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Criminal Minds: Episode 8

There’s an age-old question about why good people do bad things, but maybe the question we should really be asking is “What does power to do people?” Perhaps the most important qualifiers in questions of good and evil are strength and weakness: Does goodness rise from strength, and evil from weakness? Do we all have the capacity to become monsters, given the wrong combination of circumstances?

 
EPISODE 8 RECAP

On the NCI bus, Ki-hyung discusses the shooter’s motive with Min-young and Han, and they parse it as an emotion-driven crime. Ki-hyung wonders aloud what triggered it.

On an empty road, the shooter stows his shotgun in his trunk just as he gets an angry call from his manager. He apologizes to him nervously, but is even more rattled as a squad of police cars tears by, sirens blaring. Once they pass, he howls in rage and frustration, kicking at his car repeatedly.

On their way to meet the rest of the team, Hyun-joon speculates to Sun-woo that rage must be the reason for the shootings, but Sun-woo argues that it might not be as simple as road-rage, given how the second shooting was clearly premeditated.

Ki-hyung’s group deduces their suspect to be a middle-aged man in an emotionally demanding job. Since he used such a powerful weapon, Han theorizes that he would be timid and fearful in real life, used to suppressing his feelings.

We rejoin the shooter, whose name is Jang Ki-tae (Jo Han-chul), taking lunch alone at his desk at work. Ki-hyung’s voice provides an accompanying voiceover as he describes the suspect’s low self-esteem and weak personality that can’t stand up to others. Exactly as Ki-hyung said, Jang Ki-tae is bullied by co-workers and then by clients, one of whom even shoves him aside.

On Min-young’s suggestion, Ki-hyung requests a list of men in their 40s and 50s who’ve received mental health treatment within the local area. As they arrive at the police station, they’re met by a Chief Detective Lee, who takes the trio to the shooting case’s incident room.

The detective is dismayed that Ki-hyung intends to set up there, too, but Ki-hyung assures him that he wants to cooperate on a joint investigation and requests his help.

Together, the detectives and profilers go over the case. The profilers think the first case was unplanned, meaning that the car the shooter was driving then was his own car.

Hyun-joon urges Ki-hyung to announce the profile to the public, worried that the shooter will kill again, but Ki-hyung vetoes it, saying that it would provoke him more. His answer frustrates Hyun-joon.

They hear that the first victim has regained consciousness, and Sun-woo and Hyun-joon go to question her. She can’t remember much, but recalls passing Jang’s car, and how she snapped at him.

Hyun-joon asks what he said to her, but she replies regretfully that she didn’t let him get a word in, explaining that driving always made her edgy.

The victim’s story confirms to Sun-woo and Hyun-joon that the first shooting was indeed impulsive, when the shooter felt pushed over the edge. It dawns on them that the second shooting deliberately re-created the pattern of the first—which means he may well be looking for his next target already.

In his garage, shooter Jang Ki-tae broods over a photo of himself with a little girl. Pumping his sawn-off shotgun, he presses it against his throat. But a child’s singing, coming from his phone, makes him drop it. Choking on tears, he clutches the phone instead, where the wallpaper is the same girl. Overcome by emotion, he smashes his head on the table repeatedly.

Remembering how his wife sneered about him, his daughter ignored him, and his manager yelled at him, his face darkens. When he emerges from the house later, he’s transformed his look entirely, wearing a metal-studded leather jacket with his hair slicked back.

At the same time, Nana’s driving to the crime scene. Oh nooo! She (accidentally) cuts in front of another car, which begins to tailgate and flash its lights at her. But she’s terrified when it draws up alongside her, with Jang peering over at her. He cuts in front of her repeatedly, and she brakes hard. His car goes on ahead, and she sends an SOS to her team.

Just as she thinks she’s out of harm’s way, the car returns, aiming straight for her. Images of the last victim flash through her mind, as a man emerges from the car brandishing a golf-club—but it’s not Jang. What. Leaping onto the hood, the man smashes in her windshield while Nana sobs in terror.

