Rating:
Average user rating 4.4
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Radiant Office: Episode 1

Radiant Office starts off exactly as I’d hoped, with equal parts humor and heart, and engaging characters that I fell in love with right from the beginning. It’s all about hope versus despair, and whether a disappointing life is even worth living. What starts out as the worst day ever for three strangers could very well change their lives for the better, if only they can find the strength to dream, even when life seems to have forgotten them.

 
EPISODE 1 RECAP

A young woman in a chicken delivery helmet pulls a truck up to the front door on an office building. She screams, “I’ll destroy you!” then drives the truck through the glass front of the building and into the lobby.

Employees scatter as she steps out of the truck and begins spraying them with a fire extinguisher. Girlfriend is maaad. Suddenly, she drops to her knees and starts to angry-cry, wailing, “Why did you to that to me?”

A few days earlier.

That same girl, EUN HO-WON (Go Ah-sung), now dressed in a skirt suit and heels, sticks a talisman to a sculpture outside the headquarters of Dongki Foods. She caresses the sculpture and tells it that she loves it, then heads inside. She’s cautiously optimistic, having made it to their final round of job interviews.

Ho-won’s nerves start to show themselves during her interview, where she starts off on the wrong foot by almost answering a question meant for another applicant. Her confidence nosedives as the other candidates rattle off long lists of experience and accomplishments.

After ten minutes without a single question directed to her, Ho-won is finally asked about her good grades in school. But one manager, who we’ll come to know as SEO WOO-JIN (Ha Suk-jin), points out dryly that good grades is all she has going for her.

She’s asked what she’s been doing in the three years since graduating college. Ho-won admits that she’s been job-seeking, and has been rejected ninety-nine times. She recalls a video she saw about how to succeed in an interview, then does her best to spin her many part-time job experiences into assets.

Woo-jin actually laughs when she mentions leadership, wondering why a new hire would need to be a leader. He asks why they should hire Ho-won when her job history doesn’t show her to have any of the qualities they’re looking for in an employee.

Ho-won doesn’t give up, adding that her part-time jobs taught her perseverance, as we see her being flogged with a roll of kimbap by a previous employer. She gains momentum and says that she has great anger management skills and an ability to handle any customer complaints.

Woo-jin tells her to prove it, which is how Ho-won finds herself standing in the corner while they conduct the rest of their interviews. Round after round of interviewees cycle in and out, while Ho-won stands there, her feet throbbing in her heels. At one point, one of the interviewers tries to take pity on her and let her go, but when Woo-jin grumbles that she can always quit if she can’t hack it, Ho-won grows even more determined.

Her mind goes wild, though, imagining herself in fencing gear, brandishing a foil at Woo-jin. She pokes at his papers and items on his desk while he studiously ignores her, ha.

Woo-jin grows even grouchier as the day goes on, and when one candidate talks about working hard for their company, he gripes that he’s growing bored with these repetitive answers. He tells the candidate to impress him with something original, but the man stands and angrily says not to hire him.

He points to Ho-won in the corner and asks if that’s original. He reminds Woo-jin that he may be a job candidate right now, but once he walks out of the room, he’s a potential consumer of their products. Woo-jin just waves him out of the room.

That’s the end of the interviews, and one of the other managers tells Ho-won that he’s impressed by her patience and determination. The third manager says that he thinks she’d do well working for them. Woo-jin leaves the room without addressing Ho-won, but she’s so thrilled by the compliments that she doesn’t even care.

She practically floats through her waitressing shift that afternoon, and she calls her younger brother during a break to tell him that she thinks she landed the job. It seems to make him nervous when she asks about their mom, and he quickly changes the subject.

Ho-won promises to send some money to help pay back some loan once she gets this job, then they hang up. We see that her brother is at the hospital to meet with a doctor — about their mother, maybe?

Back at Dongki Foods, it appears as though Woo-jin carries that nasty attitude everywhere he goes. When a fellow manager asks permission to hire a certain unqualified candidate, pointing out that he’s the grandson of a government minister, Woo-jin complains about the rampant nepotism infecting the company and refuses the request.

