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Strongest Deliveryman: Episode 1

Strongest Deliveryman, the newest weekend late-night offering from KBS, bills itself as a “hot-blooded youth drama” focusing on the lives of young and broke jjajangmyun delivery drivers (with perhaps a chaebol or two thrown in for good measure). While it’s still unclear where exactly this show plans to take its deliverymen, I think we can safely anticipate an enjoyable character-driven ride.

 
EPISODE 1 RECAP

A voiceover introduces us to CHOI KANG-SOO (Go Kyung-pyo), described as a drifter who only stays in one neighborhood for two months before leaving for a new neighborhood. As Kang-soo darkens in sections of a giant wall map of Seoul and packs up his belongings, the voiceover continues to tell us that Kang-soo gives off an “I’m the crazy guy of the neighborhood” vibe.

Riding his motorcycle, Kang-soo zooms back and forth on the empty road, cheering with joy as he revels in the fun of popping wheelies and feeling like he’s flying as he drives with his arms stretched out. But he quickly returns to driving safely (and quietly) when he notices a delivery scooter next to him.

 

As they stop at a light, Kang-soo and the delivery driver are the only two at the intersection. Kang-soo remarks that the man is working late, but the delivery driver says the long hours are worth it because it’s all for his kids.

Just then, a car crashes into the delivery driver, sending him into the windshield and then up over the roof before he falls in a heap onto the road. Even though he’s wearing a helmet, the amount of blood coming from his head doesn’t look good at all. The annoyed driver of the car leans out the window and orders Kang-soo to just ignore it.

With a stunned glance back at the injured delivery man, Kang-soo calls for an ambulance and speeds off after the car. The voiceover from earlier informs us that Kang-soo has a habit of getting involved in other people’s business.

It’s an early morning race through the nearly empty streets of Seoul, and Kang-soo is hot on the hit-and-run driver’s tail. The car weaves through tiny streets, nearly hitting the handful of other people who are out at the wee hours of the morning. The driver thinks he’s finally lost Kang-soo, when suddenly, Kang-soo suddenly appears in front of him, causing the driver to slam on the brakes.

 

Kang-soo takes pictures of the car, license plate, and the driver, then speeds off. The driver tries to follow, but is soon forced to swerve, and his car crashes down a long set of stairs before hitting a wall. When the man tries to flee on foot, Kang-soo pulls up to him and cites the punishment he’ll face for a hit-and-run.

The man desperately tries to plead with Kang-soo, begging him not to call the cops while insisting that he’ll pay for the delivery driver’s medical bills. Instead, Kang-soo demands to know how he’s going to compensate the person who is hungry and angry that they never received their jjajangmyun delivery.

After the hit-and-run driver is taken into police custody, Kang-soo happily speeds off on his motorcycle, but then he has to do front wheelie when he nearly collides with another scooter emerging from an alley. The scooter driver, LEE DAN-AH (Chae Soo-bin), leans and slides under his wheel like a stunt driver, both of them barely missing each other.

When they come to a stop, they yell at each other to watch where they’re going. They’re about to go their separate ways when Kang-soo picks up his phone that fell to the ground during the near-crash, showing Dan-ah the cracked screen. Kang-soo demands that she pay for repairs, asking for her number, but she retorts that she won’t, sarcastically calling him “oppa.”

Kang-soo grabs her wrist, demanding for her phone number, and when he won’t let go, she kicks him in the groin. As he reels in pain, Dan-ah pretends to be concerned, asking “oppa” where it hurts and if she should blow on it to make it better.

Then she tells Kang-soo that she’s already going crazy trying to make ends meet. As she gets back on her scooter to drive away, Dan-ah cheerfully tells Kang-soo that if he has a problem with that, he can just sue her.

Elsewhere, LEE JI-YOON (Go Won-hee) runs from six men in suits. She stops to catch her breath, asking if they can just forget that they ever saw each other. But the suited guys’ sense of duty is too strong, and she continues to sprint through the streets with the men hot on her tail.

 

Meanwhile, we find OH JIN-GYU (Kim Sun-ho) as he enjoys a drive in his fancy car, and when he comes across a narrow street that’s further blocked with delivery trucks along one side, he accepts the challenge. Pulling in his side mirrors, he effortlessly navigates the tiny space, but slams on the brakes when Ji-yoon suddenly runs into the intersection.

Ji-yoon realizes that the only way to escape the men in suits is by going up the road Jin-gyu is now blocking. She quickly apologizes, then scrambles over his car. Jin-gyu watches in horror as the six security guys also tromp all over his once-perfect car in their pursuit of Ji-yoon.

Jin-gyu takes his battered car to his repair shop and is relatively magnanimous about the indentations on the hood and roof, admitting that he was in the way. Before the repairmen work on that car, though, Jin-gyu wants them to focus on getting his street-racer ready, promising them all big bonuses if he wins the race.

Kang-soo slurps down jjajangmyun as chef JANG DONG-SOO (Jo Hee-bong) watches. Based on the intel Chef Jang has received, he knows that Kang-soo is twenty-five years old with five years of experience as a delivery driver, and will only work at a place with jjajangmyun that tastes good.

Kang-soo gives his approval of the noodles, asking to work at the restaurant. Kang-soo reiterates that he’ll only stay for two months, vaguely explaining that he’s just curious about other places. Chef Jang says it doesn’t really matter, since most of the delivery guys barely last a week, anyway.

A gust of wind brings in the restaurant’s owner, SOON-AE (Lee Min-young), who promptly fires Kang-soo when he doesn’t laugh at her terrible puns, ha. Kang-soo quickly backpedals, explaining he was only trying to be polite by holding in his laughter.

When Soon-ae makes another terrible pun, Kang-soo literally doubles over with laughter. She can see through his act, but seems pleased regardless. However, Soon-ae says that she’s not the one who will make the final decision about Kang-soo’s hiring — that will be Dan-ah. Chef Jang and Soon-ae reverently describe Dan-ah’s ninja-like delivery skills, calling her a legend.

Kang-soo nervously waits for Dan-ah, but when he sees that it’s the scooter girl from before, he sighs in resignation. Dan-ah smirks as she tells Kang-soo that his final interview will begin.

 

During the interview, Dan-ah (still calling him “oppa”) tells Kang-soo to sit respectfully. Chef Jang and Soon-ae tell him to sit up straight and put his hands in his lap, adding that whenever Dan-ah calls someone “oppa,” it means she doesn’t like him. Kang-soo starts to pull his knees together with great difficulty, but instead of changing his posture to be more respectful, he grabs his bag to head out the door.

Dan-ah: “You pass.” That stops Kang-soo in his tracks, and Dan-ah explains that someone without any pride also has no sense of responsibility. They all congratulate him on his hiring, but Kang-soo can’t help but narrow his eyes at Dan-ah’s chipper “Well done, oppa.”

Kang-soo settles into his room above the restaurant, spreading out his wall-sized map of Seoul. This is his 33rd neighborhood, and he wonders how long it will take to fill in the entire city.

 

The restaurant is in full swing as Dan-ah and Kang-soo head out for their deliveries. It’s clear that Dan-ah isn’t just a legend because of her quick skills, because an entire school of high school boys cheer like a bunch of fan boys as she walks through the hallway with her delivery. Meanwhile, Kang-soo nervously sets out bowls of jjajangmyun to the angry glares of boxers who were expecting Dan-ah.

In one of the neighborhood’s bustling food alleys, businesswoman JUNG HYE-RAN (Kim Hye-ri) gets a report from her assistant about the amount of customers that visit the restaurants. Hye-ran decides that they need to speed up the opening date of their alley of “Jung Family” restaurants so they can directly compete with this alley of long-standing family-owned restaurants.

It’s no surprise, then, that there are protesters outside Hye-ran’s office when she arrives, declaring that the Jung Family restaurants are unfair to all the family-owned restaurants that were pushed out. The protesters yell that the Jung Family restaurants should leave, but Hye-ran just wants to know when their latest commercial will air.

