Rating:
Average user rating 4.5
73

Rescue Me: Episode 4

The tragedy that connects the heroes of Rescue Me also serves as a catalyst for change in this episode. Relationships change as friends and family members drift away or are forced apart, while other characters are thrown together, for better or worse. Other changes are more personal, as Sang-mi loses any ally she could have had and becomes the only sane voice in a group of people that are becoming more and more sinister with every passing hour.

 
EPISODE 4 RECAP

We rewind a bit to the scene we ended with last episode: Sang-hwan forces the bus taking Dong-chul to the youth detention center to pull over so he can run to the window and talk to his friend.

Sang-hwan tells his friend to “stand tall” like he did before, but when Dong-chul refuses to meet his gaze, Sang-hwan cries his apologies and begs for forgiveness as the policemen from the bus pull him away. Dong-chul looks steadfastly forward as Sang-hwan is taken, an unreadable expression on his face.

Meanwhile, the Im Family continues to struggle with Sang-jin’s death. A doctor tells Sang-mi and Dad that Mom will need long-term hospitalization, and that it may take years, or even a lifetime, to recover from her trauma-induced psychosis.

Back at Guseonwon, the young boy with a cognitive disability, Jeong-gu, films the outdoor festivities put on for the congregants by Disciples Kang and Jo. He’s easily lured over by the promise of soda, and at the mere mention of the word, he repeats it happily: “Soda! Soda!”

Driving back from the doctor’s office, Sang-mi and Dad discuss what to do with Mom. Dad is adamant about not sending her to a psychiatric ward, or any hospital for that matter, and insists that he will protect Sang-mi and Mom.

The look in his eyes, however, suggests that he is near the breaking point himself.

While Father Baek delivers a fiery sermon to his congregants, Dad drives the family to see a shaman in the hopes that he’ll be able to help Mom. When the shaman claims to be able to see Sang-jin’s spirit lingering behind his family, Mom is pulled from her stupor as she asks desperately, “Is Sang-jin here?”

Father Baek continues to rail against the nature of sin while demanding that the fervent congregants have absolute belief in New Heaven’s God, and as he does so, the scenes of his sermon are interspersed with the scenes of the shamanistic ritual being performed for the Im Family.

As both rituals reach a fever pitch, with the congregants writhing and raising their hands in prayer while the shaman dances and writhes himself, suddenly all the noise goes quiet as someone at the ritual announces, “Your son is here.”

The shaman kneels before Mom, “channeling” Sang-jin, and tells her in a shaky voice to continue living and take care of herself. But when Mom becomes desperate, believing the man to be Sang-jin as she grasps at his clothes, the shaman looks slightly uncomfortable as he claims that “Sang-jin” has to leave her.

“Sang-jin” gives Mom a formal bow and wishes her well, but Mom just begins to wail in absolute hysteria, refusing to believe her son is really dead. She begs Sang-mi to affirm her belief, but her pleas turn into screams of rage at her husband and daughter as Mom all but foams at the mouth as she exclaims, “Sang-jin isn’t dead! He’s alive, you saw him! Sang-jin isn’t dead!

As Mom sleeps in the van with Sang-mi by her side, Dad meets with the shaman, who claims that Mom is possessed by a bad-tempered spirit. The shaman says he will call them back to “try again” later and gives Dad a talisman for Mom.

He then tells Dad that he is expecting to be paid well again for his services. Dad has no money left to spend, but since he’s desperate to save Mom, he agrees to pay a lesser amount.

Back at Guseonwon, there is palpable tension between the three cult leaders. Disciple Kang accuses Disciple Jo of speaking disrespectfully to Father Baek, and for acting in a way unbefitting of the new person he has become since his salvation. Disciple Jo then speaks more respectfully to Father Baek, but it seems absolutely disingenuous, and neither Disciple Kang nor Father Baek seems to be fooled.

Father Baek asks Disciple Kang how the Im Family is doing (though he notably refers to them as “Sang-mi’s family members”), and when she tells him about Mom’s fragile mental state, he predicts that the family will come back to them soon. He explains rather cryptically, while staring at Disciple Jo, that sometimes New Heaven’s God uses evil people to save those who are just. The poor Im Family – what is in store for them next?

In another part of town, Han Yong-min heads to a polling station to greet a throng of reporters. He calls himself a servant of the people of Muji County and the one who’s best qualified to be governor again.

His son and female assistant dutifully look on, but when a reporter asks Sang-hwan if he thinks his father will be re-elected, he pauses before saying, “I’m not sure.” Luckily, his dad covers for him by saying that no one can predict the results of an election anyway.

While Dad sells the family truck for money to pay the shaman, half of the bumpkin biker gang, Jung-hoon and Man-hee, watch another bullfight as they wonder how Dong-chul is holding up. But they ultimately decide that he’s tough, just like the bull who ends up winning the fight.

Cut to: Dong-chul, who is slowly being led to his prison cell. As the cell door swings open, he hears Sang-hwan’s voice calling out, “Dong-chul-ah!” But when he looks back, he sees no one. Aw.

While Dad is working at the farm, he looks at a very indifferent cow and says, “Your eyes remind me of my son. Sang-jin-ah, I’m sorry. I was too indifferent toward you. You were going through a hard time, but I didn’t know any of that.” But he’s interrupted by the arrival of Disciple Kang, who has brought him a packed lunch.