A crowd has gathered by the time the NCI team arrives, and Hyun-joon drops the attacker on the ground with a vicious kick. He places him under arrest for attempted murder, while the rest of the team comforts Nana.

In an empty road elsewhere, Jang pulls up alongside a woman’s car, keeping abreast of her even as she tries to get away from him. She screams when she sees the gun he aims at her through his window. He shoots and drives off, but luckily, the bullet only gets her in the arm, and she’s able to reach for her phone.

Oh noooo! Jang circles back, and now on foot, he approaches her from behind, gun hidden at his back. He initially pretends to be a good Samaritan and offers to call emergency, but then his face twists into a dark grin and he pulls out his gun. He shoots her twice at point-blank range, and her blood sprays across his face. He shoots out the black-box camera, too, before fleeing.

Once home, he stares at his blood-spattered reflection in the mirror, and smashes the offending glass. His fractured reflection now stares back, and he meets it with a deranged smile.

Ki-hyung and the team escort Nana back together. She passes over the list of men that Ki-hyung had asked for earlier, but they’re diverted as they get word of the latest shooting.

It’s morning when they arrive at the scene. On seeing the dead woman, Ki-hyung thinks back to Hyun-joon’s warning about the shooter killing again.

“If we’d moved just a little faster, this woman would have lived,” Hyun-joon says now, but Sun-woo counters that the profile wasn’t complete. Hyun-joon replies fiercely that it’s more important to save lives. It’s becoming a recurring argument between them, and as usual it’s Sun-woo who drops the subject first.

Ki-hyung leaves without a word, and is immediately surrounded by reporters. He says nothing to them either, and Hyun-joon watches him go.

Shooter Jang surprises his colleagues by turning up at a posh work dinner, looking transformed: He’s dressed sharply and carries himself with confidence, and his co-workers note the difference. In the bathroom, one colleague praises Jang’s improved performance at work. But then another colleague emerges from a stall and mocks Jang for being no more than a pawn.

Taking off his glasses, Jang follows his colleague out and seizes him by the throat. “If I’m a pawn, what are you?” Jang asks, advancing on him with his gun. Whoa, that escalated quickly.

He orders the man to deliver a project proposal to him by the next day, “Before I kill you.” Crushing the man’s hand beneath his shoe, Jang gives a demented little laugh at seeing him cower.

In bed that night, he leans over his sleeping wife and draws his thumb across her neck, as if imagining killing her. Moving to her forehead, he pulls the trigger of an imaginary gun. Well this isn’t creepy at all.

Quietly, he goes to his daughter’s empty bedroom. He hunches on a child-size rocking horse, while a photo of that same little girl from before looks back at him. He returns to his garage and soothes himself by cradling his shotgun.

Hyun-joon studies maps of the shoot locations with Nana. He notices that they all took place near temporary merging lanes in road construction zones, and takes his findings to the rest of the team. Ki-hyung guesses that the shooter must have continuously haunted those roads in search of his next victims.

Hyun-joon is sure that there must be a witness among the construction crew, and the next day, he and Sun-woo go out to meet someone. The worker says he noticed someone dressed like a thug but driving carefully, which he found weird. Sun-woo sees it as a sign that the shooter is losing his grasp on reality and has begun a roleplay.

The worker also says that he saw the driver put out an arm across the passenger seat, as if to protect his passenger—except the seat was empty.

They deduce that the shooter must have a wife and child, and Sun-woo reports their findings to Ki-hyung, who is concerned he’ll act out his delusions on real people, putting the shooter’s family at most risk.

The joint investigative team convenes at the NCI for a profiling session. Taking into account the shooter’s ultra-macho attire and aggressive actions, and his choices of female victims, Ki-hyung concludes that the shooter is suffering a crisis of masculinity, which would have been triggered by some severe trauma.

