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[Music and Dramas] How dramas brought me back to my first love


The Lonely Shining Goblin

By Ally

When this month’s theme popped up, it was like javabeans and girlfriday peered into my soul, opened my subconscious, and said, “Ally, this theme is for you!” For full disclosure, I am not a writer, and I am barely a musician, but I do love music and I love K-dramas. You see, music was my first love. I’ve been studying it since I was four, and I almost became a performance major in college. I couldn’t give it up even when I was in medical school, and found another doctor to play duets with me in the atrium of the hospital. I was in a band or two, maybe three—that was a lifetime ago! And these are just thoughts from an amateur musician who would have been a professional if she weren’t too afraid that she wouldn’t be able to eat if she chose music as a career.

For me, part of the charm of K-dramas is the score—I wouldn’t love dramas as much without them. I’ve always been a soundtrack junkie. Even before K-dramas, I was (and still am) obsessed with musicals. Before the internet, I spent hours scouring cubbies of CDs, looking for librettos of songs so that I could learn all the words, sing them at the top of my lungs in my car, learn to play them on the piano, and cry with them in my room.

Then I became obsessed with movie soundtracks in college, and how their sweeping orchestral arrangements transported me into fantasy worlds far away. And finally, I’ve graduated to K-drama OSTs, with their ballads and background melodies which are relatively simple, yet stay with you long after you’ve watched the drama.

Music transcends all cultures, races, and genders. I don’t understand 99 percent of the lyrics in OSTs, but it never matters. It’s the music, the singer’s emotions while singing, and what the drama is portraying that gives it meaning. Play any song in any K-drama I’ve watched and I can probably tell you what drama it’s from. That’s how strongly music stays with me. It taps into emotions I didn’t know I had. I can go through life and live out tragedies and never cry. I have the emotional IQ of a rock. But put a soundtrack behind an actor who does one lip quiver, and I’m a blubbering mess.

A few beanies know this already because I’ve shared it on my fan wall, but the OST in The Lonely Shining Goblin affected me so profoundly that I found my love for music again. I never really lost it completely, but it had been so many years since I had really listened to music, really played it, really felt it. And now, I can’t get enough of it. I even went digging and found the obscure pieces, the ones not on the soundtrack—the ones that only the composer has on his personal Youtube channel, where he has like 100 subscribers, which now includes me! Every single track is amazing.

Every time I replay the Goblin soundtrack, I relive every look Gong Yoo and Lee Dong-wook acted out, every tear they shed, every scene they played, and my emotional IQ goes up 100 points. I become more empathic when I watch K-dramas, in no small part because of the music.


The Lonely Shining Goblin, “Round and Round,” “Amnesia”

Not only this, but I hadn’t learned a new piece of music in over 15 years on the piano, until I picked up some sheet music that an angel on the internet had improvised and transcribed for the songs “Round and Round” and “Amnesia” from Goblin, and didn’t stop practicing it until I had mastered it in two weekends. I drove my entire family batty, because they had never heard me practice before! I forget to eat, forget to sleep, forget almost everything when I dive into a new piece—and now you know why some musicians are so skinny.

Now, every time I play those songs, in my mind’s eye, I see the Grim Reaper and Goblin doing their model-walk down a dimly lit abandoned street, and the little-boy-turned-lawyer walking up the stairway to heaven, and I relive Sunny’s bittersweet pain of reuniting with her brother and her first love after so many years. Music conjures up these memories and images, and sets them apart from others because it taps into the core of our being, our emotions.

Music is therapy for me—even more than the dramas themselves, which I know is therapy for many of us. I even thought for a second of becoming a music therapist, working with children and the elderly, using it to bring them joy, work through their sorrow, and heal their pain. This is why we listen to music; a K-drama without music would just be talking, actors looking constipated, crying for no reason, and it would lose the emotional impact that we’re so familiar with.

Music is directly connected to the limbic system in the brain, the area that is responsible for our emotions. Without getting too technical, most music bypasses the decision-making parts of the brain straight to this emotional part. That’s why we feel music first, whether it sounds “good” or “bad,” whether it’s “sad” or “happy,” and we can all communicate about it without knowing any of the technical aspects. You don’t have to be a music prodigy to appreciate music, just like you don’t have to know anything about Korea to appreciate K-dramas. And together, when done well, they stay with you for a lifetime, and if you’re lucky enough to be an immortal goblin, for much, much longer.

