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Rescue Me: Episode 2

The events of Rescue Me continue to ensnare both its viewers and the residents of Muji County. Our protagonists find themselves in ever murkier waters as the cult draws even closer to the Im Family, who find themselves faced with seemingly innocuous gifts at first, only for those gifts to escalate in size. How is a family at the end of the line to say no and refuse such “kindness?”

 
EPISODE 2 RECAP

We open the episode where we left off, with the Im Family driving home from the church. This time, however, we see the scene from bumpkin biker buddies Sang-hwan and Dong-chul’s perspective, who urge each other into faster and more daring tricks as they ride on their motorcycles.

The whole thing is really just a high-speed game of chicken to Sang-hwan and Dong-chul, and just as it seems like they’re about to crash straight into the Im Family vehicle, they split paths at the last moment in front of the car and laugh at each other as they drive off.

As the motorcycle sounds fade, the Im Family is left stopped on the road and shaken by the experience. “I need to get out for a minute,” daughter Sang-mi says, sounding like she might be sick.

Indeed, she collapses against a tree as soon as she gets out, and her mother comes out to check on her. When her mother touches her thigh—almost in the same place she was touched by Father Baek—Sang-mi responds with shock, and finally speaks her mind about the church and her misgivings about the situation. Her mother tries reassuring Sang-mi, but it has the air of telling a child that monsters under the bed don’t really exist.

We catch up with fellow bumpkin biker Man-hee, who turns out to be the brother of one of the mechanics who helped tow the Im Family’s car.

Man-hee’s older brother sighs that they only have each other for family now, but that doesn’t stop him from complaining about all his hard-earned money being spent on meat for his little brother, or Man-hee from tempting his brother with a handful of meat before stuffing it in his own mouth instead.

We also get a glimpse into fellow biker Jung-hoon’s life: He’s busy livestreaming a challenge to his online viewers and gets ready to mix Mentos and Cola in his mouth, but his mother calls him to dinner.

He’s only gotten as far as the first couple gulps of soda before his mother bursts in to get him to eat—and gets spit on for her trouble. Naturally, Jung-hoon is dragged out for dinner (and for an earful) before he even gets a chance to end the broadcast.

Meanwhile, The Im Family gets their first look at their new home provided by the Guseonwon church/compound, with Sang-mi noticeably trailing behind the rest of her family. Disciple Jo explains that the house had been donated to the church by a believer who requested that it be used for “a good deed.” Sang-mi watches, detached, as her family explores the space happily and moves in with the help of the church’s disciples.

After the move has been completed, Mom and Dad’s attitudes towards the Guseonwon people have shifted dramatically, and they eagerly sign their children up to help with a campaign to help homeless people. Sang-mi protests that they haven’t finished unpacking yet but her father waves that aside. Sang-mi’s brother, Sang-jin, says nothing.

And so it is that Sang-mi and Sang-jin end up passing out flyers for Guseonwon. After a while, Sang-jin excuses himself to the bathroom, and Disciple Jo laughs at the way he’s walking without seeming to realize that Sang-jin has a limp.

In the bathroom’s narrow passageway, Sang-jin accidentally bumps shoulders with the ringleader of a group of rowdy high schoolers, and an apology from Sang-jin isn’t enough to appease the ringleader. They pester him with questions with a menacing air, and declaring that Sang-jin sounds like a girl, they decide to check for themselves.

While the boys start trying to forcibly pull Sang-jin’s pants down, Sang-jin keeps sneaking glances at the entrance, noticing a shadowy figure in the doorway. As the scuffle gets more intense, Sang-jin gets visibly distressed, repeating, “Please don’t do this.” The shadowy figure moves away, and the door shuts.

Sang-mi and Eun-shil wait outside, Eun-shil wearing a noticeably impatient look. Sang-jin finally staggers out to the car, wearing a blank look. Sang-mi asks if he’s all right, but Sang-jin only distractedly answers, “Huh? Yeah…”

In the car, Sang-jin continues to insist that he’s okay in response to Sang-mi’s concern. Disciple Jo blithely interjects, “Sang-jin must be very happy because he has a pretty younger sister.” (Creepy.) Eun-shil clears her throat and offers Sang-jin a cup of tea, which she spiked with one of the vials she carries.

The Guseonwon van drops the twins off in front of their house. Sang-mi catches her brother’s arm once they’re alone: “Something happened earlier, didn’t it?” Instead of confiding in his sister, Sang-jin asks her not to burden their parents by telling them anything about the situation. After a brief look into his eyes, Sang-mi agrees and watches him limp back home.

In the compound, ominous thumping noises sound from the Guseonwon laundry room, but it’s just Father Baek bathing an elderly man. Two women walk in and gently chide Father Baek for washing the man’s soiled underwear by hand, though Father Baek claims it’s no trouble at all. When one of the women worries about his health, what with him working tirelessly and always praying late into the night, Father Baek asks if she’d give him a massage, then.

The woman seems slightly taken aback that Father Baek knew she was good at giving massages, but the strange moment is interrupted when the second woman takes over his work.

In the morning, Sang-mi is introduced to her new classmates. Sitting in the back of the class, both Sang-hwan and Dong-chul react: Sang-hwan nudges Dong-chul next to him, asking if this is fate, while Dong-chul studies Sang-mi with a keen expression. The teacher assigns Sang-mi to the empty seat on the other side of Sang-hwan.

Meanwhile, in Sang-jin’s classroom, the bathroom bully from before sends a taunt via paper note: “Have you been doing well? Kekeke.”

The torment doesn’t end at lunch, either. Sang-jin’s tablemates stand up and leave when the bullies corner him at his table. The leader spits in his food and commands him to eat it. When Sang-jin doesn’t comply immediately, they shove him onto the floor and dump the food on his head and demand that he eat it.

Sang-jin slowly lowers his head to the food on the ground, crying softly. Suddenly, a milk carton explodes against the leader’s back. He screams in anger and turns around to face the perpetrator: Sang-mi.

“Apologize,” she demands.

When the leader refuses, Sang-mi says in an even voice that if he fails to apologize, she’ll call the police, since he assaulted her brother first. But, the leader wants to know, does she have proof? He addresses the whole lunch room, asking if anyone wants to come and back up Sang-mi, knowing all the while that no one will stand up to him.

Sang-mi looks at all the turned backs around her in disbelief. “Say something! You saw everything!” she cries out as the group of bullies laugh at her. The leader asks her if she wants to be his girlfriend, and Sang-mi responds appropriately: She slaps him, hard, and he goes down. She rushes over to Sang-jin, but the bullies start shoving her around, too.

