202

Noh Hee-kyung’s Live recruits Shin Dong-wook as loyal policeman

Aww, I’m so glad to hear of Shin Dong-wook (Lookout) being more active again, after taking a number of years off to deal with complex regional pain syndrome. He made his comeback earlier this year in the action-thriller drama Lookout, and has now confirmed locking down his next role, in writer Noh Hee-kyung’s (Dear My Friends) upcoming tvN drama Live.

Live has already secured Jung Yumi (Discovery of Love) to star, as well as Lee Kwang-soo (Entourage), and centers around the incidents that arise at a regional police station. In writer Noh’s trademark style, the drama promises to provide healing moments as it focuses on the smaller moments of everyday life, showing the efforts of police officers to protect small justices and the preciousness of daily life.

Shin Dong-wook’s character is Choi Myung-ho, a police officer who lives and dies by loyalty. Formerly a soccer player, Myung-ho values loyalty and duty above promotions and results, and while he looks up to the character played by Bae Sung-woo (The King), he’ll conflict with Lee Kwang-soo.

Shin Dong-wook was out of commission for seven years because of his health—his last show before getting ill was 2010’s Wish Upon a Star—and I’d worried that he might not ever get to make a comeback. So it was a huge relief to see him taking on Lookout, where I thought he did well with a character with relatively little screentime, and it’s encouraging to see him taking on gradually more work.

Live will be directed by PD Kim Kyu-tae, with whom Noh has worked several times before, on dramas It’s Okay, It’s Love, That Winter, the Wind Blows, and Padam Padam. PD Kim has a distinctive style that can be evocative and effective, though it can also sometimes be infuriating (see: Moon Lovers: Scarlet Heart Ryeo). But he has worked well in partnership with Noh, so let’s hope for the best.

Live is aiming for an early 2018 premiere.

Via TV Report

RELATED POSTS

Tags: ,

202

Required fields are marked *

I couldn't be happier to see more of him onscreen considering the little screen time he had in lookout

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm glad priesty is getting better and landing meatier roles. Fell in love with his forever-tired-why-is-my-brother-like-this character in Lookout, and it was such a shame that they didn't explore his character.

6
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Amen and amen! As I mentioned to sicarius in the LOOKOUT alternate endings thread, the brothers' reconciliation arc could have been explored and used as a basis for Do-han's peacemaking with himself and Su-ji. It would have dovetailed nicely with a heart-to-heart on forgiveness between Su-ji and her Mom. Alas, a missed opportunity for SDW's beautifully expressive acting. But maybe at the time the role as it was written was exactly right for the actor, if not the character.

Until LIVE airs, I'll keep my fingers crossed. In case of emergency, I'll break glass and watch SOUL MATE for the third (fourth?) time. Or maybe watch WAR OF MONEY, which I think is the only one of SDW's shows I have yet to see. ;-)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

He was really memorable in lookout and has that quite charisma. Happy to see him being more active too. The guy could sing too. i watched him om Masked Singer.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This sounds like something I'd watch, especially from the writer of Dear My Friends, but I have my reservations about the PD after Moon Lovers. I did enjoy It's Okay It's Love though so I might give it a shot.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@saturtledaisy,

Late reply, but just wanted you to know, after watching the final 2 episodes raw today (they will be available with Netflix subtitles next Friday), that LIVE was terrific. The entire cast of characters (15) are memorable, the back stories, vignettes, and incidental cases are well-written, and the performances across the board are rock solid and at times electrifying. The ensemble cast is top notch.

And PD Kim Kyu-tae did a great job with the camera work. There was none of the SCARRED HEART zooming in to inspect the actors' pores. There were some really well-done slow shifts between dual foci that worked well in showing the facial reactions between 2 people, for instance. And nice use of reflections in mirrors. The action scenes were really well done. There were many foot chases. The cast got quite an aerobic workout.

My hat is off to Writer-nim, cast, and crew for presenting such an uplifting and lovingly crafted tribute to police officers. Just keep scrolling down this thread. It is the fangirl * fanboy home of the LIVE Lifers' Brigade in lieu of an official DB recap thread. ;-)

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Shin Dong Wook, love him in Soulmate and glad he has returned to dramaland. His role in Lookout is pretty small so I hope in Live he has a meatier role. Most of all hope he stays healthy!

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This news makes me so happy!

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I hope he will have a bigger role in this one.
"writer Noh Hee-kyung’s (Dear My Friends) upcoming tvN drama Live." I can get behind that no doubt.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yesss, I love to see him again in our small screen.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for your update on Shin Dong-wook, javabeans! I've been hoping to hear he has another project lined up. Easing back into acting makes a lot of sense, and his turn in LOOKOUT was a good start. I certainly wanted to see more of him on screen as the protagonist's brother. Looking forward to his next role. Hwaiting, SDW!

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

SHIN DONG-WOOK AND JUNG YUMI? So happy he's back. For some reason I'd totally missed Lookout when it aired. Best of luck to him!

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

yay! oppa is back again, maybe I'll actually watch this drama... I couldn't get into Lookout.

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh My God! The Priest TT.TT

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

*confesses to everything and anything*

6
reply

Required fields are marked *

The priest oppa is landing another project, I loved Dear My friends and i am expecting another great drama from the writer.

Btw, is it me or does he look a bit of Won Bin from the pic?

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

So happy for him... good luck and be healthy!