They share the shooter profile with the police, describing a meek, middle-aged man who is looked down on by his family. He has multiple cars and knows the vicinity of the crime scenes well.

Ki-hyung also guesses that he might be so far gone that he can no longer function in his everyday life, making him dangerous to anyone around him. They set up a trap near a construction zone to catch him, with checkpoints to filter the traffic through, and put it under covert surveillance.

The next day, Jang Ki-tae takes lunch alone at his desk again. This time, we pan to a photo of him with his family… and he had two daughters? Okay, now it all makes sense. He relives his last shooting, but snaps back to reality at his manager’s arrival.

His manager congratulates him on his recent performance, and thanks him for overcoming his hardships. He asks Jang to let go of any hard feelings towards him, but Jang remembers the abuse he suffered from him. Once he leaves, Jang looks unnervingly after him.

Min-young gives a press conference detailing their profile on the shooter. It plays on TV at Jang’s workplace, where he walks in on his colleagues watching it. Finding it alarmingly accurate, he’s gripped by panic and flees, shoving his manager aside in the process.

In the NCI situation room, Nana tells the team that she came up with a result when she cross-referenced black sedan owners in the area with illegal gun purchases, but they’re surprised to learn it’s a woman.

They’re about to ask about a spouse when Han announces he’s found the suspect, thanks to a tip-off from the shooter’s colleagues. “Jang Ki-tae,” Nana confirms. Hyun-joon tears off, and Ki-hyung asks Nana if there’s anything notable regarding Jang’s family. She tells him Jang had a daughter named Ji-soo…

Jang drives furiously, and the scene melts into the past, where Jang was driving with his little daughter Ji-soo in the back. But the car broke down, and while he was under the hood, Ji-soo had dropped a stuffed toy out the window.

Letting herself out, she ran across the road to retrieve it—straight into the path of an oncoming car.

Though Jang rushed her to the hospital, Ji-soo couldn’t be saved. Jang had sunk into a stupor while his wife argued about not receiving the insurance payout. Back in the present, Jang pounds his steering wheel in frustration, looking ever more unbalanced.

At headquarters, the profilers add Ji-soo’s photo to the evidence board, and Han watches closely as Ki-hyung sadly reaches out to touch it.

Jang bursts into his house where his wife and older daughter are chatting cheerfully at the table. He draws his gun on them and they scream, Mom immediately shielding her daughter. He orders them to get out.

Back in his car, Jang is pursued by Hyun-joon and the police. Beside him, his wife yells at him to stop the car and his daughter pleads with him as well. His wife says they’ve been suffering too, especially watching him become increasingly strange, but Jang says bitterly that he’s as good as invisible to them.

He snarls that all she could think of when their child died was money. “Money is more important to you than our daughter,” he accuses. But his wife says tearfully that he was the one who ruined everything, and the words strike him deeply.

Meanwhile, Hyun-joon has gained on him, and Jang pulls out his gun and fires at him, sending Hyun-joon skidding away. In the car, the wife and daughter scream, and Jang nervously reassurse them.

Ki-hyung arrives at Jang’s house with Han and Min-young. It’s an absolute mess inside, and they hold their noses at the smell. Min-young finds something in one room, and Han in another. A body?

Hyun-joon recovers quickly and catches up to Jang again, and shouts at him to stop the car. But Jang instead takes his hands off the wheel, and his wife begs him not to do it. “It’s all over,” Jang says, smiling, as his car crashes into a barricade. It slides across the intersection on its side before finally skidding to a stop.

A body is taken away from Jang’s house—no, wait, two bodies. What? The profilers look on, Min-young especially disturbed, and Ki-hyung lays a comforting hand on her shoulder.

Jang kicks out the windshield of his upturned car, and emerges. Hyun-joon and the police surround him, and Hyun-joon orders them to hold fire, laying down his own gun.