Before they eat, Disciple Kang insists on sprinkling some of Guseonwon’s “Living Water” on their food, mentioning its healing powers. She adds that she’s also packed food for Sang-mi and Mom, and when Dad asks why she is being so nice, she replies that New Heaven’s God has instructed her to help those in trouble.

She also thinks that New Heaven’s God is trying to tell Dad something too, even though they don’t yet know what that is. “So try to pay close attention,” she adds cryptically.

Meanwhile, Sang-mi walks near the scene of the fight between Dong-chul and the bully who broke his back. She overhears two high school girls talking about the incident and how “that girl from Seoul” with a bad reputation (they say she’s sleeping around) was to blame. Of course, the gossiping girls are unaware that they’ve just walked past the very girl they are talking about.

When Sang-mi arrives home, she sees Disciple Kang sitting with Dad, her hand on his arm. A look of concern washes over Sang-mi’s face.

At the polling station, everyone except Sang-hwan seems to be celebrating Han Yong-min’s successful re-election bid for governor. Sang-hwan receives warm congratulations at school, except from Sang-mi, who continues not to speak to him. Along with Dong-chul’s empty desk on his other side, Sang-hwan seems very alone.

Back at work, Dad stops himself from taking a drink of water, deciding to pour some of the Living Water that Disciple Kang presumably gave him into the bottle first. He tilts back his head to drink, but stops when he sees a spider web in the rafters above.

He looks at the web, remembering the prayers that Disciple Kang said for him, quoting a Bible verse: “So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.”

Staring up, Dad suddenly envisions a cross woven into the center of the web. He now realizes, with tears in his eyes, that everything that has happened was part of New Heaven’s God’s plan and hurries off, as we see that there’s no cross within the web.

Sang-mi seeks out Sang-hwan, who is drinking beer with his buddies, and asks for Dong-chul’s phone number. She had no idea he had been sent to a youth detention center until the boys haltingly tell her. When she asks why, Sang-hwan guiltily repeats, “It was because of me.”

In the detention center, a gang of inmates corner Dong-chul, stuff a sock in his mouth to keep him quiet, and beat him where the bruises won’t be seen. The leader of the small gang cheerfully informs Dong-chul that someone paid him to make Dong-chul disabled, and hearing that, Dong-chul throws his attackers off.

With a few quick jabs and a big roundhouse kick to his tormentors, Dong-chul looks the leader in the eye unflinchingly as he asks, “Who told you to do that?”

Back at the Im household, Sang-mi comes home to find Mom busily putting on makeup as she and Dad prepare to go out. When Sang-mi asks where they’re going, Dad just smiles and says that there’s somewhere they have to go, but Mom happily interjects to add, “We’re going to meet Sang-jin. Apparently, we’ll be able to meet him there!”

At first, Sang-mi thinks that they’re going back to the shaman, and she’s against it because of how poorly Mom has been doing since then. With a wide, worrying grin, Dad tells her that they’re going to Guseonwon instead: “Sang-mi-ya, I finally get it now. The reason why we came to this neighborhood. The reason why Sang-jin had to die like that. The reason your mom is suffering like this. It was all a message that New Heaven’s God was trying to send to us.”

Alarmed now, Sang-mi tells her father to stop saying strange things and urges him to take Mom to a hospital. But Dad insists that Guseonwon is the only place that can heal Mom, as Mom frantically runs a brush through her hair to get ready to see her son.

“Stop lying,” Sang-mi finally says. “You’re doing this because of that woman. I saw you with her earlier! I’m scared. Those people gave me the creeps!” Dad may as well not be hearing her, but he kneels before Sang-mi with that same smile and asks for her to trust him. Sang-mi can only look down at him and cry as Mom whispers, “Let’s go see Sang-jin.”

The family ends up being driven to Guseonwon, where they’re greeted by Disciple Kang and Disciple Jo, who is as creepy as ever. Also there to greet them is Jeong-gu, who offers Sang-mi his favorite thing: soda. Disciple Kang says that they call Jeong-gu “Angel” in Guseonwon, noting that he never offers his precious soda to anyone but his grandmother.

After the others go in, Sang-mi hears someone softly singing, “Hide carefully, I can see the strands of your hair.” She turns around to see Jeong-gu singing this while covering his eyes. He stops singing, looks up at her, and ominously says, “Found you.”

Fast forward three years to 2017, in Seoul. A man wearing a cap gets off the subway and is accosted by two proselytizers. He stops briefly to listen, then continues on his way without comment.

The man is Sang-hwan, who we see attending a university law class. He participates (and provides a smart answer to the teacher’s question that awes both the teacher and class), but doesn’t seem keen on socializing with the other students.

One of his other classmates persuades him to go to a party, where he mostly keeps to himself. It’s only when a senior spits in a junior’s glass and tries to force him to drink it does Sang-hwan intercede, haunted by the memories of Sang-jin being brutally bullied as well as his own inaction when Sang-mi asked for his help. He defends the student by citing the laws that would punish the senior for assault, but this only enrages the senior further as he throws the tainted drink in Sang-hwan’s face.

