-important). I don’t always know what to expect in terms of what kind of story, genre, tone, or even millenium she’ll write about, but I do have a very high amount of faith that I’ll be entertained, moved, and satisfied.

Credits: Healer, Faith, Sandglass, Legend, Story of a Man, What’s Up, Eyes of Dawn, KAIST

 

9. Park Hye-ryun

girlfriday: Park Hye-ryun writes vibrant characters and emotionally uplifting dramas that always make me care a great deal. Her characters just speak to me and I love her earnest, idealistic sensibility, which makes for some fantastic coming-of-age stories like the music-themed Dream High and Page Turner, and also extends to her supernatural rom-coms I Hear Your Voice and Pinocchio, where adults are searching for their place in the world. She writes sassy, lovable heroines with funny flaws and quick comebacks, loving family relationships, and even her villains have some humanity.

Her dramas feel balanced while juggling comedy, drama, romance, and suspense (I Hear Your Voice is probably the best example of this, with a serial killer driving the plot at an addictive pace AND serving as motivation for romantic hijinks). And they hit those unabashed, heartfelt emotional climaxes the way you want (remember when Kim Soo-hyun started to lose his hearing in Dream High and Suzy saved him mid-song?). Her universe is more of an idealistic hope than a picture of the real world, but it’s one where good people do the right thing, justice wins out, and dreams come true—and more importantly, you find yourself fist-pumping along with every small victory, and believing that this is how things could be. Or at least how they should be.

Credits: I Hear Your Voice, Pinocchio, Page Turner, Dream High, Get Karl Oh Soo-jung, Nonstop 5, Nonstop 3

 

10. Kim Eun-sook

girlfriday: Kim Eun-sook is one of dramaland’s biggest hitmakers today, whose shows often become pop-culture sensations where catchphrases and memorable scenes get parroted and parodied endlessly; her classic romances like the Lovers series and On Air made her a household name, and I still see Secret Garden parodies on TV to this day. I think that phenomenon speaks to her specific appeal as a writer, more than just high ratings (though obviously, her dramas are mega-monster hits), because she writes dramas that are quotable and recognizably hers.

Kim Eun-sook is a wordsmith through and through—she crafts very particular speech patterns, enjoys poetic cadence, and turns a phrase like nobody’s business. Her writing is highly stylized (her characters don’t speak like normal people in the real world), but it’s a style I enjoy, full of wit and clever reversals. I can’t always say the same of her characterizations, which skew very heavily in favor of men over women, leading to dramas where the heroes are often glorified and heroines haven’t evolved much past Cinderella. But she has noticeably honed her skills with each new project, and I found her recent shows (The Lonely Shining Goblin, Descended From the Sun) most appealing; though their whopping commercial success probably speaks for itself. She knows how to consistently tap into what people like, which is no small feat. And though she may at times be a polarizing writer, it’s pretty certain that love or hate her shows, we’ll all be talking about them.

Credits: The Lonely Shining Goblin, Descended From the Sun, Secret Garden, A Gentleman’s Dignity, Heirs, City Hall, On Air, A Millionaire’s First Love, Lovers, Lovers in Prague, Lovers in Paris

 
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Thank you for the article. From you list I like and will follow: Kim Eun-hee, and Song Ji-nah.

Kim Eun-Sook is a hit or miss for me. I absolutely loved Goblin and also A Gentleman's Dignity; But none of her other drama that I have seen. They were entertaining enough, but nothing to write home about.

I used to like Song Jae-jung a lot (Nine is one of my favorite KDrama), until she came out with W which I thought was poorly done, and also lifted so many of the successful lines from Doctors, and what's more, the whole idea of the drama may have been lifted from Brazilian-Canadian film "Zoom" with Gael Garcia Bernal. (although overall, the drama was better, even though I still did not like that either)

I like many of the others (but not all) in some of the drama you mentioned; Especially Park Kyung-soo's Punch.

A writer whom I love, and you failed to mention is Bae Yoo-Mi (Scandal: A Shocking and Wrongful Incident is still one of my top KDrama, as was I Have a Lover, Country Princess).

Kang Eun-kyeong - I adored Romantic Doctor Teacher Kim. I liked her other drama: This is Family (with Yoo Dong-Geun), Hotelier, Bread Love and Dreams, Glory Jane.