It’s at this tense moment that Sang-hwan and Dong-chul walk in. “Hey!” Sang-hwan roars. He leaps over the lunch table and delivers a mighty kick to the bully harassing Sang-mi. The leader of the bullies says that they must be crazy too — don’t they know he’s the top dog of the class?

Sang-hwan and Dong-chul muse on this, and their cheery wordplay just angers the leader more. Red in the face, the leader asks if they want to fight and charges forward. But one of his minions has just read Sang-hwan’s nametag and holds him back. The leader protests, but the lackey says that “he’s Han Sang-hwan” and whispers something in the leader’s ear. Whatever it is causes the bullies to disperse when the school bell rings.

Sang-hwan approaches Sang-mi, who’s helping Sang-jin up. He cautions them that the bullies will be back and advises them to tell the teacher. Sang-mi’s reply is dismissive: “Thank you for helping us today, but we’ll take care of ourselves.”

After school, the four friends regroup at the basketball court. They share a companionable moment before Sang-hwan says he has to leave. Dong-chul follows and reveals to us that today is Sang-hwan’s mother’s birthday.

Sang-mi and Sang-jin make their way out of school too, only to be greeted by the Guseonwon van. Disciple Jo claims they were in the area and “coincidentally” saw the twins walking out. He says that Eun-shil has something to give to Sang-mi, and Sang-mi hesitantly agrees to be taken to Guseonwon.

Meanwhile, Sang-hwan visits his comatose mother’s hospital room, package in hand. Kneeling by her side, he notices the flowers and card his father has left behind. He clasps her hand, saying, “Mom, please wake up. Do you know how long Dad and I have waited for you?”

In Guseonwon, Sang-mi receives a package of her own: a box of Guseonwon tea. She attempts to refuse it politely, but Eun-shil convinces her to accept it by chastising her for not knowing how to accept a gift, though the tone is menacing.

“Please, please,” someone prays in the church proper, crying. “It’s too hard. I can’t hold on any longer. I just want to live like the other kids.” A red cross looms large over the person praying, who turns out to be Sang-jin.

He sobs, oblivious to his surroundings until someone puts their hand on his shoulder. It’s Father Baek, who reassures him that “anyone can be saved from their pain,” by praying to New Heaven’s God before handing him a pamphlet titled “The Road to Salvation.”

Sang-mi walks out with the tea, looking for Sang-jin. But he’s not in the van and his phone is turned off, so Sang-mi enters the church again. He’s not there.

She walks into the construction area we saw last episode and discovers the foreboding basement entrance. It’s eerily silent except for her footsteps. Just as she’s about to open the first door at the foot of the stairs, her shoulder is seized from behind by Disciple Jo. With a calm, sinister voice, he asks her what she’s doing here.

Sang-mi rambles, but is shortly cut off by Disciple Jo reaching out to touch her hair and face. “It’s like the hair of a baby,” he breathes, with his hand lingering on Sang-mi’s neck. To add to the skin-crawling tension, muffled screams and whimpers of distress begin behind the closed door.

According to Disciple Jo, those cries and screams are just from believers praying fervently. As he continues in that same placid voice, he gets close enough to her face that their noses almost touch. Sang-mi trembles, eyes wide.

“Ah,” he declares suddenly, moving back. He says that he saw Sang-jin outside, and invites her to come back and pray together with him sometime.

The Im Family gathers for dinner, and the parents continue singing the praises of Guseonwon thanks to the tea package Sang-mi has brought home. Dad suggests going to church on the weekend, and Mom agrees, “Not even family would do this much for each other.”

Mom asks the twins how their day was and whether or not they’ve made friends. Sang-mi and Sang-jin exchange a meaningful glance, and Sang-mi ambiguously replies that it was only their first day.

Sang-jin leaves the table to get some rest, claiming he has no appetite. But in his room, he pulls out the pamphlet that Father Baek gave him and begins reading.

It’s another busy day for Han Yong-min’s campaign, where reporters are being contacted and slogans coined. The newest one is “I will protect you with the heart of a father,” punctuated by Sang-hwan descending the stairs to leave for school.

His father rushes over to fix Sang-hwan’s tie: “I’ll win the election again and I’ll make your mom get better, so until then, please stay out of trouble.” It’s a caring but firm instruction, and Sang-hwan apologizes.

After class lets out, Jung-hoon and Man-hee wait for the other two at the basketball court. Jung-hoon spies Sang-mi in the distance, waiting next to a bench. “Isn’t that the girl from Seoul?” he asks Man-hee before getting hit in the head with the basketball.

“Shouldn’t we tell the teacher?” one girl asks another as they pass Sang-mi. “About what? The kid from Seoul? Let’s mind our own business,” the other replies. Sang-mi overhears their conversation with alarm and flags them down.

As to what exactly is happening to the “kid from Seoul,” we find Sang-jin being beaten by the same group of students as before, this time on the rooftop. “What?” The leader taunts when Sang-jin looks toward the open door. “Do you think someone will come to save you?”

That someone is Sang-mi, who rushes up the stairs and crashes into Sang-hwan and Dong-chul on the way. Sang-hwan asks her if she’s hurt, and Sang-mi hesitates for a moment before imploring them to help her brother.

Dong-chul turns around to go upstairs immediately, but Sang-hwan doesn’t react. He remembers his father’s request and makes a decision, removing Sang-mi’s hands from his own: “You said you’d take care of yourselves.”

Dong-chul asks if Sang-hwan is really just going to turn the other way, and Sang-hwan says that they’re not the police. Sang-mi pushes past both of them to the stairs, and the disagreement turns personal.

They strike each other’s sore spots as Dong-chul asks if Sang-hwan is acting this way because of his father, while Sang-hwan asks if Dong-chul likes Sang-mi: “If you do, then why don’t you go?” So Sang-hwan heads down, and Dong-chul heads up.

Sang-mi bursts onto the roof to find Sang-jin standing on a desk, being coerced into exposing himself for the bullies’ cell phone cameras. Sang-mi draws closer, but Sang-jin himself tells her to leave and looks away.

With a resolute look, Sang-mi tells him, “Stop. Put your clothes back on.” For a moment, he starts to do it, but one of the bullies grabs his arm. “Should we show her the picture or do you want to play with us?”

It’s an awful ultimatum, and they know it. Sang-jin again tells Sang-mi unsteadily to go. “I’m begging you. Please let my brother go,” Sang-mi says to the bullies, eyes downcast. The leader sidles closer and tells her if she’s going to beg, she has to do it “right” and take her clothes off.

Sang-hwan arrives at the basketball court, much to his friends’ joy. But they want to know where Dong-chul is, and Sang-hwan can’t bring himself to answer.