 
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Music transcends all cultures, races, and genders. I don’t understand 99 percent of the lyrics in OSTs, but it never matters. It’s the music, the singer’s emotions while singing, and what the drama is portraying that gives it meaning.

This was a beautiful piece @ally. I'm no musician but I'm definitely music obsessed. I really related to what you said here because to me music really can portray so many emotions in a way that relates to universal human experience. It allows us to feel connected to others when we feel alone, and it gives shape to our emotions when we can't find the right way to express them. Thank you for sharing this story with us.

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I’ve always been better at expressing myself better through music than through just about anything else. Music “giving shape” to emotions when I can’t find the words is the perfect description. Thank you.

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I think it's awesome that you can do that -- I've never been any good at playing an instrument, but I love it so much that I have playlists for everything. Dramas opened up a lot of new music for me to explore and I love how everyone's story is different, but they all speak to the importance of the connection between music and emotions.

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It was absolute HEAVEN listening and watching you play those pieces from Goblin! I think you've described your love for dramas and their music better than any of us could. Thank you so much.

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You’re welcome so much! That music is heavenly. All I did was be obsessed enough to learn it! Those who wrote it are the talented ones!

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enjoyed reading this, I enjoyed Round and round/amnesia - brings back my feels from goblin.

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What is this? Thank you for allowing me to share this with you! I’m still in complete and utter shock! And thank you for making me sound so much better than what I originally penned!

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This is a fabulous post Ally! You really captured what it mean to 'feel' music first and foremost ! Ppl always complain that I never get the lyrics of any song right.. but I'm usually so lost in the melody that the lyrics barely register!

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You DO sound amazing because you translated the language of music into words so eloquently! I was waiting for someone to write about Goblin's haunting and heartbreaking OSTs and I'm so excited that you did! Your piano playing is mesmerizing, your words themselves are phrased like music, and I learned a little bit more about one of my favorite KDrama soundtracks. Thank you! :)

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Wow, I am soooo impressed with how beautifully you played that piece! 👏👏👏

I definitely agree with you that music is very therapeutic and transcends the limits of language!
Thank you for sharing! ❤

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Gorgeous, @ally-le. Applause!

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This is a very nice write-up @ally-le and thank you for sharing that lovely video of you playing the piano:)

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Whoaa! that was her playing the piano?! She didnt mention that the video was her.. but I should've realised from the description and the physique of the lady playing. *tubelight comes on

What a faaabulous job Ally! You sure could've become professional musician! but Medicine is awesome too & u seem to do a brilliant job with the balancing act!

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Thank you-you’re too flattering! It’s possible, sometimes I’m better at it than others though—balancing things, that is! Dramas and music do help me stay balanced I think!

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You are amazing at it!! Trust me u are! I actually need to get some balance back.. and not let things slide in this writing slump!

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“Fighting!” Almost Dr. Unicorn!

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This is incredibly lovely. I'm glad you and music found one another once more :)

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Woww I haven't (yet) watched Goblin but this post boosts up the temptation. ❤❤
👏👏@ally-le

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Glad to tempt you! We have similar tastes, I think you’ll love it!

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I am here because I read that Ally played the piano! Simply magnificent! Both this write up and the playing.

I have hardly talked about OSTs in my comments but it's impossible not to be touched by the music when I watch a drama. BGMs are easily my favorites while OSTs bring you into the world that the characters live.

If I am hooked on a drama, the OSTs will be played on loop especially when I am driving. OSTs are also the quickest to bring me back to the time when I was watching the drama. Instantly, the story, the characters and emotions all come flooding back. That's the power of music.

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Thank you! You should really write. I listen to OSTs in the car to and from work as well—when my kids let me—or when I make them. 😝 I love how music just bypasses our “thinking/rationalizing” mind and quickly unlocks memories and emotions, putting us back where we were when it first affected us. Not just powerful, but highly efficient.

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I always fight with my kids over which music to play in the car. Since I am now into The King Loves OSTs, I've been playing them ad nauseam. Revenge for having to hear "Despacito" for weeks 😜

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I completely agree! I know a few people who don't listen to music and I just can't fathom that. Many mediums affect my emotions, from books to TV shows, but none do it in the way music does. I fond myself sad that some people apparently don't experience that.

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I love that so many of us make our kids listen to drama OSTs in the car! I made mine listed to The King Loves on the way home yesterday.

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Is your ID a reference to the Doctor Who character?

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Yep! :)

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"And these are just thoughts from an amateur musician who would have been a professional if she weren’t too afraid that she wouldn’t be able to eat if she chose music as a career."