Kim Soo-Hyun writes so beautifully, and every word in her drama is carefully chosen. Too bad, that most of her drama are poorly translated by both Viki and DramaFever who miss many of the nuances in her writing. I was lucky to have seen "A Thousand Days Promise" with someone else's translation that elevated that drama to a level of sheer poetry for me.

Another writer whom I like a lot is Jung Hyun-Min: Assembly and Jeong DoJeon are both among my favorite Kdrama, and also President.

Kim Jee-woo: Memory, Kimchi Family, Shark, Devil (2007)

So Hyeon-Kyeong: I loved Two Weeks, and 49 Days

Kim Yeong-hyeon: Deep Rooted Tree, Queen Seondeok, Dae Jang-Geum, Six Flying Dragons.
Park Sang-yeon: Deep Rooted Tree, Queen Seondeok, Six Flying Dragons. and movies The Front Line, May 18.

Choi Wan-gyoo: Jumong, The Flower in Prison, Gourmet, Gu Am Haeo-Joon (2013), Midas, Loves Story in Harvard.

Choi Ho-cheol: Mask, Secrets (the one with Ji Sung)

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Great post!

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I am surprised my own because..hey I know more than half of the writer LOL while I don't pay attention much before

I do feel your sentiment, I love Hong sisters for years (with MGIG as favorite), but ever since that one is not so more...I feel sad because they are one kind that can make me burst out laughing, through there is no clear projection line of plot LOL

And for Kim Eun-sook,
"she crafts *very particular speech patterns, enjoys poetic cadence, and turns a phrase*....I can’t always say the same of her characterizations...."
Those words describe what trait which makes her works a pop culture, that unique pattern tend to adhere into one side of your brain! LOL! Shallow, but i can not get rid of it. I find it the best with Goblin, I still can not get rid the poet "Physics of Love"!

Among them all, the one that I'll wait the most is Song Jin-Ah, I fall for her brilliance in "What's Up" and I thought my self... ahh..no wonder people called her genius

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PHR is probably my fave from this list since out of all her works that I've watched, I have liked them all. With other writers, either I haven't really watched their stuff or I might like some & dislike some of their repertoire. In any case, I'm always amazed when the writing is on point since that really is the backbone of the drama.

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I definitely agree with the writers on this list.

I was starting to get worried as I was scrolling until I finally saw Park Hye Ryun's name on the list.

She is by far my favorite writer on this list and the only one who has so far been able to consistently churn out dramas that I love one after another. That itself is a feat.

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Jin Soo Wan who wrote Kill Me, Heal Me (MBC, 2015)&The Moon That Embraces the Sun (MBC, 2012)! i thought kill me heal me was one of the best korean dramas i`ve ever watched!!!!

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I can totally understand why the Hong sisters didn't make the top 10 favorite writers for DB. Their latest works just didn't cut it for them.

For me, i think there is enough residual left for me to keep them as a favorite. I didn't watch BIg or Warm and cozy. I loved Masters Sun and The Greatest Love - watching them two many times over. Of course all their previous works that I have seen over the years. I hope they own anothe hit soon.

KES is a hit or miss for me. I liked on air, city hall, SG, and AGD.

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What??? The writer of W wrote High Kick Through the Roof???!!! No wonder! She gave such a crappy ending for that show. It felt like she just gave up on the characters by the end of that show's run. Nostalgic terrible memories are flooding back. T.T

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High Kick series have lot of directors and writers for huge eps. Yeah, their ending is the wrost.

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Thank you DRAMABEAN GODS!!! I made this request some time ago, for Top 10 Writers, and...lo and behold, here it is!! (I feel so blessed!)

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Javabeans and Girlfriday, I've been waiting for new drama from the writer of The Princess' Man. I love how she incorporated the actual history with the love story. Is there any new drama from this writer or did I miss any?

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Even if you don't enjoy Goblin, watching 16 episodes Goblin is worth it just to be able to understand this video. LMAO

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oVC5epZuFLY

Still, I think Kim Eun-sook's best written drama remains to be City Hall, but Goblin came close.

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I'm not so sure about Kim Eun-hee. I didn't find Sign to be particularly well written; Ghost started out gangbusters but really fizzled out by the end; Three Days was a mess. Signal was indeed a masterpiece, but my understanding is that all the tight plotting resulted from the PD and writer (and perhaps others) collaborating on it together for months. I'll keep her off my list for now, but I'm very much looking forward to her next project.