Looking bewildered, Jang begs them to save his family, and Hyun-joon asks him to drop his gun first. The very sight of it in his hand spooks him, and he drops it like a hot potato.

When Jang turns back to the car, calling out to his daughter, Hyun-joon swoops in and apprehends him. In voiceover, we hear Ki-hyung say that the bodies recovered from his house had been dead twenty days.

Jang is frantic to save his family, and Hyun-joon looks at him with pity and tells him it’s already over. Jang lurches to the window, calling his daughter’s name… but the car is empty. Totally empty. What.

He staggers away and collapses against the wreck of the car, howling. The rest of the team arrives, and Hyun-joon signals everyone to leave Jang alone.

Fate is not satisfied with inflicting one calamity, narrates Ki-hyung, quoting Roman writer Publilius Syrus.

And now, for a change of pace: A couple takes their daughter Yuna to an amusement park, where the father leaves the ladies to watch some performers while he gets them cotton candy.

There’s a sudden commotion as a woman searches the crowd, yelling in distress for her lost child. Yuna’s mother’s attention is distracted by the crying woman, and she doesn’t notice her own child being taken. By the time she looks down to warn Yuna to stay close, she’s already gone.

She searches the crowd, but to no avail. Yuna’s father comes back and they go to the security office, the mom getting increasingly agitated. While Yuna’s disappearance is announced over the PA system, a detective asks if the mother saw anyone suspicious at the time, and the mom recalls how her attention was caught by the commotion the other woman made.

At that, another woman who’d been watching them since earlier steps forward and says she lost her child the same way—eight years ago. She looks haggard and her tone is desperate, but a uniformed officer bundles her out, scolding her for spouting the same old story and smelling of liquor. The distraught mother pleads with the detective to listen to her, even as she’s bodily hauled away. Yuna’s mom cries in fear for her daughter.

Ki-hyung arrives at a lavish restaurant where Chief Director Baek awaits him. Before his arrival, the chief had agreed over the phone to do something, and he now shows Ki-hyung Jang Ki-tae’s psychiatric evaluation. He points out that Jang had lost the ability to make rational judgments, adding that he went on to do truly terrible things.

A flashback shows us how Jang had walked in on his wife with his gun that very first night he’d shot a driver and she’d ignored him. He shot her in cold blood, contrasting sharply with his horror when the delusion broke. Ki-hyung asks why the chief is showing him it, and the chief hands over another envelope, revealing that Ki-hyung’s results aren’t that different.

He asks why Ki-hyung vetoed the public investigation that Hyun-joon had urged, and says that the higher-ups are concerned about his judgment. He tells Ki-hyung to leave the team, and take a break to convalesce.

Ki-hyung says he’s fine, but the chief confronts him about his visit to his old mentor in prison.

“Why don’t you realize that your personal feelings could throw your team into danger?” Baek asks. He instructs him to think carefully about what’s best for the team, and expects a sensible decision.

 
COMMENTS

I find the deeper we get into Criminal Minds’ world, the more unexpectedly rich it becomes. When I said a few weeks ago that I was looking forward to see how Ki-hyung’s tragedy would change him, this is not what I thought would happen. But it’s painfully realistic, watching Ki-hyung fall apart, and Jang Ki-tae really does hold up a fascinating mirror to Ki-hyung’s own mental condition. Jang is his cautionary tale, the proof of how deeply grief can destroy you and eat away your sanity until you lose your humanity. Becoming a monster, unable to distinguish the delusion from the reality, is only its natural endpoint. It was haunting to see Ki-hyung make that connection himself, and I felt like we were watching him slip a little deeper just from being exposed to Jang. But even though he says he’s fine, I don’t think he genuinely believes he is—there have been signs for the last few episodes that he’s quite aware that he’s not fine at all.