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yay! I'll be in the front row for this. *grabs melona bars and popcorn*

2
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Omo! I just realized that I said this way back when and melona bars were featured in the second episode! @sicarius! I must be clairvoyant. Here’s the gif @azzo made af it! http://www.dramabeans.com/members/azzo1/activity/421153/

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you!!!!!!!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

All the best.i hope kim woo bin to get well soon and come back to dramaland just like you

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

it's getting cold though i hope he has enough heaters outside and coats to combat his pain.. nonetheless, this drama will be on my to-be-considered list because i'm not really familiar with his acting (and i should really start Lookout)

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I highly recommend SOUL MATE. It's not your usual romance... and the music is terrific. ;-)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Shin Dong Wook has been on my radar since Soulmate (where I totally
fell in love with him), and I'm so happy that he is returning to the industry. Jung Yu Mi is one of my faves as an actress and just in general, so I absolutely cannot wait for them to be in a drama together! <3

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

YAY I love Shin Dongwook! More, more please~

1
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hey @ally-le. I decided to use this thread for the Live episode convos because it had the least comments to start off with. Below are my comments on the student protest in episode 2 and the first 10 mins or so of episode 3.

The student protest was really good. This drama simulates reality on a totally different level and I can see it becoming controversial because of it. Whenever you see a scene like this in a drama, you’re more often than not getting the perspective of the protestors. Here, we’re getting the perspective of the police without losing the meaning it held for the protestors. Sooo much of this drama draws real world parallels to what’s going on in our society today especially in cases where police are involved. What was brilliant about this scene is that we see that there was no need to use pepper spray, tear gas, or guns. Although none of these coercive methods were used, it still managed to be a harrowing and injurious experience for many involved. Could you imagine if those more forceable forms of action were used?

I didn’t manage to get too far into ep 3 yesterday–only the first 10 mins or so–because I kept on having to pause because I was sooo hyper and then I was livid that they were trying everything to smear Oh Yang Chon.

I truly appreciate how immersive this drama is. When one of the squad cars was making a U-turn on their way to the fire scene, I yelled “he’s going to crash into another car!” and lo and behold he did. His partner’s reaction was all kinds of amazing and I really appreciated that they didn’t immediately switch to a different scene but showed the partner directing traffic etc. Those little things contribute in a significant way to keeping me immersed.

The last thing I’ll talk about is the very beginning of the episode with Ahn Jang Mi asking for a divorce. The writing. Oh the writing. In life there often isn’t the right moment to take certain actions. If we wait for the right time, it may never come. Something else might come up which puts what you should do further and further back. That’s why I admire Jang Mi for sticking to her guns even though her husband is going through a hard time. I really loved how dad was trying to figure out what happened for things to reach this point and he goes down the laundry list of all the really bad but seemingly typical reasons for a divorce in a patriarchal society. The reason was much simpler yet just as important. Further to that, when dad didn’t want to move out, she decided that she had to. This is sooo true to life, especially the way it was executed.

I’m going to get myself in trouble because I feel like I could talk about everything that happens in this drama. There’s not a single wasted frame or scene.

6
35
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really was glued to the screen with that student protestor scene. It was so well done, and the music being soft and subtle, interspersed with silence and screaming, the slow motion, the close ups of the hands, the faces, everything was directed perfectly in my mind. I love the music in this, the retro feel gives it more grit. For some reason it takes me back to those cop shows in the 80’s, like Hill Street Blues. Now, why my parents would let a five to ten year old watch that is beyond me, but I just remember the music mostly, and how it felt. And this scene is how it felt, even to a seven year old, who had no life experience, but knowing police were ultimately good and sometimes they did things because they had to, not because they wanted to, and feeling the unfairness of it all.

5
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

@ally-le,

I'm glad you mentioned HILL STREET BLUES because I didn't watch that show back in the day. I've heard it mentioned favorably for years, and finally watched a bunch of episodes today to see what I missed, and I have to agree that in many ways, LIVE feels like a Korean take on HSB.

I came across a dandy interview with Daniel J. Travanti, the lead actor, which you might find interesting. Enjoy. ;-)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYrtlUB0W8Y

1
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I hadn’t thought of this show in probably 30 years, and it’s strange how all these childhood memories flooded back to me after seeing Live. Like the little TV 📺 we had when I watched it with my parents, with the dials you had to turn manually, the bunny ear antenna, etc. I think they watched it to learn English and American culture. I watched it because it was on the only TV we had the house. I’m glad you enjoyed it. I think this show resonates so much with me because it brings back those memories for me.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

HILL STREET BLUES is a good show. I'm in the midst of watching episode 7. It's very addictive. I wasn't into cop shows back then, aside from MAGNUM, P.I. -- and that was mainly to see my old home after I returned to the Mainland. And my cousins who were extras. And Tom Selleck. ;-)

It blows my mind to see such a young Joe Spano, whom I know from NCIS -- and an equally young David Caruso.

It's interesting to me to at long last see the show that pioneered so many innovations in TV drama writing and production that are now standard practice.

1

Oh, that interview, thank you! And he mentions Steven Bochco. Not related, but Doogie Howser, MD (another show he produced) was one if my favorite shows in my formative years and mayhave influenced my career choice, lol!

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm glad you enjoyed the interview with Daniel J. Travanti on HILL STREET BLUES. I posted another on on realism in HSB on my fan wall. IMHO, it applies equally to LIVE. I enjoy listening to this actor. He's got a great vocabulary as well a a pleasing voice.

Somehow I'm not at all surprised that DOOGIE HOWSER, MD was one of your favorite shows. ;-)

1

PakalanaPikake reporting for LIVE discussion, Chingus. Thanks so much for including me.

Sending carrier pigeons to:

@cloggie, @kurama, @frabbycrabsis, @johnb, @egads, @xhuizini, @gonebarefoot

who mentioned LIVE in Open Thread and What We're Watching last weekend. The more, the merrier. ;-)

6
23
reply

Required fields are marked *

For a second, I thought you wanted to have a Live discussion - ie as the drama aired - and then my brain came back into my head. Looking forward to chatting about this.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I have only watched 2.5 episodes and may have to table it for the time being as My Ahjussi might be my limit of angst and trauma this cycle.

For those who have watched further, does it lighten any? The teasers for Live made me think it was going to be a completely different show, which is not to say I don't think its good, because it is very good, and Shin Dong-wook is always welcome to grace my screen.