Ho-won goes home that night to the rooftop apartment she shares with her roommate, LEE HYO-RI. Hyo-ri demands Ho-won’s portion of the rent, but Ho-won adorably wheedles for a week-long extension, saying that she just learned her mother is in the hospital.

Later Ho-won’s aunt calls to pressure her to call her mother, but Ho-won argues that they aren’t on good terms right now because she doesn’t have a steady job.

Woo-jin carries a box of his personal items out to his car that evening, complaining that the company values connections over ability. Uh-oh, was he fired, or did he quit? He makes a call, but all we hear is Woo-jin asking the other person if it’s been three months yet.

That weekend, Ho-won works another temporary job, which involves wearing an ill-fitting uniform and greeting people on the sidewalk. It looks utterly mind-numbing. An unseen supervisor barks orders at her through a headset, telling her to smile bigger. When she’s momentarily distracted by a couple crossing the street, she’s called inside to be disciplined.

As the supervisor rails at her, Ho-won’s mind wanders back to her interview, and she can’t hide her smile. That makes the supervisor yell even more, and Ho-won fantasizes a miniature version of herself on his desk, dancing around and singing a silly little song.

We join the couple that distracted Ho-won just as the girl, HA JI-NA (Han Sun-hwa) is breaking up with the guy, DO KI-TAEK (Lee Dong-hwi). At first Ki-taek thinks that Ji-na is only mad at him for something, but she’s dead serious about ending things.

She complains that he only works part-time jobs and can never afford to buy her nice gifts or take her out for a nice meal, and that she worries that she’s throwing away her future by dating him. Ki-taek has been studying for the civil service exam but has been unable to pass, so he promises to give that up and get a job.

Ji-na scoffs that it’s not as simple as that, and she walks away from him. Ki-taek follows her to give her his scarf, worried that she’ll catch a cold, but she rips it off and shoves it back at him.

The following day, Ho-won joins two of her friends for lunch, celebrating one of them getting a job. Ho-won says that she should have some good news herself soon.

One friend pours Ho-won a drink, saying that it’s consolation for not being hired at Dongki Foods. Ho-won goes still and asks what she means, and learns that they’ve announced the final hires… and she isn’t on the list.

She chugs an entire bottle of soju before driving away on her chicken delivery scooter, crying with anger and disappointment. She pulls over at one point to check her messages, and finds a rejection notice. Rage builds up inside her as she thinks about the humiliation she went through at her interview.

She heads toward the Dongki Foods building with all of Woo-jin’s hurtful comments ringing in her ears. Thankfully, the scene where she drives through the front of the building turns out to be just another fantasy — in reality, Ho-won just putters up to the door on her scooter and falls over. Oh, how embarrassing.

Ho-won pretends to be delivering chicken to Woo-jin in an attempt to talk to him. As she waits for the elevator, she overhears two employees talking about how Woo-jin quit to take another job, speculating that he won’t last long there with his bad attitude. Ho-won feels even worse as she wonders why she wasn’t hired when the other two managers liked her, especially if Woo-jin wasn’t planning on sticking around anyway.

Ki-taek sits in his goshiwon room, drunk-dialing Ji-na to beg her to take him back. She refuses to reconsider her decision and hangs up on him. Ugh, she’s already on a date with a new guy.

Heartbroken, Ki-taek cries and takes some kind of pill. Then he grabs the bottle and swallows the rest of the pills, washing them down with soju. That’s not good at all.

Ho-won is also drinking heavily as she walks along a bridge over the Han River. She thinks about how she’s now been rejected one hundred times for good jobs, and what she takes away from the experience is, “You’re doomed.” She hollers out over the water as if she’s yelling at Woo-jin, asking why he rejected her.

As for Woo-jin, he isn’t giving Ho-won one single thought as he decides to clean out his kitchen. He throws away mountains of prepackaged meals before moving on to his refrigerator, where he tosses out everything made by Dongki Foods.

Ho-won stands on the bridge railing (which is sadly plastered with anti-suicidal notes), wondering why she worked so hard in school if she can’t land a single job. She gets a call from the convenience store manager where she works, asking why she’s late for her shift, and she yells that she’s not coming in. She screams that he didn’t even pay her for her overtime last week, and in her emotional state, she loses her balance and goes tumbling off the railing and into the river.