I feel you! :( Oh well, nothing to do but to accept the fact. Anyways, so beautifully written and that play makes me want to re-watch Goblin all over again. FANTASTIC! Thanks for sharing!

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I’ve written short dissertations here on eating, so that’s also a highly important aspect of my life! If @javabeans decides she wants a theme of the month about kdramas and food, I’ve a few thoughts on that as well. ☺️ So I guess food trumps music if you’re analyzing this. 🤣

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I can't blame you we can go 24 hours straight talking about food and it'll still not be enough. Oh, best things in life...

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hahah Food and Kdramas! That's a great theme of the month.

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First, what a great piece, @ally-le! I could relate to it so much. Then you also played music for us and we have a winner! Haha! You're so good at playing it too!

Now that I've read this and you've told your story, I remember that kpop, specifically Big Bang songs back then, made me want to touch my keyboard after a long long time. (I quit my lessons very early because I realized as a 10-year old that I'm not really musically gifted/talented/inclined (in terms of playing instruments/tones/pitch/rhythm)). I am great though at appreciation! Hee

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Aloha, Ally...

The best thanks that I can bestow upon you and DramaBeans for posting your essay -- and your rendition of “Round and Round” and “Amnesia” from GOBLIN -- are the tears that fall freely as I read and listen. More than once, music has saved my life and my sanity. It has enabled me to feel emotions for which there are no words in my native language -- or maybe any human language. The capacity to feel emotion is hardwired into most of us, and music is the shortest path to it.

Music may just be the hook that grabbed me early in my Kdrama career. I don't need to know the meaning of Korean words because emotions are conveyed by the music. But translations of lyrics add even more layers of significance, particularly when turns of phrase deftly reinforce mood. I find that it's often the incidental instrumental passages of soundtracks that burrow deeply into my consciousness.

I'm not much of a musician myself, but music has held a special place in my heart for most of my life. I learned to play guitar when Latin dirges gave way to vernacular folk music so I could "make a joyful noise" in church as a kid. Although my spiritual path has lead me away from institutional religion, some of my best memories are of "praying by playing" with the folk group during practice and at Mass. Then I would trundle off to my part-time job at a radio station to babysit the transmitter during the weekly Sunday night remote live broadcast of a local church's gospel-infused worship service. On Saturday nights, I was the operator on duty during a live Korean culture program. I heard “Arirang” for the first time when I was working there, and it stuck in my mind.

As in the film SUNNY and the currently airing LINGERIE GIRLS' GENERATION, whose first episode I watched earlier today, music supplied the soundtrack of my young life. It only took a couple of notes for me to recognize “Sealed with a Kiss,” although I admit that I mistook Bobby Vinton's version for Brian Hyland's. ;-)

For about 10 years I spun platters at a college radio station, and music truly was the soundtrack of my life as I navigated young adulthood. My fan wall is crammed with music, some of it from Kdramas, much of it from my radio days.

When I started watching Kdramas, I never expected music to touch me so profoundly. Not every OST reduces me to a blubbering blob of protoplasm. But many fill my being with majestic awe, inspire sunny optimism, remind me that no matter where we're from, we're all on this planet at this time for some mysterious reason. If I listen closely enough to the music, I might just hear the “red stings” that connect me to my fellow human beings. I'm as Irish-American as Paddy's pig, but cannot tell you how many times I've heard a Kdrama OST that hits my Celtic soul hard. I have long sensed a kindred-spiritedness between my ancestral homeland and Korea. Chalk it up to han.

Thanks again!

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I stalk your fan wall often for the music!

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I've been adding American pop from LINGERIE GIRLS' GENERATION. Much of it in ep. 2 is actually from the 1960s -- and one from '57. ;-)

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Oh I've seen your post on Lingerie Girls Generation soundtrack. Awesome!
I really want to have/make/find a complete list of all the music used in the show because it's amazing.

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LINGERIE GIRLS' GENERATION may turn out to be the next SOUL MATE or COFFEE PRINCE as far as the background music is concerned. DB used to have a list of all the music used in SOUL MATE, but it seemed to have gotten lost during the website upgrade. I sent an email to let the Powers know, but haven't checked back.

As for compiling the background music list, this sounds like a project for the denizens of the LGG recap threads. It would be nice if there were a single forum for it. I've heard some Korean pop songs that I liked, but have no way of identifying them, let alone finding clips. I'd love to know what they are, with translations of the titles and lyrics, and a little background as to popularity, social / historical significance, meta references for non-natives, etc.