1
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's still brutal, but I'll keep you updated.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

As much as I love Live it isn't an easy watch because it feels very realistic. As such, whenever something happens that annoys me, I have to pause and then come back to it. Thankfully, I don't have that problem as much with My Ajusshi.

My biggest issue is that there are so many dramas coming out at the same time now that it's getting a bit difficult to keep up. Once Pretty Noona comes out, that might make it 6 if I don't drop one I'm currently watching. That's just too much stress for something that is supposed to be fun.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm having the same problem. I can't keep up, and these shows with long episodes are not helping. The stress is real.

2

I've now written two wordy comments and neither of them seems to have posted?

Anyway, I'll be here reading & talking about it.

3
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

As much as I don't do it as often as I should, copying you comment before you post it is your best friend on here sometimes.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

All my long comments suddenly turned up again this morning... now I seem to be repeating myself .... oh well. Off to delete one or two of them

1

@cloggie March 27, 2018 at 11:32 PM

I'm glad your comments materialized after all. That has happened to me. I think it occurs when the site is offline for maintenance and is being mirrored by Cloud-whatever. After getting burned several times, I compose my longer comments in LibreOffice (so I can keep an eye on the 3,000-character limit). It's much easier to proofread. Plus I have the original just in case. ;-)

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I forgot to mention: After posting a comment via my Win7 laptop, I hit Control + F5 to force a refresh of the current webpage. There may be other refresh methods with subtle differences, according to resident programmer Mr. Pakalana. This works for me.

If the upload was successful, I can see it immediately. If it doesn't show up, I save my backup copy and post it later.

0

Sometimes the spam filter just eats them, and it takes time before we can find them there and fish them out. :'(

1

@mary and @pakalanapikake thanks for that! I thought that maybe I'd used up my weekly word-allowance for posting things on here :P

1

Thanks for paging me. I feel so special!

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

You're welcome! LIVE fans finally have a place to hang our hats. ;-)

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh thank you to include me :)

I really like the song Carry Me from Family of the year :)

2
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Family of the Year also performed Hero, my favourite song in It's Okay That's Love.

5
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Given that Netflix was the one who picked this up, I think they're definitely targeting an American/English speaking audience with this drama. I could be reaching here, but given the problems that exist with police in America, I feel like I can relate on some level. That and the use music with English lyrics helps bring me into the scene that much more.

5

You're most welcome! I love "Carry Me," too. I've transcribed the lyrics in one of the comments on this link:

http://www.dramabeans.com/members/pakalanapikake/activity/414123/

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

OML, I've been on the lookout for the english tracks in this drama.

1

This is awesome, thanks for tagging me in @pakalanapikake!

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

You're welcome, @gonebarefoot! We Lifers (har!) have to stick together. ;-)

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

haha, thanks for mentioning me. Here's to wishing we get an open discussion about LIVE. I'm dying to discuss it with all of you guys and to the people subbing it - You're doing good work. I'll patiently wait for the subs :)

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@xhuizini,

You're welcome! Glad you found us. Thank @ally-le, who clued me in. I wouldn't have known otherwise. ;-)

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for staking a discussion spot for LIVE, @hades.

The student protest scenes have raised a ruckus, according to a link @cloggie brought to my attention on my fan wall:

https://www.soompi.com/2018/03/23/live-apologizes-controversy-remaking-protest-ehwa-womens-university/ .

All I can say is that the realism of the scenes reminded me only too well of the antiwar protests, student sit-ins, and race riots during the 1960s. And Kent State, which occurred in May, 1970 and involved the Ohio National Guard.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCS-g3HwXdc

LIVE also shook loose a memory of going shopping in Hamburg, Germany, on a Saturday when I was off from my internship job in the autumn of 1978. I saw busloads of police in riot gear assembling along the Alster to head off to the (antinuke?) protest a couple of blocks away in Mönckebergstraße, the main shopping street where demonstrations were prohibited. I got my butt out of there pronto.

2
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Although I haven't had an experience witnessing riot police as you have, the parallels that can be drawn to the problems in America with police and the use of excessive force and profiling makes me relate to this show in a way I didn't think possible. Every time I see that a gun wasn't the first line of defence or that proper procedure was followed and instilled, it seriously just hits me.

Actually, when I see armed police in real life and I see police in TV shows, that's usually two very different things. Here though, they really do feel like real life police.

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

so they're going to completely change that episode then?

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

It sounds like that part of the script is being deleted. I won't know until I see it on Netflix, which hasn't aired it in the US yet.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

At this time of this post, that scene hasn't been edited on Netflix's version.

2

Ok, I’ve seen up to episode 5, and color me impressed at ALL the actors right now. I’ve not seen any of them in anything else, except for Shin Dong-Wook of course, and they all command attention on screen. I was Mesmerized with Jung Yumi in ep 4 after her shock of seeing her first homicide (hope that’s not too much of a spoiler) and then even more with Shin Ding-Wook when he just didn’t answer her when she said that what she saw was unusual, wasn’t it? Like @hades says, not one scene is wasted in this drama. It’s gritty and in-your-face, but also has a ton of beautiful human moments as well. The writer said that she wanted to show the police characters as fathers, mothers, sons, daughters, and she has, in spades. I care so much for everyone right now. I just want all of them to succeed, find a way, live another day. I’m preparing myself for a death of a main character even now; I think it’s going to happen. It has to, right? Police officers in the line of duty? We’ve already seen one police officer go and that shook me even though it was the 1st episode. I was like, noooooo! Why did you freakin’ try to swim at high tide, in the dark, to find a guy that you said was dumb for going into the ocean to save a drunk guy himself? So, that was a poor way to die, and I didn’t get it. But other than that, this show had been excellent in it’s concept and storytelling. I’m going to try to stay with this one. Thanks, @azzo1 and @hades for discussing this one with me! Hopefully, we can get @pakalanapikake to join us and some other Beanies too!