Just as the bully leader is about to unbutton Sang-mi’s uniform, he gets a bucket to the back. Dong-chul’s here, and he says he’s ready to clean up the trash. He goads the bullies, and in return, the leader tells him that without Sang-hwan, Dong-chul is nothing.

Unfazed, Dong-chul jumps into action. It’s a 4-on-1 fight until Sang-mi starts fighting the female member of the group in a hair-grabbing contest.

Sang-jin watches the fight and staggers away. Below, Sang-hwan plays ball with Jung-hoon and Man-hee, but is clearly distracted. He looks toward the rooftop—and on the edge stands Sang-jin. Alarmed now, Sang-hwan sprints back toward the building.

All the fighting stills when Sang-mi screams for Sang-jin. “Please don’t do this,” she begs with feeling, trying to convince him not to jump. “I shouldn’t have been born,” Sang-jin says levelly. “Everyone’s the same. I can’t escape it anyway.”

Sang-mi keeps telling him it’s not true and that she’ll help him, but he doesn’t seem to hear her as he thinks of Father Baek telling him: “The arms of New Heaven’s God are always open to anyone.” Instead, he apologizes to Sang-mi with a cryptic, “I don’t think anyone will listen to my prayers.”

“What do you mean by that?” Sang-mi asks. Her only response is a few measured breaths, and then Sang-jin plummets backwards. He falls to the ground below, face bruised and pants still slightly open.

Sang-mi screams, and Dong-chul runs to the edge. Even the bully leader is in shock. Sang-mi can only repeat “No!” to herself as she cries.

Sang-hwan runs through the rooftop doorway, but he’s too late. Dong-chul and Sang-mi turn their faces to him—one bloody, one tear-streaked—and from Sang-mi comes a whispered plea: “Save me.”

Jung-hoon’s police father and his partner pull up at the police station with the bullies and Dong-chul in tow. The other three friends run up and protest that it wasn’t Dong-chul’s fault. Jung-hoon’s father states that the details will be found through police investigation, but he also says that he can tell that Dong-chul is guilty just by looking at him.

Meanwhile, Sang-mi cries as she runs alongside the stretcher bringing Sang-jin from the ambulance to the hospital.

Mom and Dad each receive sobering phone calls at their respective workplaces. Mom makes her way out of the restaurant in a blind panic, attracting stares as she runs out barefoot and cries, “There’s no way it’s true!”

A couple of believers, including a young child, get out of a van parked in front of the church. The light from the red cross on the roof of the church flickers, then goes out. The young child points at the cross: “The red light… is gone.”

Tonight’s service at the church includes a cheery song praising New Heaven’s God. Eun-shil and Disciple Jo lead the song, and later, they call for Father Baek to lead the rest of the service.

“Father!” the crowd chants and cheers, and Father Baek appears from behind the curtain. Most of the congregation members get up to dance, including the boy who saw the red light go out.

We see Dong-chul sitting in a cell, looking pensive and tired, and Sang-jin being taken care of by hospital staff. Sang-mi walks up to her parents outside Sang-jin’s hospital room and puts slippers on her mother’s bare feet.

Sitting on a hospital chair, Mom raises her head when she hears Sang-jin’s voice—only it’s not coming from the room he’s in, but the hallway. She calls out to the shadowy specter and gets up to follow it into the darkened hallway, crying out her son’s name every few steps.

Back at the church, Father Baek preaches to the audience, claiming that New Heaven’s God spoke to him. His mission, as he claims, is to “spread the secret to salvation on this earth and save the poor souls that are struggling in pain.”

At the same time, Sang-mi calls her mother when she can’t find her, but Mom’s phone has been left on her chair. “I can’t find Mom,” she tells her father.

Father Baek uses a lesson on demons to segue into his main point: To combat the hidden demons of the world, they must believe in New Heaven’s God… and Father Baek, of course. “All you have to do is believe in New Heaven’s God and believe in me,” he repeats.

In an intercut scene, the Sang-jin ghost leads Mom up to the roof. He stands on the edge, and Mom begs him to come back.

“The only way we can be saved from this evil world is through our belief in New Heaven’s God. Do you all believe?” Father Baek intones. The audience fervently chants back, “We believe!”

With rising panic, Sang-mi and Dad follow a pair of running hospital staff members up to the roof. There, Mom takes step after trembling step along the edge of the roof, calling and reaching for a Sang-jin that isn’t actually there.

They approach her slowly, and then Dad takes a risk and grabs her off the ledge and back to safety. Mom looks up at the now-empty rooftop edge, then faints. Downstairs, the real Sang-jin flatlines.

Meanwhile, the audience shouts ever more fervent proclamations of their belief in the church, New Heaven’s God, and Father Baek himself. The sound of moaning and yelling swells to a fever pitch.

At Sang-jin’s memorial, Mom wails his name, Dad apologizes, and Sang-mi chokes out a silent sob. In the midst of their grief, Sang-mi spies intruders: Disciple Jo, Eun-shil, Father Baek, and other churchgoers have shown up.

They offer platitudes and sympathy to the family, and Disciple Jo adds, “From now on, we’ll protect you as if you’re our family.” Eun-shil holds a grieving Mom in her arms as Sang-mi watches.

Father Baek gives a speech. “Why did you have to take our precious son? Why?” he cries out. The speech fluently expresses the emotion of grief and loss, and everyone present is moved again to tears, including Sang-mi, who relives anew the torture Sang-jin endured over the past few days.

The family cries as Father Baek asks, “You told me you would save your child suffering in agony, so why? Why did you take him away? New Heaven’s God, I really… resent you for doing this.” Father Baek beats his chest as he demands an answer: “This child cried out to you and asked you to save him so desperately. Did you really turn away from him?!”

 
COMMENTS

Oof. What a traumatic episode this was, for all members of the Im Family. I had felt uneasy since the bathroom incident early in the episode, but I hadn’t anticipated that it would escalate so far, so fast, nor did I foresee Sang-jin’s death in this episode. Until the last minute, I was still on the fence as to whether or not the show would let Sang-jin live, either by him coming down from the roof or being nursed back to life in the hospital. Rescue Me does a good job of keeping its viewers off-balance, so much so that I really believed for a moment that Sang-jin’s mother might follow her son off the roof.

Part of the reason it achieves this off-kilter sensation so well, at least from what I’ve seen, is the excellent use of sound. High strings or rumbling drums alert us to anything from a hand grabbing someone’s shoulder from behind or a seemingly innocuous religious gathering. Even the quiet moments of this show are sometimes woven with a sense of imminent danger, leaving us always on edge. In fact, there are almost no happy music cues in this episode except when the cult is singing in the service, and that’s one place we can almost be certain a layer of evil lurks underneath. Our protagonists just can’t catch a break.