Kang-soo’s next delivery takes him to Jin-gyu’s car repair shop. Kang-soo marvels at the race car, wondering how much it costs. Jin-gyu says that it’s expensive — and the price doesn’t really matter, anyway, since it’s not like Kang-soo could ever afford it.

 

Kang-soo takes offense at the way Jin-gyu looks down on him and tells Jin-gyu to respect other people, even if they’re just deliverymen. Jin-gyu says Kang-soo shouldn’t take his inferiority complex out on him, and Kang-soo retorts that when someone like Jin-gyu is mad, it’s just “anger,” but when someone like Kang-soo gets mad, it’s apparently an “inferiority complex.”

Jin-gyu pushes Kang-soo in a friendly-but-not-really way as he repeats that Kang-soo is amusing. Kang-soo is ready to punch Jin-gyu in the face, but the car guys quickly separate the two men.

Kang-soo makes his way back to the restaurant, but he’s blocked by a handful of other neighborhood deliverymen. They tell Kang-soo that he’s now on “their” turf, and Kang-soo sighs to himself that there’s people like this in every neighborhood. The ringleader tells Kang-soo to report to a man named Baek Gong-gi at another noodle restaurant, bow respectfully, and let Baek Gong-gi decide what to do with him.

 

Kang-soo jokes that he won’t go see someone named a hundred (“baek”) bowls (“gong-gi”), and instead would rather wait for someone called a thousand (“cheon”) bowls (“gong-gi”). The other deliverymen take offense at Kang-soo’s joke, warning him that Baek Gong-gi is an experienced martial artist, so Kang-soo should be careful about what he says.

It’s just another day in the delivery life when Dan-ah overhears a mother warn her young daughter that if she doesn’t study hard, she’ll end up as a delivery girl like Dan-ah. This is likely far from the first time Dan-ah has heard such a comment, since she rolls her eyes and turns back to the mother, telling her that one actually has to be smart to know the roads and make quick calculations.

When a loan shark gets a little handsy as she delivers jjajangmyun to his new neighborhood office, she grabs his arm and pinches down hard on the nerve, quickly incapacitating him. She also uses her delivery box to knock the loan shark’s assistant across the room.

Dan-ah tells the loan shark that her job is only difficult because of creeps like him, then orders him to never order from her restaurant again. The now-terrified loan shark agrees.

After the restaurant closes, Dan-ah tells Kang-soo to finish up his work by collecting all the empty bowls from the customers. She promises to check on him first thing in the morning when she returns, and she drives off with one last “Good job, oppa!”

Exhausted and hungry, Ji-yoon sits on some steps, craving every little food scent that passes her. She spots the empty bowls set out for Kang-soo to retrieve them, happy to discover there’s still some leftover sweet-and-sour pork on the plate.

 

Ji-yoon tries to talk herself out of eating a stranger’s leftovers, but her stomach wins the argument and she wipes off the chopsticks. Just as she’s putting the piece of pork in her mouth, Kang-soo drives up. He covers up the awkwardness by politely asking if she’s finished eating, and Ji-yoon hurriedly gives him the dishes as she says she’s done — all the while trying to chew and swallow her leftover piece of pork.

Kang-soo tells her to follow him so she can eat some fresh food. When Ji-yoon insists that she’s fine, he grabs her bag and slowly drives off, forcing her to run after him. At the restaurant, he makes her a bowl of fresh jjajangmyun, which she immediately devours.

Ji-yoon’s father worries that his security guys weren’t able to find his daughter. But Ji-yoon’s mother — none other than Jung Family CEO Hye-ran — tells her husband that his way of having people chase Ji-yoon will just push her further away. Hye-ran’s method of cutting off Ji-yoon’s credit cards guarantees that Ji-yoon will return home, since without money, Ji-yoon will be cold and hungry.

Except Ji-yoon currently has a warm belly full of jjajangmyun. Ji-yoon happily thanks Kang-soo for the meal, and he accurately guesses that Ji-yoon ran away from home and has no money. Ji-yoon marvels that Kang-soo knows she’s been on the run for three days, and he wryly points out that’s how long it takes before someone’s hungry enough to eat a stranger’s leftovers.

 

Kang-soo asks how old she is, and Ji-yoon chirps that she’s twenty-three. He tells her not to lie — twenty-three is too old to run away from home, since that’s the age for someone to start living on their own. He knows that she’s really a high school student. Ji-yoon laughs when he says that she looks like she’s seventeen, but she goes along with it.

She explains to Kang-soo that her running away is a textbook case of rebellion. Since she’s always obeyed her parents up until now, all the rebellious urges finally built up, and she finally just exploded in her desire to run away.

Kang-soo sets up some bedding for her in his room above the restaurant, telling her to think of her parents’ faces a thousand times before she goes to sleep. Ji-yoon meekly agrees. After he leaves the room, she cautiously leans over to lock the door, but Kang-soo bursts back in and orders her to lock the window. Then he locks the door from the inside before closing it behind him, making sure that no one — including himself — can get in.

The infamous Baek Gong-gi sits in a mediation pose as all the other delivery guys lounge around him. They update him about Kang-soo, and Gong-gi says they can do whatever they want, but they can’t forget his one rule: Do not harm women or children.

Three of the guys suddenly realize that it’s time for someone named Yeon-ji to return home, and they run outside to appraisingly watch the young woman walk to her apartment. Yeon-ji is Dan-ah’s roommate and a yoga instructor, and when she gets home, Dan-ah chides Yeon-ji for staying out so late when she knows there are perverts in the area.

Dan-ah is busy studying her English homework, and Yeon-ji teases her about it, asking if Dan-ah really has to move to America. Yeon-ji pouts that she’ll be sad if Dan-ah leaves, but Dan-ah says it’s the only way for someone with only a high school degree to escape “Hell Joseon” (that is, the current socio-economic climate of Korea, where the poor people continue to be poor and the rich get richer).

 

Dan-ah proudly reveals that, thanks to her frugality and constant working, she’s only 195 days away from having saved up enough money for a new start in America.

Meanwhile, at the restaurant, Kang-soo makes a bed for himself downstairs on the restaurant chairs. He has a video call with a couple of old friends and sighs when he sees the cracked screen.

In the morning, Dan-ah finds Kang-soo asleep on the chairs. She leans over and quietly calls out “oppaaaaaa,” which would normally be a pleasant way to wake up, but Kang-soo leaps up in terrified shock. She tells him to get started on the day’s tasks, but first, Kang-soo hurries upstairs to check on Ji-yoon.

 

Kang-soo is surprised to find that Ji-yoon is already gone, and she left him a note of thanks (calling him “ajusshi”). Sitting alone by the river, Ji-yoon repeats what Kang-soo told her the night before: that someone aged twenty-three is too old to be a runaway, but instead should be moving out on their own. Her stomach growls and she sadly wonders what she’s going to do now.

Meanwhile, Jin-gyu’s family has breakfast, and his father Chairman OH SUNG-HWAN (Lee Won-jung) imperiously tells Jin-gyu’s older brother that their company is only ranked in the Top 30 of Korea’s businesses — compared to the top three, they’re like a corner store. That means they should be focused on growing and only compare themselves to those who are above them.

 

Chairman Oh’s attention turns to Jin-gyu as he asks his son what he’s been up to. Chairman Oh is not impressed with Jin-gyu’s vague answers and tells Jin-gyu that he doesn’t have any goals and only lives to have a good time, which disappoints everyone. Jin-gyu’s mother tries to intervene, suggesting that Jin-gyu be put in charge of something. But Chairman Oh doesn’t want to lose his company’s competitive power by dividing it up between his sons, and instead tells Jin-gyu to live like he always has — like an “idiot.”

