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Because This Life Is Our First: Episode 15

Somehow we’ve arrived at the second-to-last episode, and while it feels to me like we got here too fast, in this episode it does begin to feel like we are approaching the ending of a completed story. Though my heart doesn’t want to say goodbye to these characters and this beautifully crafted show, I think I am ready to see what each character has chosen for themselves, and be happy for them regardless of the outcome.

 
Episode 15: “Because this is my first intermission”

Ji-ho asks Se-hee to dissolve their contract, and his eyes move immediately down to Cat’s new nametag, which Ji-ho has missed. He repeats her request slowly as a question—his voice wavering slightly—but she doesn’t meet his eyes as she affirms it.

Elsewhere, Young-hyo sees Ho-rang back to Su-ji’s, and the atmosphere between them is friendly as Young-hyo thanks her for a nice time. It seems that she’s also warmed to his silliness, and she bids him farewell with a smile.

Ji-ho and Se-hee reconvene at the dining table, where Ji-ho explains that since her contract with Jung-min’s company will likely go forward, soon she’ll be able to find her own place to live. Thus, there would be no reason to continue with their contractual marriage.

Cat whimpers in the background when Se-hee congratulates Ji-ho on her job, since she will now be able to continue writing. He seems anxious and tells her that they can discuss the specifics later, then gets up to leave.

But before he goes, Ji-ho reminds Se-hee that there was something he wanted to say, and her expression is heartbreakingly sad as she waits for Se-hee to speak. After a beat, Se-hee says that he will take care of the recycling from now on, given that Ji-ho will likely become busier during the week with her job.

Later in her room, Ji-ho remembers her conversation with Se-hee’s father, where she confessed that she married Se-hee because of his house. She explained that they married because their conditions and values matched, and apologized. His father hadn’t thought it such a big deal, and remarked that most people marry for the same reasons, rather than love.

His answer surprised Ji-ho and she asked why he accepted her even though their marriage was so sudden, Se-hee’s father explained that it was the right age for Se-hee, and given all of Ji-ho’s merits, there was no reason to oppose. Plus, she said she loved Se-hee back then, which he thought was fortunate.

Ji-ho found that reasoning strange—the idea that having love in a marriage was “fortunate” rather than necessary. She admitted that it been bothering her that she lied when he had asked her why he was marrying Se-hee, because although it was a lie then that she was marrying him for love, now she had really fallen for him.

Se-hee’s father smiled, and said that kind of love was common between married couples, and urged her to take the bankbook.

Outside, she bid Se-hee’s father farewell without feeling like she had been clearly understood, and in the present, Ji-ho looks at the bankbook in her hand with a heavy heart.

She calls Se-hee on the phone to ask, “What is marriage? Do you know what marriage is?” The question sends Se-hee back to the memory of him telling his parents that he was planning to marry Jung-min twelve years ago. His announcement was met with a swift slap to the face from his father, and subsequent shouting.

Se-hee promised to take responsibility for Jung-min and their baby because he loves her, and his father angrily asked if love would feed them, or pay Jung-min’s parents’ debt. Se-hee asked how his father could only worry about his reputation and rumors when Jung-min is going through so much. His father had kicked Se-hee out of the house then.

In the present, still on the phone with Ji-ho, Se-hee walks to her door and puts his hand on the handle. But he stops when Ji-ho says through tears that a real marriage with love must be a happy one.

Slowly, he lifts his hand from the handle and thinks to himself, “Her voice is shaking. Her eyes are tearing up. Ji-ho is crying because of me.” Noooooo, open the door.

The next morning, Ji-ho finds that Se-hee has already completed her usual chores. She spots an envelope on the table with a note from Se-hee informing her that he’s going to his parents, and to let him know if she needs anything to terminate their contract. Inside the envelope she finds their contract.

Won-seok wakes in his studio and is startled to find Bo-mi lying on the floor next to his bed. He freaks out to see himself in his underwear, and she asks if he forgot what happened the night before.

He notices Bo-mi holding Ho-rang’s pink pillow and snatches it back from her, yelling at her for using it. She slaps him hard across the face and calls him rude, informing him that he took off his own pants when she brought him home from the club after he passed out.

She storms out, and so he chases after her to apologize. He explains that he’s mad at himself and unfairly took it out on her. Bo-mi, in her usual curt way, simply asks if they’re getting hangover soup and walks ahead.

Coincidentally, Ho-rang and Young-hyo are also eating hangover soup at the same restaurant as Won-seok and Bo-mi walk in. Bo-mi recognizes Young-hyo as their accountant and joins him, making the ex-couple uncomfortable.

Ji-ho resigns from her cafe job and nearly misses saying goodbye to Bok-nam. He finds her at the bus stop and gives her a framed photo of the one he took on her wedding day of her and Se-hee stiffly shaking hands, and she thanks him for the thoughtful gift.

Se-hee visits his parents to tell them of his impending divorce. He cites their different personalities, which her mother finds absurd, meanwhile his father silently leaves the room upset.

Things are awkward at breakfast as Ho-rang tells the table that she met Young-hyo through the app. Young-hyo thanks Bo-mi and Won-seok for helping him meet his “ideal woman,” then proceeds to call Ho-rang perfect, and explains his dream to marry someone like her.

This tidbit leads Bo-mi to assume that they’re a couple and seriously discussing marriage, but Ho-rang hurries to correct her and crosses nervous glances with Won-seok. Young-hyo confirms the misunderstanding, but then enthusiastically vows to do his best until Ho-rang accepts his eventual proposal. God, this guy is so painfully awkward to watch.

Then Young-hyo notices that Ho-rang hasn’t added any perilla seed powder to her soup and motions to add some, but before Ho-rang can explain that she doesn’t like it, Won-seok reflexively stops him in a panic.

On the bus, Ji-ho looks at the framed picture, then calls someone to request a date.

Se-hee finds his father outside smoking, and he’s resigned to Se-hee’s decision and says that Se-hee always does as he pleases anyway. Se-hee doesn’t see it that way at all, and tells his father that ever since “that day” he hasn’t been able to live as he wanted for a single moment, because the first person he ever chose for himself was denied by the person he loved and trusted the most: his father.

Se-hee tells his father that he loved him so much and yet he ignored the life Se-hee had chosen, and made a door form inside Se-hee’s heart. His father gruffly says that if he could go back in time, he would do the same thing again, since he could never stand by and watch Se-hee ruin his life. He asks Se-hee to imagine how unhappy he’d be now if he had gotten married to Jung-min then, so Se-hee asks why his father let someone else’s daughter go through hell alone just to save his son.

His father replies that his child is more important, and though it’s selfish, it’s his way of loving Se-hee. Se-hee understands his father’s feelings but says that given what happened with Jung-min, he doesn’t have a right to be with someone, and that being unhappy on his own is enough.

Ji-ho’s “date” turns out to be meeting Jung-min at a rock-climbing class. Jung-min asks if Ji-ho really won’t contract with her company, and whether it’s because of Se-hee. Ji-ho replies that it would be a lie if she said no, then adds that she is getting divorced.

Jung-min is astonished and her expression turns troubled, thinking herself the reason. Ji-ho says lightheartedly that she isn’t that influential in their relationship, and Jung-min is relieved to have overreacted.

Ji-ho actually thanks Jung-min for giving her the opportunity to clarify her feelings for Se-hee. She explains that she wants to love Se-hee with all her heart but doesn’t know how, because “I feel like I’m locked in the Room 19 that is marriage.”

Ji-ho calls her feelings odd and complicated, but Jung-min understands too well because she knows that marriage involves so many people’s feelings. However, the trouble is that everyone’s feelings are sincere, all beautifully intentioned. But when beautiful things grow entangled with each other, it can be difficult to recall their original beautiful shapes.

Jung-min muses that this must be why people say married spouses stay together out of attachment and become family. She calls marriage impressive, but at the same time scary. Still, Jung-min sighs regretfully, she’d hoped that Ji-ho and Se-hee would have a happy ending.

Ji-ho asks, with wide-eyed exaggeration, if Jung-min thinks that she and Se-hee can only be happy if they’re married and if divorcing means that they’ve failed somehow. Ji-ho exclaims how odd it is that the CEO of a production company leading the contemporary culture would be so old-fashioned in her thinking, teasing that she’ll have to reconsider working with her company.

Jung-min initially fidgets uncomfortably, taking the comments seriously, then realizes Ji-ho is joking and laughs in relief.

Meanwhile, Se-hee has drinks with Sang-gu at the office, and Sang-gu asks if Se-hee was able to confess to Ji-ho. He looks at Se-hee’s text message asking him for advice on the least corniest line to tell Ji-ho how he feels, and finds it amazing that they were authored by Se-hee so sincerely.

By this point, Se-hee has gotten adorably drunk as he admits that didn’t confess because Sang-gu said that all the options sucked, but Sang-gu asks meaningfully if Se-hee couldn’t confess, or didn’t.

Su-ji visits her mom in Namhae, and tries to hide her girlish smile when she receives Sang-gu’s text message. Mom notices and brings up Sang-gu so that she can voice her grievance for not knowing about Sang-gu earlier, and feeling like she’s competing with Sang-gu for Su-ji’s attention.

Eventually the air becomes strained when Mom asks if her bad legs are making Su-ji hold back from going after what she wants in life. Su-ji heatedly insists that isn’t it, so Mom pointedly asks why Su-ji can’t quit her job then, even though it brings her so much stress and unhappiness.

Su-ji replies that they need they money, which Mom knows is for the apartment she’s already vowed not to move into. Su-ji asks hotly how Mom is going to live alone with her bad legs forever, which confirms Mom’s fear of Su-ji holding back because of her, when she had always told Su-ji to stand tall.