Ho-won opens her eyes underwater to see her cell phone floating in front of her face. She watches it light up with a text, and reads the word “Congratulations.” She passes out, but thank goodness, she’s rescued and rushed to the hospital.

As the doctors work to revive Ho-won, she relives a memory of herself as a teenager running to her father’s hospital room to tell him some good news. But she finds her mother crying by his bedside, her father having passed away just moments earlier. Ho-won has to tell his still body that she got into college.

Her perspective shifts, and now she’s in her rooftop room. She finds a sticky note reminding herself to apply at Dongki Foods, and slowly rips it to pieces.

Woo-jin meets with his headhunter, who gives him information on the only company left that lives up to his high standards for employers. She warns him that he has a terrible reputation due to changing jobs so frequently, and that only his experience keeps getting him hired. He brushes off her concerns and takes the job.

The doctors successfully revive Ho-won, but the moment she wakes up and remembers the last few days, she starts to cry again. She freezes when she overhears the doctors talking about someone’s test results, which indicate a late-stage terminal illness. The doctor wonders if this is why the patient tried to kill themselves, since they have less than six months to live.

Naturally, Ho-won assumes they’re talking about her, and she peeks out of the curtains around her bed to see if anyone is there. All she sees is the patient in the bed next to hers, also looking shocked — it’s Ki-taek. Then a third patient peers out from behind his curtains, with the exact same alarmed expression on his face as Ho-won and Ki-taek.

A man is brought to the bed next to Ho-won, but the doctors can’t save this one, and he dies with his family right there watching. It’s a horrible thing to witness, and it brings back Ho-won’s sorrow from her own father’s death.

She realizes that she has no money to pay the hospital bill, so she decides to skip out. She pulls out her IV (ouch!) and crouches on the floor beside her bed, trying to avoid the nurse.

HAHA, Ki-taek lands on the floor on the other side, apparently having had the same idea. He and Ho-won communicate their intentions through silent gestures, then the moment the nurse turns away, they make a break for it. Ki-taek does a pretty great job as lookout, and he safely navigates himself and Ho-won past the bustling nurses’ station.

There’s a bit of a hitch when they nearly run smack into their doctor, but Ho-won jumps into a wheelchair, covers her face with her hair, and Ki-taek wheels her behind the doctor’s back and out the hospital doors. They ditch the wheelchair and run until they’re out of breath.

Ho-won surprises Ki-taek by getting the nervous giggles, and she says this day feels like a dream. He agrees that he wishes it were a dream, and gives her a tiny smile in return. A voice calls out to them, and they turn to see the third guy from the hospital, who apparently followed them out. We’ll come to know him as JANG KANG-HO (Hoya).

The three sit together on a park bench, looking like the saddest sacks who ever lived. Ho-won starts to cry, moaning about racking up a hospital bill when she wasn’t really trying to kill herself. Ki-taek asks if that’s why she was at the hospital, and Kang-ho suddenly perks up in surprise. All three of them realize that they were there after (allegedly) attempting suicide, so the patient with the terminal illness could be any one of them.

Kang-ho tells the others why he tried to end things — he has a horrible overbearing mother who berates him for not getting a job yet, blaming his quiet voice and meek demeanor. The three wonder how they can find out which of them is sick when they can’t go back to the hospital, having just dodged their bills.

Ho-won decides that actually, she’d rather not know, because what’s the point? She says that dying is inevitable whether or not you see it coming, so she thinks it’s better to just let it happen when it happens.

The three find themselves on the bridge together, having decided to try suicide again. Ki-taek takes out his phone to record a tearful goodbye message to his parents, and Kang-ho says that he already left a note. Ho-won borrows Ki-taek’s phone to record her own message, though she steps away so that the boys can’t hear what she’s saying. Kang-ho says that it feels good not to be alone, and asks permission to call Ki-taek “hyung.”

Ho-won finishes her message, then leans over the railing to yell her dissatisfaction to the universe: “What did I do that was so wrong? Do you think I wanted to be born poor? Do you think I want to be jobless?” Ki-taek and Kang-ho get swept up in the drama of the moment and join her, screaming their hearts out about the unfairness of life.