So is he holding himself together for the sake of team, because he doesn’t want to let them down, or for the sake of catching Reaper? I’m not a hundred percent sure. There’s some mixture of duty, perceived necessity, and also the desire for something more complicated than revenge, which includes closure for his wife’s death, an end to his fear for son Han-byul, and the need to remove Reaper from society.

I don’t think he feels that there’s any real justice to be had, anything that can make up for Hye-won’s death even a fraction, but until Reaper’s off the streets (or indeed, the mortal coil), there’s no way for Ki-hyung to continue life normally. Reaper’s made this very personal to him, and as long as he’s out there, Ki-hyung is trapped in stasis, with everything precious to him under imminent threat. I think the thought of losing more than Hye-won is killing him, and it’s under that crushing burden that he carries on—not because he wants to, but because he must.

Until now, I’ve liked how implicitly Sun-woo trusts in him, but I’m beginning to think her faith in him is at risk of being blind to his changed state of mind. She doesn’t seem to want to admit that he’s not infallible, and I understand her extreme loyalty. To her, he’s the father figure her real father doesn’t live up to, so she’s deeply emotionally invested in him, and perhaps like Ki-hyung himself, it affects her ability to be objective about whether or not he’s making the best calls right now. And that’s another reason why I think it’s been instructive for them all to see Jang Ki-tae in his final, pitiable state, because perhaps it’s a warning they all need, that the line between sanity and madness is not as wide as they think.

The last two cases have really been showcases for the criminals. I don’t know how it bears on the original series, but I find it an interesting format to center the eponymous “criminal minds.” I continue to enjoy how the show can trick me and then deliver a climax that leaves me gaping, as it did with the reveal of Jang Ki-tae’s delusion. It’s a really effective device for giving the viewer a taste of psychosis that’s as discomfiting to experience as it is compelling to watch. I was actually convinced that Reaper had a hand in this case, and was so sure that the body found in Jang’s house was Hyun-joon’s friend that the appearance of two bodies totally threw me and I didn’t realize what actually happened until the show spelled it out. (I told you I was dense!)

Actor Jo Han-chul has provided the most intriguing and complex villain in the show so far, with his character’s transformation from meek salaryman to macho gunman fueled by an explosive mix of grief, fear and rage. It also raises the interesting question of how the most timid of people become capable of the worst of crimes, and there was more than one point where I thought to myself, this is too dark for me. I think most disturbing of all was watching the light in Jang’s eyes change, as he starts to see the world with new eyes—a world where everyone is someone he can potentially kill. I even got the impression that killing people was in some ways his version of being cowardly, because it was pretty clear that the person he really wanted to kill was himself. But he killed others because killing himself was too hard. Which makes him a very strange kind of murderer—oddly relatable while simultaneously totally alien.

The one downside of highlighting the day players is that perhaps it comes at the expense of the main cast, who are relegated to the background as the criminal’s story takes prominence. So I do hope that as we go on, the cases won’t end up overshadowing our team. Though we haven’t spent nearly enough time with them, I really adore the little moments of tenderness they share, and how quick they are to comfort and support each other. Like the Han-Hyun-joon bromance? I cannot get enough of it. And I love how much Nana uncomplicatedly adores Hyun-joon while Min-young clearly has a crush on him (and I’m fairly sure Han has a crush on her). And though Sun-woo’s been in the team longer than Hyun-joon, she seems like the outsider sometimes, and I want to see her not hold everyone off at arm’s length—not when they can all climb into each other’s hearts and live there forever.

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cant wait for the continuous ep of hunting the Reaper, and i also hope the CMK ratings aint drop from 3%.. -_-

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Agree ....

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This case was heartbreaking the first time and they managed to keep me hooked in spite of already knowing the twist from having watched US CM.

In the original, Norman (Jang Ki-tae) was played by a fantastic actor, Mitch Pileggi, so playing the Korean version of him was no small feat and Jo Han-chul nailed it. I kept trying to remember where I'd seen him before and then it dawned on me, Healer, he was the cop who had crush on Jo Min-Ja.