3
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

Comment was deleted

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for paging me, @ally-le! Am tickled to be able to yak about this drama with @azzo1, @hades, and fellow Beanies. ;-)

Why did you freakin’ try to swim at high tide, in the dark, to find a guy that you said was dumb for going into the ocean to save a drunk guy himself?

Because Detective Ho-cheol had his partner's back. And he wouldn't have had it any other way. And because people who are drawn to the profession are wired that way. Why do some people run into burning buildings? My husband had a colleague who was literally handing in his paperwork to resign from the NYPD to return to practicing law when the first plane hit the Twin Towers. He took back his badge and went to assist, and died in the line of duty. "Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends." (John 15:13)

Detective Ho-cheol going into the surf after Yang-chon dove in to (successfully) rescue the drunk -- only to die himself -- was bad enough. But learning that their collaring of the murder suspect after years of dogged police work resulted in Yang-chon being defamed by higher-ups who'd botched the original investigation just made my blood boil. No good deed goes unpunished.

I agree with you about that riveting scene of Han Jung-o asking Corporal Myung-ho if what she saw were unusual. What he didn't say spoke volumes. For more on the scene, see paragraph 5 of
http://www.dramabeans.com/members/pakalanapikake/activity/414123/#acomment-424402 .

Myung-ho doesn't speak rashly. I especially like how he handled his negligent colleague's situation, and read him the riot act to do the right thing -- even as he encouraged him to take the bus instead of further exhausting himself by driving long-distance on his vacation. He put up with his friend Ban Jong-min's anger over what the latter perceived to be Myung-ho's betrayal until he knew his buddy had cooled off enough to mend fences with him. The guy is a straight arrow, but also compassionate, and I like that very much. Whereas many of the other officers are vocal and hair-trigger, he is more soft-spoken and only appears to be laidback, as evidenced by the way he made short work of cuffing the club owner who was acting like an idiot in the back of the police car. (Manseh, Shin Dong-wook!)

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I guess I have a much higher sense of self-preservation, but that was a losing battle at high tide, pitch dark, and I’m surprised any of them made it out alive.

And I think that was my favorite scene between Jung-o and Myung-Ho all drama, and I’m already shipping them...hard.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@ally-le,

I’ve not seen any of them in anything else, except for Shin Dong-Wook of course, and they all command attention on screen.

Au contraire, mon chère. You've seen Jang Hyuk-jin, the guy who played the detective in the brown leather jacket who helped collar the murderer in the stakeout. He played the craven Dr. Song Hyun-chul, Chief of Surgery, in ROMANTIC DOCTOR, TEACHER KIM. And the blue-jacketed KTX steward in TRAIN TO BUSAN. I know you saw those productions. ;-) He was also in MAD DOG (as Mad Dog's assistant manager of fraud investigation), BEAUTIFUL MIND, SIGNAL, and MISAENG. He caught my eye in HWAJUNG.

Sang-soo's hyung (Kim Tae-hoon) played Jang Do-han's rival prosecutor Kim Eun-joong in LOOKOUT. I know you saw this one. ;-)

For some reason I'm thinking you might have watched the following:

Sung Dong-il (Ki Han-sol of the bodycam) was big bad in both timelines of LEGEND OF THE BLUE SEA.

Kang Shin-il (drowned Detective Ho-cheol) played a minister in SEVEN DAY QUEEN. Jang Hyun-sung (Eun Kyung-mo) played the father of the title character.

I don't think you watched TWO COPS, but Lee Si-un was a hoot in it as Yong-pal. He was hilarious.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes, true. lol! I was really referring to the main cast. But again, so impressive how you know all this, and remember what I’ve watched! Lol!

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Really, thanks for this recap because this cast is AMAZING. It's like all the good supporting actors together in one drama. Such star power. I only hope it helps Lee Kwang Soo get main roles from here onwards, he deserves them (the same thing for his partner).

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

LIVE's ensemble cast is one of many things I love about the show. I've made it a practice to look up actors' past roles on AsianWiki and DramaWiki (and HanCinema, which sometimes has more comprehensive extended cast listings than the other two). If I see a performance I like, I usually do a little research. ;-)

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm only up to ep 4, but I'm so impressed with this drama so far.

I love the writing because I can understand everybody's actions (even if I don't agree with them) including the guy who stitched up Oh Yang Chon.

I really love the realism in this. I know I shouldn't compare it with Mystery Queen - that it a very different type of drama - but there, one cop was joking about all he does was deal with drunks and vomit. Well, Live shows you what that's *really* like, hand-scooping vomit and all. It's the difference between glossing over something and showing it in all it's colourful horribleness.

I also love the way that Oh Yang Chon's home life is depicted. His wife isn't horrible to him, just calmly and matter-of-factly says that she wants to divorce him. That conversation between his two kids though. Wow. When the son said he didn't want his parents to divorce. The daughter then said: do you want to be like dad? No. Do you want me to get married to someone like dad? No. Then why should mum. Ooooph.

And I liked how it seemed to the others that Jung-o was getting the 'cool' assignment, only for her to be so affected by the homicide, right after that sexual assault too.

And my final like: all the actors look the right age for the parts they play. I can imagine them all out on the streets as (rookie) cops. And as @ally said: all the actors are great in this.