Mom looks worried, but Jin-gyu amicably agrees and nonchalantly continues eating his breakfast. Afterwards, his brother approaches him and apologizes. Jin-gyu just jokingly says it’s nothing as he mocks his father’s commands to always look up, never look down. Hyung hands over an envelope of cash, telling Jin-gyu to get himself a new car. Jin-gyu protests, but it doesn’t take much pleading to get him to accept the money, and soon he’s driving away in an expensive new car.

 

Kang-soo’s used bowls have mysteriously disappeared, and Chef Jang and Soon-ae tell him to report the loss to Dan-ah because, as Soon-ae points out, Kang-soo “belongs” to Dan-ah. Dan-ah has no time for it, though, and simply tells Kang-soo that if he doesn’t find the missing bowls, then he’s fired. What would normally be considered an encouraging “Oppa, fighting!” gesture seems a lot more menacing coming from Dan-ah as she sends Kang-soo back out to find the bowls.

Kang-soo finds some of the other deliverymen that hassled him before, gloating about how they stole his bowls. They send him on a merry chase trying to retrieve the bowls, but Kang-soo focuses on tracking down one of them, even though that deliveryman doesn’t have his bowls. Kang-soo doesn’t care — he wants to know where he can find Gong-gi.

 

Kang-soo finds Gong-gi on a rooftop, practicing his martial arts. Kang-soo asks if he’s responsible for the other guys stealing his bowls, and Gong-gi says that there’s a good chance that he was. Kang-soo isn’t in the mood to play games and immediately tries to fight Gong-gi, but Gong-gi really is talented at martial arts and easily overpowers Kang-soo.

Kang-soo doesn’t give up though, despite the beating. But he’s soon pinned to the ground by Gong-gi, who tells him to leave. Kang-soo rushes Gong-gi one more time, and Gong-gi pushes him to the edge of the roof, growling that Kang-soo can’t beat him.

Kang-soo grabs onto Gong-gi, knocking him off his feet and causing both men to balance precariously on the edge of the rooftop. Kang-soo demands his bowls back as Gong-gi frantically tries to find his footing, fearfully screaming for Kang-soo to let go before they topple over the side of the building.

Epilogue. At a dock by the sea, a teenaged Kang-soo yells at his father, demanding to know where he went, since Dad should be in the hospital being treated for cancer. When Kang-soo finds out Dad left the hospital to go to Seoul to look for a woman, Kang-soo angrily says that they wouldn’t have lost everything if it weren’t for “that woman.”

Dad says Kang-soo shouldn’t call his mother “that woman,” but Kang-soo believes that someone who would run away with all their money doesn’t deserve to be his mother. With tears in his eyes, Kang-soo tells his father to go ahead and die so that Kang-soo will stop worrying about him.

 

As Kang-soo starts to walk away, Dad calls after him, begging Kang-soo not to become hardened because he will no longer have a mother or father if he does. Instead, Kang-soo should live a life as a good person. Kang-soo just continues to run up the pier away from Dad.

Later, Kang-soo weeps as he spreads his father’s ashes out to sea. He vows to be a good person, also promising to find “that woman” and tell her how Dad lived — and died — after she left them.

A train heads to Seoul, and Kang-soo sits alone, staring out the window.

 
COMMENTS

As much as I was enjoying the episode (I laughed out loud more than once, which is always promising), it wasn’t until that final epilogue that everything sort of “clicked” for me. I think it’s because I was struggling to believe that Kang-soo was a renegade bad-ass psycho. Kang-soo is just too fluffy (literally, with that hair, as well as figuratively) to really make me believe that any one would seriously be intimidated by him. So I’m relieved to know he’s not a crazy bad-ass drifter — he’s actually kind and generous, but super focused on getting his job done so that he can systematically go through every neighborhood in Seoul, looking for his mother.

Which meant that all my concerns about the direction and casting abated because the little character moments that felt slightly “off” now have more meaning and make sense. I’m hoping we’ll get epilogues for each of our characters, because I’m pretty sure there’s much more to everyone than the Candy who wants to make enough money to emigrate to the supposed promised land of America, the heiress who’s trying to escape her family’s controlling grasp, and the playboy chaebol that no one takes seriously.

In fact, I get the feeling this show is going to play around with our stereotypical expectations. I’m already fond of everyone, including the second leads. I think Ji-yoon is utterly delightful if only because she seems to have such a positive attitude even while being aware of her situation. I’m also fully on board any potential loveline that might be brewing between her and Kang-soo, if only because you could see how much she respected and appreciated that he didn’t try to do anything but house and protect her. I’m pretty sure I’d have heart-eyes, too, in that situation.

While I’m not quite sure what to do with Jin-gyu yet, I still like him (and his dimples!). Even though I feel like he’s supposed to represent the standard asshole chaebol, there’s something so warm and adorable about him that I feel like he has to be more than that. I definitely sense there’s something darker lurking within him than the breezy chaebol who loves his cars.

The way he casually accepted his father’s scolding actually shocked me. I can’t imagine someone so lightly accepting being called a “byung-shin” — which does mean “idiot,” but in a much less socially acceptable way. To see Jin-gyu cheerfully driving in his new car, shouting out that he’s an “idiot” makes me wonder what his earlier years were like. Maybe Jin-gyu is dealing with being a disappointment by accepting the role provided for him, the cheerful idiot who can be easily distracted by a fast, shiny car.

My only other quibble about the premiere is that the editing still seems a leeeetle bit rough. I was getting whiplash going from a joking moment to a super serious scene without any warning — which is perhaps what the show intends, but somehow the musical and/or visual cues weren’t quite working for me. Again, it’s not a major complaint. I love the goofy comedy as much as the heartfelt, emotional side. Just not randomly jammed up against each other.

Overall, though, it was a solid introduction to everyone and the underlying premise. I enjoyed all the ridiculous jokes (so much wordplay!) and I’m excited about the promise of character growth. I’m looking forward to spending more time with Kang-soo, Dan-ah, Ji-yoon, Jin-gyu, and all the weird and wonderful minor characters in the neighborhood. I also anticipate endless cravings for jjajangmyun.

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i am loving this drama! i also like how we get to see a glimpse of the character's backstories in the epilogue.

also, chae soo bin is so adorable!

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Loving this drama so far as well. The epilogue isn't the 'kind' I'm expecting though but like you said, it's pretty good that we get to see more of their stories with it!

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It Just gets better in the 2nd ep ?

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Strongest Deliveryman delivered the weakest characters. Refund.

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Are you serious? How were they weak? She is badass and he's crazy out of his mind awesome.

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Yeah Violent heroines are always badass.
She is so mary-sue. And oppa magic doing some cool stuff. Gary stu. I somewhat agree with @apple that they are weak characters. fun to watch.

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Honestly, other than her competence and self-defence abilities, Dan-ah doesn't fit the idea of a Mary Sue at all. She's selfish, combative and brusque and presented as such, and last I checked, those things don't exactly endear people to others.

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She's flawed but real. She is badass and doesn't try to be endearing. We just relate to her and that's endearing

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If anything, they are all very intriguing characters, which I guess they have to be in such a character driven show. I mean why else are we here if not for the characters (and the adorable actors playing them). I admit we don't get much details about them in the first episode, but watch the second ep and I'll grantee you will be hooked. They delve a lot more into the characters themselves and their motivations in the 2nd ep.

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I mean, if they gave us more detailed and up-close food shots, then I'd stay for that, too. I'd also love if they talked about the history of jjajangmyun and how it became such a staple in Korea's (food) culture. I know it's not really that kind of show, but I'm just sayin', I'd watch that.
I've eaten jjajangmyun many times, but I don't think it taste nearly as good as it looks in K-dramas. I'm holding onto hope that it probably tastes much better in SK. I'll find out one day.

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I had it a few times when I was in Taiwan, back about 40 years ago. Didn't think it was anything special.

But compare the sounds. The Chinese call it "Jajiangmian". I love the way kdramas illustrate the way languages borrow words.