FYI: The excellent blog Ask A Korean had a wonderful section devoted to Korean pop musicians the last time I looked. He gives great insight into historical and cultural background and the sociopolitical significance of the music and the musicians who made it. Highly recommended!

The main reason I'm watching LGG is to hear the music of the time. Oddly enough, much of the American music is from the mid- to late 1960s, not 1979. Stuff that I listened to as a teenybopper on WABC-AM in New York, the top station for pop music in its market, if not the entire Northeast.

By the time I was in college (1974-78), my taste had expanded to include progressive and acid rock, heavy metal, New Wave, punk, blues, folk, and jazz, which mainly aired on FM stations, especially WNEW-FM in New York and a few college stations. Europop was heavy on disco at the time, as was American pop music. It will be interesting to hear if any of these other genres made it to Korea.

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@pakalanapikake

Omg I didn't even dream so far as to get the complete list with "background as to popularity, social / historical significance, meta references for non-natives, etc." That would be amazing. When you dream you dream big. I like it.
I noticed the songs were chosen from a larger range of time but I wondered if that was because in Korean the foreign music would have been harder to come by in their region?
I think when it's over I'll set aside time to search the show & the web for the music. This might end in me sending letters to the network...hahaha

That Ask a Korean blog looks so good. His writing is so crisp. :)

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By any chance did I spy a piano video by your son the Kdrama actor?! ;-)

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Maybe! Now you know my YouTube channel! It’s just mostly my kids’ playing so I can embarrass them later in life. We are totally surrounded by music this day and age that they really take it for granted. I only have two recordings of my own playing as a teenager and treasure them. They have almost every song they’ve memorized on YouTube. I’m a bit of a tiger mom when it comes to piano too. I just think it organizes your brain so well, multitasking is a breeze, and builds the foundation for art and mathematics like nothing else.

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Wow! Your kids played so well!

If you are a tiger mom, I'm a kitten when it comes to making them practice 😅

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It's amazing how technological changes, especially in computer sciences and electrical engineering, have transformed consumer electronics -- and enabled anyone with the means to become their own video / audio producer and broadcaster. It's analogous to how Kodak "Brownie" and Instamatic cameras turned my generation into shutterbugs. I recall the first small easily portable reel-to-reel tape recorder my family got, with 3-inch reels, in the 1960s. Before that, there was no way to preserve someone's voice. What I wouldn't give to hear my elders' voices now.

My paternal grandmother played the piano, and her sisters-in-law played guitar, mandolin, and maybe violin in a little music group in their younger days. That's how I came to love the piano -- and how Grandma met their kid brother. ;-)

I yearned to play the piano, but my family couldn't afford one until Grandma died and left a bequest. By then, I was in junior high and involved in other activities. I took piano lessons for a while, but was not motivated to stick with it. Perhaps a different teacher, or the opportunity to learn music that I loved, would have made a difference. I could play music by ear on guitar, but still couldn't read music. Elementary school music classes had been traumatic as I could never get the hang of reading music, which made me feel like an idiot. It would have destroyed my grade point average, so I faked it for years and then studiously avoided all forms of music education involving grades in high school and college.

A few years ago, I began singing Sacred Harp, which employs shape notes (fasola). What a revelation! The music is powerful, primal, and stunningly harmonic, and dates back to itinerant New England singing masters in the early years of the Republic. The tradition was preserved in the rural South. When I sing it, I feel a deep connection with my Southern ancestors. And my soul rejoices. ;-)

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"red strings" -- as in REBEL. ;-)

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This is such a lovely response! You should seriously consider writing a post for this theme. Your writing is expressive and eloquent. <3

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Very entertaining read ally. You sure know how to write as well hehe. I think I saw this clip on your fan wall and you are pretty much awesome! Now I want to play piano just to be pencil skinny lol. Btw on goblin I love round and round, and the theme song, but the one I love the most is "I will go to you like a first snow". The music is soul touching and aelee's voice is so mesmerizing that it evokes certain emotions from God knows where. 😍

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Drama OSTs are a tricky one for me. On one hand, I can't understand what is being sung because I'm not korean. On the other hand, the soundtrack is so powerful and moving that you kinda get the tune stuck in your head for a long while..playing over and over again. But by the time I finish that drama and start a new one, I pretty much forget the music and move on to the next one.
Then I fell in love with Goblin. Like every part of the drama. The story, the cast, the emotions and most definitely the music.
Truth to God, I have all the OSTs from Goblin. All of them. And I don't understand the language!!!. For the first time ever, I had korean music on my playlist, over and over on my phone. And every time I played the music, it was like i was reliving the drama.
Goblin's Stay With Me has been my ringtone for close to 8months now and I dont see myself changing it for the rest of the year.