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I personally like writer Joo Hwa Mi's writing style a lot. 'Marriage Not Dating' is a precious gem that, if not for its strong script, wun be this memorable. Even for the controversial 'Introverted boss', her writing style continues to be witty and funny.

Where are the Hong sisters? Although their later works were not up to expectations, their more successful works were still outstanding rom coms of their own. Still waiting for their comeback. But please, come back with a proper script! *trying to forget warm and cozy* I remember Dramabeans even featured their interview some years back.

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I'm just loving how these female writers are pulling their weight / dominating.

Especially in a seemingly conservative country like Korea.

It mustn't be an easy feat and I'm full of admiration for them and their beautifully written dramas.

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I was expecting Hong Sisters to be on the list because of my all time favorite preference, the classic Sassy Girl Choon Hyang! Ah... Now i miss Hong Sisters drama...

Anyway i wholeheartedly agree with the list. Song Jae Jung FTW!!! Nine is masterpiece!

Other than those 10 writers, i anticipate the brighter future of the writers of Six Flying Dragons, Oh My Ghostess/Weightlifting Fairy, Marriage Not Dating, and Squad38/Missing Nine.

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omo true.. hong sisters had really good works and engaging romance.. i thk from their last flop.. they've gone MIA
I hope they would come back with a good script in 2017

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The Hong sisters were always a bit over-rated and while they were good at creating a few memorable characters (Mi-ho, Dokko Jin), the overall story tend to be lacking and supporting characters most of the time got a short shrift and were 1-dimensional and lacking.

"The Greatest Love" is probably their most complete drama, but they have had a few real stinkers.

In a way, they are like KES, but with the ability to create some truly memorable characters and write some truly funny, witty lines/dialogue (something I have never seen from KES).

Am hoping that the HS come back to form b/c they can actually write some good stuff (just need to do a better job of getting all the pieces together).

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their names didnt really ring a bell to me. i had to look at the credits.
- Song Jae-jung and Kim Eun-hee
: tends to churn out sth different. Sth captivating. Sth that interest me. It's nice when writers try to push their own boundaries
- Park Hye-ryun
: is a mixed bag for me. Page Turner and Pinochio were the ones i care about and love the story
- Kim Eun-sook
: Before Goblin i had mild interest in her. Cause Millionaire's first love left an imprint in my heart. DOTS was interesting in the first half and i do enjoy the banter- cringey or not. Then Goblin happened and i'll forver check out her drama if she could churn sth that has deep emotional impact, of love and life and death.. and dont forget the bromance.

I would like to add
- Yang Hee Seung.
Her last two dramas hit me in all the right places. While Oh my ghost had some issues with cohesiveness towards the end, it was an entertaining and good watch from start to end. Then Weightlifting fairy came and had a how cast of wonderful people. It just made the world that much more beautiful.

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I will forever hold Heirs against Kim Eun Sook. Even though I have heard all the speculations AND I do believe that every writer is allowed one bad drama. The Hong Sisters had BIG and Kim Eun Sook had Heirs. But why it gotta be that drama?! To this day I still reference Heirs when I'm talking about bad dramas. I don't think I'll ever be able to forgive her for Heirs. Even though I am watching and enjoying her dramas again...

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She has more than one bad drama

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Actually, both Heirs and Dots were pretty badly written, in my opinion...

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SG is also one of the worst-written K-dramas.

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Did anyone else realised that there were more female writers than male?
Wonderful list
Please do a top 10 OST too *fingerscrossed

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yeah love that ideal, mine is eternal love.

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Noh Hee Kyung !!! I love her, she's that writer I'm actually a fan of regardless of other factors like cast, director or whatever. I'd watch anything of her's

The top three are my absolute favorite kdrama writers hands down
Lee Woo Jung for Answer Me 97 & 88
Song Jae Jung for W & Queen Inhyun's Man

Number 4 for me would be Kim Eun Sook

Number 5 Park Hye Ryun

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Ooo.. I am going to bookmark this for future reference.. There are some writers and their works here that looks interesting.

Let me also put in a good word out there for Yang Hee-Seung, Jo Seung Hee (King of HS writers) and Seo Sook-Hyang (JI). Yes, they are my favourite dramas :) but it's the sincere writing (along with the acting/ directing) that earned these shows a place in my heart.

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I am so glad there's no K2 writer here... hahaha....