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I had jjajangmyun before going to Korea, and I ate it in a fancy Chinese restaurant there, and it was just meh. But the cheap stuff from the delivery guys in Korea was AWESOME. So now whenever I see drama people eating it, my mouth waters.

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I'm fond of it, but it may be an acquired taste? If you don't grow up with it.

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Were we watching the same show? These are some of the strongest (physically and mentally) characters I've seen in a while. Physically Dan Ah is downright badass and there's no disputing that. Mentally, they all seem to be dealing with a lot of stuff in their person lives but they find the courage to keep living everyday and set goals for their futures. There is nothing weak about them.

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I think you might need some further watching - I don't even find myself intrigued by Forest of Secrets' characters until the second episode! And SD's 2nd episode really does get better (I've just watched it) with all the intersecting character development and more jokes. Try and stick with it for awhile!

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This was so whack. I love the way they portrayed their mundane lives and struggles. Both leads killing it, and im already used to his hair. Lol.

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Ha, so "whack" = good? I usually hear/use it to mean the opposite of good. Anyways, I'm really liking it so far, too, and loved Go Kyung-pyo's hair the moment I saw it.

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Same?? Where I live "whack"=bad

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Yep. whack means bad where I'm from too.
His hair has always been adorable to me too.

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Meant crazy good. Lol. Living in boston, we say wicked,for example, meaning good as well. Someone who's crazy is whack. The show was crazy at depicting the mundane job as this thriller and had neighborhood gangs and romanticized portrayal of simply handing out business cards. Lol. I loved it, in case it wasn't explained well.

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Ohhh Boston it all makes sense now. ?

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Apparently, Go Kyung-pyo was the one who suggested the hairstyle for his character. It actually matches his character though, and I'm sort of liking it now (omg, what is wrong with me hahaha)

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It's apparently not the character's natural hairstyle (in the epilogue he's got straight hair) :-/

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Maybe it signifies a change in Kang-soo's character? When he had straight hair, he seemed very moral and uptight and organised to me, being the one to berate and scold his father for missing his treatment. In the present, though, he's much more loosely inhibited, wild and freer in a way.

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How cute! I like that he suggested it. I'll always loved it. It actually does help me get into a new character when actors change their hair color or style. Especially when they do multiple films and dramas a year.

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Omg same! I love when an actor/actress fully dedicates themselves to their character. True, hairstyles really do make a difference (just think of Hannah Montana LOL)!

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I adore the hair with a fiery passion.

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That hair is lit?

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I want jjajangmyun, it looks so good. On my way to K-Town...

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*Napoleon Dynamite voice* Lucky! It probably tastes better in K-Town than here in my neck of the woods. Enjoy~!

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They filmed it sooo well.

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Such an interesting show with so many multifaceted characters. I am looking forward to unraveling the mystery behind each of our 4 leads (and even some of the supporting characters) and analyzing what makes them tick. Most of all, I'm definitely intrigued by the slice of life direction the show seems to be taking. Its been a while since I have seen one of those.

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I enjoyed this - it was the nice change of pace I needed.

Interesting that Lee Min-Young is in it, because it's giving a pretty strong/close Fermentation Family birth secret vibe.

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Ohhh finally the recap is here!

I like this drama. I like the couple. I like the humor and the scenes that made my heart tic tac... and drench like a piece of clothes.
I am excited about this! Somehow even more than the water god's bride....

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When Da-nah kicked him in the balls I huzzahed for all the kdrama heroines grabbed by the wrist unnecessarily. I love her. I look forward to continued greatness and hope and pray it doesn't end like Oh Ha Young again.

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I did not watch oh ha young again... but just by your comment, it looks like i better not watch it at all ???

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I loved the first 8 episodes of Oh Hae Young, but after that they just ruined the heroine, I couldn't even finish it because I was so angry. However many people loved it, so don't let my comment deter you.?

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Thanks. For now I am looking forward to watch the hospital ship, so maybe when I am really free...

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? I thought the exact same thing!

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Yess! And I also lovved that our Hero isnt automatically a bad-ass fighter and actually got beaten up by the street bully who is supposed to be good at martial arts! Yayy!

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I am not sure how I feel about this show yet, despite the flashback at the end (which is much appreciated, as opposed to the beginning of the episode, BTW). There is something that feels off about this show.

For example, there were two near-accidents in this premier. The first one with our main leads and the second one with the second leads. The reaction of the first leads after the accident was to be entirely rude up to the point of actual physical assault. The second had Jin-gyu, your typical rude, playboy chaebol, asking if Ji-yoon is okay. He was nice and polite. So was she, apologizing for stepping onto his car trying to get away.

I am supposed to like the leads, right? After their first encounter I was about as interested in them as I am a typical rude playboy chaebol (not at all). In contrast these two supposed rude playboy/girl chaebols I am interested in...

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I feel the same about the first episode which didn't quite hook me up until the epilogue scene. I feel a lot of that was owing to the mystery surrounding our leads. We get that they are quirky and maybe a little crazy but nothing much beyond that. However, the second ep does a much better job of explaining character backstory and motive and got me to actually care about all 4 main characters.

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For me, the epilogue felt too cliched.. like of course he had to have a sad family back story & it was sorta obvious that he's moving neighbourhoods so quick cuz he is searching for someone & what better way than to deliver food to houses?!

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I thought the fact that he was searching was pretty obvious too but I liked the epilogue for delving quickly into a more serious backstory that wouldn't have really fit into the narrative of the episode. But it was nice knowing who he was searching for and not having that strung along like some kind of huge mystery for multiple episodes.

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I liked that they were pretty straight forward with the set up and sort of spelled out what to expect from the first 2 episodes itself instead of dragging it out. Hopefully, this means we can move on from character backgrounds and see where the show takes our characters from here.

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True.. only this aspect that they got it out of the way instead of making it a long mystery made the epilogue sorta redeeming for me.

But I do hope they will have more of the underdogs rising up to the ocassion and beating the odds through personality & grit rather than cry-baby stories & birth secrets!

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Same for me. The epilogue really put me off (and let me guess three times who the mom that abandoned him is!). By the time I finished the second episode I was groaning, because every single one of our four main characters has *such a dramatic* or *such a tragic* background story (what happened to the 'ordinary people' that I thought we were getting from the trailers?) and we have two chaebols to boot – and quite possibly a third one that doesn't know about it yet.

I'm afraid, that unlike others, I have zero sympathy or interest in Jin-gyu, no matter how 'black sheep' he is within his family. He's a total a** to people outside of his family, I'm so not okay with that.

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Exactly. I'm so surprised that the a**hole is the one getting all this viewers love, how is this different from the chaebol a**hole in every other drama whose excuse for being a jerk is 'waaah my daddy didn't love me!' (See: Heirs - Kim Tan)

(I didn't put the ** in the word before, sorry to db)

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I find Jin-gu's character really interesting without liking him as a person. Yes he's the black sheep of the family with an abusive father, but at the same time he made the decision to take the easy road and go through life as an asshole. I hated the scene in the cafe where he kept telling like an entitled ass instead of rationally taking things out. Also the scene where he's super condescending about deliverymen not being able to afford his car, and ergo should not even bother asking for the price! But I'm hoping that having set up the basic premise, the show might go off on a different direction and do something original with these characters like in slice of life drama.

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I second all of this - I like at least two of the characters, but the second leads leave me cold too, especially Jin-gyu.

For all the talk about how his entitled behaviour is a reaction to his dad, I'm just not getting anything from the actor's performance to make me feel any sympathy for him. It just feels like extreme first world problems, like your dad doesn't love you so you race cars for fun? Excuse me while my eyes roll all the way into the back of my head.

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Jin-gyu is such a fascinating character. From that one dinner scene you can already tell he's the black sheep of the family. I have a feeling that he tries to act all blase but that its all buster and no substance. You can tell his father's words effect him and that despite his outward nonchalance, the fact that his father constantly throws abuse his way and calls him “byung-shin” really gets to him. Buying cars and racing is his coping mechanism.