Finally annoyed enough, Sang-hwan downs half a bottle of makgulli and uses the bottle to hit the senior in the head, calling it self-defense. He easily fends off any other attackers with a few well-placed kicks before challenging anyone else who’s willing to come at him.

We see someone with hands tattooed with crosses giving a haircut to Dong-chul, who is about to be released from detention. The barber tells Dong-chul that it’s time for him to live as a new man, while Dong-chul just stares at his reflection in the mirror with a hardened expression.

Back at Guseonwon, Father Baek watches on as Sang-mi’s dad takes charge of a new cross being installed at the church. A car pulls up and a man gets out and bows to Father Baek just as Disciple Kang approaches with an old man in a wheelchair. The younger man is greeted as Assemblyman Park, and it’s revealed that the old man in the wheelchair is his father.

The assemblyman asks Disciple Kang out on a date, but Father Baek intervenes before she can reply. The assemblyman seems to be a believer and a financial supporter of Muji County and the cult as well, and he chats with Father Baek while Disciple Jo stares sinisterly at them from afar.

Sang-hwan returns to Muji by bus and meets up with his old friends (excluding Dong-chul, of course). It seems just like old times, but they do mention that this is the first time Sang-hwan has been back to Muji in three years.

We find Sang-mi working in Guseonwon’s kitchen with many other women, all of them silent. She watches Jeong-gu eat his meal, the boy never taking his eyes off of his precious can of soda. However, when she finishes her work she finds both the boy and soda gone, and goes to look for him.

Jeong-gu walks through the woods as he takes videos with his phone, and he stumbles upon a small, isolated shack where he can hear a woman yelling and struggling inside. As he looks through the window (while filming with his phone), the screaming continues, and Jeong-gu notes, “They’re fighting. You shouldn’t fight, it’s not right.”

Suddenly, the door bursts open as a woman in a dress runs out. Disciple Jo comes out as well, fastening his pants. Jeong-gu, who doesn’t know any better, just asks Disciple Jo for soda, but an enraged Jo grabs the boy by the throat and drags him behind the shack.

Having first heard the woman’s screams and now Jeong-gu’s, Sang-mi goes running into the forest. She finds Disciple Jo standing over Jeong-gu, who’s now sporting a bloody lip and urine-soaked shorts. As the boy calls her “Sang-mi Noona,” Sang-mi’s reminded of how Sang-jin had been mistreated and gathers the boy in her arms, demanding to know what Disciple Jo was doing.

“If you beat him one more time, I’m really going to report you to the police,” Sang-mi growls. Disciple Jo attempts to laugh it off, but she’s not having it, and she helps Jeong-gu up to take him back. But Disciple Jo cuts them off as he reminds her, “Everything that happens in Guseonwon needs to be kept and dealt with in Guseonwon. You know that, right?”

Sang-mi comforts Jeong-gu as he sleeps feverishly in his room, but is surprised that he whimpers when she pats his side. Lifting his shirt, Sang-mi’s hand goes to her mouth in horror upon seeing the extent of Disciple Jo’s abuse in the enormous bruises covering the boy’s body.

Sang-mi goes straight to other Guseonwon members to plead for them to allow Jeong-gu to go to the hospital, since he isn’t well. She calls Disciple Jo out for being the one to beat Jeong-gu when Jo tries to silence her, but her father just chastises her for her rude behavior instead.

Disciple Jo, Disciple Kang, and even Dad are all against Jeong-gu’s getting help from outside. They all suggest that Living Water and faith will cure the boy of any ailment. Looking at everyone gathered in the room, Sang-mi asks them if they really think that the water can work miracles, which earns her a scolding from Dad.

That seems to be her tipping point as she asks her father to come to his senses, reminding him that it’s been three years already: “Until when are you going to live your life like this? Three years have passed. Every year, I kept wishing that we would get out of here, but it’s been three years already. Look at Mom — how can you call this a place of salvation and miracles?!”

Dad slaps Sang-mi hard across the face, but seems to instantly regret it. Sang-mi just says he is crazy to stay here before imploring everyone in the room to come to their senses as well. Finally, Disciple Kang has had enough and tells Disciple Jo to take Sang-mi to the Prayer Room. Oh, no. This is not good.

Right at the moment Sang-mi is about to be hauled away, Father Baek comes to her rescue. He says that Living Water does not work if one does not believe, and lets her take Jeong-gu to the hospital. He stares into her eyes and says that right now, she believes that everything at Guseonwon is fake and the outside world is reality. He assures her that soon, she will discover that the opposite is true.

We find Sang-mi at the hospital with Jeong-gu, but when she comes back after a break, she sees Disciple Jo whispering something into the boy’s ear. She demands to know what he said to him, but of course doesn’t get a straight answer.

Disciple Jo then states that the boy is ready to return home and, to Sang-mi’s horror, the doctor complies with this request. Jeong-gu, still obviously in pain and cringing from Disciple Jo’s touch, just whimpers that he misses his grandmother.

On the way back, they stop at a gas station, and while Disciple Jo is in the bathroom, Jeong-gu confesses to Sang-mi how terrified he is. He says that Disciple Jo hits other people and that Jo threatened him that if he said anything, he would kill him and his grandmother. Sang-mi picks up his phone and sees the video that Jeong-gu took of Disciple Jo’s attempted rape of the woman in the shack, her eyes going wide with fear.