The editing also helps with the show’s tone significantly, especially in combination with the script. Both are executed with a deft hand, and the show flashes between scenes to build tension, especially with the church services. Sometimes the show allows us a conclusion to a scene, like the door shutting on Jung-hoon’s failed livestream, but it’s also fond of jumping away before a conversation is “officially” done. It’s like hanging up at the end of a phone conversation, but without saying goodbye. The experience is jarring but also trims away some of the unnecessary parts of the characters’ conversations.

More on our protagonists—I’ve said I was surprised by the escalation of Sang-jin’s bullying, but I also feel that I’m missing information on several points. Some the show may answer, like Sang-mi was referring to when she reassured Sang-jin that their experience in this town would be better, what Sang-jin meant by his last words, whether or not the pamphlet had a substantial impact on his final moments, or who closed the door in the bathroom. But, for example, the show didn’t satisfactorily explain why Sang-jin was bullied so heavily within several days of this new school, and instead only showed the senseless bullying and intimidation that was inflicted upon him.

I can accept that teenagers can just be that cruel, but the biggest question mark for me is Sang-jin himself. He didn’t get many lines before the fatal rooftop scene, and he displayed remarkably little agency. I do appreciate that his death has catapulted several characters into action and that it sets up a major catalyst for events to come, such as the family potentially being folded further into the world of the cult. But to me, Sang-jin was just a sketch of a character, and I never got to feel the stuff that makes him human.

Though the negativity that Sang-mi has brushed up against so far has been less outwardly severe than Sang-jin’s, her experiences in Muji are no less traumatic. Besides the tragedy that has just been dealt to her family, she’s also the recipient of several creepy and predatory comments/actions. The fact that she’s pretty is brought up multiple times in situations that gave me a bad gut feeling, which was only cemented by the church basement encounter with Disciple Jo.

I’m glad we’ve finally got a full picture of all the relationships in the town, even though several of the key players are still quite mysterious. The plot flows smoothly, and though the relationships are bound to change—clearly Sang-hwan and Dong-chul have split from each other in more ways than one—the current lay of the land is a useful benchmark for understanding what makes Muji tick. (Incidentally—why don’t the bullies and Sang-hwan/Dong-chul seem to know each other? It seems like Sang-hwan holds some type of reputation due to his father, yet the ringleader had to be fed an explanation on who Sang-hwan was.)

I also appreciate the small but consistent symbols like the tea and Disciple Jo’s perfume, and I’m curious to know more about them. Is the tea just a way for the cult to get their foot in the door with the local residents, or something more sinister? Oddly, the constant references to a paternal figure in the cult, Father Baek, are reminiscent of Sang-hwan’s father’s new campaign slogan: “I will protect you with the heart of a father.” I was prepared to write it off as coincidence, but Disciple Jo’s “We’ll protect you as if you’re our family” echoed it closely. Interesting.

It’s only Episode 2, so I have faith that Rescue Me will answer these burning questions with style, considering its fascinating setting. Though, as we can see from the show, faith can be a dangerous thing.

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This episode was so brutal. I may just follow through recaps from now on!

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I hear you, I actually can't force myself to finish this episode after that bathroom scene and with Sang Mi walking through that eerie basement. I'm a fan of OCN dramas but this one is a bit too much for me. Thanks @petrichor for the recap.

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I like OCN drama for the thrillers and police procedurals that they bring out, but sometimes I wish they were tamer. I couldn't bring myself to watch Voice when I heard about all the gore.

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If it's tamer, then it'll not be OCN drama level. At least that's what I see from OCN thriller drama trend.

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i can watch blood and murder but sexual harassment/pedophilia which this show's vibes is giving me is a bit too hard for me to watch.

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They are teenagers. I don't think Pedophilia even suits the storyline. Also Mr. Baek isn't a priest so any controversial angle of child abuse go out the window.

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A part of me would say. 'This episode was brutal. I love it. Stay this way til the end. This is what dramaland needs. Scare us."

But the other part would also be forcing myself to pause so that I will not get heart attacks for all the creepiness. I did pause in that scene where she was going down the basement. I was yelling, 'get out of there!!!!'

Overall, the drama is doing what it's supposed to be doing and more.

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yeah on the horror and creep factor, it's well-done. Can't wait on the episode that will focus on bringing down this cult, I might rewatch it then for now, will be waiting for recaps.

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K-drama land does need variety. While the subject matter is disturbing, it's delivered well so far.

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Real world is much more brutal without any sound/music influencing our senses. Direction and Music is quite good here and i agree with recapper thee brother was just a pawn to escalate the story.

Its clear that Sang Jin was dangerosuly bullied in Seoul and its effects reached Sang-Mi too. I am sure mild SEXUAL ABUSE did happened in Seoul to both siblings. This is not mere sexual-harassment. All the actions go far beyond that.

I skipped all the annoying chitter-chatter of Cult.

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I'm thinking what those easily offended muh-relgion, muh culture virtual identities have to say now.
Maybe its not their religion so no warnings or threats to Dramabeans community.

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Well this drama definitely has cult plot. True, they use church and Christianity background, but every viewers know that this drama is about cult, so it's not an act of ignorance by showing the wrong way of how Christian prays or culture.

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This episode is so dark and it makes me decided to stick to this drama until the end. I was shocked that Sang Jin died at the end, it really surprised me. And Father Baek's speech at the end, it creeps the hell out of me. I wonder what will happen to this Sang Mi's happy family. They're so happy eating ramen together and cherish their family-bonding time. Up until now, I can't really predict what's the hidden agenda behind the cult other than power gain at the town. I'm so interested on what makes Father Baek decided to manipulate people using religious cult.

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Sameee! Really shocked that he died in that horrible way. Didn't see that coming.
And totally agree with you! Usually we can kinda guess where the story is taking us...but with this I can only make guesses and which are probably far from the truth anyway.
This makes me more invested in this show because it's so mysterious that I wanna stick around to find out. Especially what the cult leaders get out of this. Do they truly believe in what they're doing? As in, being religious and accepting that god is real and evil is sin etc. Or is there something more sinister lurking beneath that facade?

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Yup, I'm curious if Father Baek, Disciple Jo and Eun Shil really believe in their so-called "Faith," especially Eun Shil and Disciple Jo. One moment, I was like "nah-ah, they're just lying, the whole thing is a scam" but other moment, I was like "they might actually believe Father Baek and look up to him highly. Gosh, really?" Eun Shil is such an interesting character, how she plays the role of having "woman touch" especially towards grandmothers and moms. I also wonder why they're all so invested in the twins, or if there's any prophecy that they believe in twin-born.