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He's the black sheep in the family, but I feel like he intentionally act like the way he is now. Maybe he's just not interested in his father's company and he doesn't want to compete with his brother.

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I agree with you! I think he's given up on himself and in pleasing his father because he can't compete with his brother and he realizes he will never be good enough

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I like him, but I think that's a byproduct of liking his nerdy nice character Chief Kim. I can't help but feel that he's still nerdy nice underneath his fancy cars and bluster.

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I'm constantly trying to figure him out. He's words, actions and expressions seem so layered. He seems like he's accepted being a "failure" to his parents. It doesn't mean he hasn't tried to do them right in the past but it seems like he's accepted that he can't please them and will just live as the stereotype they see him as.

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Yes it feels like he's exhausted frombhis efforts to try to please his father. At this point I think he accepts that he's a failure who will never be good enough for his father. He also has the self awareness to actually know how shallow his existence is and I think part of him hates himself for it. But at the same time he's taking the road of least resistance and wasting away his potential rather than doing something with it because if you don't do anything you can't disappoint any more than you already are.

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Since we didn't get the whole of his backstory yet, from all the pieces we get to see from him, my conclusion comes to a stop much like yours. I suspect that, when he was small, Jin-gyu never really could quite live up to his successful, better-loved brother. I think that he kept trying to make his father proud, make his mother love him for his successes, but something might've happened that caused him to completely give up on his quest for approval.

And because of that, I think, like what you said, that he's putting up an act of being totally indifferent with being called an idiot, playing along with this supposed image of him being an airhead chaebol whose only passion is racing cars - I get the feeling that that's the side of him that his parents see, and so he just accepts the insults thrown his way. Because he can't ever be like his brother, he stopped trying. That quiet, in-your-face acceptance of "yeah, sure, I'm an idiot" is a prime example of someone who had tried too much in the past to change who he was, got hurt, and decided to play along with this image of him being a failure so much that he actually became one.

Agh, my heart hurts for him.

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He's basically Kim Tan from Heirs in a different setting and a different name but same background and same jerk behavior, only not a teenager this time.

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Oh yes definitely. I like that his character has some depth to it rather than the usual cold hearted chebols we get in dramaland. I understand his character without liking him if that makes sense? I do like his character a billion times more than Kim Tan though who was just super dull and boring.

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Honestly, he just comes off as a garden-variety jerk with money - the gratuitous bitchiness to Kang-soo sealed that deal, his daddy issues don't excuse that literal level of entitlement.

I mean, I know kdramas love the 'jerk who is mean because his parents are mean' trope and I've bought even some of the more extreme cases of it (most recently Scarlet Heart) but if that was what this drama was going for, it's singularly poorly executed.

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I get you - my heart does hurt for him because I can empathize with his situation with finding approval (I've been there, done that, wasn't a good experience). Doesn't mean I like him nor excuse/justify his rude, jerkish behavior toward Kang-soo at all - that wasn't really the point I was trying to make.

What I was trying to say is that he is a fascinating, intriguing character, and that opinion is subjective, obviously. Not everyone has to think of him that way. However, I am interested in his future growth and redemption arc (and yes, a heartfelt apology and making it up to Kang-soo).

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Love our main four leads already!

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Thanks so much for the recap! I'm enjoying the main leads, but I was really surprised to find that I enjoyed the second leads so much. In Ji-yoon case, she's obviously so adorable, so it's understandable that I would like her. Jin-Gyu, however, doesn't seem to have many redeeming qualities, if any. I think you've articulated perfectly why I like him when initially I thought I just like him beyond any logical reason. So thank you for at least giving me a basis!
Really enjoying this show so far.

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This plays like a webtoon/manga/manhwa. In fact, I had to check to see if it originally wasn't.

I like it.

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I had so much fun with this. I think 2 was slightly more coherent production-wise, but this was a highly enjoyable and rollicking intro to everyone.

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If it were me, I wouldn't try to stop the escaping car with just a motorcycle, at least not with me on it. Not after what happened to the last motorcycle that was in front of him.

And if he got hurt then he wouldn't have Dan-ah to blow on it and make it better :)

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I'm not quite sold on this drama yet - I thought it would be an underdog-type show - but I will watch it through to at least the fourth episode to find out what it does settle into being.

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Chae Soo Bin saying 'Hell Joseon' sent Rebel shivers up my spine, but of course it might just be me still not over her character in Rebel.

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The thing that impressed me about "Hell Joseon" is that it sounded like the English word for hell. I still love the way kdramas illustrate the way languages borrow words. And wouldn't the Koreans have a suitable word of their own?

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I enjoyed episode 1, it gives me good laugh. I guess I'm those in minority who warmed up more to the second leads rather the first leads. I mean, GKP and CSB are great, their characters are entertaining, but there's something off with them. It might because I think Dah Ah's character is a bit rude, so their bickering moments kinda turn me off. Whereas, I'm more curious on the supposedly rude chaebol, but have a good heart to me. And both of the chaebols seem like they're gonna make a good second couple and I'm looking forward to it.

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As for now, the second leads are the ones that would make me stay at least until next epi, which is funny because I came for main leads. lol. I won't be surprise if I will love second leads until the end.

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Me too, I came for GKP, CSB and KSH, but I only like KSH character which is Jin Gyu and Ji Yoon (this is my first time watching Go Won Hee in drama) so far.

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I have soft spot for Go Won Hee after watched her in Cruel Palace so I hope she will shine more.

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I was already thinking, "Is this High Society all over again?", where I enjoyed the 2nd couple more than the leads.

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He's not 'supposedly rude', he is rude.

There's a saying from Harry Potter that to see a person's true character, you measure how they behave with their inferiors/people not of the same status as them.

Maybe some things can be excused because of the chaebol guy's dad being a jerk, but how he behaved with Kang Soo in the shop for just asking about his car shows that he really is a spoiled jerk who thinks his money makes him higher than other people.

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Profoundly in love with the unexpected depths I found in all of these people. Also, haven't connected to a drama female character in a long time (I've liked them plenty, just... none of them really hit me in the heart in that "OMG, I understand you so completely" kind of way in a year or so) so I'm excited about Dan-Ah. I hear you lady who wants to get out. I've been there. Go fight for what you want! <3

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That opening scene, though. Geez Louise. When Kang-soo removed BOTH his hands from the motorcycle steering handles (it's that what it's callled?) and proceeded to just let the motorcycle drive itself, I was like, "BOY. Do NOT do that!" So glad the other delivery driver told him to be careful because he could get into an accident like that. Oh, the horrible irony. That split second when Kang-soo looked back at the guy that just got ran over and just pulled the helmet cover over his face, I thought he was gonna just leave him like that. When the voiceover continued and said, "Oh yeah, he loves to get involved in other people's business," I was like, "Oh, thank goodness."

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That whole sequence was jarring for me, especially the accident. It went from comedy to tragedy to thriller all in 30 seconds.

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"It went from comedy to tragedy to thriller all in 30 seconds." What a spot on way to describe that scene. And it was weird how he was more concerned someone not getting their delivery as opposed to the guy who died/almost died

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Solid premiere. The first part was a bit jarring. I wasn't sure if the delivery driver survived the accident, but I'm guessing & hoping he did. The rest of the episode was fine with some good, funny moments.

The 4 leads are intriguing and I like that they have their own stories. Hope the show keeps up with the slice-of-life feel. I'm interested in getting a peek into the lives of deliverymen and the daily things they have to deal with too. Kang Soo's jjajangmyun looked sooooooo delicious. Loved seeing his cooking.

Hee, the terrible punny jokes had me laughing. More puns please! xD

The epilogue added some weight to the drama, but I didn't quite connect with the son & father relationship. I also had no idea that Kang Soo was going all over his neighborhood map in search of his mother.