But when she looks up, she sees Disciple Jo staring at her through the car window. Whether he saw what was on the screen or not is unclear, but he does take note of the phone being broken when he sees her clutching it tightly in the car as he shares an unnerving look with the mute driver of the van.

As they continue home, Sang-mi finds a screwdriver in the backseat, hides it in her hand, and the next thing we see is the van careening off the road and flipping several times down the side of a mountain. We then see Sang-mi and Jeong-gu bloodied and suspended upside-down by their seat belts, eyes closed.

Then Sang-mi’s eyes shoot open, wide and alert.

 
COMMENTS

Throughout the show, Sang-mi has exhibited a will of iron as well as a nearly infallible bullshit detector. She has remained steadfast and unquestioning of herself and her own moral compass despite all that has happened, not least of all being forced to live inside a cult for three years. Until she confronted the others in the cult about Jeong-gu, her strength had been shown mostly through her patience and passive resistance. After seeing the video of Disciple Jo’s attempted rape and the car accident, she will now need to prove her strength through her ability to fight back and actively protect herself and those she cares about, especially since Jeong-gu reminds her so much of the brother she couldn’t protect.

In contrast to Sang-mi, Sang-hwan was far more doubting and unsure of himself. This made it so gratifying to see him stand up to the sunbae bullies at the university. In Seoul, he seems to have little interest in a social life, focusing his attention on studying law instead. Sang-hwan’s transformation is surely the result of his role Sang-jin’s death, Dong-chul’s repeated arrests and incarceration, and his father’s pressure on him to hold back from doing what he knew was right and just.

Back in Muji, he had already started to distance himself emotionally from his father and did not return home for three years after going away to school. Now seemingly a more confident, morally aware individual, it will be interesting to see what Sang-hwan’s relationships will look like when encounters his father, Dong-chul, and Sang-mi after such a long absence.

Dong-chul looked like he was strong enough to fight the inmates that were paid to hurt him, but what happened after that initial confrontation is less clear. What changes did he undergo during his incarceration? Also, how does he feel about Sang-hwan, who basically turned his back on him twice in favor of helping his father’s re-election campaign? Has he forgiven Sang-hwan, or has he been building up resentment over the last three years?

Rescue Me started out as a grim, dark show that was almost too intense and painful for me to watch. It is still dark and grim, but it’s been fascinating to see how the interconnected lives of all the characters unfold. And the inner (and often outer) strength of our heroes provide rays of hope for a better future in the episodes to come.

RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , ,

73

Required fields are marked *

I like Sang-Mi so much. She is such a caring and strong heroine without being good at Taekwondo, having Superpowers or police badge

22
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

Also
1. I felt SO bad for Sang-Mi, it really felt like she was alone against the whole world.
2. I blame her parents (her mother wasn't exactly great even before getting ill). This people were supposed to protect her, but their incompetence made the child be the one who had to be the adult in this family. No wonder Sang-Mi doesn't smile, did she ever even had a normal childhood?
3. Jeong-Gu kinda creeps me out, don't know why but there is just something about him that makes me worried when Sang-Mi is near him.
4. I REALLY REALLY hope that crosses on Dong-Chul's hairdresser's hands are red herrings.

8
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

I remember being troubled by something that Sang Mi's mother said about Sang Jin. I don't know if she was putting all the blame on herself or did she somehow caused Sang Jin's disablity through negligence.

Maybe I was too sensitive but I was annoyed when Dad said the cow's eyes reminded him of Sang Jin.

6
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

We can blame the cult all we want, but I believe that it is parents who somewhat caused all the "misfortunes" that got in their ways.
I mean, in the beginning we have a girl who after Seul agrees living in a farm, she doesn't complain and even cheers her father who caused it. In next scene we see how she says that she doesn't want to live in a warm-comfortable house, because the people in church scare her. We might think her parents would listen to her because she has never shown this side of herself and probably has the reasons for acting that way, but nope, her parents act like she is overacting and don't even ask why.

Sang-Jin as well doesn't complain, because he doesn't want to bother his parents. Unfortunately, his sister can't protect him, because she is also a kid and kids need parent's support. At some point, boy simply gets tired of it all and kills himself. Sang-Mi's dad calls himself incompetent in previous episode and it perfectly summarizes him. If only those two were listening to their children, had enough guts to face real world we would have a whole different type of drama.

12
reply

Required fields are marked *

Her father strikes me as the typical mindless follower that often get sucked into cults. In the end (though her mother was no gem), he is the cause of all these problems. I won't miss him if he steps in front of the Truck of Doom.

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Where is ToD when you need him??? He'd be busy for eons and have a cheering fanclub.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I see Jeong-gu as a version of Sang-jin who's been twisted by the cult. He's innocent around the cult members, but he warns and watches over those he trusts whom are stuck there like he is. He's creepy from the cult twisting him into their version if an "angel".