Ji-ho returns home and thinks back to a conversation she had at Su-ji’s, where Su-ji asked Ji-ho to pick the least of the three cheesiest lines for confessing one’s feelings. Su-ji had gotten the text from Sang-gu, and told Ji-ho it was probably from Se-hee.

The revelation stunned Ji-ho, and as she walks home, she wonders why she doesn’t feel happy in that moment. Those words were something she’d been waiting to hear, but she wonders now why she feels afraid.

Nearby she hears a ruckus and sees Sang-gu trying to wrangle a stumbling Se-hee home. As Ji-ho approaches, Se-hee shouts her name loudly in a drunken stupor and then flops forward, leading Ji-ho to help corral him.

They manage to put him into bed (but not without some drunken shenanigans) where Se-hee gives them a fright when he sits up in bed and reveals a drunken habit of taking of his clothes and neatly folding them. LOL, cute.

Ji-ho serves Sang-gu a drink, and Sang-gu tells Ji-ho that Se-hee was planning to confess his feelings to her, and she admits that she already heard from Su-ji. Ji-ho then asks if Sang-gu has ever seen Se-hee mad or scared before.

Sang-gu answers that he has—many times before. He’s seen him crying too, and Ji-ho voices her envy for him having been able to see Se-hee express his emotions. She sighs that she’s never seen Se-hee’s Room 19, and that she won’t know what to do until he shows her what’s inside. But perhaps he doesn’t know what’s inside, or he doesn’t know how to open the door, or maybe he’s just scared of her seeing it.

She tries to play off her statements as strange, but Sang-gu says that he understands… only to assume that Room 19 is what Se-hee named his folder of porn. Ha! Sang-gu promises to get Se-hee to quit “those kinds of videos,” and Ji-ho tries to explain that it’s not what she meant, to no avail.

Young-hyo drives Ho-rang home after spending the day together, and when he notices that her legs are shivering, she remembers Won-seok sweetly bringing her socks to wear on their walk home. Young-hyo talks casually about his life as if getting married and having kids are all he can think about, but Ho-rang just smiles awkwardly.

In his studio, Won-seok remembers Young-hyo praising Ho-rang for being smart and easygoing. He cradles Ho-rang’s pink pillow and likewise goes back down memory lane to one of their earlier memories, where Ho-rang cried because Won-seok didn’t look back at her waving when they parted.

It’s a silly memory, which makes Won-seok in the present scoff at how not easygoing Ho-rang actually is. He texts Sang-gu to ask (between three options) the best language to use when texting someone late at night.

Sang-gu tells him not to send anything and go to bed, but it turns out that Won-seok doesn’t have to Ho-rang texts him instead, asking if he’s asleep. She frets alone in Su-ji’s room when she sees that Won-seok read her text, then panics when he calls.

They both navigate carefully through small talk, until Won-seok says that Young-hyo seems like a nice guy. Ho-rang agrees, and says that she’s still getting to know him and her feelings too, in order to find what might be in her heart as he suggested she do.

Ho-rang calls Bo-mi a cool and honest girl (a statement Won-seok neutrally agrees to), then says that she spent a quarter of her life with Won-seok.

Won-seok apologizes for not being able to be responsible for the time they spent together till the end. But Ho-rang says that she didn’t say it to get an apology, but rather wanted to say that she was happy she got to spend the best time of her life with him. Aww, how lovely.

She asks him to call her if he’s ever going through a hard time, since though they were once lovers, they were also old friends. He tears up from her wise words and she hurries to let him go, but before they hang up he asks her to definitely “be happy.”

In Namhae as they lie in bed, Mom asks Su-ji to understand how she feels because she’ll only be happy if Su-ji is. She urges Su-ji to fly high for her, as Su-ji cries. Oh no, the tears.

In voiceover Ji-ho says, “The heart’s intentions were beautiful. Ultimately, those beautiful hearts all just wanted to make you happy. A passing heart, a new heart, someone’s clumsy heart, and also this hurting heart—ultimately, they all hope for you to become happy. Will I be able to protect all those beautifully intentioned hearts as they are?”

Ji-ho watches over Se-hee sleeping that night, and traces his profile in the air with her finger. Her mother calls late at night to relay some news, but we don’t hear what just yet.

Se-hee wakes the next morning with a hangover, and finds some soup and hot tea left for him by Ji-ho. He goes to her room but finds it empty except for a large backpack on the bed. Jung-min calls right then, and he answers.

Ji-ho tries to return the bankbook from Dad to Se-hee’s mother, but she’s preoccupied with getting Ji-ho to make-up with Se-hee. She seems to understand that Ji-ho might be upset because Se-hee acts indifferently, which makes it hard to know what he’s thinking.

Ji-ho agrees with her, so Mom assures Ji-ho that all men are like children, which is why women should take care of them and try to understand them.

However, this is were Ji-ho diverges with Se-hee’s mother’s logic. She states that marriage should take place between two adults, and that Se-hee is an adult, who has been hurt a lot in the past. She adds that Se-hee’s father told her that a wife is supposed to act as a bridge, and she had thought that since Se-hee was her landlord, being a bridge was a good thing.

But the more she fell in love with him, the more confused she became, until she decided that she wasn’t sure if she should let the confusion continue—the confusion of exchanging labor like kimchi-making and cooking for memorial rites, uncertain of where the exchanging would end.

Ji-ho tells Se-hee’s very puzzled mother that she doesn’t want to continue taking care of Se-hee just to maintain her marriage, and act like a bridge and buffer between two families because of Se-hee’s wounds.

She says that Se-hee’s parents hurt Se-hee, and though it was a long time ago, wounds can remain and happen again in different ways. Se-hee’s mother calls Ji-ho selfish for calling off the marriage without consulting the parents, and says that marriage is sacred.

Ji-ho disagrees, however, explaining that love, and not marriage, is sacred.

When they meet, Jung-min tells Se-hee that Ji-ho knows of their past relationship. Se-hee notes that Jung-min and Ji-ho seem rather close, and Jung-min asks if it’s strange.

He replies dryly that it isn’t common, and Jung-min agrees that she thought it was weird at first, but Ji-ho told her that there were no reasons to think so. She adds that Ji-ho may be a little crazy, in a good way.

Jung-min tells Se-hee that she didn’t know that her hurtful words (about not having a right to love) would reach him and stay with him for so long, then apologizes because she wrote them during a low point. He says that she doesn’t have to explain herself, then uses Ji-ho’s words and says, “It’s no one’s fault, back then it just turned out that way.”

This time Jung-min has new words for him: “Be happy.”

Se-hee returns home and sees Ji-ho packing up her things. He asks about her parents, but she has already told them the news yesterday when they came to visit. He asks whether she has secured a place to live, but she says that she’s going to travel first, since she’s never done that alone before.

He expresses his gladness that she found a path that makes her happy, and is even doing something that she never had time to do before. She asks about his plans, which surprises him. He replies that he’ll probably continue living the same way.

She asks meaningfully if he’ll get a new tenant too, and after a pause he shakily replies that he probably will.

The time finally comes for them to terminate their contract, and so they each rip their copies in half. With that, it ends.

Ji-ho asks if there is anything that Se-hee wants to say (her expression hopeful but sad), and Se-hee thinks, “I wanted to say that I have a gift that I bought her. I wanted to say that there are still many soccer games to watch with her. I wanted to say that. But…”

Aloud, he says no. And so, she grabs her things and goes to the door. As she puts on her shoes, Se-hee continues internally, “If I say these things now, they would go inside her heart and stay there for a long time.”

As a final gesture, Ji-ho suggests they shake hands, then wishes them both luck since it’s the first time they’re getting divorced. He takes her hand and wishes her luck likewise.

Before she goes, she looks back at him once more and lingers for a second before finally exiting. As she does, Se-hee thinks, “I became alone again.”

He settles down for a beer and some soccer, but realizes that he hasn’t seen Cat in a while. He calls for her and ends up in Ji-ho’s empty room. He sits on the mattress and looks around for a moment when Cat comes trotting in. Se-hee stills when he sees the “Woori” nametag around Cat’s neck, and soon his mind fills with memories of Ji-ho.

He cries and says brokenly that he misses her. In voiceover he narrates, “Today, I lost what would have been my one and only love.”

COMMENTS

By the end of episode thirteen, I really didn’t think that Ji-ho and Se-hee would part ways, but perhaps I was blinded by my selfish desire for an ending where Se-hee and Ji-ho spend the rest of their days living their quirky and simple life (all the romantic recycling! And Cat co-parenting!), all while making these unhurried and mundane strides forward in love bit by bit. I was perfectly content with glossing over the fact that Se-hee has been living the last twelve years in reaction to his trauma, and in a totally self-contained way, in hopes of never hurting anyone or being hurt by anyone again. He’d been abiding by Jung-min’s spiteful words born of anger and despair, without addressing how his way of living and thinking and emoting affects Ji-ho and Se-hee’s relationship ability to move forward.

Clearly my assumptions prove that I haven’t been paying nearly enough attention to some of the main lessons of this drama, and specifically Se-hee and Ji-ho’s love story. Because people are not self-contained entities, they come with pasts, presents, and futures, and people in their lives, whose feelings are intertwined with theirs in complex and sometimes irreconcilable but deeply felt ways. There’s a pain there in Se-hee’s family that hasn’t been able to heal through the years, even with the good intentions, understanding, and deep love from all sides, and Ji-ho realized for herself that trying to be an ideal daughter-in-law wasn’t going to heal those wounds, but nor should she try to. Because allowing her relationship with Se-hee continue on its old trajectory would likely result in Ji-ho living like Se-hee’s mother and constantly needing to be understanding of Se-hee and making up for his shortcomings and emotional aloofness, without ever forcing him to express himself and be accountable for his own feelings, and for making sure his feelings reach her. I loved those scenes where Ji-ho was patiently and heartbreakingly waiting for him to realize these things for himself, because maybe then she wouldn’t need to leave.