Woo-jin heads to the gym, not a care in the world. On the news is a report about three young people who are trying to throw themselves into the Han River at this very moment, and the camera cuts to our three sad sacks, fending off the reporters and rescue workers who are trying to prevent them from jumping.

Ki-taek distracts the reporters, and the three take off running. Woo-jin watches the spectacle on television and sighs that they only think they have hard lives.

After a busy night of failing to commit suicide twice, Ho-won, Ki-taek, and Kang-ho find a restaurant to calm their rumbling stomachs. They only have enough money for one bowl of rice and an order of stew to share. The restaurant owner comes over to fuss at them for not adding the baby octopus to the stew in time, and does it herself.

The three sadly watch the poor creature writhe in the boiling stew, and the restaurant owner takes pity on them and brings them each some rice. She tells them that everyone feels like dying at times, but that there’s really not much to life in the long run.

She realizes that Ho-won isn’t wearing shoes and kicks off her own to give to him. This unexpected kindness makes the three feel even worse, and they choke back sobs as they eat the food gratefully.

The doctor who was treating them in the emergency room, whose name is SEO HYUN (Kim Dong-wook), is mostly just amused when he realizes that all three of his attempted-suicide patients ran out on their bills. He then talks to his father on the phone, who seems to be comparing him to his brother, and sighs that he went to medical school to avoid this sort of competition.

The following morning, Ho-won informs her roommate Hyo-ri that she’s moving out because she can’t afford the rent. Instead, she gives Hyo-ri her laptop, asking her to hold it until she can scrape together the money to repay what she owes her.

She asks if she can check her email one last time since she lost her phone in the river. Ho-won gapes to find a message from another company she applied to, notifying her that she passed the initial screening.

She slams shut her laptop, telling herself that one hundred attempts is enough. But she finds herself at the interview anyway, hoping beyond hope that this time she’ll get lucky. She’s surprised to see Kang-ho there too, and they move to the hallway to talk privately.

Kang-ho asks if Ho-won has been back to the hospital, worried about the one-third chance that he may be dying. Ho-won says she hasn’t, then admits that she came to this interview even though it could be her last.

Kang-ho reveals that there was a huge scandal last year within this company regarding unfair recruitment, so this year they passed everyone who applied. Ho-won says that she thought it was strange that she passed the screening when she almost never does.

Kang-ho tells her that those who have already been interviewed report that the interviewers are really mean, criticizing every tiny thing about the applicants and humiliating those who are under-qualified. This sounds awfully familiar to Ho-won, and she starts to look very worried.

Her fears are confirmed when a man walks down the hall towards them, and Ho-won recognizes him as Seo Woo-jin, the man who destroyed her at her last interview. She ducks as he passes her, but she can’t resist turning back to look at him, only to find him staring right back at her.

 
COMMENTS

I think that Radiant Office is starting out strong — this premiere episode did a great job introducing its characters, setting up each person’s primary conflict and reasons for feeling hopeless about their lives without feeling rushed or confusing in the least. I am so emotionally invested in the trio of misfits already, I can hardly stand it. The chemistry between the three actors is wonderful, and their shared experience of wanting to just end it all, though for different reasons, makes them sympathetic in a way that had me rooting for them immediately. I was concerned that having three of our primary characters suffering from suicidal thoughts would be depressing, but instead they’re just so achingly pitiful that I want to wrap them in a blankie and hug them until it’s all better.

All three — Ho-won, Ki-taek, and Kang-ho — are sensitive souls, which can be a strong asset when things are going well, but it’s no surprise that societal and familial pressure has sent all three of them spiraling into despair, feeling that they have no other way out but death. They’re emotionally vulnerable, though in different ways, judging by the tiny clues we got about each of them. I’m eager to learn more about them, and I’m going to really enjoy watching these three oddballs learn to rise above their lowest moment, when they felt so worthless that they wanted to die, to eventually helping each other find their strength and self-worth.