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yeah, an incompetent parents can make their child's life a living hell. We grew up thinking our parents will always be able to protect us, they are invincible and they can always find a solution to our families problems. It turns out that's not the case.
That's why although I don't like Sangmi's parents because they are really weak minded, I can't hate them because they are also human being. Of course it's also not right that a child have to grow up and be the adult of the family. I don't know how much Sangmi loves her parents, but if I were in her situation I'll just run and leave them with the cult. I guess I'm not as brave as her.

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

True.You have brought down most of the kdrama heroines.

She is an idiot. Spent 3 years there. Saw how people are brainwashed and still played the shout-match. It was same in bullying case, her thinking students will stand against bullies.
2nd - What she makes out of her parents. In real life - going Dan-ah would do her best but we know she is the Heroine. How can she leave her parents behind. But so far she has no clue/idea or plan to what to do. She doesn't know anything about cult.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I said I would just read recaps from now on but I went ahead and watched episode 4 and oh my GAH!

I really hope jeong-gu is alive because poor kid, I loved it when Sang-mi stood up for him and that she's really the only one who isn't wearing rose coloured glasses. When father Baek said that it's the outside world that's fake, it gave me chills. I have no idea whether he actually believes in his ideals or if there's something more sinister lurking beneath. I KNEW IT! There was something weird about that apostle Jo guy, from what I've seen in this episode, he probably got arrested for rape and is now, "turning a new leaf" I suppose.

Usually I can feel for parents but my god, dad has gone into complete oblivion. It sucks that the cult took advantage of them during a vulnerable time in their lives, it's gonna take a lot for dad to wake up and see the world around him. That "holy water" probably has some sort of drug that causes them to hallucinate or perhaps dad just wanted to shed his responsibilities and pass them onto someone else. The part where dad slapped Sang-Mi he definitely regretted it but there was a look of acknowledgement? Almost as if Sang-mi's words got to him not because it's disrespectful to his beliefs but because there was truth in what she said, they're not living in salvation, they're living in an illusion because someone else offered them a "better solution". I don't know, it probably was nothing but this show is great and I think I'll just watch it instead.

8
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Religion + money(business) = Politics. They always thrive on peoples misery. They look for hope and religious nuts hammer home run there and we can brainwashed followers. Chemical Water surely is some sort experimental drug which helps take control over people. Power isn't in water. Power lies in the words chosen by Baek. Water just amplify the effects of those words on followers minds.

I said in previous recap - Baek and that Lady a bit believe in whatever crap they spout. They both believe this shady almighty is the right path for the everyone. But at the same time they have criminal past so they have the inkling how much of their actions are just big ugly lies.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The first 10 mins of this episode creeps the hell out of me. The sequence between Shaman and Father Baek, with the background music, the sound of the those musical instruments and believers in the church cheering "our wishes will be fulfilled" that keeps getting louder and louder made my heart raced really fast. I only could breathe properly when the music stopped and the old lady said, "your son's here." I was really scared when the Shaman spoke like Sang Jin.

I think I'll be sticking with the theory that the tea and the spray water have drugs on it to make people delusional. It can be seen when Sang Mi's dad even saw the cross on a freaking spider web. I feel sorry towards Sang Mi for carrying the burden for her broken parents. Moving out to the town is definitely the worst mistake that the Im family had ever done.

And how did Jeong Gu end up being a weird kid and addicted to the soda? He used to be normal right when he first came to the church?

12
14
reply

Required fields are marked *

I can't wait for the next episode! For all the time Sang Mi's in the car with Disciple Jo, I pray that she'll be safe and she'll not fall into being another rape victim of Disciple Jo. I was shocked with the cliffhanger! But then again, this drama never fails to shock me on how far the writer will go. May the rest of the episodes will be interesting as it is right now.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm seriously considering the Holy Water being a placebo only. Even Spiritual Father himself told that it only works when someone believes in it (not that he was a most trusted person, but still it's a hint to bear in mind). I imagine Sang Mi would be exposed on it in food and drinks during her stay with the cult people and even her strength alone wouldn't be enough to fight hallucinations. But she doesn't falter.
If it's drugged, sticking to pre-sealed beverages isn't that bad of an idea.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes to that ten minutes sequence. I was one of those people in the church. I was clapping. I was screaming. I was jumping. I wanted to believe. It was exhilarating and a good release of all the worries I have. (My gosh, I guess I will become a member of the church before this ends.). --- Very tight editing. Well done. Again, kudos to the crew for letting us get a glimpse of what is happening in small rural town. Thank you

Regarding the tea and spray water, Father Baek said it, there is nothing in special there. It's water. And that's my theory. It's just plain water. But people do get sucked in to believe that it is a miracle. I'm sure the wine that Catholics drink on Sunday mass are purely wine. But we like to believe that there's something greater than that. It's the same concept, I think with this drama. That the message the drama is saying, we follow unbelievable things rather than the logical ones.

9
9
reply

Required fields are marked *

Do you need the four bumpkins to save you from becoming the member of that church?

Great insights on the tea and spray water. It might be that Sang Mi's dad is vulnerable and Disciple Kang's word what moves him to find "peace" in believing the Almighty. Oh well, I guess people just believe what they want to believe.

1
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

With those accents, yes please. I'm weak when it comes to Busan dialects. (I think, that's where they're from)

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

That dialect is Jeolla-do, I think. Busan is slightly different from Seoul, and as an outsider, I feel like South Koreans are the only one who can distinguish the small difference. On the other hand, that Jeolla-do accent is really thick lol

1

No, I'll just take a Dong-chul to save me. ?