GAH! I don’t know anymore! I just need to know that they end up together! I don’t know if I can handle another scene of someone throwing Cat’s name tag into the trash.

In all seriousness, my favorite moment in this episode was surprisingly that really short one between Su-ji and her mom when they were in bed and she told her to fly. When she said that she can only be happy when Su-ji is—those words opened the floodgates. It was the same kind of intense, lighting-quick, and bone-deep emotion I felt about Mom’s letter to Se-hee at their wedding, and it was a beautiful moment. I am really going to miss these moments when this show ends.

On that note, another mother-daughter moment I am expecting to make me cry is the one between Ji-ho and her mom. Mom is such a special character that has an amazing way of providing so much perspective in this already rich world, so I always find myself missing her in episodes she isn’t in. I really hope that she rounds out the show with some of her signature wisdom and helps Ji-ho find her way back to Se-hee somehow, or maybe the other way around, because Ji-ho seems to have a clear understand of her feelings, but Se-hee still might need to. I think I would love a final scene with Se-hee and Mom because those two are adorable and seem to really understand each other.

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Thank you! I was totally in the same boat as you, murakasimi! I thought they were going to stay together too! But then I thought again, and this is what I came up with.

I may be in the minority for thinking so, but I rather liked this 15th episode. I definitely threw me for a loop, though, as I thought Ji-Ho would be more forward with Se-Hee and confess to him her feelings outright, that she has fallen for him, and hard. What I got was the opposite, but am not opposed to what happened after I reasoned it out. (And I’ve purposely not seen the last episode so that my thoughts on this are not influenced by that final episode or the Beanie fan walls.)

This show has always been about women navigating the social expectancies of their culture. I loved how all the women were portrayed this episode (even Se-Hee’s mother because she’s my mother-in-law, to a T). Ji-Ho has realized that the love that she feels for Se-Hee is under false pretenses. She is beholden to Se-Hee because he is her landlord, who provides her a place to live, for next to nothing. Although it’s not Stockholm Syndrome, it’s pretty close. She has to live with him, he’s who she spends most of her time with, and he provides her a very important basic need, shelter. He’s also nice to her which is a plus. However, he’s also broken, emotionally and physically closed off, has emotional baggage, and is difficult to read. If she were under different circumstances, would she love him as much? That’s what she has to find out. Now that she is no longer penniless and homeless, she needs to stand on her own, live in her own home, not be so physically dependent, and see if he still means as much to her as he did when he held all this power in the relationship. Because, anyway you slice it, he holds more power in this relationship than she does, and as feminist as this show is, it’s all about equal division of labor, and coming into the relationship on the same level, or at least getting to the same level while in the relationship. Does that even make any sense?

For how much Seol and Ho-rang annoyed me at the beginning of this show, I did a 180 degree turn and fell in love with both of them this episode. They are communicating better being broken up than they were when they were dating. I’m hopeful they find happiness, and am just fine that it’s not with each other. However, new guy got super eager this episode and turned me off to him. I think I would have smacked some sense into him at some point if I was Ho-rang.

And how sweet is Su-ji and her mother? She’s definitely taken over the role of provider for her mother and has kept it up all these years. No wonder it’s been difficult for her to be in any other relationship. It will be difficult for her to give up control of her life, but not only her’s but her mother’s as well. I thought that dialogue between them was the strongest in the show this week.

And, Lee Min Ki. He broke me and I have yet to be put...

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Ho-rang's new guy rubbed me the wrong way from the beginning, to be honest. No one else seemed to have an issue with him so I just kind of forgot about it, but I could tell that Ho-rang wasn't really feeling him from the beginning.

The scene between Su-ji and her mother was probably one of my favorites of the finale week! I love how the conversation spurred her to advance her relationship with Sang-gu. So satisfying.

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I found the accountant a bit much at first as well but his obvious sincerity won me over I didn't expect them to be end game. But I warmed up to him enough to feel bad for him.

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...back together.

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Also, I really like what you said about the inherent power imbalance in their relationship and how their relationship depended on her housing situation, because it's so true. It's something I recognized from the get-go and kind of just brushed it under the rug until this week. I won't give any spoilers for the final episode but I thought that was something they tied up nicely!

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I’m watching it now!

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I also felt that she had good reason to leave I didn't feel it was a manipulation although I know some felt it was tacked on angst. I Hated for them to be parted at all but you cant have a fresh start without an ending. If Se-hee had said anything at all before she left I think they could have gone from there.

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reading your comment, i can slightly change my pov about how JH was thinking in this episode...but still i felt it could have been done differently..i mean SH was opening upto her..albeit slowly...and he did take the first step in initiating...whether it was their kiss or their date or them sleeping together...so he was opening up...forcing him to show his emotions like that felt a bit too cruel too me. i totally understand JH not wanting any external influence on their marriage..especially of the parents..and i am sure SH feels the same way too. she could have talked it out with him. and how is he supposed to confess to her after she just told she wants out? anyone would be too shocked after that. i may sound immature and many people would not agree with me but thats just my opinion. plus she knew that SH was going to confess...how could he when he was backed up against the wall like that? and she started having these insecurities and doubts right after his ex showed up...she was fine taking it slowly with him before that. and for all the talk about SH needing to express himself..what about JH? she told everyone else she loves him except for the person who she needed to tell? i may be wrong but even she has never told him outright she likes him...she never told her she was upset before...SH had to pick up the clues himself. yes i agree SH should have confessed to her..but i cant really agree the path JH took to force him...it may be an unpopular opinion..and many people may disagree with me...but please dont be too critical of me..

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Thank you so much for saying that. I watched the previous episodes to see if I had missed clues or explanation of why she left. It just hard for me too understand. I am a woman myself but I am very afraid of how woman can make things complicated. Does she doubts her feeling or his feeling? Does she wants to see if she or he misses each other after a separation? Why does she left ??

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I totally understand your point of view too. That’s the thing, all relationships worth having go through an exsistential crisis of sorts and those on both sides have to decide where to go from here. We can only react to our reality. My reality is different from yours and it’s differnt from my husband’s even though I lived with him for 15 years. Does Ji-ho think he loves her? I don’t know if she does. They haven’t known each other for that long. Is it too early for him to be proposing? She isn’t ready for a real marraige yet, but here he is texting proposals. You’re totally right, neither of them have been honest with their feelings about each other. Like Se-Hee says, words are slower than the heart. But this happens. In.real.life. All.The.Time. Real life example: I liked someone. I think he liked me. We never said how much we cared for each other. I met my now husband, who did express his heart. I married him. Would I have been happy with the first guy? We were highly compatible, liked the same things, had the same temperament—heck, his mom was even Korean! Maybe, but he never outright said anything that made me think he wanted to be with me. Was it worth confronting him about it at the time? No, it wasn’t. Am I glad we broke up? Yes. She doesn’t know if Se-Hee likes her enough to put in the effort. She doesn’t know if she loves him enough to express these things either. Dramas make it look easy sometones, but it’s hard to know when you’re in love how in love you are.

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Thank you for your comment...as someone who has never been in love...I guess I can't understand what's going through ji ho's mind...

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Ohh.. That makes two of us. I too has never been in love. Maybe that is why it is hard too understand.

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You two definitely have something to look forward to then! Matters of the heart are complex. I often wonder how I would interpret kdramas if I knew of them before I had my life experiences: dating, really liking several people, falling in love, doing stupid things because of it more than once or twice, getting married, having kids, navigating the in-laws. This show has it all (except the kids) and it’s very realistic. However, I probably would think similarly to you all. That’s why is resonates so much with so many of us. I feel like I’ve been through this. Like I said above, my situation took the opposite turn and I found someone else. I was right. That guy didn’t like me as much as I thought he did, or he would have fought to get me back. But I’m not sad about it...not in the least. I found someone who will fight for me and has, multiple times, defended me in front of his family, his friends, his enemies even. You never really know a person until something terrible happens, how they’ll react, if they really love you. Good luck finding that love!

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I really liked your insights and what you've said in your comments, this and the previous one. Both you and murasakimi prompted me to think about the characters' actions and motives more. Things started to make more sense! Thanks!

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I understand, I have dated someone who pursued me over someone who I thought liked me because if you are not 100% sure it takes alot of confidence I didn't have at that point to pursue the unknown.

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Exactly, and was that first guy heartbroken? For me, I never spoke to him again so I don’t have any idea and I can’t say I’ve ever even thought about it until now.

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I think the drama format of needing things to move along and needing this to be somewhat resolved by episode 16 made this part of the relationship process come off a little artificial. It makes sense for Ji Ho to leave, but at that point in the relationship, it felt like a rush in judgment. I felt like we needed a longer period of her feeling dissatisfied with the way things were before she made her decision. And the editing/order of the scenes didn't help.

But then if we needed for it to happen a more natural point, then this drama would need to be like 20-24 episodes.

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I agree wholeheartedly with your opinion. Maybe SH haven't say I love you openly but his actions do. And actions speak louder than words. And JH know he's going to confess! I'm not Korean but from my limited understanding of Korean language SH's planned proposal sound stronger than just plain 'saranghe' because all imply long term commitment (something Ho-rang badly want but fail to get).