Haven't seen Go Won Hee before, but she is super adorable.

Glad to see Jo Hee Bong in this. He was quite endearing in Tunnel. ^^ His relationship with Soon Ae is already cracking me up.

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<the slice-of-life feel

What slice of life? With that many near-accidents involving the same group of people? Every single character having greatly dramatic background stories? Two, possibly three chaebols? And four complete strangers all criss-crossing, multiple times, within a matter of a couple of days (and have I mentioned that they all go to the *one café* in Seoul)? I don't want to say more, because it'd be spoiling episode 2, but slice-of-life this is not.

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I was referring to the job of delivering jjajangmyun and the restaurant business when I mentioned slice-of-life. I’m interested in seeing the daily errands of the deliverymen and the obstacles that they may face like Dan Ah having to deal with loan sharks and if or when their business takes a hit after new businesses make their way into their neighborhood.

I’m not surprised about the dramatic encounters since this is a drama.

I haven’t watched EP 2 yet.

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It's an interesting job choice, particularly if they keep in the focus of the drama (I rather like KS's motivation to build an app, that works much better for me than DA's wishy-washy 'I'm emigrating to America with a pile of cash b/c somehow I'm going to make it without a residency permit / work visa'). We have had 'delivery people' before – as early as Coffee Prince comes to mind – but it was never at the heart of shows as far as I remember, just something characters sometimes did. So making this job central to the story is great.

<I’m not surprised about the dramatic encounters since this is a drama.

Sure, I'm not objecting to that, I'm just objecting to calling this a slice of life drama since it is doing the usual dramatic encounters with so many supposely 'coincidental' encounters that just wouldn't happen realistically.

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I like how Soon-ae and Dan-ah both have steel behind their personalities. While I am sure the show will probably explain why, and soften them some, I hope they get to maintain at least some of it. Also, I have a feeling that Ji-yoon will be revealed to have some steel in her too. At least I hope she will, because I love it when unassuming and overwhelmingly positive characters turn out to be the opposite.

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Idk this episode felt just okay. I wasn't wowwed or super impressed by anything that happened. When they did that "is your siblings name..." I was instantly reminded of the Best Hit (I will forever hold a grudge against that show). Somehow the seconds leads grabbed my attention the whole time.

I HAVE SUCH A GIRL CRUSH ON JI YOON???. She's so positive and there's something charismatic about the actress that forces you to focus on her.

And omgg I didn't realize until after the episode that Jin-gyu is the super cute, nerdy guy from Chief Kim. Gosh he's so attractive *swoons*

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i'm ok with the first 2 episodes. it was darker than expected but i need a drama to watch since TBH finished 2 weeks ago. will tune in for the next couple of episodes to see how the story goes. for now, i feel bad for both leads, their lives is full of obstacles and sadness. huhu

p/s: i can't help picturing yoon shi yoon as kang-soo since he initially was the lead in the strongest delivery man. heh

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ME TOO! Omfg, I guess I'm still deep in my throes of Yoon Shi-swoon (haha). I kept on imagining him in Go Kyung-pyo's role, and then I have to snap out of it because I couldn't focus on Go Kyung-pyo, and then I had to rewind some scenes. Thanks, Yoon Shi-yoon!

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Thanks for the recap!
"In fact, I get the feeling this show is going to play around with our stereotypical expectations. "
That's it. I couldn't put my finger on what was happening with this show until I read that. It feels like the show is challenging me on so many levels...the characters, plot, speed of events, etc.
It feels like a bit of a rougher show. Slice of Life sure but with a little bit of bitterness and hardness that life can sometimes give you. I mean it's the first episode and already everyone has had their moments of being nice AND of being rude.
I'm intrigued....I mean where the heck will this show go?

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Finally, i thought I wouldn't be able to find a drama to watch this season but... HERE IT IS! It's comedic, emotional and the characters seem genuine. Ep 2 also solidified that it's a story worth following. Hope it keeps this kind of heart throughout the rest of the episodes~

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i am liking this show very much! they are adorable together...

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Epi 1 for me was just okay, nothing great, nothing amazing. The writer & PD might wanted to make the main leads cool but Dan-ah ended up look a bit rude one. I love strong and badass female lead, but I can't really ignore the rudeness vibe she has. Yes I knew she must have a story why she became like that, but I think they could have tone it down a bit. I just don't understand why kicking someone's ball is cool and funny, especially with no good reason for it. She can kick him elsewhere if she is that strong. By saying that, it's not I hate her or anything, but I'm not warmed up with her yet. I also don't really feel anything with Kang-soo yet.

This is kind of strange when I'm easily warmed up with both second leads first, and on top of that they are from chaebol families. lol. I was excited before this drama started, but after watched first two epi, my excitement is getting lesser. I'm going to watch at least 2-4 epi more to see how it goes first.

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I get that rude vibe off her as well! Especially when she first met Kang-soo (where his phone broke). I just watched the second episode, and not only did she tone it down, we also get to see more of her story.

On the other hand, tho, the humor here is great. That jjajjangmyeon lady reminds me of MJ, ha!

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jjajangmyeon lady is daebak. lol. Yeah she reminds me of MJ too.

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Honestly I thought the chaebol guy was more rude than Dan Ah when he met Kang Soo for the first time, with that comment about how he can't afford the car.

I at least feel more understanding of Dan Ah because she was in a stressful situation and that was related to her main problem that she is poor and needs to earn money in a demanding job. people shout at each other over less fancy almost-accidents like that even in my country. It's not even like he got hurt and asked her for medical bills, he asked her to repair his phone which should have been more securely kept away (like inside a bag). While the chaebol guy just has a car sitting in his garage but acting so high and mighty to the delivery man? No matter how much an asshole his father is, does he think his car is going to get up and run away if he tells someone how much it costs?

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I think their level of rudeness is same and I can also understand both of them - where they are coming from without justifying their actions. They look like a good pair for now because of their similar attitude.

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I don't understand what the guys excuse is. Dan Ah at least only is rude if she gets provoked or thinks someone rude to her like she thinks Kang Soo was, but the chaebol behaves like that to Kang Soo even when he's asking a simple question?

Is "my daddy hates me" an excuse for that kind of behaviour even to people who did nothing to you, it doesn't reflect well on his character to be looking down on people like that no matter if he is such a misfit with his precious car.

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Well there's no excuse for that guy's rude behaviour. No one is loving this rude and jerk attitude too. Just chill.
I too, understand if you want to defend Dan-ah's action, I'm not concluded her as a total rude either. But I don't find find any good excuse for her to kick Kang Soo's ball. I don't really care about her rude appearance in other parts, she is still rude but there, like you said there are reasons for her to be like that and it is at least understandable for me.

This is just epi 1 anyway, so my opinion are also based on what I saw on this epi solely. Sure there will be more positive things coming hopefully, so that's why opinion is called as opinion. It can be changed.

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@Sera - I think @pigsnout may not be speaking about you personally but I have noticed that some people who find Jin-gyu sympathetic are criticising Dan-ah for rudeness/violence etc, it may well be reacting to a seeming double standard given that, by even the most generous reading of Jin-gyu's character, he behaves as badly as Dan-ah if not worse.

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That was a solid first episode!!

Plot: I was actually surprised by how breezy and fun it was, while maintaining brief flashes of a deeper, more introspective tone. That scene where Kang-soo confronted Jin-gyu at the car repair store was AMAZING. I loved that we get to focus on a 'lesser' species here (God knows how many lawyer/doctor/police dramas we've already got in our hands).

Characters: Dan-ah just stole my heart while simultaneously kicking my ass - she's SUCH a brave, fierce character in such a tiny body that all I can think when I see her is "sassy smol bean". Go Kyung-pyo was good at this role, but it wasn't until the epilogue that I really connected with him (before that, I just felt he was silly), but the last few scenes of him crying totally made me tear up as well. I even like Jin-gyu, whose quiet acceptance of being called an idiot hurt my heart.