Hyun-joon is losing his patience with Sun-woo's blind loyalty to Ki-hyung . I think he can see the situation with fresh eyes because he isn't influenced by whatever it is that drives Sun-woo's idol worship. She can't see it or won't see it and I wonder if the show is gonna deal with this because sometimes us as viewers see potential conflict that's unintended and never addressed, so I have no idea if they're planning on going anywhere with this.

Another aspect I wonder if they're going to explore is Sun-woo's self-inflicted isolation. On the one hand we have Hyun-joon, who has suffered his own share of tragedy but manages to bond with the team with relative ease. And on the other hand there's her, who seems to willingly keep everyone at arm's distance. She has become emotionally stunted and I really want to her her break from her shell. And I try to keep my expectations in check but this is one thing that if left unexplored would be a real disappointment.

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NIce comment ...

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Ok I was genuinely scared for Nana, because it seemed like it was Jang Ji Tae chasing her. My breath stopped for a second.

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Thank you Saya for this great recap and interesting analysis. This week villain was the most interesting criminal so far... very complicated and as you said oddly relatable while simultaneously totally alien... he certainly overshadowed the NCI team this episode... but still the team small moments are so adorable, I hope the show give us some more sweet team moment to mitigate its DARKNESS

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The actor playing mysterious shooter is amazing. The creepiest moment was when he shot at the dying victim without batting eyes, as well as the most complext expression when he looked at the reflection of himself in the mirror.

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i was wondering if someone also noticed that the reflection he saw looked like the Reaper.. the man smiling back at him looked like Yong Chul.. or is it just me? hehe.. ?

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The actor, Jo Han Chul, did an amazing job. I'm glad this series is able to let Im Soo Hyang and Jo Han Chul demonstrate their acting skills, though I'm sad that it's at the expense of the main cast. I'm looking forward to seeing the next villain and the next actor/actress portraying him/her.

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I like the show but I want more from the profilers. I know why the criminals do what they do, but I don't know enough about the team and what makes them tick. There's playing it close to the vest with your emotions and then there is being downright stingy. This show is being stingy with the emotions of the team. (I swear there are times I think Sun-woo is a robot.) There needs to be a balance between fleshing out the criminals and fleshing out the profilers; this show hasn't found its balance. It may be called Criminal Minds, but let's face it, we're here to watch the team, but something feels lacking. The scene where Han locked himself away from Hyun-joon who was desperate to get him out, and when Han called him Hyung, I felt the emotions of those two. I need more scenes like that. (And more Lee Jun-ki!!!)

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The way they put each scenes one after the other, it's still confusing. I didn't know whether scene A should have happened after scene B or the other way around. But there's always a recap to the rescue, thanks @Saya :)

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This is a show with extremely good actors, but extremely frustrating editing. All the individual cases are good, but the editing and interweaving makes it a lot more confusing than it should be.

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Very nice Drama . Love it ....

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Getting better and better ... I'm Glad I continue watching ...

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The editing is still frustrating but I guess I can live with that already. One thing I noticed about this adaptation is that they're more brutal in terms of depicting crime scenes (probably because they're on a cable network) while the mother show depicts more or less a sanitized version for broadcast.

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Yes I feel like the show is getting better now because the chemistry between the cast is slowly becoming clear.

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Plot: In "Normal" the team didn't hesitate to share the profile with the public, which led to team tension when the criminal killed two more people after seeing the broadcast. It was very clear that he was hallucinating at times throughout the episode and his family was very dismissive and aggressive to him, foreshadowing the reveal of his family's deaths (he had three daughters in the original). The criminal never threatened to harm anyone except when he was killing and wasn't as giddy to kill as the Korean version, doing it almost compulsively.