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Actions might speak louder, but they're not always as clear and easy to understand. Have you ever tried to understand a screaming child?

Sure she knows he's doing these things, but the motivations behind them are not so clear. There are alternate explanations. Skinship doesn't necessarily mean love and caring, maybe he's just horny after 12 years. Protecting her from BM (she doesn't know about [email protected]#$%&*$ director) could have been from a sense of responsibility as her contract husband. Encouraging her career is to keep his promise to her mother. Etc, etc. Sehee's motivations are important to Jiho but he's not letting her into those.

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i cant agree more with you. If there is love between 2 ppl, then you dont need to throw that person off the cliff to test their feelings. Honestly i was hoping for something like Jiho confronting Seehee for not expressing his feelings and giving his heart a chance rather than straight away dumping him. She has seen in past of how her efforts have helped Seehee , then why take this extreme step esp when u know how sensitive this situation can be . She simply walked away without notice when she wanted and then decided to return with a cake when her heart was ready. What about the other person pining for you? what should he do ? In real life that could even send the person in depression. May be i am missing something about what the writer is trying to convey.

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I want to say something about this, but it's strongly related to ep 16. Though I have the speculation since this ep, but still it will count as spoiler. I agree with what ally said :)

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Just say it! I always enjoy your personal insights!

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I just think that JH may be need a time to re-organized her feeling and her heart. This is JH first love, JH first relationship. From the beginning, this drama describes that JH is a deep person, and always thinking before decided something. She is married (without love) and then she realize that she fell in love, when she feel that anything it's okay, she must face the reality that she doesn't know anything 'bout SH. Even SH not telling her 'bout his ex. JH also think that marriage is not as simple as people think. Like the poem that shown in the beach about "when meet someone you must accept 'bout his past, his present and his future (correct me if I wrong)". JH just need a time so she can face anything with SH in the future. Is not like she come and go as she likes.

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I totally agree. It felt like the writer needed to force them apart at this point in order to get the ending she wanted. All this stuff about parents and Room 19 just seemed like a lot of empty talk to justify this move for plot purposes. And needing to be happy - wasn't she happy when they were by the ocean, and when they went on a date, and when they spent the night together, and.... Is she really so immature that she expects to be happy every moment? Given the maturity she has shown in other ways, I just find this really inconsistent.

Even if she decided to leave Se Hee for now in order to work on their relationship from more of a distance, if she really loved him, she would tell him why, not just make it seem like she was dumping him permanently. I understand that the writer needed to set this up to pull off her finale, but I don't think it was consistent with the characters or their relationship at this point. For the first time, I was really disappointed in the writer.

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Thank you. This is exactly what I was thinking but you said it way better, haha. I didn't even realize these doubts came up after the ex showed up, that's interesting.

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Thank you so much for the recap, murasakimi! I also can't believe we're at the end! Your comments are making me see the episode in a slightly different light and I really appreciate that.

But I really feel like I can’t comment on this episode without considering it in the context of the finale, so I’m gonna talk about the funniest part of the episode: Drunk Se-hee.

I was CACKLING during that scene. Se-hee’s “Ji-ho-SSI?!?!?!?!” whenever Sang-gu said her name was just too funny. And his insistence in taking off his own shoes and clothes. The “Please drop me off here, driver.” Not gonna lie, when he started unbuttoning his top I thought he was gonna take it ALL off, but laughed even harder when he just undid the top button and dropped back into bed. That was just SO Se-hee.

Not to mention Se-hee just being too dang tall for Sang-gu to handle properly.

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That was my favorite part also, JI HO SSIII???!? and i laughed so hard. Drunken se hee is just adorable!

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oh yes, I LOVED that part together with the clothes folding. How expected of him to be a neat person even when drunk. He really did seem like a slipper squid when they were trying to remove his shoes.

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Drunk Se-Hee is hilarious and adorable that I wouldn't mind seeing him again!

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Drunk Se Hee in this episode is hilarious. :)

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Not to mention the sound effect when SangGu turned and saw SeHee already sat on the bed. It's like watching a thriller. JiHo screamed because of SangGu, not SeHee. My my... SangGu... The healthiest person in this drama.

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That eye rolling of se hee was the best...I don't know how he managed that but that was suuuuper cuuute

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Hahaha I was thinking the same thing! "How is he DOING that with his eyes?!"

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He's eyes are really awesome!!! So expressive..

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His eyes are really awesome!!! So expressive..

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best drunk line ever!!!
"JIHO-SSI?!?!?!?!"

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Ji-Ho’s meeting with Se-Hee’s mother was the moment the entire episode flipped for me. It started as a typical mother daughter-in-law confrontation…until Ji-Ho’s so cutting prediction “...it will happen again”.

That one moment recast the entire exchange and Ji-Ho’s motivations became clear. Here Ji-Ho signals she has seen the impious nature of Se-Hee’s mother’s actions/responses.

Ji-Ho had registered that the mother was always fully cognizant of the pain Se-Hee had lived with yet the mother was more interested in bending Se-Hee to the family than healing the underlying trauma to her child – all couched in the nobleness of family harmony. That pattern of calculated infliction of pain (and using Ji-Ho as the weapon) left no room for Se-Hee to ever be honest with Ji-Ho.

She could only see a future where the moment that had suffocated Se-Hee was pulled back. This includes removing the residual power of the key players.

Again this writer shows us how real conflict is. This separation is not the usual Kdrama noble idiocy, or will-they-wont-they. In the terms of the poem, Ji-Ho could accept his past broken heart, but has come to realize that she can’t live with his present (his continued holding of the pain/guilt strangling his present self). There is a blurriness of universal terms—like family—that are used to hide our sins. I wonder if this is what Ji-Ho’s mother had actually seen through at the wedding dinner.

If Ji-Ho is crazy…it’s the wonderful kind of crazy …she is that rare soul who is willing to take calculated efforts others forgo. The risks in a reset are massive, but she has not only bet on herself, she has trusted Se-Hee has real feelings for her and that may be enough.

Got to love this show.

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This show continually made us all viscerally lament the lack of honesty between Won-Seok +Ho-Rang—with our 20-20 hindsight. Now the writer turns that lens on us and asks if we really can live by our own standards.

The writer is now giving us that exact same choice in real time with Ji-Ho and Se-Hee,. How many of us wanted to not upset the current path of romance? How many of us were found wanting at the moment of decision…?

The reason honesty is not simple is in reality its high risk. Couples don’t get to reset with no consequences and we don’t get to control the outcome/reactions of others/our partners.

We all fight for our truth with proxy arguments (even Ji-Ho). Everyone is too scared of naked honesty. (Notice everyone in this episode slept fully clothed except for WS who really did get caught pants down in his own self-guilt)

The negative risks for Se-Hee are potentially catastrophic. He has lived for 12 years as an island. Trapped in his mind as he attempted to take on the pain of both himself and Jung-Min as a coping mechanism. The extent this mechanism has become his cognitive programing is illustrated by the folding clothes while asleep. If Ji-Ho’s reset is not as she expects I fear Se-Hee may never see the sun again.

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No one wants to be vulnerable or get hurt, or even hurt another person. These are the reasons we’re not totally honest with each other. And these are the reasons that this episode so eloquently pointed out to me.

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So eloquently put! Thank you.

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That is very astute. And articulate. This is the best I've seen.

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Show

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daebak! this is... *closing my mouth* really... thank you...

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I'm also very glad that the conversation between JH and her MIL turned out the way it did. Se-hee's family always glossed over the fact that he got hurt, even though they knew it deep down. I loved how JH bluntly pointed it out, without trying to be diplomatic.

And actually, even though we didn't get the conversation we wanted the most: between SH and JH, there were a lot of other significant discussions we got.
(a) Su-ji and her mother got to hash out their feelings(gosh, was that beautiful)
(b) Se-hee finally told his father that his actions broke him and that he still isn't over it. When SH said "Abeoji" I was done for. LMK's delivery and his teary eyes got me in the guts. That whole exchange was so honest and heartbreaking and raw.
(c) Jung-min and Se-hee talking about their past and finally finding some closure. I just love that they didn't blame each other, and that they were comfortable with each other. When JM said "Be happy," I almost shed a few tears because it meant so much to Se-hee and it visibly liberated him.

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Oops, didn't mean for all of that to be in italics. Just the "abeoji"

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This. You read Ji Ho’s reasoning perfectly.

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So much emotion ooozing out from Se Hee on this episode (and the finale also). I was crying along with him at the end, I can feel the "I miss her" weighing on myself as well.

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As much as I hated the fact that they parted, and as much as it tore me apart to see Se-hee cry, I feel like Se-hee really needed this to happen. As Ji-ho and Jung-Min mentioned, he hasn't really shown his feelings, even though it's becoming more apparent that he likes her. I think he needs her to leave him so that he can realize that it's not just the words that he says that can creep into the heart and stay there, but it's also the lack of them. Because he hasn't said anything, she doesn't know where she stands and she can't just spend the rest of her life gliding by without a definitive answer.

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Actually, I don't feel much for both Ji-ho and Se-hee this eps. Maybe because they stopped talking honestly to each other about what they are truly thinking or feeling, or maybe simply because the longer duration finally got to me. (I really wish TvN would be stricter about that because there's more impact in shorter eps.) That is, until that last scene when Se-hee broke down and admitted that he missed Ji-ho. That late realization when you seemed to be okay all day long, but then with only a small reminder suddenly everything broke loose, that really got me in the heart. How we can be in denial without realizing it, how our heart can hurt without us knowing. The writer managed to capture all that gamut of emotion in such a simple scene.