I was actually afraid when Father Baek gave the speech after the singing ceremony, especially to the grandmother with her grandson, how he said demons can be around her in the form of husband, son etc. I was afraid if he might ask her to kill her grandson (lol, I'm thinking too much) just because that kid seems so uninterested to the whole prayer thingy and he's yawning most of the time. Thank God, nothing happened.

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I was thinking the exact same thing!! I was thinking "run boy, runnnnnn!!" I thought Father Baek was going to say that demons are inside children...but I guess I breathed a sigh of relief that he said demons are everywhere around them. I guess I thought this is better than labelling just the children as demons because that would just be wayyyy creepy.

I'm getting this feeling that Father Baek might have convinced Sang-jin to suicide...I don't know why but he probably brainwashed him by saying that people with disabilities (people like Sang-jin) should never have been born. Or something along those lines. That pamplet he gave Sang-jin is extra suspicious. What was in it? Just a bunch of rules about their religion? Or something more?

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It might be true as well that Father Baek convinced Sang Jin to suicide. Maybe he did say something about he's better of dead so that he can go to heaven and lessen his family's burden. With the pressure that he feels from the endless bullying and the Father Baek's influence (probably), I totally understand Sang Jin's extreme decision on taking out his own life.

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Yeah that's what I was thinking. Pretty sad and really heartbreaking for Sang-jin. ?

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If it is in line with what most real life cult leaders believe, then no - they are just in it for the money/power/sex. Though some cult leaders actually DO think they are the latest god.

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Exactly! A few years back, I would not have seen this show but now I am eager for some variety in dramaland and this show is so dark and intense and creepy that it makes me curious about the cult, Father Baek and his motivations, Sang-mi and the boys' fate. Seeing that there was a death in episode 2 itself, I am more afraid for the boys.

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I agree, I was a rom-com and melodrama girl. I only watch that two genres, then I slowly entered legal, medical and thriller drama. If this drama were to air 5 years ago, I might not even think of watching it. The more I watch kdramas, the more variety that I need. I need something new and fresh, and I get exactly what I need in this drama. Sure it creeps me out, but my curiosity is higher and I like how this drama challenges my view in the society that is not norm to me.

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After watching tons of k-dramas, getting tired of the same old formula dramas where the main theme is some teen love triangle, or cops so stupid that all they can do is serial head slapping, and further proof that Korean girls cannot possibly ride bicycles. This show is pretty gritty, but still a welcome change from most. I guess also that "Stranger" spoiled me.

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I will probably say it on every episode, but
YOU CREEPS, don't you dare to touch Sang-mi

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with this trend, hopefully Sang-Mi will be rescued before the creeps decide to do something even more nasty. God, even just the stares they're giving the girl is giving me chills T_T

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Could this cult BE any more predatory??? Ooh, I probably shouldn't ask that...

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I did a little reading up on cults, and yeah - they can be a LOT worse.

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And I'm prepared for the worse. Well, hopefully.

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Thanks for the recap, petrichor
The atmosphere is so eerie and creepy, I love how they are building it up. But i think i'll need to switch RM back and forth with some lighter drama or even some pets videos to balance it out))

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A true story. One night in March of 2015, I was watching a psychological thriller in Netflix called The Fall. It is about a family man who is kidnapping and murdering woman. He keeps a diary and some souvenirs and hide them on the ceiling of his daughter's room. She actually get nightmares and keeps mentioning something about the ceiling. By midnight and three episodes later, I told myself I'm going to have a nightmare. I need something light and fun to watch. That's when I discovered this drama called Boys Over Flowers. I ended up finishing two episodes that night. I didn't get nightmares that night. Instead, it was the night that started this journey of feeling teenager again, appreciating family values, discovering different dishes, and knowing that ramyunkdrama is best served in the pot.

Moral of the story, let's see what new journey, if there is one, this creepy drama will bring me.

The TV afficianado in me says, this is good for the industry. Kdramas can't all be roses and rainbows.

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Yeah, no diversity, no fun))
... also Gillian Anderson was brilliant in 'the Fall'

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The scene with Sang-mi and Disciple Jo was the heights of creepiness. I was filled with disgust and fear for Sang-mi and just wanted her to kick him where it hurts a thousand times. To think that she has to get more involved with those people!! *shudders*.

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Honestly, even as Disciple Jo was being so disturbingly forward with Sang-mi, I was just hoping she didn't set him off. As we saw earlier with his interaction with the drunk drifter, he has a very short fuse. And I think he could definitely overpower her, she may stand-up against school bullies, but one-on-one against a grown man in a strange place is a very different matter.

At times I felt like the show was pointing out where a different drama might allow our heroes to fight back. But it is at those moments that the writers say, "but in reality, this outcome is more likely." Because in another drama, Sang-jin wouldn't have died or even stepped off the roof, but not in this drama.

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I was waiting for the School franchise-style suicide save. But no, I then recalled this is OCN, and they will go ALL THE WAY. I LOVED Tunnel, and Rescue Me is looking to be added to my top creepy/sci-fi list of favorites (yes, I group sci-fi and creepy/scary together). This is one scary, creepy, keep-me-on-my-toes drama!

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@rinny I love how you interpreted the suicide scene and the writer's intent. And totally agree there with poetic justice versus reality ?

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I blame the parents for most of this fiasco. I bet the dad would answer emails from Nigerian princes.

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Just reading the recaps gives me chills. "Rescue Me" is most fitting - I was probably thinking that every few seconds or so.

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"I can accept that teenagers can just be that cruel, but the biggest question mark for me is Sang-jin himself. He didn’t get many lines before the fatal rooftop scene, and he displayed remarkably little agency."..."But to me, Sang-jin was just a sketch of a character, and I never got to feel the stuff that makes him human."

Yes, there's so much we don't know Sang Jin. He hardly spoke but I felt like I knew his lack of self-confidence, shame, fear and utter despair from those eyes and the way he moves. The actor did a fine job in conveying all these without saying much. There are people in the society who like Sang Jin, has little or no agency in life. Unable to take control of his life, cowering in fear of bullies and finally seeing death as the only way out.

I won't be surprised if Sang Jin had contemplated suicide more than once. I am curious as to what drove him over the edge. Was it the brutality of the bullying? Was it shame? Or was there something in the pamphlet and what Father Baek said?

This reminds me of a creepy Chinese movie I've seen long ago. The story set in rural China in the 1980s featured a group of young women, each faced with social persecution which led them to run away from home. They found refuge with a kind motherly figure who took them in and they spent the happiest days in their lives living together. Soon, this woman started to tell them about an utopia where these women can be free and happy. I can never forget the last few minutes showing this group of girls happily sewing together red strips of cloths, giggling and laughing in process. The last scene had them all hung in a row from the beam.

I am for the show to go dark all the way, I can take unpleasant scenes, scares and brutality as long as they make sense.