Directing: I do have to admit, as stated in the recap, the editing was jarring. However, the humor and characters in this show were special and funny enough to make me forget about it.

Conclusion: 7.5/10 - definitely bring a snack if you're watching this!

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Interested but not yet invested with the characters. But it is still early on anyway. Epilogues are definitely plus. Gives us more glimpse into their back story. Admittedly, Danah was too violent and too uncaring for me in Ep 1, but by Ep 2 I understood why she had to be uncaring.

Unlike odilettante, I'd rather have Jiyoon & Kang Soo as half siblings rather than as a love line. Kang Soo needs someone to dote on to. Given the premise that he was looking for his mother who left him and their age difference, I'm hoping this will be the case.

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Am I the only one here who is staying with this drama because of the first leads and not the second leads?

I find Kang Soo and Dan Ah interesting and realistically stressed by their situation but you got people here saying she is 'rude' even though we see how she gets looked down on and sexual harassment.

While the asshole chaebol second lead guy is 'interesting' because he..... has an asshole father? Like every other poor little rich chaebol in kdramas? I'm supposed to feel sorry for this guy but he's pointlessly rude and looks down on people beneath him, like what is the reason why he can't even be polite to Kang Soo about the car? As for the second lead girl, the character is ok but nothing special, at least the actress doesn't make it anything special. I rather see more of the main leads who are 'common people' than more damn chaebols and rich people.

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Well, I'm not sure I'll stay with the drama (I'll give it two more episodes), I definitely have zero interest in the second leads and find the first leads ok but not particularly intriguing so far. After 2 episodes I only thought the writer is writing with a sledgehammer (b/c everyone has such dramatic stories and, so far, the four leads seem pretty cliché to me, and the Jung chaebol family threatening the neighbour is as stereotypical and boring as a it gets).

Interestingly several people here are arguing the writer is trying to revitalise stereotypes. I'm not seeing that yet at all (as you point out, how is Jin-gyu any different from any other chaebol jerk we've seen before?), but maybe I'm just missing the more down to earth FOS kind of writing of characters? Because I was expecting ordinary people but got several chaebols, yet again?

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Truthfully I like the main lead actors. So it's not because of the characters but because of those two, mainly her, that I want to keep watching.

I think the only character who is even slightly different from the kdrama stereotype is Dan Ah, who isn't some always cheerful Candy like that type of girl usually is, but angry about her situation and working for her own sake instead of to support ten siblings and parents with cancer and loan sharks, at least she isn't some doormat. Every other character is a cliche, from the rich girl who runs away from home because her parents are too strict, to the jerk chaebol with the supposed heart of gold, to the guy with a mysterious past who.... is looking for his long-lost parent.

Like you said, it's not some new take on a stereotype, it's the stereotype exactly. But I at least like to see characters based in more humble and non-glamorous settings, I don't know why they had to go and throw chaebols in there.

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<Dan Ah, who isn't some always cheerful Candy like that type of girl usually is, but angry about her situation and working for her own sake

That's true, but I'm not fond of certains things related to her portrayal. I do think she's more rude than she needs to be to a stranger (though I agree with the point you made elsewhere, at least there is something that triggers the rudeness and it's not out of the air like with the chaebol guy), I hate the high school boys fawning over her scene (it's supposed to be funny, but it's just so fake to me) and the whole countdown to America annoys me. Which, truth be told, has less to do with her character but with the way kdrama writers always package up moving to another country: something that is apparently as easy as can be. Dan Ah is saving money at least, but how the hell is she going to get a work visa or a residency permit anywhere? Some savings and studying English don't allow you to permanently (or even temporarily) emigrate – you can travel abroad and live off your savings, sure, but only until your tourist visa (or money) runs out.

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I actually didn't catch the part about where she was planning to emigrate, did she say she was going to America? I thought the countdown was until she had enough money to apply to emigrate or at least move, a permanent country shift would probably take way more paperwork and prep than she's currently got.

(I actually wondered if she was moving to Australia - it's closer geographically and iirc, unlike in the US it's possible for people on student visas to work and stay on in the country, I thought the money might be to pay for course fees or something - it'd still take her out of Korea with a more or less clear path to staying away permanently).

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I didn't get from watching where she's emigrating to (I'm not sure the subs I had specified it?), but odilettante says in the recap that it's America.

I think kdrama writers use the 'going abroad' as a lazy narrative device, I have yet to see a drama where I got the impression that writers actually know what moving abroad entails (whether in terms of legality, finances or culture shock).

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yeah, I'm pretty sure she's never left the country before so I wouldn't rule out major culture shock. And as for being sloppy with the specifics of how she's going to manage the immigration process.... that's kdramas for you. I mean, I'm not surprised that a show that would stick chaebols in its supposedly down-to-earth setting, would be fuzzy about the details of how and where a person could move when they're moving countries.

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Also I think if they wanted to have a character who behaves horribly but is still someone you feel sorry for, neither the writing or the actor of the jerk chaebol make me feel that.

It's definitely possible to have a character like that though, look at Chae Soo Bin herself in Sassy Go Go. But that had much better writing and portrayal of a girl living under enormous pressure and acting like a jerk.

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I liked a lot of things about this show, but I'll comment on two things so far less commented on:

First, the delivery "culture": I love it! From the total seriousness with which the two leads take their work and all the little details we're given about the job to the delivery "gang" and their bizarre leader... it has the feel of one of those urban fantasy type stories where there's a whole different world operating in parallel to the everyday "normal" world that most of us see.

Tied somewhat into that, I think they're developing a theme of "chosen families" (which is the anthropological term, I don't know if there's a more common term for it) wherein migrants to the city develop kin-like networks of connections that offer strong support, particularly in circumstances where the migrants have lost or severed family ties. The delivery gang has their leader that they live with (?); the older woman at the noodle shop referred to Dan-ah as the cornerstone of their family, although it seems that none of them are actually related. The two heirs are moving in the direction of severing family ties and moving towards the delivery world and it's strange culture and chosen kinship... It's not a totally unheard of theme (Buffy made major use of it), but it strikes me as an atypical k-drama one. I'm interested to see where it goes.

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I wish they'd spend more time in the delivery culture - those were the parts of the first couple of episodes that interested me most and are supposed to be what the show is about, NOT the millionth tired 'chaebol with issues' subplot (I may have been alone in this but I eyerolled every time Jin-gyu was on screen). The show is far better when it leans into its restaurant delivery setting instead of trying to be something else, because it's simply so much more interesting that way.

Good catch about the found families too. That's a trope I wouldn't mind seeing a bit of, in here.

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One of my favourite first episode of a kdrama ! It was hillarious at times and also serious mostly at the right time.. so there was a good balance.. I kinda empathize with all the main characters which i felt like all of them are different and have their own set of dreams and problems . Looking forward to more.

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Woah, it's like half of dramaworld quirky characters populate Lively Noodle's neighborhood; am totally loving the assemble here! Some of their actions annoyed me, and some makes me sympathizes with them, but I sure want to know what makes the tick, so am sticking with the show for a bit.
I do agree with @odilettante quibble tho, sometimes get confused whether a scene is deadpan comic or plain serious.
Am also liking that all our characters are on the extreme ends in their attitude towards money/family, can't wait to see them meshing and balancing each other under the Lively Noodle roof.

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I watched the first hour trying to guess where i had seen Kim Sun-ho before..realuzed he was the nerdy co worker in chief kim...colour me impressed!!

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I don't know if anybody noticed that Jin Gyu (the chaebol) is the same guy who played the cutie with glasses in chief kim. Hope he won't be one of the villains

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Pretty funny. And I like the second leads better than the main leads.

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I don't understand what the guys excuse is. Dan Ah at least only is rude if she gets provoked or thinks someone rude to her like she thinks Kang Soo was, but the chaebol behaves like that to Kang Soo even when he's asking a simple question?