4
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love that conversation with Yang-chon's kids as well. It really, really hit home when the sister was explaining to her brother why their parents should divorce.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Totally. It shows maturity from the big sister and from the writer as well. In kdramas divorce is usually depicted as evil and horrible for the family and society but that is just so wrong. It doesn't mean that Jang-mi hates Yang-cho, it's just that, even though he is a great cop, he hasn't been that great as a father and husband.
And being great at his job and very busy doesn't justify it at all, because his wife is a cop as well and had to do shifts and extra hours while raising their children, do the household chores and take care of both's parents. If the woman can do it, why couldn't he do the same as well? that's why she is so burned out.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ah, Dramabeans. When we don't have a place to discuss, we make one. I love you guys! ♥

1-4 Thoughts:
- I like what Noh Hee-kyung is doing with Oh Yang-chon. He is is half incredibly unsympathetic (weeding out the weaklings in the most brutal way possible, beating his colleagues). It's clear he's passionate about his job, and wants his hoobaes to feel the same way, but shouldn't he show them the good rather than 'prepare' them for the bad? And then, suddenly he's VERY sympathetic - we have a window into his personal life, and suddenly his perpetual bad mood is all too understandable. Whilst I think he's a cleverly written character, I don't like him much yet.
- Jang-mi Noona is a mystery. I hope we get some more insight into her desire for divorce soon. Yes, neglect and tiredness seems like a valid reason. But something in what we've seen of her so far suggests there might be more to it. I don't want to believe there's no hope for them, because Yang-chon seems as much in love with her now as he always has been.
- The soundtrack is pretty. It stands apart from the competition, since we expect more racing and emotional shows in procedurals and thrillers.
- Jesus, this drama is brutal. She had her tongue cut off?? And we just never found out whether he or she was responsible for it?? I'm expecting to never be satisfied with the cases - although, if they come at the expense of actual character moments, maybe I can live with that.
- No particular thoughts on Lee Kwang-soo or Jung Yumi's characters just yet (at least, not enough for a decent analysis), I'm just glad they're both here.

3
15
reply

Required fields are marked *

It is brutal, but the characters are making me stay. I don’t think we’re going into the litigation aspect to figure out what happens after the criminals and victims are handed over. Which I think is very realistic to what police officers see. They arrest the individuals, but they have no idea what happens to them once they go to jail or the detectives or prosecution get a hold of them.

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank god they don't go to court, because there are already too many shows about prosecution / detective work / etc. This show is so refreshing because it shows a seldom seen side of the police, the less glamurous, but you cannot help but root for them. They seem true heroes.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

👏👏👏

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

And Yas!!! to the soundtrack! Unlike any police procedural I’ve ever seen.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

@frabbycrabsis,

Oh Yang-chon is indeed a tough character to like. He's antiheroic -- but also a softie. And his family life is a shambles, not just with his wife and kids, but with his parents as well. I'd love to find out why he became a police officer.

I haven't been able to figure out what gives with Jang-mi Noona, either. She seems to have a serious case of burnout. She has also referenced menopause a couple of times, so I think she's totally at the end of her rope and not suffering fools gladly, be they hungry offspring who can't get it together to cook their own instant ramen or a workaholic spouse. It was mentioned in passing that Yang-chon had beaten romantic rival Eun Kyung-mo to the punch when he married her. Maybe she's gotten fed up and wishes she'd married the other guy. -- But would that have made much of a difference? They all work in the same meat grinder of a profession.

I noticed that Jang-mi seems to have a warm relationship with her father-in-law. It's interesting how she told him she was divorcing his son, and it didn't seem to bother him. (Is father-in-law a retired cop himself?)

It suddenly occurs to me that perhaps Jang-mi has some kind of health problem and she's no longer willing to settle for a half-baked life.

After watching episodes 5 and 6 raw, it seems the gruesome first assault case might be coming back into focus. Or maybe I'm just totally confused.

1
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I actually really like Oh Yang-chon's character. Whenever I see Korean students studying hard to pass the entrance exam to become a civil servant, or in this case a police officer, it always seems a little odd to my western eyes. Don't they still need to do a job interview? What about taking a paper exam makes you ready to be a police officer? That's what he seemed to do in the academy: get rid of some people who can have the right level of intelligence but not the right attitude.

That scene with his two kids was tough. When his son said to his daughter that he didn't want his parents to divorce and she said: do you want to be like dad? no. Do you want me to marry someone like dad? no. So why should mum. Ouch.

I'm guessing he was just a largely absent husband and father and the wife waited until her parents passed away to divorce him? I love how she did that without any anger but with a firm finality

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

@pakalanapikake about Jang-mis' health problems: I recognised the exercises that she was doing in her front room. I had capsulitis (frozen shoulder) and that's what you have to do to make it move again. It's such a nuisance when you have it - not only makes it hard to sleep at night but she might even have problems moving her arm enough to point a gun. Luckily I didn't have to try that lol but it was hard enough to get my coat on and off.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Comment was deleted

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for explaining that scene of Jang-mi at home, @cloggie. I couldn't figure out what I was seeing.

I was wondering about Jang-mi's shoulder stretching gyration against the wall in the precinct. (It was after everyone else left the conference room following the discussion of what to do about the negligent colleague who left the abusive drunk outdoors.) I was wondering if she had gotten roughed up during one of the protests.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks to No Hee Kyung's writing, you get to love these two (Yang-chon and Jung-mi) at later episodes. I just watched episode 16 and, together with the previous ones, you can get a glimpse of how their marriage was and why they got together in the first place. It's just that, at the beginning of the series, Jang-mi is too jaded and hurt and Yang-chon is too focused with what has happened to his mentor and him, so both characters are not very likeable. It takes some episodes and events for them to interact with each other and see a glimpse of what an amazing cop couple they are.
On another note, I love the bromance/student-teacher relationship between him and Sang-su later in the show. They are adorable.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@snows119,

Finally in ep. 16 we got to find out why Jang-mi became a police officer. I've been wondering about that since the start of the show. She and Jung-o are more similar than I would have guessed. But although Jung-o said in voice over that she doesn't have a sense of duty, it sure doesn't look that way to me.

The sense that I have gotten of Jang-mi from the start is that she is exhausted. I first picked up on a feeling of weariness, and noticed after she was suspended that she was at least resting and decompressing. Maybe getting suspended was a blessing in disguise, although not being paid is not. When she went to the snack bar and paid for her son and his buddies, she seemed to have a happier, lighter feel than usual.