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I didn't expect Sang-jin's death so soon, however, I understand it for the plot device that it is. I appreciate that it happened as early as it did as well because it always the show to pace itself well, something most K-dramas have problems with. I suspect that his death would be the catalyst of a host of events that affect multiple characters.

I don't think Sang-jin was a sketch character or lacked agency. We were given a good bit of moments with him that went a long way.
1. When the family was considering whether they should go to service/figuring out what they thought of the church while driving, Sang-jin might have thought that the priest/God could heal him. When they were at home and he left the table and went to his room and took out the pamphlet was also pretty telling.
2. When he was praying at the alter, you good see and feel his desperation.
3. Being looked at as different day in and day out is difficult to deal with by itself let alone being bullied for it. I think the show expects us to piece together these things.
4. Shame/humiliation can be a powerful driving force especially in the digital age.
5. K-dramas have a tendency of giving us bit of information and explaining it in piecemeal or not at all, both of which can be frustrating.

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At your point #3: hooray, a drama that expects its viewers to have a brain and use it! Now let's hope they don't assume TOO much by giving us next to nothing.

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I agree with you guys. I put it together and I got the essence of poor San Jin's character and struggles. He is an important part of his family, Sang Mi's other half, and his life and death will immensely alter the rest of the family's lives. The story is only just beginning though. Let's see where it goes from here.

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Sang* Jin

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Obviously, the latest round of bullying triggered Sang Jin into hopelessness. Because he had recently been praying desperately, the continued bullying would have told Sang Jin that his prayers were not answered and possibly made him believe that they never would be. Although.... it remains to be seen what the pamphlet said, and how that might have affected Sang Jin's decision to take control of the bullying by ending it once and for all.

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@outofthisworld YES to Sang-jin not needing to speak. This actor's looks and mannerisms spoke volumes. Wow. Maybe what drove him over the edge to actually commit suicide was in his wording right before he let himself fall off the rooftop: he saw that events were repeating, and he didn't want to go through it again, he simply couldn't do it any longer. Poor guy. Poor family!

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This ep sealed the deal for me. I did not expect the brother to be written off so soon, so the unexpected turn of events kept me wondering what would happen next. So far, besides just knowing the bare bones of the plot, nothing else has been predictable, and I like it.

Agree that the show's editing, music choices and directing have been effective at maintaining the creepy feel and suspense. It does really well at highlighting the tension in small everyday moments, and in playing up the desperation, frustration and helplessness of the characters so well that you emotionally get engaged right away with their struggles.

The damsel in distress set up usually does nothing for me, but Seo Yejin (did I spell it right?) has been doing an ace job so far. I was right there with her when she threw that carton of milk at the bully and felt all her horror and disgust at the thigh grab.

And Dong Chul - what a scene stealer. Hope he gets the girl, but it's probably not gonna happen.

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She is Damsel in grave Danger. I was annoyed with "save me" as camera right away showed hero's face. Also, i thought save me made less sense there. The only argument i can give is that was her heartfelt plea to anyone.
Dong-Chul is doing far better job and Tec. looks the same everywhere.

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Her name is Seo Yeji.

Off topic but she reminds me so much of Soo Ae. They kind of have similar air and look, and also a surprisingly husky voice (compared to their sweet look).

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I read Sang jins suicide as the result of what would of obviously been a series of unfortunate events (Im sorry I had to it was right there). He had obviously had been bullied before and suffered trauma which well I thought was indicative of his timid nature and mannerism. His sister was his guardian and she did the talking of them as the collective. The whole family are obviously in a state of desperation which I think they all play so well and moved from Seoul for a fresh start and when obviously that didn't happen he just lost all hope and jumped.

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From what I gather, the father fell for some scam, and that is why they are broke. He does not seem too bright, and he is far too ready to suck up to those leaders in the cult. I cannot see anything good coming of this.

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I wonder how the cult can not come off as very obviously creepy to normal people and then I remembered they didn't have the benefits of mood lighting and non diagetic sound and obviously Sang Mis perspective. oh as the creepy life tea which I TOTALLY think is a hallucinogenic by the way, theres nooo way thats normal tea. Plus the basement which is basically a metaphor for hell at this point because you go right down to get there and its guarded by a creepy demon that beats you with a shower nozzel am i reading to much into this?

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Oh I definitely agree that the tea/medicine is not "normal" tea and very likely is drugged. Another thing that I didn't notice anyone mentioning here is that phrase that everyone keeps saying. I forget exactly what the phrase is, but all the followers say it... something about "annihilating them" (or something similar) What's that about?

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Thank you for the recap, the show is pretty intense, can't wait to see what happens next.

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Thanks for the recap! I really like the somber/eerie tone so far but also can't wait for the creepy and thriller aspects to kick in. After this episode, I was glad for a deeper look at the family dynamics of our main characters - surprisingly, that's what's standing out to me the most so far. While our main three characters are far from perfect, they all have a certain sweetness with their family members that really gets me.

But can I say, damn, I didn't think Sang-jin would die. As a plot point, it would make sense for this to be the driving force behind Sang-mi's family getting more involved in the cult, but I was also surprised the story would go there in the second episode. I guess I haven't been watching enough OCN dramas, haha. But my favorite moment in the episode was Dong-chul immediately turning to go help SM the second she asked. He's already turning out to be my favorite character, which I know is probably asking for heartbreak down the road.

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Dong-chul forever! *sets off the ship's foghorn*

And I wanted to slam the police officer's head into his desk for saying that he knew Dong-chul was guilty just for how he looks. I'm sorry, but he's a superb specimen of the good guy. The end.

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I love it. I've seen way creepier stuff, but this is pretty good. Hopefully it maintains the goodness and doesn't deteriorate like Voice did. Also I saw Sang-jin' s death as inevitable. Hopefully the friendship between the boys maintains and isn't lost.

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Yes, I hope so too for this drama to not turn out to be like Voice. That drama was so good in the beginning, and it turned to be a lil bit flat in the middle and the ending's so damn weird and disturbing.

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My thoughts exactly!

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Thank you, @petrichor, for mentioning the background music. It is definitely not melodious; it is a sound that is almost constant, adding to the tension and overall mood.

Sang-mi's has been in a difficult situation. I definitely think that she was the strongest of the four (now three) family members. That being said, while she did express her reservations at various times, she was not that forceful in doing so. I almost get the feeling that she was afraid to destroy whatever little bit of hope onto which her parents and brother could hold. As I mentioned in my comment on the first episode, this is a family that seems to be quite broken. The father, described as having the naive eyes of a cow by his new boss (and one of the church's members) just wants to accept any apparent act of kindness. He was duped by a friend before and he is none the wiser for it.