On the flip side of the personality coin, Ha Suk-jin is pretty much reprising every role I’ve seen him in — the cold, cruel jerk who is really a nice guy deep down inside, if only he could meet the right woman to draw him out of himself. It’s nothing new for him, but luckily he’s very good at this kind of character, and I do always warm up to him once his character starts to relax and open up. We don’t know much about Woo-jin at this point other than that he’s overly critical of others, and that he appreciates hard work and experience over connections. He respects workers who bring something new and fresh to the table, so it should be fun to see him interacting with Ho-won and her two quirky cohorts once they’re all working together in the same company.

I’m pleasantly surprised that the central premise of Radiant Office isn’t exactly what we were led to believe — all of the promos made it sound as if it’s Go Ah-sung’s character who is dying, but I like this setup much better. All three of the hapless losers overheard that someone was diagnosed with a terminal illness, but none of them knows which one of them is sick, only that there’s a 33% chance it’s them. When I go into a show aware that a character is dying, it colors my perception of them, and everything they do is tinged with the futility of knowing they will die no matter what. But it takes a little bit of the darkness out of the story when the terminal person is a mystery, and at least for me, that will allow me to relax and enjoy their office hijinks without the specter of certain death hanging over one of them.

Of course, we do know that one of them will die (assuming the show doesn’t pull a switcheroo where it turns out that the doctors were discussing someone who wasn’t even in the room at the time). But for the characters themselves, the uncertainty of not knowing exactly who it is will allow each of them to examine their lives, and look at how they got to the point of despairing that living wasn’t worth it, and how they can change and make their possible last months in this world count. I’m hoping this will be a story about the three of them living life for the present and not worrying too much about their futures, finding the joy in simply being alive. Because terminal illness or not, you really never know how much time you have left, so you may as well make the best of it.

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But I don't want any of these three to die! I'm impressed with the first ep, really hope it keeps it up.

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As usual, I don't like Ha Seok Jin, he always act boringly and he's not attractive despite of his nice face features.
But, I love to watch this movie because Go Ah Sung, Lee Dong Hwi, and Hoya are such talented actors, and attractive on their own way.
Unfortunately, it has the same schedule as Chief Kim.

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Such a delight to see Lee Dong Hwi back on small screen. Dong Ryong ah I did not know I missed you this much until I saw you on screen again.
The loser trio chemistry is wonderful from 1st ep...cant wait for more funny moments.

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I love the trio as well. I hope it will stay as friendship until the end.

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If neither of them dies

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Well that was a strong start and i like it

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Yes! I love this trio!

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Woo-Jin seems to have it all: strong background, good career where he can easily move to a new job, big ego -- however, he also seems to be a bit of an oddball. He holds high standards and won't compromise. It would be interesting if he find that his own "place" is with the three misfits that he discounts. I am looking forward to seeing how the characters change and grow as the series moves forward.

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I agree. He is a bit of a perfectionist, but I actually get his frustrations over good job applicants losing out to those with connections. He's certainly not "premium trash" level jerk as in Let's Drink.

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The female is a strong character. Thats what I like. The friendship remind me of R88. Friendship is important and beautiful but we dont see that much on drama.

I wish MBC can change the timeslot. The rating has been low for quite sometimes even though the dramas are good. We wont see vast rating increase for RO but i hope it increase over time, even a little

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I believe, it will have better chance after Chief Kim finishes its run in few weeks. This drama so far has the elements that viewers will watch.

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plus she's super pretty, the prettiest in this world. she'll win 100 miss universe titles in a row if she want.

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lol. she is quite cute though.

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I believe @Seranom obviously made a sarcastic comment. There is/are (not sure same person who are using different names or not) who keeps appearing insulting Go Ah Sung's face -saying her face is ugly etc.Anyway, if I am wrong, here is my advance apology.

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Sera, you are not alone.

I am still very curious why GAS attracts such comments. I was surprised to read similar remarks elsewhere. I can't see why anyone would call her ugly except perhaps that she does not have the traditional or coveted Korean standard of beauty. Or put it another way, she looks different from the "After" pictures of Korean girls in plastic surgery ads. To me, that's a compliment, not an insult. She has got a very unique and totally refreshing look. And she's nowhere ugly at all.

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+++++10000000!

Go Ah Sung is wonderfully refreshing to see on my screen.