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Goblin’s soundtrack is something special, no doubt. Every song is a gem, it’s really remarkable. I completely believe that you have every song from the OST!

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Oh Wow @ally-le, your playing is amazing. You really could have been a professional musician.

Thank you also for reminding me of how amazing Goblin's soundtrack was - I think I'll just watch the series again. I do agree with you about how music lingers, and hearing an OST long after a drama has ended will remind one of how they felt while watching it. I've found this to be true of all aspects of my life - certain songs will always take me back to a certain moment, or feeling, or time. Be it Backstreet Boys' "Show me the meaning" taking me back to the school choir, "Aik Alif" to my early, lonely days as a student in London, or Goblin's OST to the last days 2016 and also to your post.

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Enjoyed reading your post, Ally. Thanks for sharing!

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Wow @ally-le! Is there anything you can't do?! A doc who can tickle the ivories? Lol...

Great post and love the little guy who sits atop your piano.

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Great post, Ally! The Goblin OST is fantastic. I also have always loved soundtracks and musicals too, the music enhances the emotions, and then the music becomes the emotions. Whenever I love a drama, I listen to its OST constantly to stay in the emotional state of the drama. And even later, hearing OST songs brings those feelings back.

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Wow! That's seriously so good Ally! Really love that u took the time to practise and play that piece so wonderfully. I've always wanted to learn how to play but alas never had the chance. This just reminds me of my love for music back in the day which medical school and residency did not allow to grow. Ur write up about music is so on point and beautifully expressed, thanks 4 sharing.

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It was really hard to stay connected to music in an active capacity in professional school. But harder when I became that professional and also having a family. I have a friend who used to play the harp with me who just started playing the harp again after 20 years. My mom, who started playing the piano when I did, who can just play chords and simple melodies, gave me her piano 2 years ago, and missed it so much that she bought another and started learning again at 60! It’s never too late to start again is my point! I hope you find your love as I did!

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By some coincidence I was already listening to a piano compilation of Goblin's OSTs before coming to your article. The screen capture of Goblin should have clued me in. 😆

I am delighted to find another lover of Goblin and it's OSTs. I too am so taken with the music of Goblin that I can listen to it repeatedly, although I do not always link the music to every scene in which they played, but the emotions they evoke will come flowing back and I sometimes have to stop what I'm doing because I get lost in the music and lose concentration LOL.

I just heard at least one piece of music when watching Temperature of Love that I felt was wonderful for setting the mood and giving us clues as to the type of personality we were dealing with. I'm going to look for it and add it to my playlist. 😋

Thanks and much happiness in more music 'practice'. 😃

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dear @ally-le
I watched/listened to you play "amnesia" and it brought tears to my eyes (I'm not exaggerating). O, how I LOVED Goblin during its running time! I would re-watch each episode about 2 - 3 times for each release!
Thank you for sharing your talent!

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That Amnesia melody is so gloriously simple but so haunting at the same time. I see Reaper’s tears and Sunny’s heartbreak every time I hear it. It’s unforgettable!

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BRAVO!!!!

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Ally, beautiful essay and beautiful playing. Many years ago, kdrama brought me back to the piano as well (back in the days when you could even buy ost sheet music books from YesAsia). Not starting with your level of talent, my reintroduction to the piano was more like 'chord-chord-expletive!' but I enjoyed it all the same because even through the mistakes I could still "hear" the songs. People tease me too for listening to songs all day when I don't understand the lyrics. I tell them I can't understand most of what's being sung in Western songs either, so what's the difference?

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Haha! Imagining your expletives! I do the same! I love it! Keep playing!

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Beautifully written! I loved when you stepped into a little of the technical connections with the brain and music. It's truly fascinating. My step-grandfather has Alzheimer's and as he's progressed music has been the only thing to remain with him. When we put his music on there's a spark back in his eyes. Music is incredibly powerful.
Goblin was a fantastic choice to really focus on because it's almost other worldly with how absolutely gorgeous the OST was. Thank you for once again bring it back in our lives. <3

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Aloha, toramona!

I'm so sorry to hear of your step-granddad. My Mom had Alzheimer's, and I can corroborate that her memory of music lasted the longest. She would sing along with my brother, who remembers all the old Tin Pan Alley songs that our grandmother used to sing to us. Some of them were hits when Mom was little.