That little domestic interlude with Yang-chon was precious. Gosh, he was such a goofball. Quite lovable -- and a noona killer. I can only imagine what he was like when he was younger.

I think that when we first met them, they were both preoccupied and run ragged with work. Jang-mi in particular appeared burned out and at the end of her rope, in equal parts from work and family stuff.

It was touching how he changed the sheets for her when she needed to sleep. And when she asked him to join her, it was a lovely contrast to her kicking him out of their bedroom at the start of the show. It's taken a while, but they've made great progress in reconciling.

I agree about the Yang-chon & Sang-soo Show. What a pair. In ep. 16 it really struck me how much Yang-chon has calmed down when he was eyeing his partner's unsecured holster (and loose gun belt?) and refrained from striking him. Geeze, he's come a long way. They are both equally hard-headed, and that's part of the charm.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@frabbycrabsis I loved it when Jung Yumi's character was badass and put those handcuffs on Yang-chon. With everybody around the table grinning at him getting a dose of his own medicin.

I think the relationship between Kwang-soo's character and Yumi's is very interesting. He's competitive and thinks she's getting the more interesting case but she's really been hit by the double whammy of that sexual assault case and the murder. I like that she understands that this is part of the job. So far, she seems smart and resillient.

2
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

There was such lovely fluidity of movement as Jung-o flipped Yang-chon and demonstrated her improved handcuffing technique. Har! As embarrassing as it was, he could rest assured that she could hold her own against uncooperative parties. I hope Sang-soo was taking notes. ;-)

I guess Sang-soo is gunning for Rookie of the Year or something. I can sort of understand his feeling that the cases he's been working on are routine. MAGNUM, P.I. it's not. He hasn't been in the job long enough to appreciate the blessing that an uneventful shift represents.

IIRC, roommate Hye-Ri was also bemoaning boring cases. I haven't been able to get a handle on her yet.

2
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Despite his embarrassment, I think he really respects her now! XD

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Comment was deleted

0

I agree. Despite his chagrin at her having gotten the drop on him, he knows that she really paid attention to what he was teaching her. As her instructor, he had to be pleased that both their efforts paid off.

1

Comment was deleted

0

I ship them. I know I probably shouldn't and that it's not where this is going. Still can't help myself.

3

Hello everyone! I'm here for the Live discussion (thank you for the invite @ally-le. I have to admit I loved the opening 2 episodes, but the show kind of lost me in episodes 4+. I really thought it would dive deeply into police corruption and show us how all the little people (ie. local police) deal with it.

However, now it looks more like a police procedural/documentary perhaps? Almost like a very well done episode of cops where I also know all the cops background and am all up in their personal business. We are still live recapping it though! I am giving it two more episodes (and maybe two more episodes after that ad infinitum :-) )

I love reading all the discussion though, so I'll go back and read some on this thread!

3
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hi, @veeee!

Thanks for joining us. I appreciate the recaps of LIVE, SHOULD WE KISS FIRST, GRAND PRINCE, and GREAT SEDUCER over at Drama Milk. ;-)

Instead of a police procedural or documentary, LIVE strikes me as more of a character study of people who work as police officers. We had a ringside seat during training because the two leads weren't already cops when the show opened. We got to see how two young job hunters arrived at their decisions to go into law enforcement as a profession.

I'm glad we were privy to the rigors of training designed to weed out candidates who weren't suited to the emotional, intellectual, and physical demands of the job. The thing to keep in mind is that all of the cops have had this training. The only difference is that the seniors at the precinct have street experience and more time in the job than the rookies. Some things cannot be learned from books, in the classroom, or even in the field under supervision.

As we follow the three rookies, I find it interesting to observe the differing approaches of the various mentors and team mates. Oh Yang-chon is a hardass. After seeing him getting choked with an electrical cord when a stakeout suspect got the upper hand on him, I could understand why he was so adamant that his academy students learn how to properly handcuff prisoners. Ditto for his badgering of the female cadet who couldn't handle rappelling. Seeing the practical application of academy lessons later on the beat makes me view the training scenes in a new light.

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm so happy you visit us on occasion :-) Please forgive all of my typos 🙏

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh really? Does it turn out to be another kind of procedural? I was really impressed with the first two episodes and am already behind the next two. However, I was really impressed by this police drama that showed a humanistic element involving the police and not really a procedural. If they are going the procedural route then I worry if I should even spend time on the rest.

1
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I don’t think it will be a procedural—more slice of life with cases thrown in to elicit emotional responses from the main characters and how it shapes them as individuals.

2
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

The way @pakalanapikake described it above is really good. It is more of a character study on two people who became police officers

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Right! She did.

0

Right on, @ally-le. The slice-of-life elements make LIVE look like a police procedural because cops work long hours, so that's where life happens. But it's procedural only to the extent that we see them going about their business. The focus is on the characters and their lives, not on the outcomes of the cases. Even the stakeout in which Yang-chon and Ho-cheol finally nabbed a murderer after ten years was more about the elder detective getting closure on a case that had been botched by others. He wanted to get justice for the victims, even if their survivors were still angry at how long it took.

Occasionally there are off-duty moments. My favorite so far is that of Myung-ho and Ban Jong-min leaving the precinct and mending fences over their difference of opinion re: their colleague's neglect of the harassing drunk. Myung-ho says Jong-min is his only friend in the precinct and asks him to forgive him. In reply, Jong-min plays his baby's sonogram for him. Myung-ho instantly recognizes it as a fetal heartbeat, and is genuinely thrilled to bits for his buddy. The look on his face says that he wants a family of his own. Jong-min tells him he should get married. I wonder if his wife is also a cop. How else could he have met someone to date, given the working hours and demands of the job?