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I'm trying to be objective here. Someone said that Seohyeon of SNSD is not beautiful, just because she can't act

dramabeans.com/2017/03/snsds-seohyun-lands-lead-role-in-weekend-drama-thief-nom-thief-nim/#comment-2743329

and someone said that Go A-seong is pretty because she can act.

This is wrong from my perspective. I could say that Go A-seong is not ugly, but to say she's pretty, sorry, I can't.

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i'm quite excited for this show. i like our trio so far. i don't recall actually ever watching ha suk jin in anything but i will take lollypip's word that he grows on you. my week is nearly full of dramas. woohoo!!

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Thanks Lollypip for the recap!

I am trying to control my excitement here. Ratings be damn but I love the first episode!

I wasn't expecting too much from this drama except that I like Ha Suk Jin and Go Ah Sung. My biggest bugbear was the terminal illness trope. Boy am I glad that got an absolutely interesting spin. Lollypip, I so agree that I know a character is dying, it changes my perception of him/her and I just can't shake off the knowledge of impending death.

I didn't expect to like the Desperados so much that I already cannot stand the thought of any of them dying. The show did a great job of getting me vested with the characters this early. Hey, I even felt sorry for the octopus! I know it's a delicacy but I just can't imagine eating them alive :( That aside, I appreciated how the ahjumma showed kindness to them. Sometimes it's acts like this which make the difference.

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I almost didn't give this a try because of the terminal illness aspect, but I'm glad there's a spin on it. Much more interesting although I don't want any of the three to be terminal.

I already like Ho-won, Ki-taek, and Kang-ho. They make me want to watch Episode 2 so good job there.

Nothing new with Ha Suk-jin's character. I've never warmed up to him or the type of characters he tends to play.

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Ha suk jin's character seems to be consistent in every drama that he is in - a non smiling successful person and someone who takes life seriously all the time.

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yes, I've watched Drinking Solo and really struggled to continue watching the show because of him.
I don't find him attractive or charming. He fits to the role with his annoying expression but when he starts to act nice I still feel annoyed and can't understand why the female character might fall for him. He's so plain

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I wanted to talk here about how much I liked the first episode, but I found this:

[link removed]

Do you guys know about this or am I overreacting?!

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Yep. I hate them :( but there are too many copycat sites. Can't fight them all.

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That's not on. I'm so sick of people impersonating others. Whoever made that is probably jealous of the fantastic staff and community there is here.

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Yayee! New favourite show. I hadn't even planned to watch this one. Just clicked on the episode on a whim, and am delighted to meet the trio.

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I started off not liking this show at all, but stuck through this episode probably because I'm a Ha Suk Jin fan. For one, I guess I didn't like how the comedy was inserted at times. Like everyone else, I'm a bit disappointed in Suk Jin for typecasting himself--or being typecast--and hope he is able to bring something new with the role. The premise seems hackneyed and that could be a problem for me since I'm really yearning for dramas that scream different these days. That being said, I like that the show gave us a bit of a twist with the introduction of the two other listless souls who have been beaten down by their own issues, and there is a one in three chance that our lead has the illness. The latter part is a bit annoying and cool at the same time because it could go the way of the typical drama cup out when she doesn't have it, but could be good if she does and her life actually had an impact on the others. I also like that the female lead could actually have a meaningful rebound in here life if they play the story right. I appreciate that many of the characters look like your average person which helps make the emotional aspect more relatable. Here's to hoping that this turns out well. Suk Jin, fighting!

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redfox watching an office drama. I didnt think this day would come.

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So do you like it? I'm having a blast with Chief Kim, which was particularly fun this week... I may start this one too since even redfox is watching it. ;)

Actually, I recently watched Reply 1988 and the prospect of seeing Dong Ryung at the centre of a friendship group again is very very tempting. Will keep an eye on recaps before taking the plunge. I don't want to be Hwaranged again.

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I did like the 1st episode, haven´t found the time for the 2nd yet. I have watched bits of Chief Kim, maybe my mom would be more into it (she is an accountant)

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I'm just wondering how does Lollypip manages so many recaps!!

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IKR

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Lots and lots of coffee :)

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Thank God for coffee then. This drama deserves watching, commentary n discussion. Another underdog drama fr MBC

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Agreed. I need to talk about episode 2 now!

I so hope this get's good ratings and if not, the buzz picks up about it.