6
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

So wise of you for wanting Dong Chul for yourself. Hahaha. But I wonder if Dong Chul is still the selfless guy who'd help people in need without any hesitation after what happened to him. Hmm

1

I'd really prefer if it's just water. The idea of putting drugs in these over a long period is not very feasible. Where do they get the drugs and how can they afford it? It will have more impact if there's actually nothing special about the water but a demonstration of how powerful a human mind can be.

7
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

If indeed it is just plain water i think he just playing mind games with them and manipulating them...The dude knows beforehand what type of people they are and even more if they are mental weak,it's easy to do it

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

They are not averse to using drugs disciple Kang was shown giving Sang Mi mother a pill in an epilogue. The mother even opens her mouth to show she swallowed it. It could be anything.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am surprised at how realistically they portrayed exactly how many of those cults actually work in real life. I have seen a few "sneaky" videos on YouTube, and except for the language, it could be a mirror image.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

"And how did Jeong Gu end up being a weird kid and addicted to the soda?"

From the first moment we were introduced to Jeong-gu, I thought that he might have had some intellectual disability.

Regarding some of the "strange" things he says: it might be a result of all the things he has seen/witnessed. Perhaps he lacks the vocabulary to describe (or a good understanding of) what is really going on.

8
reply

Required fields are marked *

The first 10 mins reminds me a lot of the "battle" between Korean shaman and Japanese monk in The Wailing.. equally dark and creepy..

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I couldn:t even imagine how life was for Sang-mi in the past 3 years. What a strong girl, to say the least.

Thanks for the recaps !

9
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This show makes me feel horrible. It´s so disturbing, but at the same time I just can´t take my eyes off the screen.

11
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

"Throughout the show, Sang-mi has exhibited a will of iron as well as a nearly infallible bullshit detector."

I can't agree more! To live in a cult without giving in mentally or breaking down is an astronomical feat. Love for her parents and unwilling to abandon them must be what's holding her up. Having someone like Jeong Gu also gave her purpose.

Honestly, that scene where Jeong Gu sang that creepy song sent a shiver down my spine. I wasn't expecting Sang Mi to take him under her wings as her dongsaeng. Kudos to the young actor who's playing Jeong Gu. His trauma, fear and distress were so real - a stark contrast to Criminal Minds which failed miserably in their portrayal of young victims.

Was it just me or did anyone else cheered when Dong Chul made mincemeat out of the gang so effortlessly? I wonder who was it who wanted to maim him? Was it the bully's father? I sure hope it wasn't Sang Hwan's dad. That would make it impossible for the two boys to reconcile. I also wonder who's the person who gave Dong Chul the haircut? Someone with links to the cult?

9
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

If the cult has members from every walk of life, I wouldn't be surprised if the fellow prisoner (?) were one.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Any time Dong-chul was on-screen I felt my heart squeeze with pain for this poor kid. Same for Sang-mi.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

If I thought I was stressed before the timeskip, it's nothing compared to now. I love seeing the main characters' adult selves, but I'm anxious about things to come.

Sang-mi is such a wonderful heroine—her iron will is what keeps me going through all the creepiness. Whatever happens throughout the rest of the show, I hope she never loses that mindset—never completely, at least.

I'm so worried about Dong-chul, because I'm sure he'll have changed immensely. Will he still be willing to stand up for people, or is that all behind him? As much as that saddens me, it'll be interesting to see how he interacts with the world after everything he's gone through.

14
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

And Sung-hwan, who seems to have been trying to repent for the mistakes of his past, by gathering strength of his own to make a difference in the future. I think that maybe he has been living day-by-day punishing himself. I want to know how he managed to get away from his father.

6
reply

Required fields are marked *

Dong Chul was changed but I hope deep down he's still that sincere high school boy with values. This show needs people with good hearts.

9
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recap and comments. I missed Dong chul this episode, he only had two or three scenes but I quite enjoyed watching Sang mi , who is a strong and capable heroine.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I wonder how our heroes will try to help Sang-mi. Will they try to infiltrate the cult? I am now thinking about the prisone scene and the mysterious person cutting Dong-cheol's hair. Do you think that there is a possibility that someone might try to recruit Dong-cheol? Dong-cheol seems to be strong willed, and I do not think that he would easily believe the sweet words uttered by Father Baek and company, but it's just a thought. Perhaps he might agree to join the cult if he sees Sang-mi and the predicament she is in. So whether the result of a conversion or a desire to save someone, we could see Dong-cheol as one of the Church of New Heaven's newest members.

3
9
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think I may be remembering incorrectly, but for some reason, I thought Disciple Jo had tattooed hands? I don't know why, but when I saw the hands I assumed it was him...

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Disciple Jo and Father Baek were "bad" people before the cult. So they might welcome juvenile criminals like Dong Chul who lost their way and are rejected by society.

6
reply

Required fields are marked *

I believe the mystery person had a different voice from Apostle Jo.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I had the same thought about Dong Chul. He can help her from inside and the three other boys from the outside.

4
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Wouldn't that be awesome?