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I also had the feeling this was written by another author. Jiho's actions were so unlike her. I feel betrayed. 😥

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Or maybe they have to write something to incorporate that rucksack + jacket PPL.

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Ha ha - maybe they will go "glamping" in ep. 16!

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I think if you look back, it is EXACTLY like JH. She is not without her flaws.

1) She went to different Uni without telling her dad
2) She moved out of the original house because she didn't want to stay with her bro and sis-in-law
3) She quit WRITING when her team didn't see her point of view regarding the assault. (I mean, she could have just quit the company and not her entire career plan)

She is consistently someone that pulls away when she's hurt and confused or believes she will be. In this case, she's hurt and confused over her feelings for SH and what she think is SH inability to open up. Is she right? Maybe. But she is behaving very consistently.

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Yes, I did understand Ji-ho's actions and thought they were consistent with her character. I still think she could have made different choices, but I definitely didn't find her out-of-character here.

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Number 3 is a bad point.

Violence will change your personality -- I have always called rape an attempted murder of a soul.

Please do not judge someone for their reaction to an assault. That seemed to be perfectly reflected -- she had almost been raped and then her co-words, and the people she probably thought were friends, reacted as if it was nothing.

No! No! NO!

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@tummy,

2) She moved out of the original house because she didn't want to stay with her bro and sis-in-law

From the subtitles I read, Ji-ho was forced to leave her original house when her brother got his girlfriend pregnant -- even though she's the one who paid the deposit. She didn't want to stay with them, but she really didn't have an option. Everyone ganged up on her to move out (except for Mom, maybe -- but Dad never listened to her anyway).

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I think it is exactly like JH, but not for your reasons. JH is always struggling against and defying the patriarchal norms.
1. She had to sneak away to another college instead of talking it out with her dad, because her dad thinks he's the ruler of his family.
2. She moved out because if she stayed, they would have expected her to do all the housework, especially since her sister in law and brother are bearing a precious son to bear the family name. She's single and a woman - of course, she has tons of free time to serve the childproducing folks. She didn't want to be a maid in the house she paid for.
3. She left writing because not only because of the sexual assault trauma, but the overall trauma of being disrespected at every turn. For something as serious as attempted rape, her boss and the other guy (producer?) tried to bully her into forgiving that director.

She is pushing against his patriarchal notion that women have to bear all the emotional labor (Se Hee's parents expected her to heal the wounds they caused), that women have to swallow their insecurities, and the depressing fact that without a tallying system of exchanging labor, it would be easy for her to slip into the traditional housewife role. But then a tallying system also feels unnatural for a marriage. That tension is confusing.

I really like Se Hee, but I also think it's unfair that Se Hee gets to be left alone, while there are higher expectations for people like Jung Min and Ji Ho to rise above it all.

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I was disappointed. I didn't understand Ji-ho at all this episode. Why leave Se-hee? Why not sign the contract?

I kind of felt that everything the series was building up towards suddenly got deflated in this episode. I loved that I felt so in touch with each character throughout the series, but Ji-ho was an enigma for me, the final week.

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My fave part of this episode was when Ho Rang and Won Seok talked over the phone - what a lovely way to end a relationship, if I ever broke up I'd like it to end up like theirs. I felt that this was a long time coming, though - they weren't on the same path nor were they compatible so I'm glad they broke up in the end rather than the writers giving us a forced happy ending.

And while some people may say that HR hasn't gotten over WS yet but is hurriedly getting into a relationship with YH, I think all her memories that flashed back while she was in the car spurred her to call WS and end it cleanly, so I think she'll be able to move on and find a partner (hopefully YH?) that wants to walk the same road as her :')

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That's my favorite part too, along with JM-SH lines.

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So was Ji Ho is one and only love? oh my god, that end scene broke my heart. It's obviously just as hard for ji ho to leave him as it is for him to be left by her, but seeing him cry is so sad! Like, if he were to just say what he was gonna say on the couch earlier, everything would have been ok.
I love this show so much! I really wish they added one extra episode of pure fluff lol.

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*his, *was so sad!
man, i really wish there was an edit button lol.

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I’ve given up sounding intelligent. Typos abound, we get it.

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I could have used an episode of pure fluff too! lol :)

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I doubt we will ever really know exactly what happened between Jung Min, Sae Hee and his dad. From the subs, I guess Sae Hee’s dad rejected Jung Min because she was poor, in debt, pregnant out of wedlock and Sae Hee has not yet established his career? It seems an extreme reaction, because these are issues that could be overcome with enough family support.

I believe the main reason Ji Ho asked for a divorce and left Sae Hee was to provoke some reaction in him other than his stoic wall of reserve. I was yelling at my screen, “Damn! Sae Hee ask her to stay and not leave”, and I got pretty frustrated with him in this episode.

Sang gu can be incredibly insightful where Su Ji is concerned; and at times incredibly dense when it comes to seeing his friends ‘ problems clearly. His allusions to a porn collection had me in stitches!

Speaking of Su Ji, mom’s conversation was exactly what she needed to spread her wings and soar, flying high. She’d been getting plenty of nudges from Sang gu all along to leave her safety nest; but the one person who could convince her to abandon her fears and blossom to her full potential was mom. And what a beautiful conversation that was!

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From the subs, I guess Sae Hee’s dad rejected Jung Min because she was poor, in debt, pregnant out of wedlock and Sae Hee has not yet established his career?

What SH's dad said in that conversation put certain things in perspective for me.
I understand that as a parent, you would want nothing but the best for your children, including who they chose as their partner in life. But SH's dad seemed a bit hung up on JM's financial situation, and how that would "ruin" his family's situation... it suddenly made sense that he would easily accept JH who was from a relatively well-off family, and well educated.

On the other hand, getting that snippet from the past also made me very proud of what Jung-min has achieved and that she managed to make someone of herself. It also makes sense that she is someone who clings to her individuality and independence, and does so with pride. What a cool girl

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Very cool! Lee chung-ah's cameo was too brief but boy did they make the most of the character!
It's regretful that the trope of the ex from the past is usually sad bitter. This drama is trully a gift that keeps giving.

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@Adal,

If murasakimi hadn't explained that Sang-goo thought "Room 19" referred to Se-hee's folder for blue movies, I'd have never guessed that's what he was saying, based on the subtitles I read. It was totally lost in translation, and confused the heck out of me.

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Thank you for your words murakasimi! Your ability to understand these characters and their human choices is amazing. I think you shed light on what might be some head-scratching points for some people. I appreciate that the writer has very chosen to diverge from that well-worn stereotype of a woman coming into a man's life and healing his pains. Ultimately, the only person that you can save is yourself, with the help and encouragement of others.

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I kinda like this episode apart from the fact that it was a little bit slow. I think this episode brought into focus the similarities btw seehee and horang relationship. I think Wat this writer is trying to say is that at the end of the day, it's all about communication. The fact that we have seen how he fell in love with ji ho and is putting it into action but never says out loud how he felt about her parallels the way horang has been saying it in action that she wants to get married but never says it out loud until she was urged.I love the fact that ji Ho broke their contract, for her peace of mind because like the saying goes "Action speaks louder than words " but I think it only speaks louder only after you must have told me with words how you feel about me. I don't think anyone would love to spend their lives with someone that does not emote, like Ji ho told sangu, even though she can guess that he loves her and want to spend the rest of his life with her. And seehee really had the chance to say it out loud but missed but I will pardon him cos I know (1) he is going to rectify the situation and (2)it is not easy for someone like him who rarely shows his feelings to start in a few months...
Thank you @ murasakimi for recapping this wonderful drama. P. S horang fighting.

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And now I wait for the comments

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first off - I think this episode for the first time, for me, didn't contain the same ooomph that the previous ones did.

However, I really enjoyed the scene with Se-hee and his father. While Se-hee resents his father for being so rude and forceful in preventing his relationship with Jung-min, his father argues that he was only trying to protect his son from what he perceives is a grave mistake.

I think in a typical drama the father would be seen as purely evil, meddlesome, and manipulative, but in this drama Se-hee's father explains his actions as the most human action a parent can take. Literally, halfway through that scene I began to understand and sympathize with Se-hee's father and his struggle, and honestly, I think Se-hee did as well. Sometimes in life, you have to sacrifice morals to give the people you care about happiness/success. I don't necessarily agree with the father's actions, but I love how this drama highlights the complexity and humanity in his decision.

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The scene with his father was very satisfying to me as well. These are generational differences that are inherent in every culture. What one generation deems sacred another does not. But the love of a parent for their child, that never changes. I will break anyone that hurts my kids. It won’t matter who it is.

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I second you about this episode being the least (Ooompph..) but then like you, I also found lots of things to think about.
I really love and touched by their father and son conversation. SeHee's words about how much he loved his father and how much he looked up to him opens up a new perspective. We can only be hurted by the person we love and care for. At first I thought SeHee doesn't like his father because he watched how his father treat his mother while growing up. But then it's all about seeing your parent, your idol, as they are. They are human, not super hero, with flaws and imperfectness. SeHee wasn't ready to see that and real life openned his eyes in a hard way.
I myself remember those momment from my teenage years but it happend in a subtle way, bit by bit. No traumatic event and I survive fully intact.
SeHee's last words at the conversation about how he can not let anyone get hurt because he is his father son, resonates at the last episode. Being his parent, they will always try to get involve in his life and intentionally or not, it will hurt his spouse. That's why he lets JiHo walks out of his life. Not that I support him for that...

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I had the same feeling this ep. Although I liked the segments with the parents.