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

You have to give it more than two episodes, but you'll get blown away. As so many beanies have said, the trick of this series are the characters: it's totally a character-driven show. It deals about how ordinary people that decide to dedicate their lives to the common good deal with everyday police situations, from the very trivial to the gruesome deaths and rapes. It takes a lot of courage to do this job, and it can take a toll on you.
My favorite part is the relationships and interactions between the characters: halfway down the show, when relationships are more or less established, that is when magic starts to happen. Noh Hee Kyung's writing has that special thing (I don't know how to describe it) that makes you love and root for the people on the screen. And the interactions are so natural and authentic that it's hard to say it's a kdrama because, frankly, dramaland is not the most realistic mirror of life. They manage to be natural and quirky at the same time, so they feel like real people and not stereotypes (the good cop, the bad cop, the lazy cop, the cool cop, the gentle friend-zoned character, the feisty heroine, etc that were introduced in the first episode).

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Here is a link to the official blog of LIVE, you can get to it from their main tvN page, too.

https://brunch.co.kr/@tvloverna

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

If only I could read and understand it. Lol.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I've finished watching episodes 1 - 4 and I loved it. I still don't like Oh Yang-chon but I'm looking forward to discover more about his personal life as with his work life with Sang-soo.

I feel very bad for Sang-soo especially with his frustrations at work. Everyone is being fucking vague with him and that really gets me because I've been in his position before, new job and everyone already expects you to do everything correctly. And when you do something wrong, its like they judge the hell out of you but no one goes out of their way to explain why. (though that really is how it is, everyone for himself in the workplace T_T)

Also I love the scene with the police chief taking all the beating from the congressmen and cheering his subordinates about it after showing them a body cam he secretly hid that captured everything. Only to reveal later that there is no way he will release that if he still wants to have a job, ugh the fucking unfairness.

Can't wait for more episodes tbh, like there's still a ton of characters we have to know more aside from our rookie trio.

Also its just me but I'm hoping that they won't insert romance in the story because I like the tone of it overall.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

In a precinct full of bellowing ahjussis, Corporal Choi Myung-ho is an island of calm. He strikes me as its straight arrow, but not a rule-quoting jerk. He truly seems to understand the spirit of the law, and seeks to apply it in everyday life. This sometimes puts him at odds with his colleagues. He sticks to his guns as a matter of principle, and doesn't appear to hold grudges. He has keen insight into human nature, and exercises patience as well as compassion.

In the scene in the conference room when incriminating evidence of dereliction of duty (i.e., a drunk being left out in the cold) was discussed, Jang-mi was of two minds, and deferred to Myung-ho, whom she seemed to regard as the precinct's King Solomon. He said he'd think about it, then discussed it directly with the patrolman in question. In the locker room, Myung-ho first told him to take the bus on his vacation instead of driving long distance after being on duty for 48 hours. Then he emailed him the camera footage of the infraction, and walked out to the parking lot to tell him in person to turn himself in to Internal Affairs after vacation or he would report him.

Myung-ho gave his colleague the option to turn himself in, knowing that it would be better for him to do that than to be reported by someone else. Perhaps he could raise extenuating circumstances? I suspect he was going to be suspended or demoted for 6 months, based on something Myung-ho said in a later episode, perhaps to Jong-min during one of their confrontations in the restroom. It was along the line of, “In six months, he'll have paid for his error in judgment, and the slate will be clean.” Myung-ho was looking out for his colleague's future, and not just being a stickler for the rules. It might delay his transfer to his home town, but he wouldn't lose his job. He could redeem himself by receiving his punishment.

Everyone screws up at one time or another. Better to face the music and move on. By going that route, Myung-ho ensured that his colleague could remain an honorable cop, and the force would retain an excellent officer. A single lapse in judgment would not end his career – as it could have had it been swept under the rug. More importantly, his colleague would be honoring the code of conduct by turning himself in. Even if people fall short, there is a mechanism for atoning and making good.

I suspect that Myung-ho knew that it would be further documented evidence of the year-long harassment that the congressman had perpetrated against the patrolman. It might come in handy later when (if ever) Ki Han-sol's bodycam footage of the two congressmen's abuse is revealed.

Shin Dong-wook's portrayal of Myung-ho is dandy. He comes across as business-like when on duty. He's a good teacher and takes the time to review procedures, as exemplified in Jung-o's first sexual assault and homicide cases. He keeps her focused on the work at hand, but later follows up to see how she's faring, and shares his...

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

- continued -

He keeps her focused on the work at hand, but later follows up to see how she's faring, and shares his own coping mechanisms.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Bravo! For outlining this character so succinctly. He is my favorite so far, not just for obvious reasons, but because of how wise and able he is. He is fair and compassionate and Jung-o is lucky to have someone like that to emulate.

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hi Everyone! We're trying to put together a music list for Live. Does anyone have any songs that they want to know? This show has several great songs that play throughout. I just made a post for it so comment on that post if you want to know a particular back ground song! Also, did anyone here think that the Father was a ghost in the opening episodes, or am I the only one?
https://www.bah-doo.com/complete-live-korean-drama-music-list/

3
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I never got the impression that Yang-chon's father was a ghost. Jang-mi noona spoke with him at the hospital when she was caring for her parents and he was taking care of Yang-chon's mother, who seems to be unconscious. Apparently he was pretty abusive towards mom. -- And now I think I understand why Yang-chon beats up his juniors. Somehow he has managed not to beat up his wife and kids. Hmmm. I wonder if that's why he works long hours and isn't home much: to avoid temptation to act like dad did? Maybe that's why he said, "I didn't beat up you or the kids" to Jang-mi when she told him she wanted a divorce, and he was trying to understand why.

Is Yang-chon's mom unconscious because dad beat her up? Sheesh.