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Yes! I really like ep 2. Ratings aren't looking good though.

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Chief Kim is become more and more interesting.
Despite of this drama's (also) interesting story, I don't think this drama's rating would be raised significantly before Chief Kim is ended

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By the way...you guys forgot to tag Go Ah Sung;)

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Loved the first Ep, love our lead and trio. I never warmed to the lead in drinking solo but did like him in 1% of anything. This character seems more like a rehash of Drinking Solo. Don't like DongRyongs ex. At all.

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If Ho-Won still wants to kill herself she doesn't need to bother with any bridges or rivers. Just keep chugging soju bottles and riding around on that scooter and it will get taken care of.

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oh i like it. I like it a lot. To be honest I'm not planning on watching it, but the first episode was different from how I expected. So I'll be testing the waters and watch the first episode ^^

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Thank you so much for recapping this! I'm not even planning to watch this but I'm curious to see Hoya and Lee Dong Hwi and ends up checking up the pilot. What a strong first episode! Go Ah Sung is so lovable and relatable, and the script was nice. I really love the seafood restaurant scene. I hope the rating gets better though

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Are Seo Hyun and Woo-jin brothers??

And I hope none of the characters has the terminal illness and that the doctors were talking about some other patient.

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Hi junny, you watching this?

I certainly hope Seo Hyun and Woo Jin aren't brothers otherwise it's Drinking Solo v2. They do share the same family name but Seo Hyun goes by single name whereas Woo Jin's not. Not sure if Koreans name siblings with the same middle name especially if they are of the same sex.

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Hi ET,
Not watching yet, just reading recaps to get a feel of the story.

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Its the same role over and over again for the Ha Suk Jin..

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OMG it's the guy from coffee prince!!! I've been thinking for solid half an hour where I've seen his face.. He looks handsome ?

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I thought it was pretty standard k-drama fare until half way through the first episode when she's in the hospital. The minute the three slap eyes on each other in the ER the show got much more interesting. I don't think anyone of the three is terminal. During the great hospital escape, you can see the two nurses talking in the back ground. One nurse is showing something to the other nurse saying, "I don't think this is right" or something like that. I think some paperwork got messed up. This drama is on the comedic side for someone to actually die.

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I don't think any of one of them is ill.

Anyhow, enjoying this so far. It's a bit wacky in the comedy (Ho-won's imagination), but combined with the much darker undertone that actually works for me. In fact, I really like the darker undertone so far, because really the drama is tackling some serious, real issues in South Korea that very much need tackling. (Side note: Vice recently had 13 minute video feature on the river rescue team: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5jYBWBlEd0U.)

Loving Go Ah Sung. Wonderfully refreshing to see her on my screen and to see an actress that can act.

No impression on Ha Suk-jin yet. It's indeed like every role he's played (although I don't think I made it through any of his other dramas? Sorry, but I found his character in 1% creepy, not romantic.)

I'm glad Ji-na dumped Ki-take, because he deserves someone who loves and believes in him just for who he is. Ji-na, just go marry a sparkly wallet if that's what makes you happy.

Anyhow, fingers crossed this show will continue to deliver.

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just go marry a sparkly wallet if that’s what makes you happy.

LOL! Thanks for the laugh.

I wasn't much into Lee Dong Hwi but I am loving his Ki Taek here. When he passed his jacket to Ho Won, I was moved that he could care for others in spite of the situation.

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Thanks Lollypip for the recap. If there will ever be an award for the recapper of the month or the year, it will be awesome if our Lollypip will be the first recipient.

It's been a while since a show that is fun, heartfelt and relatable comes around. Hope to see more bonding moments between those three friends.

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I was looking for something new to watch after Voice and Introverted Boss ended and saw this. The premise is nothing new and so I decided to watch the first 10 minutes just to see if I'd like it. I ended up watching the whole episode and I'm itching to finish work and watch the second one.

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First episode was boring for me, second was better tho. Can't wait for more plot development. Ha suk jin is yummy but he barely on screen ?

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I'm so excited that Hoya's back in dramas! He's such a talented actor I still have to watch it so I didn't read the recap yet but I'm happy everyone's saying good things! So excited to watch this

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