Se-hee's dad has kind of been an inscrutable meanie the whole series, but today, I saw that he really does love hisson and care for Ji-ho too as a daughter-in-law. I can understand why he did what he did a decade ago, even though it was harsh.

Also, love Su-ji and mom. How sad, complex and heartwarming.

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This is where the writer and director's had a 'trick' that they leaned on too much. They would set up a scenario (i.e. Bok Nam's Stalker) let us interpret it on way and then fill in the colors differently.

It worked in some places -- but in other places, it cost them a great opportunity if they had moved sooner. They clearly were leaning towards an expectation that we would interpret Se Hee always having had problems with his dad... this scene puts a different spin on it.

Se Hee was crushed by finding out his father was human and could make what he perceived as bad and even cruel decisions.

This would have been more powerful if had come sooner -- it would have given us a better window into the fact that Min Jung wasn't Se Hee's true love... it was about EVERYTHING that happened in that time.

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Frustrating,disappointing and heartbreaking but at the end of this episode I realized that SeHee and JiHo needed that distance as much as I as a viewer needed it too.

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Same sentiments with you.. after watching the finale episode, and the insights of other beanies here.. it all made sense! Kudos to writer-nim for tying these up.. Perfect drama for me.. 👏

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I'm very disappointed with this episode. I do not understand at all why Ji-ho has to leave Se-hee behind. I know she wants a new beginning with him, but is it really necessary to have a separation just so she could get Se-hee to talk to her and express his feelings? This feels like a strategy Ho-rang would use and this made me dislike Ji-ho's character and I've never really had a problem with her character before.

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I think Ji Ho also needed time away. Sometimes, it's difficult to separate the "me" from "us" because you're always dealing with "us". To me, it's as much about her trying to understand what she could and could not accept from Se Hee in order to form a real "us". Also, that contract really had to go. When the basis for the formation of a contract changes, the parties involved sometimes renegotiate to see whether a new contract is worth entering into. Here, the relationship came *after* the contract. And now, she wants the basis (of their relationship) to *be* their relationship. I didn't see it as manipulative.

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well, then she could have just told him so. she could have told him that she can't handle their relationship like this and let's take a break and reflect a little (the Mongolian story). Instead, she made it look like she was leaving for good and their won't be a chance for them together.
The writer has flipped many age old tropes in this drama and I think that's what happened here also. In usual romcoms, this is the time for noble idiocy but here the writer wanted to do something different. somehow It didn't felt so natural.

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It’s all about vulnerability. It’s the same reason that Se-Hee didn’t open the door when he knew she was crying. She gave him ample opportunity to stop her from leaving. Asking him twice if he had anything to say to her. She was fishing for a reason to stay, and was convinced that his regard for her her wasn’t as deep as hers. She didn’t want to be hurt with an actual rejection as much as he didn’t want to hurt her if she loved him. He was fine (initially) to let her leave because he saw himself as a stumbling block to her happiness as well. I don’t think he ever feels like he’s good enough for her. He knows the emotional baggage he has. No one wants to burden someone they like or even love with issues you haven’t resolved yourself.

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And he could have easily said something to keep the conversation (& relationship) going at each of the moments she asked him if there was something he wanted to say. She may well have found that being away from him wasn't as hard as she thought it was -- this being her first time in love.

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@Dreamer,

And he could have easily said something to keep the conversation (& relationship) going at each of the moments she asked him if there was something he wanted to say.

I think that the operative word here is "easily." If it were easy for Se-hee to speak about his feelings, he would have done so already.

He's basically had his legs kicked out from under him with Ji-ho's decision to cancel the contract. If I were in his shoes, I probably wouldn't be able to say much myself, and I'm much more of a talker than he is. Given his emotional turmoil, I definitely would not expect him to speak.

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As much as I didn't want the separation to happen, and as much as I wanted Se Hee to protest and just tell her his feelings, I understand your take as well as @murisakimi and some others points of why the need of separation.
I think Ji Ho was trying to explain it to Se Hee in a round-a-bout way in Football (soccer) terms. But I don't think he got the hint. She asked him, "During the intermission in the halftime, what do the players do?" He answered "They evaluate their performance in the first half or plan their play in the last half,"

I think they do both - evaluate AND plan. But anyways it was pretty much spot on, and he should have left it there to chew on how that answer relates to why she needed to leave. ( The episode Was called "Because this is my first Intermission").....but then he adds "..or perhaps eat some bananas, I imagine". (It's at that point I throw up my hands ugh!). So... he didn't get it,....and neither did a good majority of us at the time. It was a great analogy used by Ji Ho (the writer)

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^^ referring to Dreamers comment

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I understand where JH is coming from, even SH. I didn't hate ep 15, even though it seemed a bit too angsty from what this show was in the other 14.
I even understand their separation and also agree that it was necessary, BUT what actually frustrates me is that JH never clearly told SH her intentions. For all the talking about SH needing to verbalize his feelings... I think before JH left, she could have just told SH that she needs to re-evaluate things and wants some time for her own, but that she's NOT leaving forever.

Their lack of communication was what was jarring for me, and I feel that the show only sacrificed it for the sake of amplifying the angst.

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It's the classic drama frustration for a viewer: why don't the characters just TALK to each other, openly and honestly! Argh!

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See, I love that she left, not because I think it was the best way to handle the situation, but because I do think it was a realistic reaction from JiHo, and that's what I want from this drama. I want to see the characters act as real people would, to explore how their flaws and varying personalities generate different responses to similar scenarios, and have seemingly odd situations and reactions make sense as we learn more about the characters. This is one of the best slice-of-life shows I've ever seen, because it's entertaining while being so close to how we experience real life.

I'm not sure why everyone wants the characters to react in the way we, third party observers with a lot more information than the characters, have identified as the best option for optimal results. We wouldn't have a drama if that happened!
Several people have already commented on JiHo's motivations (@tummy nested in comment 6, a couple in this thread, I'm sure there's others), but I did see her reaction as consistent with her character who tends to bail and take time to herself to think. JiHo is an odd, psycho duck who rarely reacts to situations in the same way most people would. I'd be disappointed if she chose the "obvious" path.

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For me, anyway, the disappointment is in seeing Ji Ho behave in a way that seemed manipulative - like Ho Rang, as someone else said. But not just manipulative, calculatedly manipulative. I get that she wanted Se Hee to be vulnerable and emotionally expressive with her, but is emotional manipulation an ethical way to go about it? Does she have break him down first in the process? It seems brutal as well as manipulative. And I've seen the finale, but am just talking about my reactions to this episode as I watched it.

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I guess I don't read it as being cumulatively manipulative, but more as a massive communication failure that she didn't realize would impact SH the way it did? She needed time to think and reset, figured he did too, so she went "travelling." Those two have always spoken in metaphors with each other, so she thought he'd understand that she'd be back after "intermission," and what Woori's collar meant. He didn't try to stop her in any way, how could she know he wasn't OK with her going on a trip?

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Well, maybe you are right, @LydiBird. There is something to be said for trying to see the best possible motivation in others, and I'll admit I was feeling baffled and somewhat traumatized, like Se Hee, by Ji Ho's actions in this episode and the next. Sigh. This episode made me feel that she would not at all be an easy person to understand or get along with, despite the way she seemed in most of the previous episodes. She went from the character whose eyes we see the show through, as @Tom mentioned, to an opaque character (the "other") whom many of us were struggling to understand.

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Thank you for this review! I burst into ugly tears at the SuJi and mom moment, just as I burst into tears at the Ji Ho’s mom letter to Se Hee.

When I watched this episode without subs, I was livid. Separation? Now?!?! But with subs and a couple of deep breaths, I understood the motivation. And you had great points @murasakimi about how Ji Ho would be just like Se Hee’s mom, explaining the dad’s actions and intentions. This episode was necessary, that’s true... I wish, though, that is wasn’t the second to the last one with three storylines to wrap up.

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Room 19! Totally loved this concept, but now it will remind me of Sang-gu . LOL

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It's here!!! Thank you, Murasakimi.

This is the saddest episode but love... love... love it. Off to read.

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This was the episode I fell out of love with the show. I was supportive of them separating and having a real go at dating and that. But JiHo's behaviour and reasons were a bit random. The characters, to me, turned a bit immature, cruel and manipulative.
Another issue I don't get is the issue of their families. When JiHo had the daughter-in-law syndrome, she explained it as her feelings for SeHee guiding her obedience to his parents. So what changed?
Also, I come from an african background so less memorial services and more parties where it is customary that the daughter in law helps in some way. Just choosing not to help/do something and remain removed from your inlaws family seems disrespectful to me...I think Family(natural or otherwise) is what connects you to the world. SeHee's and JiHo's parents were cast in a bad light and they didn't like them as much but what happens if the man/woman loves his family. He naturally wants you to be part of it. EX SuJi wanted to live with her mom, even in marriage, so how does the same situation apply differently? Why is one good and the other bad?

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I think there is love and respect there but wow Se-hees mom is incredibly manipulative. And Ji-hos dad is a bully( even though he's an ineffectual one) if he doesn't get his way he throws a fit, these are not the people you want to dictate your behavior in a marriage or model your marriage on.

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Actually, his mom is very typical of an Asian mother. This is my husband’s mother and I turned to him exactly when she was talking to Ji-Ho about appeasing the child-like husband to bring peace to the house, and told him how familiar that sounds. He didn’t say anything. Lol! And I love his mom. She’s an example of a peacemaker, in every situation. Sometimes you have to pick those battles, and diplomacy goes further than all out war most of the time.