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Shallow of me but i want to see Sang mi and Dong Chul sharing the same space, hopefully working together. They have shown themselves to be the strongest -willed characters with a better sense of right and wrong then any other. I'm glad Sung hwan is willing to stand up to bullies again but he has to stand up to his father now, A much more difficult task.
I can't see his father wanting to risk rocking the boat, especially considering the influential backers the church has

6
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Honestly I agree with this, both characters have a grit to them that makes them seem like a good match to fight their way out.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I have different view. I don't think Dong-Chul or Sang Mi are far better than Sang-Hwan. All 3 deal with terrible parents. Its just that Sang-Hwan has father-power + couldn't indulge in risky business.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I worry now that Dong-chul may become an unwilling new occupant of one of those prater rooms in the basement. Maybe he will meet Sang-mi there, escape with her, and they can run away to a happy future? Did I just come up with a makjang reverse plot? Like a film negative? Because I'd watch it.

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ugh, that three-year time jump felt like a punch in the gut. Knowing that the characters we knew have been living through tough experiences seemingly alone, is tough. Now, they are probably all quite different from how we knew them, and it will be interesting to see which parts of their personalities survived. We know that Sang-mi has been in a bad situation, and roughly how she got there. But what worries me the most, is how Dong-chul may have changed. This show is perfect for setting up uncertainties that feel realistic in that way.

8
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

As you said: perfect. What. A. Show.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Recently, I am loving all the strong heroines dramaland has given. Emotionally strong, steadfast in their morals, having quiet dignity, not afraid to voice their opinions, smart, resourceful heroines such as Yeo-jin, Chae-kyung and now Sang-mi.

10
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Apostle Jo is disgusting. How can he beat weak people, children and abuse women for so long ? The poor souls can't do anything !

I think Sang Mi sees her brother in Jeong Gu. She's the same protective high school girl as three years ago. I'm glad to see she was not brainwashed and still stands strong in front of them while living with them. The videos Jeong Gu took can be used as proof to take the cult or at least Apostle Jo down.

It would be great to see Dong Chul infiltrate the cult. He didn't graduate high school, has a poor background and spent 3 years in a juvenile center. The society doesn't want him and the cult can see him as a potential believer. I just want someone to be by Sang Mi's side because no matter how strong she is, she and her parents can't escape alone.

8
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm glad that we share the same ideas of Dong-cheol possibly infiltrating the cult. I can definitely see cult members trying to recruit him. And regarding criminal backgrounds: it seems that the leaders of the cult themselves may have criminal (or at least very shady) backgrounds. Maybe some of them had even been abused before their lives were changed. I can't wait till we get the background stories of Baek, Eun-shil, and Jo.

7
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Among the trio Disciple Jo must have a criminal record I think.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I thinks so as well.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

omg how do you guys watch this show?? this is so disturbing and creepy especially whenever disciple jo comes up.

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Haha, it's scary and creepy, BUT SO GOOD AND SO WORTH IT. I don't like scary stuff, but I was drawn to this show from the first frames of the first episode. Now I don't want to watch any other show episodes in full.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's is so hard to watch it tbh and sometimes even reading the recap gives me the chills.But it's such a fascinating and well produced show so I keep coming back to it every week

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

This is just too good! I love how Sang-hwan seemed to have taken his guilt and transformed it into something useful. He's studying law, probably to protect himself and other people, without the influence of his Dad. It also makes me happy to see him standing up for those who are bullied, learning from previous mistakes of just turning away.

The scene with Sang-mi trying to convince the Guseonwon people to take Jeong-gu to the hospital was very powerful. Like you're the only sane one but these people look at you as if you're crazy. I was totally there with her asking them just how do they not see how suspicious this cult is.

Disciple Jo is just garbage. I can't believe these things are going on for years and he's still not getting punished for it. He's hella creepy too. I watched this episode twice, raw and subbed, yet I still got surprised watching it a 2nd time when his face appeared outside the window!

I wonder how much Dong-chul has changed. It seems that the crosses on the barber's hand suggests they do religious activities in jail. It would be interesting to see him a changed man in the religious aspect too.

This drama can go so many places. I'm excited to see where it's taking me. Bring it on!

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Forgot to add my thoughts about Father Baek. I'm still confused about him. Does he really have a sinister plan/goal for Guseonwon? Does he really believe what he preach? We know for sure that Disciple Jo is creepy af and he would show his true colors when they're by themselves. However, I've never seen that with Father Baek. He's always the same whether with people or with the other two leaders. I just can't get into what he's thinking.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Sang mi's father acting like a sheep is seriously disappointing. His poor wife is being drugged. It would have been better if she were in a hospital where at least there are trained personnel who would monitor and care for her.

Sang hwan most likely feels guilty for not intervening in the bullying incident and for his best friend going to prison. I hope things gets better for them and Sang Mi can get out of the cult.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Is this interesting? Is the acting good? Because reading the plot only, I find it really promising, but I'm still in doubt whether to watch it or not. It looks great cinematography-wise though.