I talked about possible motivations behind Father Baek and company's actions. I also talked about the themes of beauty and aging beauty in relation to the female figures. I'll just re-post what I wrote last time.

Excerpt of my comment for episode 1:

What motivates this cult? Father Baek asked Apostle Eun-Shil if she "missed those times?" What life did they lead before all of this? I almost get the feeling that they want to destroy the happiness around them. It was that observed moment of familial bliss that brought the Im family to Father Baek's attention. If not to destroy happiness, do they want to somehow partake of that happiness (even if pain and destruction results)?

And all of this talk of beauty is somewhat unsettling. Eun-shil is praised for her beauty by the Church's supporters, and Sang-mi's beauty is remarked upon by Apostle Jo and Father Baek. And I see the way that Eun-Shil stares at Sang-mi. I wonder if age (growing older) and beauty will somehow play a dark role.

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So what does everyone else think?

I remember having the weird feeling that Sang-jin's death, or the circumstances surrounding it, was somehow orchestrated. But I couldn't put my finger on what exactly bothered me.

Additionally, I do not recall seeing a shadow in the bathroom bullying scene. Did I forget? I'll have to re-watch that moment.

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Father Baek probably has a hand on it. I bet there was more to their conversation in the chapel that we didn't get to hear. With Sang-jin's death, the family will be in more despair and will be even more helpless. This is where the cult enters and provides much needed help. Father Baek's speech at the end is probably there to make the parents think that he actually care and that it's okay to trust that man.

What I'm more curious of though is why them? Why did he purposely choose Sang-mi's family? They're quite an easy target but something tells me there's a deeper reason to it.

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With Peridot's theme on aging in mind, I think he wants Sang-mi as a new right-hand woman. Creep. Yuck. NO. You can't have her, cult!

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@peridot I feel very strongly that the cult has A LOT to do with Sang-jin's death and did it from very far in the background. They have a crazy-long arm. I was thinking that they had loads to do with his death, especially when they showed up to his wake. The intrusiveness had my skin crawling. It felt like a pack of hyenas had descended on what's left of a severely broken family. As for the shadow in the bathroom bullying scene, I did see that, and I thought I heard that door being locked or closed, like the shadow may have been a cult member (Disciple Jo?) guarding the door. I think I'll re-watch that scene, possibly the whole episode, even as sad as it is.

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I did re-watch the scene. There is a shadow. When I first heard the door closing, I assumed it was the girl member of the gang, because she had been asked to close the door by the ring leader. But now, I realize it was someone else. "Pack of hyenas" is probably a good way to describe them. They are despicable and if they did in fact play a role in Sang-min's death, then they have crossed over into evil territory. God knows what else is going on. There are numerous hints to sexual misconduct. And the poor souls trapped in the depth of that twisted church are probably undergoing re-programming. Mind Control, Sexual Violence, Murder--God knows what else!

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Oops! I meant Sang-jin!

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The fact that all the local cops seem to be on board with the cult leaders makes me think of a cult in Texas of a few years ago, where in fact most of the cops actually belonged to the cult. That did not end well from what I recall.

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I think that "naive eyes of a cow " describes the father perfectly. And I fear that his cowlike behavior will end up doing nothing good for what remains of his family.

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Unfortunately, I will have to agree with you on that one.

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I'm leery about the full length of conversation between sang jin and father baek. Might be father baek said something that sang jin interpreted as permission to commit suicide. Father baek could've told him 'it's ok to free yourself from the pain, death is temporary etc. etc.' Something that could shake an already emotionally unstable kid.

Plus, this strange tea they keep handing around to their disciples might be mixed with some substance that makes a person susceptible to suggestion (might not be a hallucinogen as others pointed out). Could be amytal? This could explain why sang jin was easily swayed with whateved baek told him, if he indeed suggested suicide.

I kept thinking why the walls of the church were covered with plastic. Might it have something to do with their obsession for cleanlineness/whiteness/purity? Come to think of it, father baek was always dressed in white, even his hair was white. :/

Whatever's in the depths of that church, I think something sinister is taking place there. I fear the drama might touch on rape.. I hope not. Dong chul and sang hwan need to guard sang mi 24/7! Such a creepy village!

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The plastic is because the church is under construction. Disciple Jo is indeed obsessed with cleanliness and it makes me think that one way or another, he was considered "dirty" before.

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I half hope for and half dread getting more of the Father Beak/Sang-jin conversation. I suspect the bullies are also involved with the cult in one way or another and their ugly actions were fine-tuned to prey on Sang-jin, maybe under the guise of seeing weaknesses and/or deformity as something unclean or needing to be wiped out. I think the cult had come for Sang-jin from many angles; that's how little I think and feel towards the cult!

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Thank you so much for the recap, it's great to get another's perspective. :) Totally agree about the editing and the great tone it lends. I disagree slightly on one point, however--Sang-Jin may not have had many lines, but I feel like he was still a well fleshed out character. He had either from birth or circumstance lost the use of one leg, leaving him to be protected by his sister (not a bad thing, but certainly something he might have seen as an irreversable reversal of roles). And he didn't like being a burden, he was at once considerate of his parents and also stubbornly wanted to be able to handle things himself. He was talked more "about" and less "with" by his mom and dad, so what started as a quiet demeanor probably became even more closed off. He said something about how "nothing changes" so I can assume he was bullied in Seoul as well--this is perhaps even what spurred the move. I really liked him as a character, and I'm absolutely appalled at what those kids did to him. That's not just bullying someone--that's downright sexual harassment, and they need to be punished accordingly. I'm sad that he died (I still don't think suicide is the answer), and sad that he went through what he did, and I hope he's able to find some peace now, at least.

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I know. I was so angry with the horrible bullying, assault, and subsequent suicide.

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And then I was outraged that Dong-chul was pegged as guilty because he was there and he must be guilty because of how he looks! Grrr...

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@cozybooks I like your assessment of Sang-jin; it was everything I wanted to say and worded far better than I had planned to do! Now for the family to pick up the pieces, if they can. Seriously, I was appalled at the congregation coming to his wake and at Father Baek taking over the scene. Sang-mi is surrounded by sheep and/or cattle, including her parents, in that scene and several others. I'm genuinely worried for her.

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I am afraid that the father will fall for that whole spiel and lead his family deeper into the abyss.

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I think that there's always someone like Sang-jin everywhere, a kid who got constantly bullied by everyone withouth even knowing the reason. Isn't that what they say? The strong prey on the weak, and Sang-jin is definitely a weak person

And did I imagine right about what just happened in the bathroom? It's not... that, right? But Sang-jin was limping afterwards and OMG I felt so sick when watching it. I hope it's not what I imagine

Hope next episode will be less... dark?