You might be interested in the writings and videos of the late celebrated neurologist, Dr. Oliver Sacks. I'd read a couple of his fascinating books (Island of the Colorblind is great) before learning that he would be speaking on music and the brain at the first World Science Festival in NYC in 2008. He spoke at the Abyssinian Baptist Church, and their choir sang as part of the program. It was well worth the trip into the city.

http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/programs/music_and_the_brain/

Dr. Sacks noted that whenever he met a new patient for the first time, he would sing "Happy Birthday" to them, regardless of their actual birth date. In many cases his dementia and Alzheimer's patients would sing along. Music enabled them to retrieve old memories.

Similarly, he discovered that Parkinson's patients, who were otherwise "frozen," could initiate movement when music was played. They could "hitch a ride" on the rhythm of the music. (My brother had a high school buddy who developed Parkinson's disease, so this caught my ear.)

Dr. Sacks was a delight to listen to. A truly modest person who was as much an anthropologist as a neurologist.

I've posted a couple of links to Dr. Sacks on my fan wall. Here's hoping there's some helpful information for you. ;-)

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@pakalanapikake
I'm sorry to hear about your mother but it's really nice your brother was able to to sing with her and transport her for a bit.
Thank you for the recommendations. I think I've heard the name Dr. Oliver Sacks before...I just ordered an audiobook so I can check it out. :)

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Aw, Ally. I'm happy you've found your passion again and acted on it this time. Sometimes, we need to give up on things for really good reasons but some dreams stay in the deepest part of us until they've been awaken. Yay for passion! Yay for music! Yay for kdrama!

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I recently started listening to the Goblin soundtrack again before I saw your article. All the tracks on there bring back so many flashbacks of the drama. I really enjoyed what you wrote. Unfortunately, work has blocked all my videos, so I will have to wait till I go home to check out your musical piece! Thanks for sharing! Music really is therapy!

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Oh! What a wonderful treat! Thank you, @ally-le for the music and the writing. I also felt that Goblin set a record for soundtrack music, more so that Descendants of the Sun ... and most of the time it surpassed the story itself, stopping me from abandoning Goblin when I felt it lacked character depth & story development. It was all thanks to the OST, hands down!

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This piece made me tear up like a Kdrama OST, reading how you put precisely into words why I always feel strongly connected to soundtracks.

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A wonderfully written article, Ally. Thank you for conveying some of my feelings on music in drama, so well at that.

And also, thank you so much for that link to the composer's youtube channel! i've been a big fan of OSTs since i was in elementary school, but those days it's very hard to get my hands on those film OSTs that i love so much. Now thanks to the internet, i can listen to them whenever i wanted, and be lost in my own world.

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You’re welcome! I HAD to find that stairway to heaven song and I don’t think it was included on the official OST, which took me on a wild chase around YouTube looking for it! So glad I found it though, because there were so many other tracks I love that I found here.

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I second that! What a treasure trove. How often is it that we get to hear the tracks that were not used in the finished drama?

FYI: A while back I came across Two Steps From Hell, composers of music for trailers. Their music is simply epic. Their latest album, Unleashed, debuted a few days ago. I just listened to "Impossible," and it made me want to jump into my Viking longship and set sail for Vineland -- or invade Albion. One or the other. ;-)

http://www.dramabeans.com/members/pakalanapikake/activity/253031/

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Thank you for reminding me of the music in Goblin - I immediately rewatched my favourite parts of the drama.

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That was lovely. Thanks!!!

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Lovely.

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"Music transcends all cultures, races, and genders."
Yes, it does! There are many songs that I love that aren't in my native language. I cannot imagine what my life would be like if I didn't listen to a song because I couldn't understand the lyrics.
"Music is directly connected to the limbic system in the brain, the area that is responsible for our emotions. Without getting too technical, most music bypasses the decision-making parts of the brain straight to this emotional part."
I never new this but it makes so much sense. Music is truly one of the greatest gifts given to mankind. Thank you for this post @Allly!

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@Ally: I always love OST with piano as a dominant instrument (sorry I'm no musician). You did an amazing covers of Round and Round, and Amnesia. Millions of hugs to you!!!!!

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Btw, I just checked out the youtube channel you shared of unreleased score music... they're all so great!!!!!!
I'm listening to "Stairways to Heaven" and remembering the scene where a soldier meets his wife after long separation by war... Thank you for sharing this! It's very precious to me too!!!

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