Is "my daddy hates me" an excuse for that kind of behaviour even to people who did nothing to you, it doesn't reflect well on his character to be looking down on people like that no matter if he is such a misfit with his precious car.

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Sorry this comment was meant to respond to @Sera, it got posted twice.

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I find it a shame that they recast Lee Yeol-eum - don't get me wrong, I do like Go Won-hee in her role - my only complaint is that I don't think she could have been believably mistaken for a high schooler. Lee Yeol-eum has the kind of appearance where she could be swung either way. I'm nitpicking, really.

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<I don't think she could have been believably mistaken for a high schooler

Yes! She looks older than Kang-soo to me in the drama (even apparently in real life she is indeed younger than him). I would have put her at mid/late 20s...

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yeah, that was stretching disbelief a bit too far, I would not have put her down as a high schooler.

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Jin-gyu says that it’s expensive —" This car is an expensive car that you can not buy even if you sell it." He ignores him.

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'you sell yourself'

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I was expecting Fight My Way vibes from this show, but it turned out quite different. The opening wasn't so solid, but I actually liked it! I realized that there is so much more to know about a deliveryman's job.

Also, it was my first time to notice how they pack the meals in such a way that it still feels like home made. And how amazing is it that they collect the plates after!

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It is so nice to see Go Kyung Pyo back on screen again (I was having serious withdrawal symptomps after Chicago Typewriter ended), and that hair! Kyaaa can I be Kyung Pyo's hair stylist so that I can ruffle his hair?

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So time to make a guess. Any idea on whether it can be correct or not.
My prediction that Mama Jung is going to turn out to be Kang Soo's long lost mother thus making him Ji- Yoon's brother.
Lets try figuring it out via K-Drama Tropes.
He was raised by a single parent and is now on the search for his long lost mother. This leads to a good chance of there being a birth secret involved. (though i haven't seen one with a short length drama but still possible).
Korea also happens to be such a small place that people can easily be their neighbors and not realize it till much later on. Case in point we have already met the main characters and how each of them are related sort of. Another example is how much chance is there that a person you had an incident (Kang Soo and Danah) end up working at the same place. Not much in reality but that doesn't apply in dramas. This means a lot of people are going to be connected to each other.

Then again I may be wrong. There may even be a few more tropes that easily be added here but I don't think that this might be the place to add them.

Still what are your thoughts regarding this. Does anyone else think that this might be true or have I been watching to many dramas and am thus seeing things that aren't actually there ?

Also on a side note drama 14 Days has finally been picked up for an English Adaption. Did anyone know that.

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<My prediction that Mama Jung is going to turn out to be Kang Soo's long lost mother thus making him Ji- Yoon's brother.

That's my guess so far too not only because the mom ran off grabbing money (though I imagine there's more to that story) and Mama Jung is a money grabber, but because of how Kang-soo is taking care of Ji-Yoon – in pretty much every other kdrama that kind of set-up (essentially 'co-habitation') is meant for the OTP, but since they are definitely not going to be the OTP, this kind of scenario is only appropriate for brother/sister. Agewise, her being two years younger works too.

The whole "evil Chaebol family threatens small businesses" is a) pretty clichéd conflict and b) for a story writer working with clichés fits perfectly too, because they can reinforce the conflict between mother & child even more (because, why otherwise do we need the whole Jung-family-takeover storyline at all?).

Of course, nothing's certain yet, but since I'm not seeing anything innovative so far and only familiar character/conflicts so far, I'm expecting the obvious. But if the writer wants to surprise me, I'm all for it.

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I like the show. Will stick around for now.

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For me this is the best among other currently airing drama. I tightly hooked up with this plot.

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I liked the first two episodes except for the second leads' parts, Jin-gyu just seemed like a straight-up jerk with that crack about how Kang-soo couldn't afford the car, and I'm not getting any depth off him beyond the most desultory 4576348990218th chaebol with daddy issues, so I'm surprised other viewers are convinced he's any different from the usual chaebol jerk - to me, he's literally just the same and him and Ji-yoon are p much superfluous (I know, she is nice and optimistic and hardworking and all of that but in this particular story, that Candy behaviour is annoying - I'd take Dan-ah's brusqueness any day). Like someone pointed out below, there are ways to pull off telling a story featuring a rich kid having a hard time with an awful parent and those ways are all over Sassy Go Go, but despite Chae Soo-bin's presence, Sassy Go Go this is not.

I do enjoy GKP and Chae Soo-bin though, despite the tired 'find lost mother' thing - I'd rather see more of the crazy culture of jjajangmyun delivery world than the chaebol stuff, especially if the latter stuff comes all over self-pitying poor little rich boy/poor little rich girl. This drama doesn't do a good job making me care about those two, no matter what jerks their parents are.

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<I'm not getting any depth off him beyond the most desultory 4576348990218th chaebol with daddy issues

Yes, I'm wondering what the depth is that is being referred to by some of the commenters, I'm struggling to see it. (I eyerolled right along with you.)

The thing is with Sassy Go Go, Chae Soo-bin's character was nasty, but her nastiness was driven by a compelling goal so you could understand it: it was all to relieve the pressure from her mom to be student #1. The nasty things she did were all to achieve that student #1 position.

With Jin-gyu, when he's being a jerk there seems to be no other purpose than to feel superior to others? Daddy may beat him up, but when he treats others as lesser beings, I can't sympathise with him – he's just being nasty. (People like that exist of course. But they are not nice, likeable people – indeed, Jin-gyu makes me think of the Korean nut-rage-lady.)

Agree btw that the delivery culture has a lot of potential, which I hope they'll use rather than going back to the ever recylced chaebol stuff.

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"The thing is with Sassy Go Go, Chae Soo-bin's character was nasty, but her nastiness was driven by a compelling goal so you could understand it"

Exactly. And it wasn't just her, Ji-soo's character also had an awful physically abusive father (not that unlike Jin-gyu's father, in fact) and he actually did erupt into violence on occasion/act dismissive towards the other kids, but at least there was a pre-existing conflict there so unlike Jin-gyu, it didn't come across as pointless nastiness. And they've done a very poor job of making Jin-gyu seem sympathetic, if that's what they intended - he and his affluenza don't seem any different from the Boys Over Flowers/Heirs type of chaebols, and I think we can agree those were pretty terrible characters/people.

(spot-on with the nut rage lady comparison, btw, his level of entitlement is similar to that - especially once we hit the episode 2 recap)

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Ji Yoon was a definite stand out for me in this episode and episode 2. I'm gonna keep watching mostly for her, but I did like Kang Soo as well, if only because he's really nice and I like nice male leads in dramas. I actually liked Dan Ah more this episode than i did in episode 2 for spoiler reason so I won't get into that. But bottom line is there's an acceptable level of self interest that she crossed and even though I'm sympathetic to her circumstances it's over the top. And the show tries to play it as a joke but it's really not funny so I'm left feeling uncomfortable with her. Same with Jin gyu, spoilers but something happens and I don't know if I'll be able to fully be on board with the character if it's not handled properly. But his circumstances are really crappy, and I wish his brother could be there for him more beyond giving him car money.

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you know, I think Jin Gyu is a turtle and the car is the shell he pulls into because he keeps burning his nose every time he attempts to look around a bit.

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JG Even if you sell yourself, you can't buy this car.
KS More expensive than people? I'm not that cheap.
JG (Very funny.)
KS could hear him mumbling to himself.

JG doesn't understand why KS is angry.
He asked me the price of the car and I let him know, but he suddenly expressed his inferiority complex.
He rationalized his conduct by thinking so.

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Ok, I din't like how Dan Ah handle her first meeting with Kang Soo... You don't have to be a pushover but also, you don't have to be rude... with that first meeting she has this impression of someone who thinks she is always right and it is hard to root for such characters.

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