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Well, Sang-jin's limp was always there, but I see what you mean regarding the bathroom altercation. I'm not sure if we are meant to read into things, but I did wonder if something more nefarious happened.

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Sang-jin's death caught me off guard. I never thought he would be killed off right away. I guess that leaves Sang-mi on her own now. This will probably make her parents more involved in the cult, becoming more indifferent to her.

I think they were bullying Sang-jin because of his limp. He's not normal to them and an easy target. He can't run and won't fight back. People just love stepping on the weak so they can think they are strong. There might be more to it but for now, that's how I'll make sense of it.

Man, Disciple Jo creeps me out so much. I felt slimy after that scene with him inching closer to Sang-mi. It's disgusting. The background music makes this show extra creepy too.

I'm glad this is shaping up well. This is the drama that thrills me out of everything that I'm watching right now. Thanks for the recap!

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The events in this episode were accidentally spoiled for me and as a result i knew there was so no way I'd make it through the episode without crying. Just reading this was too painful. I don't remember the last time a show made me feel this way

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This show, it truly lives up to the OCN reputation for dark thrillers and perhaps will take it a few steps upwards in that department. My feelings kept travelling in circles in between disgust, sense of relief, sense of unease, disgust, anger, helplessness. The Im family are good people. The dad and mom seems like one of those naive guys who refuse to see past face value, Sang Jin is a traumatized teen in the verge of breakdown while Sang Min is the strength and light that bound them together. To see them suffer such a heartbreaking loss by the end of the episode made me teary eyed. Sang Jin, poor kid! What those school bullies did to him goes beyond bullying and is sexual harassment. It was clear that he had similar experience of being mercilessly harassed and bullied in Seoul as well and he may be the reason the family decided that there was a need for change. But in the bigger picture I see why his death was necessary. His parents may have lost their fortune and are new to Muji but if Sang Jin and Sang Mi slowly build confidence and friendship in their new place, the cult would never be able to truly integrate them in their church. Sang Mi may have been silent but she wouldn't keep quiet forever and her parents are the kinds who would trust her above all else. So, now that Sang Jin is dead, that makes the adults more and more vulnerable emotionally. Sang Jin and Sang Min's mother almost died herself and had a breakdown. From the looks of the preview, the father seems to have lost all control on himself who is now going after the bullies with an ax in his hand. So, with her brother gone and both her parents having lost their last thread of emotional clarity and strength, this puts the whole family in the exact place on an emotional level where the Spiritual father can manipulate and slowly trap them. That said, what on earth is going on those underground basement. Are they sexual predators in the guise of a church preying on woman or full scale psychopaths going beyond just exploiting woman?? Spiritual Father seems like a psychopath to me, so does despicable Jo. Both may have different MO's driving them but heavily depend on each other. Also, again the police and the governor, how much will they be willing to risk if they found out what the Church is actually doing in the name of God. Or do they already know and yet pretend to not see anything?? I have bad feeling about Sung Hwan's father. I don't know but what if he is somehow connected to it all. I am also scared that Dong Chul may not make it by the end of the show. I don't expect romance here at all. If my guess is right and there is a time jump then a battered, sexually violated young woman needs to be rescued and get medical and psychological counselling first, romance can wait.

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to be honest, I wonder if the spiritual father is, for the most part, just a figurehead and the true drivers of the cult are that women and Jo. I wonder if they are doing things even the father isn't aware of, and keeping him placated by...serving his needs (which are apparently for attractive woman ugh and i suppose a need for attention and adoration)

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Wow, this episode was hard to watch. But it's so well done! Sang-jin may not have said much, but he didn't need to; his looks and the way he attempted to get along in the world spoke volumes.

I love that Dong-chul didn't hesitate for even a second to help Sang-mi when she asked in the stairwell. He's lovely, plain and simple. He's giving me strong Bok-dong vibes from Angry Mom. Don't listen to judgemental adults; you're awesome, Dong-chul!

I think that last scene we were given of the Im family's wake service being interrupted and taken over by the cult "family" was the nail in the coffin for my belief that they were directly involved in Sang-jin's demise, all in a calculated effort to steer this new meat I to their clutches. Gosh, they're creepy!

Okay OCN. Premier week's episodes have me hooked. Don't let me down!

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And the cult has connections in different sectors of society. One of the members leads Father Baek and Co to the wake service.

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Seriously creeping out here.

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I cried so hard during the roof top scene. I felt as if I was the one standing on the edge :(

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That was a heartbreaking scene. The split second shot of his descent from a school window was horrifying.

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I keep wondering what the crap is in that water?!

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I'm like a lot of you in that I'm torn. I think its well done and I'm going to continue watching it. But it has gotten me emotionally invested pretty quickly. To quickly, I'm terrified I'm going to see that poor girl raped. 2 episodes in and no less than 3 men/boys with bad intentions have put their hands on her.

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Could the woman portraying Taec's mother be in a vegetative catatonic state? Watching this episode a second time to see what else I might have missed.

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It's possible, but I'm wondering what could have pushed her into that state of trauma?

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:O Wow, when I was told that this was a heartbreaking one to watch I think it was right. The topics treated are heavy, religious- brainwashing cult, bullying, suicide, sexual harassment, maybe drugs or slavery, or maybe like a torture thing is going on in those secret rooms.

-I get your point about needing more character development fo Sang Jin but you can see from ep 1 that he's shy, unconfident and low self esteem probably due to his leg problem, or maybe he lacking something else. You can see some elements that make obvious why his sister is watching over him.

- I wanted him to survive but plot wise it seems that his death get everything else going. And I like that Sang Mi is not buying the words Baek is saying, maybe she0ll find something in his speech and SJ final words, I want her to yell at him because he's taking advantage and using her family's pain to do his business and she needs to speak up before her mom and dad get into the cult too

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Dang! I feel Sangmi when her oppa jump to his death. ?

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I finally started this drama, I don't get Sang-Mi at all...her reticence is really cool in one way and understandable especially when it comes to the new church -- but what is going on with the bullying? The mistrust of adults here is weird because it's both understandable, but a little extreme without reason. I feel like half of these problems could potentially be squashed like particularly sooner had the kids like trusted their parents a bit more or gone to their teachers.

Idk, I legit don't think the show is all that great, but I do think it's fun. It's clearly going for a dank grit sorta feel, and it's hitting it. And the playful antics of the boys is just great. <3

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Also, I really wanted to say -- was I the only person who was not a fan of the "take your clothes off" scene? Idk, something about it felt cheap to me -- like an easy place for the show to go and not the most creative? Idk, maybe I'm being too harsh but the scene felt very familiar in a boring sort of way. I feel like they're dipping into the tropes for this show a little too often to get away with.

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