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True , both families are shown as typical Asian families where parents never really give up full control over their kids after marriage and kind of continue being a part in married couple's life. Also i dont find it dishonorable to be adjusting to families' idiocentric behaviors as such . Bending a little for parents is a part of understanding where your partner is coming from.
In this show, this is shown as something as very negative, now sure if this is common but felt bit harsh for parents.

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Yes! To me, marriage is different from dating bc it is a union of two families, but I can see how some would view marriage as just being about the two people being brought together.

I think in the beginning ji ho was happy to help out with the family rites, but she didn't want to make a habit of being a middle man between se hee and his parents, which was smart. The bankbook business should be between se hee and his parents, not ji ho.

Maybe the show should have presented it as the spouses priority becomes your priority. If se hee doesn't particularly care for his family, then regardless of the social norms, ji ho shouldn't have to either. Honestly, these last few episodes have been giving me the impression that the writer has a slightly selfish and still half-baked, immature view on life sometimes.

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Definitely, when you marry a person, you marry everyone in the family. And in cultures where the family unit is the most important social, religious, and moral context of your life, it’s even more vital to be part of it.

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@maripaz: "I think in the beginning ji ho was happy to help out with the family rites, but she didn't want to make a habit of being a middle man between se hee and his parents, which was smart."

This reminds me of my sister-in-law's marriage, when she found herself bending to gender-role expectations and acting as the middleman between her mother-in-law (who expected Mother's Day flowers, card, etc.) and her husband (who never remembered and didn't care).

In the early years, my sister-in-law was always the one to remember and buy a card, send flowers or a gift, arrange a special dinner, etc. because her mother-in-law would be hurt and cry if her son didn't give those to her. Finally, my sister-in-law got tired of it and said, "You know what? That's between those two." And she refused to do it anymore. And somehow the world continued to turn, and her mother-in-law adjusted. :)

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Great story! There's a great mantra for this: "Include me out." ;-)

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I see it a little differently.

In the past, JiHo followed SeHee's mother's orders because of her feelings for SeHee. And then that made her unhappy because she doesn't even know why she's doing that when SeHee's not even her real husband. And she's doing it because of SeHee but instead of a happy face, SeHee actually put on the frowniest of frown he can pull in 12 years. Then why is she doing it again?

Now, JiHo is choosing herself, because she knows that she's the only one who can secure her own happiness.

It's an argument of Obligation vs Doing something just because you want to see the other person happy.

A marriage is between two families, correct, but what keeps the marriage is the link between the two people who are willing to be together. And so when it comes down to it, the priority in the marriage are the needs, wants and desires of the two people that make up the couple and obligations to the rest of the people around the couple must come second. If they decide that keeping away from family is good for them, then so be it. Any involvement in each other's family must come from the bottom of the heart otherwise they're just being hypocrites and again, why do something you don't want to do for no result?

And just because you're part of a couple, it doesn't mean that you should be manipulated to solve your spouse's issues with his/her parents. Issues between parent and child are theirs to be solved. The most the spouse can do is to soften the interaction but again, a child knows his parent better than the spouse can. I think issues like that are Room 19-s in a marriage. Best not to touch unless the spouse asks for help.

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+1

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@lindl,

Wanted to give you a heads-up in case you didn't see Tom's post in thread #49 about ongoing discussion, should you be interested. Here's the link to it.

Cheers!

http://www.dramabeans.com/2017/11/because-this-life-is-our-first-episode-15/#comment-3143677

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@PeepsLeAwsomePotato,

In the past, JiHo followed SeHee's mother's orders because of her feelings for SeHee. And then that made her unhappy because she doesn't even know why she's doing that when SeHee's not even her real husband.

What made no sense to me was why Ji-ho insisted on participating in Se-hee's family memorial rites when he specifically told her not to get involved. She was not doing it for him, she was doing it to curry favor with the rest of his family. Too bad he didn't inform her that his father had disowned him. Not that he would ever have burdened her with that information.

A similar scenario played out between the OTP in TEMPERATURE OF LOVE, and it likewise bothered me greatly. In both cases, the women disregarded their partner's wishes. It struck me as disloyalty towards the husband/boyfriend, and getting in good with the in-laws.

Maybe this is an example of Ji-ho's idiosyncratic nature. Perhaps Se-hee will eventually discover that her non-conformist ways makes dealing with her akin to herding cats. ;-)

In 20TH CENTURY BOY AND GIRL, Ah-reum also found herself compulsively cozying up to her boyfriend's four elder sisters and little nephew. People-pleasing behavior is becoming epidemic in Kdramaland.

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@misspeppermimi—Yeah, the strict separation from each others families (ep. 16) was radical but probably something that many people wish they could. At least selectively.

In 22 yrs of marriage, I've gone from being all in — attending every family gathering, cooking, cleaning, serving, tending to peoples feelings while ignoring my own hurt — to taking a more balanced approach, where I can happily send my love while doing my own thing. I also observed that my brothers-in-law didn't feel the same obligation to make appearances everywhere and I finally followed suit.

Filial piety is the core of my Chinese family's happiness and traumas. The expectations of my mother's generation are particularly demanding; it's no wonder that the members of my clan who emigrated from Malaysia seem the happiest. What I don't like about my Chinese family is the constant scrutiny and running commentary on my parenting, organization, my lack of Mandarin/Cantonese, etc.

So, I can actually relate to Ji-ho and Se-hee's revised contract (ep. 16) ...

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P.S. Speaking of African backgrounds, @misspeppermimi, I was born in Zaïre but lost that family connection after we emigrated from what's now the Democratic Republic of Congo. I hope to reconnect some day.

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I hope so too! I have a lot of friends who say the same thing so I totally understand you. Sometimes I even feel the same

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Hi , i am Indian and being adjusting to in-laws is first advice we get from everyone when getting married.
Completely excluding them from ur life is not an option . We just have to find our rhythm to being independent but without making parents feeling ignored. So i m havign a hard time Seehee and Jiho's decision of blocking their parents like this. I would be hurt if my kids do this to me ever.

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It seemed to me that they avoid going together on the holidays when ceremonies and expectations are ramped up. I'm sure they have an amicable relationship most of the time and I envision Se-hee helping to make kimchi.

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Yeah, I guess you are right. Everythi ng in moderation. But i think the process of navigation is also important, because you learn a blueprint on how to act in your own family.

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I think watching the last episode would help. Being a Christian, I'm definitely a believer of marriage. Also, from where I came from, having in laws could have its benefits. But the thing is, I've said it before on my comments on previous episodes, the Show is showing us how bad this situation is in Korea. I've watched countless dramas, from sageuk to family dramas, all showing that the in-laws have a huge role in dictating whether a marriage would work or not. THEY.ARE.JUST.SO.DICTATING.AND.THEY.ALWAYS.HAVE.A.SAY.
Imagine, before you get married, they might approve/disapprove (the reasons might be good or bad).
Once you get married, they meddle with where you live, how you take care of your spouse (especially for the women), when you're going to have a kid, how you're taking care of your kid, what education are you going to give your kid, etc.

That's the case with Se Hee's parents. However we want to look at it, it'll always be Ji Ho's loss.

Su Ji's mom, whether she lives with them, by the looks of it, does she sound like she'll meddle with Sang Gu and Su Ji's life?

*just another POV* hugs!

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@misspeppermimi

Another interpretation of the drama regarding relationships and family.

I think JH doesn't mind the "labor" or participation in family events nor does she want to be removed from the family. But, the question that she's asking - is she also inheriting the obligation to be a bridge between husband and father in law? In many cultures, it is assumed that the woman plays that role to the extent that the woman's desire or happiness is secondary. In fact her relationship with her husband is even held as secondary to her obligations to the family she marries into. I think that kind of social structure is being questioned by the writer - what answer you come up with is your own, clearly.

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+1
I also think that she's afraid that if she serves as the bridge/cushion that Sehee's wounds will never heal, and thus his relationship with his parents will never improve. She sees backing out of the marriage as clearing the way to love each other, which gives her the freedom to make SH her priority instead of making familial harmony the priority (which would be the priority if she remained a DIL in the culture she's a part of).

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Ji Ho gave Se Hee all those chances to really talk to her and he just couldn't. It certainly validated her decision to walk away at that point in their relationship. And props again to Jung So Min for her acting -- those long sad looks as Ji Ho waited for Se Hee to speak were heart wrenching.

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She even knew that he was going to propose. So it is not true that she separated because Se Hee didn't say something.
And she choose to play with 'our first divorce' apparently for the sake of it. To play on his (and may be hers) nerves.
I remember crasy separation in Century Bride - it kiiled that show for me. I just wish dorama heroines playing with noble idiocy all ended in monastery - because divorce is not a game.

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Here is another perspective. She knew he was "thinking" of proposing to her. She gave him the opportunity to do so. Did he? or did he shut down again? If he shut down, what was JH supposed to do? keep waiting?

Remember their divorce was already stated in their contract - all she did was pull the date in.

Also from her perspective, she's confused and hurt and uncertain. Staying in his presence is continuing to hurt her. Doesn't she have the right (in fact, an obligation) to stop hurting herself.

I think it would be noble idiocy to STAY in a relationship that is continually hurting you in the HOPE that it improves. What JH did is the OPPOSITE of noble idiocy - she's protecting herself because she thinks SH is not quite ready to step up to the plate.

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This. I think you’ve hit the nail squarely on the head.

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If it was hurting her, she could wait (in our case few seconds, because in our case he was just going to propose).
Or if she was really hurted and he staid silent, she could ask him if he loved her and was wanting to turn this to real marriage - and go away if he refused, as normal people do.
And not divorce because you love him - which happens only in doramas. I really don't undersand why it attracts dorama writers so much. In real live after that they will stay separated and unhappy in about 70% of cases.