OH well, so far, consistently I'd go for Song JiNa, as her writings are very dimensional, tight & social relevance... And the romance and OST too, as I heard she would even personally chose the songs... She doesn't go with the popularity (if there's no choice, like what happened to Faith- LMH is the last choice), BUT on how they can give justice & portray the role effectively......

with DOTS & Goblin writer??.. It's a hit or miss, only pure luck on her... Maybe she has this strong appeal to press and advertising companies... But in fairness, FEW of her works make sense...

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Same here. I totally agree with you on Song Ji Na (my absolute favorite) and Kim Eun Sook (I only liked Goblin, among her dramas).

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After the horror that was Heirs and the annoyance that was Secret Garden, I vowed to never watch another Kim Eun-sook drama again. No amount of top actors could pull me back in. I hated her weak Candy female characters and her over-the-top heroes. However, seeing the great amount of buzz around Goblin, should I give her another try? Has her writing changed? I find her dramas lacking in substance, where she mostly relies on the eye candy and appeal of her cast.

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Maybe you can start off by reading a few recaps? See if you like the characters? Goblin is definitely much better than Heirs and Secret Garden. She still has a larger than life, over the top hero, but he doesn't have the boundary issues that her heroes had in Heirs and Secret Garden. I feel like people were divided on the heroine. She has her weak Candy moments, but also her strong moments. You can tell that Kim Eun Sook is trying to overcome some of her writing flaws that she a single received criticism for. Was she successful? Not totally, but it's an improvement. I think her best written drama so far is City Hall, but it was one of her lower rated ones and had no pop culture buzz around it, so I don't think she'll make another City Hall.

If you watch Goblin, beware of the excessive use of flashbacks and Subway PPL. Use those moments to retrieve snacks.

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Keep it a promise. Her other drama, "Desendants of the Sun" was also so ordinary. I have no hope in Kim Eun-Sook

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Goblin is the only drama I liked from that author.

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SG was truly horrendous - could easily be used in a class to teach how to write a truly, awful TV script.

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I just curious when Hong Sisters will comeback dramaland. It's sounds like never.

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I'm watching Goblin at the moment and thinking how about a "Top 10 Subway-less dramas" list?

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It is a pity you did not include the marvelous drama writer, Jung Sung-Joo , the writer of "A wife's Credentials", "I heard it through the grapevine", "Secret Love Affair"

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Hong Sisters remain at the top of my list, and I would remove Park Hye Ryun because I really didn't like any of her dramas even though lots of other people seem to. I want to add my second favorite writer too - Yoon Nan Joong (Flower Boy Ramyun Shop, Queen of the Office, and Hogu's Love) because her dramas are so carefully written and plotted. Each episode has a strong theme and I really like that.

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It'll be interesting to read about Top 10 Villains!

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Yasssss!

No. 1 "How's your health these days?"
Shin Sung Rok

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Kim Eun-sook? Really?

While KES may have written a string of popular shows, most of her stuff is paint by nos. fluff without any real interesting plot elements, much less interesting/witty dialogue.

Like I had stated before, she is the Korean TV script writer's version of Michael Bay (the film director behind underwhelming schlock, but box office hits such as "Armageddon," "The Rock," "Pearl Harbor," and the "Transformer" films).

There are a # of writers who are much more deserving than KES, even if they haven't yet hit the same level of success in terms of ratings.

One would be Han Jeong-hoon who wrote PU38, "Bad Guys" and the current show, "Missing 9."

Another would be Park Yeon-seon who wrote "Age of Youth" and "White Christmas."

"City Hall" is the best of KES's work, but that doesn't make up for the cringe-worthy bad writing in "Secret Garden" and "Heirs" or the paint by nos. soap that was DFtS.

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Definitely Kim Younghyun-Park Sangyeon duo for me. They never disappoint.

Plus Park Jieun's writing is really strong too until I guess she felt pressured after YWCFTS.

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My list:
1. Kim Eun Hee (Signal, Sign,...)
2. Jo Jeong Joo (The Princess' Man, The partner)
3. Kim Young Hyun (Dae Jang Geum), Kim Young Hyun and Park Sang Yeon (H.I.T)
5. Park Kwan Gyu (Sangdo)

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Park kyung Soo since my Punch is there

and

Jung Yoon-jung for Arang..

and of course

Kim Eun Hee and Noh Hee-kyung

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Song Jae-jung and Park Hye-ryun are my favorites.

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My favorites are Kim Eun Sook and Park Ji Eun

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