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'd say yes to interesting and well-acted. More than that, the directing, cinematography and music works together to create an amazing amount of tension. They do a great job of making the audience FEEL what the characters are feeling... whether it's fear, betrayal, friendship, disgust.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm a major weenie when it comes to scary TV and movies, but I love this show's darkness, actong, and willingness to just go "there" and beyond for the sake of the plot, etc. So well done! Try the first episode and see what happens!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's decided. I think I'll just stay with the recaps for now. The show is too grim and dark, so if anyone is going through depression, they should better avoid it. I won't say I'm going through any, but this show and the disturbing contents do create/ bring a certain mood, which I'm not comfortable with at all.
And for God's sake if that father or whatever ever brings his face close to sang mi's face again I'm gonna break my laptop I swear. ?

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'd love to see that Sang-Mi had been visiting Dong-Chul all these years, after learning why he's there, or at least once to thank him for his support and help. Also, I'd had minded a lot to Song-chung and probably would have helped him to stay strong and focus, kind of like in Triangle, when the girl visited him in prison and he's "don't come, I'm not good for you blah, blah, blah, and she's not buying it, and call him out for it.
I just really want Sang-Mi and Dong-Chul to have a deep bond, I found more plausible their romantic relationship (if there's gonna be one) than with Sang-Hwan.

2
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I feel the same way! Part of what keeps me going through all the darkness is the possibility of some sort of relationship between Dong Chul and Sang Mi. I accept that Taceyeon is the lead, and if there is going to be a romantic relationship it will be between Sang Mi and him, but the actor playing Dong Chul is so magnetic that I am dying to see him interact more with Sang Mi. I hope he does end up infiltrating the cult. that will be so thrilling to watch.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@anaismac I like the idea of Sang-mi visiting Dong-chul, but I wonder if she's allowed to leave the compound alone or unescorted. I don't recall seeing any cult members living on-site driving or leaving if they weren't the top three.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

True, but what about as a cult program for those poor lost souls ~ if we think that the barber is a member, that means that the cult may have been visitors, not uncommon with 'religious' organization to set this kind of programs...also it will help with the facade of good Samaritans involved with the community, no?

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

* It'd had meant it a lot to Dong-chung

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This is one of the few k-dramas I like. Save Me is another good drama by OCN this year. The OST is really good too, very haunting!

Hope more viewers will watch it and gets higher ratings.

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I had to fast forward certain parts of the show because it was too difficult to watch

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I had a culture shock when I first started watching this show because of the eerie aftertaste it left behind. But over the course of these four episodes, I find myself growing attached to Sang Mi. What keeps me hanging on is the hope that good will ultimately triumph over evil and that the hapless will not always remain so... That all it takes is a few good people to save a whole lot of those being misled. I am waiting with bated breath to see this unfold. Please, show....

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This drama literally puts me through a roller coaster of emotions. One minute I'm crying and the next I'm furious! Sang Hwan was pissing me off so much when he didn't stand up for Dong Cheol! Apostle Jo is so disgusting and the scene where Jeong Gu was beat was so hard to watch and when his face popped up by the window I legit SCREAMED

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This show is great. Editing, music, cast (lol mostly) and everything else is simply amazing. It is so good that I need a dose of straight simple comedy to recover after.

As a lot of beanies have mentioned Sang-mi has iron mind as she did not fall under the influence of the cult for 3 years. But it is kinda difficult for me to believe that she did not notice anything bad for her to react for 3 years. For me the actress and actor portraying her parents are doing a great job as I do not like them. They should be pillars of the family but they are a mess. Mother who could not pull herself together when she has a second child plus lashing out on her for not protecting her brother and blaming her is just bad. Sang-mi should be there for her brother, but she is also a child same as him without any real power. Father who is guilable and who ignores his daughter straight out telling him she is scared and creeped out by the people in the cult has failed in the most important role he had - protecting his child from harm (again).

I am intrigued with the relationship between apostole Jo, Kang and father Baek. They certainly have a history together. But why is Jo bowing down to Baek when he clearly wants the power for himself? He is the only one whose mask of a believer is taken off. What does Baek have from the cult and did he succeed in fooling himself to be a reformed man and a spiritual leader? Kang's motive is the least clear here for me. You can sense something with the other 2 but she is just cold.

And for the end - Dong-Chul. The beating scene completely stole my heart. I was surpised when I saw him just taking the beating and not reacting. But then BAM - injustice - and he is off. Curious to see how he has changed and what are his beliefs now. Did he forgive? For sure he did not forget. Hope he just stays true to himself.

Rescue me crew - Fighting!!!!

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hair really has an important role in this drama. It’s amazing how Sang Mi’s hair and clothes matured her appearance so much. Jo Wan Tae’s unchanging curly hair seems to perfectly accentuate his nefarious nature. Father Baek’s hair is reminiscent of many televangelists, but paired with his white suits highlights his desire to reflect purity, cleanliness, and the new start.

At this point I appreciate all of the actors, especially the young actor playing the autistic boy. He is killing it.

I adore our Dong Cheul, like everyone else on here it seems. I feel like I was waiting the entire episode for Sang Mi to go visit him in jail. I’ll be really disappointed if it turns out she didn’t, although it seems like he free choice and free time is very limited up in that cult temple.

I wish I could binge this drama. It is so, so good!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Currently Airing

Prime-Time Shows This Week
Monday-Tuesday (March 23-24) Wednesday-Thursday (March 25-26) Weekend (March 27-29)