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But she had been waiting. She gave him so many opportunities and asked so many reflective questions to try to get him to open up and own up to his feelings. He just never did. By the end, she had taken on the role of both striker and coach, yet his defense was still too strong.

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No.

She was told what he was thinking and she SPECIFICALLY said she was not happy about it... it was something that she questioned.

Therefore, by this point HER decision had been made.

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Exactly. And isn't that why everyone was upset with HR and WS before they broke it off? They were assuming things without saying so, and it caused a lot of problems. JiHo opted out before that happened to her.

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But remember, they were never really married. They didn’t make any promises to each other, except what was contractual. There was defefintely nothing in the contract if they started liking or even loving each other. Their false marraige was a hinderance to their relationship at this point and needs to be terminated. They never even got divorced. They just broke up. Sure, it didn’t look that way to their families, but that’s what truly happened in their minds. That’s their reality, no matter what anyone else was privy to.

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As we see later, they update theis contract every year. Do they divorce for a week every year?? They could make it permanent, drop renting agreement and, I don't know, mention that they love each other???? They could agree on this just saying they love each other.
I doubt this line is present in most marriage contracts, however. (I didn't see any marriage contracts myself). May be it is usually assumed?

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Yes, this would work too. But it doesn’t always turn out to be this simple. Both of them are too vulnerable (especially Se-Hee) to express his love for fear that she will be hurt by him. Which is why he doesn’t and lets her leave. He really doesn’t know the extent of his own love for her yet. We do, but he doesn’t. When you declare something out loud it makes it real and then you have all the responsibilities that are attached to love. He’s not ready for that and she isn’t either. They are not ready to really be married to each other. They both have to step back and approach it differently. They both have to figure out what it means to be married before they actually get married, because now, they have no idea.

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But you could argue that they treated marriage like a game and now that the feelings that rightly belong in a marriage are there and sincere it doesnt seem out of line to dissolve their first contract which is what is was more so than it was a marriage, to make way for a new beginning and to determine whether marriage is the best next step for them.

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I’m in the minority here, but I don’t understand why se hee needs to verbalize everything. THe man made a smiley face omurice for her and beat up her assaulter (I’m assuming she eventually finds out). And she Has seen him angry, when he kicked the motorcycle. I’m bringing my personal bias because my husband is taciturn and I can probably count the times he’s said I love you to me, but he shows he cares for me every day in countless ways. The show made it seem like ji ho implicitly understood se hee (like when she knew he was hurting when he called to congratulate her). so all this doubt and misunderstanding when se hees actions seem very clear didn’t riNg as true for me.

Also, how is marriage her room 19? And why does se hee have to open up to her about his room 19, but she doesn’t?

Still love the show, but these questions and thoughts made for a bumpier ride than I was expecting or hoping for.

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The thing is............ he didn't do it in a way that she can see his intentions. To know that he loves her and wants be with her, JiHo has to find that put through SuJi who found that out through SangGu. He beat up her assulter but he doesn't ask if she's okay after learning of the assult. What doea a Smiley-Face Omurice even mean?? Is that him being a kid trying to be cute or his way of showing he likes her? Does she have to keep guessing based on what she thinks his personality is like without even any confirmation? Kiss? Hug? Snuggle? Does that mean 'I want you for life' or does that mean 'I need your comfort for now'?

It's hard to keep a relationship going when you keep having to infer the other person's intentions or hear them through other people. How many people are there in that relationship then??

The importance is not about verbalising. Thr importance is to show that you care, I agree. But JiHo doesn't have that basic assurance from which she can safetly interpret SeHee's actions. She's always self-doubting herself, hanging her heart out to dry.

SeHee doesn't have to keep saying 'I love you' nor does he have to be cheesy. But he does have to show, somehow, that he explicitly chooses her and that he does want her and will be with her. Otherwise JiHo will just keep second guessing everything until she dies of heartache due to all the rollercoasters.

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@peeps Well said. She's borne the bulk of the emotional labor without the full rewards.

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With regard to Room 19, I actually have no idea what JiHo's is other than the universal need for one's own privacy for one's deepest darkest secrets. She's quite open with him.

SeHee's on the other hand, encompasses all his wants and desires and even actual feelings. When he wants to rage, he doesn't. When he wants to laugh, he barely does it. When he wants to love, when he wants to hold someone back, when he wants something of her, he expresses nothing. Some things need to come out of his Room 19 because otherwise, he's not ready for a relationship at all and will just hurt the other party.

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Well, that's fair enough, I guess, but my issue with this is that Ji Ho holds back just as much from Se Hee as Se Hee does from Ji Ho.

He doesn't tell her about his traumatic past; she doesn't tell him about her traumatic sexual assault. He doesn't tell her he loves her; she doesn't tell him she loves him. She's every bit as careful and cloaked and emotionally reserved as he is, usually.

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Hers was her near rape, I think. Which she still has not openly talked to him about. He found out from the perpetrator himself. She has not shared that very traumatic experience with him, which tells me that she doesn’t yet trust him enough to go all in with the relationship.

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Preach! The thing is all the central characters-- Su-ji, Sang-goo, Jung-min, and yes, even Ji-ho know that Se-hee loves Ji-ho.

I felt the show was great so far in showing all the little ways in which Se-hee loves Ji-ho, but maybe the writer decided some seperation angst was in order?

Which kind of pisses me off, because I had so much faith that the drama wasn't going to be like every other drama, needing to stage a breakup/divorce for them to realise how much they love each other.

I just loved how the drama was about the little things in life that brings a couple together, and this episode felt jarring in contrast with all the thoughtfulness before.

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This! JH's been burned before with reading too much into it with the rapist director and may not want to make the same mistake in assuming anything. I was like that too when I was younger, I always played this "are we aren't we" game in my mind and it got tiring. Now that I'm older (and hopefully wiser), if a guy can't spell it out for me then I refuse to read into anything no matter how much flirting going on.

Plus JH is a writer and appreciates/pay attention to words. She initially noticed him because of his comforting words. She didn't care about Bok Nam advances because nothing he said while flirting ever touched her (she even scoffed at his You Only Love One). It may not be the same for everyone but clearly for JH words are as important as actions.

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@maripaz I agree with you that care and love can be shown through actions. What makes it more painful for Ji-ho–a woman of words—is that neither of them have ever verbally expressed their love.

It's an important gesture for Ji-ho, a woman of words—especially now when they've been sharing more emotional and physical intimacy.

That said, the execution of the intermission seemed was maddening. Her best friends have said all along that Ji-ho was crazy so ... I guess she's consistent.

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Action speaks louder than word.
But here, it's a little bit difficult. Don't forget about their conversation, about one love in life is enough. In voice over, JiHo asked about that statement, whether that love has passed and whether it will begin again. If I were her, a definite confirmation from his mouth is what I need to hear to know where i stand in his life, in his heart.

About the phone call, I don't think JiHo made a right guess. Perhaps SeHee indeed torn, afraid and nervous, but the reason is different than what she thought.

Same thing with his actions. He is kind, nice and polite to her. He shows how much he cares but with what reason? The contract? For how long? For 2 years?

I don't know... I still digging here and there to try to get reasons behind every actions because as a logical person, I need to understand it to fully appreciate it.

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This is a challenging drama.

The writer is making a few points to challenge our thinking.

1) Does Love => Marriage?
2) Does Love => Relationship?

There is no correct answer.

While JH realizes she loves SH and probably realizes that SH loves her in return. Is that enough to form a relationship? The same question for SH too. In JH's mind "love is sacred" - it isn't tied down to conventions of marriage or relationship.

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Don't forget that HE took the first step to kiss her.

He was the one that suggested sleeping together.

He asked for a first date.

She turned him on the sleeping together the second time.

He WAS expressing feelings -- but to me, she wanted him to be at the 'married' stage rather than the dating stage.

This would have supported her 'we have to start over' reason for leaving if done correctly -- they were married in a legal and familial sense, but emotionally they were at the dating stage.

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Yes, I think this is what was so weird to me. In the beginning it seemed like ji ho was making all the effort and being obvious and we had to guess at se hees intentions but after the kiss, it was all se hee and ji ho took a backseat. To be honest, if I were se hee, I'd be questioning if ji ho actually liked me.

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This is where the contract makes everything fuzzy. If they had met, become friends, and then he started treating her that way she probably wouldn't have as big of a need for verbalization. But the contract and resulting power imbalance (in Sehee's favor) added a confounding factor that made it really hard for her to attribute his actions to love. Does he love her, or does he feel obligated to live up to expectations? Would he love her without the contract, or is he trying to make the best of a situation where they are bound to each other anyway?

Jiho has always been insecure about her ability to interpret romantic interest (she says as much at their first meeting). This situation is complicated, and her strong feelings make the stakes even higher. She needs the added assurance of words.

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But I want her to use her words to tell him he needs to use his words with her. :(

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I know, so do I, but she's a human, experiencing her first real love and the fear of rejection is real. :( There wouldn't be a drama if everyone always made the right choices, so I'm glad when they make bad but somehow understandable one's instead.

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When asking why marriage is Ji-hos room 19 it makes me think of Su-ji saying she'd rather be crazy than pathetic. I think that is Ji-ho,-will you stay in a marriage that makes you feel pathetic or be crazy and leave? risking that they can be together in a new way.

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I finished English subbing all of the OST songs (including the latest one by Jung So Min), you can find all the English subbed OST songs here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIDckZuI0IdVQPv2cbAsAMv1LQ5wAzq67

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You are an angel. Thank you!

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Thank you.

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