Character: The team didn't argue about releasing the profile, rather once the profile was released and more people died a temporary member of the team was strongly affected. The family's deaths didn't help :(

Plot: This was the first time knowing the original show hindered my viewing of the drama. I love the original episode so much that I didn't like the changes lol, but it's probably personal preference. I feel that the original episode had more nuance and tragedy to the situation and it was very emotionally powerful. And I'm still not digging how sparse our character development is, I really want an episode that focuses on someone without putting one of their loved ones at risk.

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Thank you for taking the time to describe how the case went in the original Criminal Minds. I wish they'd focus more on the decision to not release the profile. It was an interesting dilemma.

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Can some one elighten me ... the two bodies that found in jang house... does really one of them belong to hyun joon friend?

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No, they were the bodies of Jang Ki-tae's wife and daughter. We still don't know what the Reaper did with Hyun Joon's friend's body.

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I did not quite enjoy the last 2 episodes, though it's one of the few dramas I'm currently able to bear watching..this is a pitiful remake- i can't help but compare because the cases mirror the original ones so much.. I feel like they took almost the exact criminal storylines from the originals (the shooter husband) but 'adapted' the team dynamics while working the case..i'm left wondering whether HK decision to withhold the profile had any real basis or was due to him going bunkers..I know in the original we had the main characters going nuts and making questionable decisions; but I really liked Hotch calm steadfast demeanour with what played out in the original.. at this point, the show does not sell profiling well..
As for the Nadeul river case, it's so weirdly complicated- would be glad if someone summarised what's going on there..

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Thanks for the recap Saya... Viki, DramaFever and Netflix CA are not showing this, so I'm left with your recaps and hunting for other late streaming links for now. I tried so hard not to comment but as big fan of the original series and other US procedural shows, I understand the mixed reactions. Admittedly, procedural dramas are not everyone's cup of tea and it takes time to get used to it, sometimes having watch too much (of the same theme) can also dampen the expectation or leave you with nothing to expect. Remakes like this are huge risks since the original spans over a couple of seasons (currently 282 episodes over 12 years) with enough time to build each characters back stories, relationships and popularity. Trying to compress it to less than 10% of the original is a huge undertaking and will definitely require a lot of sacrifice. LJK's bad-ass-cheeky character is spot-on for Derek (although I think I need more cheek) , MCW's Emily is a little too cold for Emily but their banters are close to the how Derek and Emily interacts. One thing I miss is the most are Reid's rapid spot on if not awkward analysis and the Derek and Garcia's saucy banters... Still cheering for this show!

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I would think a procedural would be much easier to remake (I use remake in the sense of adapting rather than just lifting everything wholesale) than something serialized like Broadchurch or Game of Thrones, where the scenes and episodes really build on one another or else the whole story just breaks down.

I do wonder if the writer was even a fan of the original Criminal Minds or if she was just intrigued by the Criminal Minds concept and just watched a few episodes. I remember hearing from somewhere that the reason Marvel movies are so successful is because the people behind them are true fans of the source material.

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i cant wait for the continuous eps, i just dropped MH cause of this LJG drama loool

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Haha ...Same here ...

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I was abit confused when the road rage murder ended abruptly. I really liked the original CM series though I stopped watching after the 5th season. I liked that the show is showing how profiling works in this case but still felt that it was abit lacking in terms of profiling and the intended effect didn't play out as planned? The road rage case just dropped without like proper conclusion, the backstory was good but I was expecting something more like the unsub has schizophrenia or you know what was it?? Give me a conclusion please CM

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It's my first crime drama to watch so everything is really new to me and it keeps me thrilled and excited for the next episodes.. so far, this villain Jang Ki Tae is the most interesting for me.. the actor also nailed the acting and I can't help but to symphatize with him just like Hyun Joon did when he watched him grieved in the end..

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I like kdramas.criminal minds is very good.as the itself says its about different minded criminals.nice plotting.loved the songs and music.hyun joon performance is good. The drama is at a fast pace.I watched episodes in two days.great drama

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