1
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yeah, when I look back I'm like, nope, not a ghost. But I initially thought it because only JM was the only one who talked to him so I thought he was a ghost that only she could see. It was also strange when he showed up at the funeral in the clothes he wears all the time and didn't talk to/acknowledge anyone else, not even his son.

Oh my gosh, yes! that probably is why he told JM he didn't hit them. When he said that I was all like, "Um, that is not the bar line, buddy." But now it makes sense. Maybe that is what he thinks makes someone a good father/husband. But people raised in non abusive households are all like, "Um, Dads are around and play with us and stuff."

2
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Suddenly Yang-chon's anger management issues make sense. I've seen so much violence in Kdramas that it seems as if at least half the characters in any given show should be in some kind of behavior modification program. Sheesh.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

One of the most distressing things I’ve seen in kdramas and movies is how much fathers abuse their children and wives. Even supposed “good” fathers.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

And the mothers beat the crap out of the kids. (And sometimes the fathers, as in SHOULD WE KISS FIRST.) And the kids take it out on each other and the wangttas at school.

2

5 Thoughts:
-Common theme of the episode: Walking out, and then walking back in to finish what you were saying.
-Woah, what, Yang-chon's Daddy is a wife beater? He's so chill, I didn't see that coming at all.
-I'm glad that Sang-su and Yang-chon are actually communicating here. I was getting frustrated that Sang-su, even after hearing what Yang-chon was criticizing, still tried to find reasons to hate him, because then he wouldn't have to feel ashamed.
-Okay, there's clearly no option but divorce for Oh Yang-chon and Jang-mi Noona. I understand that he loves her and wants to make it work, but if she refuses to budge then what can he do?
-Jeong-eo's Mum has to stop using her mental health as an excuse to take out her frustrations on Jeong-eo. She constantly makes little of everything her daughter has achieved, and acts like she's the only person in the world who ever struggles. That's immature, and she needs to stop.
-Oof, poor Jeong-eo. I'm so proud of her for acting when she was hurt, but this is going to have some serious repercussions.

2
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I didn't notice that walking-out-walking-back-in thing, but that is so truuuuuuuuuuue. OMG they do do that all the time.

I feel like Jung-oh is being set up to be a very good police officer, a "genius" police officer dare I say? She notices very tiny things that everyone else misses. I wonder if she will move out of the local office and into one of the bigger units by the series end.

Meanwhile, SS is just struggling to get by. I am pretty concerned with him and that knife wound too, yeash.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Re: Jung-o’s mom and her mental health issues. It may look like an excuse, but she probably can’t help it. She exhibits tendacies if a personality disorder too—probably borderline personality (where she splits the world into all good or all bad and if you do what she wants you’re good and when you don’t, you’re bad). I’m not a psychiatrist but have patients like her. Their issues are so debilitating to them that they can’t see the forest for the trees. And empathizing or sympathizing with another individual’s plight (especially if it’s in direct competition to their own) is nearly impossible for them. Can they do it? With a ton of counseling maybe, but their baseline is so far off the empathy scale that it’s really difficult to get them to not think of just themselves. However, I’m reminded of the scene in the second episode when Jung-o got into the police academy and she was there to celebrate with her on the sidewalk. A normal person doesn’t dance in the street, usually, but she did—probably part of her psych issues too. She’s really emotionally sensitive, but when she’s happy, she’s overly happy and when she’s sad, she’s depressed. (I haven’t seen ep 5 yet—so I may be way off here.)

2
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Over, perhaps I'm over-simplifying the issue here a little. But she doesn't recognize her loyal daughter as someone who is undoubtedly always looking out for her, trying to keep her healthy and please her. It makes her come off as volatile and unreasonable.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

@ally-le,

Late to the party, but at least I found my way back. ;-)

Thanks for your insights into Jung-o’s mom. For someone who complains about being stressed out by panic attacks while working as an insurance agent, it made no sense to me for her to want to run a coffee shop. She'd still have to interact with customers all day, while also having to manage the profitability of the shop, order supplies, pay bills on time, etc., etc. She didn't strike me as someone with the experience or temperament to be a business owner. Maybe this is indicative of her being out of touch with reality.

It concerned me to see Jung-o coming to the shop after getting off her police shift and finding the place a messy shambles. All it would take is one spot check by the health department to close the joint down for crappy sanitation. Mom drags her butt in late, and gives her slave-laborer daughter a hard time after she's cleaned the place up. This is not a good way to run a business.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

It makes no sense whatsoever! But a lot of what people do don’t make sense to me, especially those with mental illness.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Just watched episode 5 and this series keeps going from strenght-to-strenght for me.

I already liked Yang-chon previously but this was really his episode. For full disclosure, my father was a cop and I'm probably identifying with all of this way too much.

I liked the scene when he ended up with Sang-Soo as his reluctant room mate and their talk which broke the ice. But then the bit the next morning with Yang-chon's father and suddenly the problems in his relationship with Jang-Mi made so much sense.

He'd worked so hard not to follow the example that his father had set. He loved his wife and kids and *didn't beat them* and he thought that this was enough. That he was being a good husband by not acting the way his father acted towards his mother.

That's why my heart broke for him a little when he realised that even though he'd thought he'd done a good job, he clearly hadn't. That JM was so matter-of-fact about the 'here are all the things I did by myself' made all that hit even harder. When she said: 'I didn't need you, but it would have been nice if you'd been there for me' it was so real.

It's so raw - it's so good. I'm just glued to my screen for the entire hour.

5
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

You will love episode 7!!!

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh no! I have to wait until Friday 😭

I can be patient.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@cloggie,

It's taken me a while to warm up to Yang-chon. After the revelations about his family of origin, I have to hand it to the guy that he has turned out as well as he has. He's a complex character who goes for broke. Despite his own best efforts, he's gotten the short end of the stick at work more than once. I can appreciate how he's trying to get all the rookies wised up.

And yes, it's really sad that, despite his best efforts, they weren't enough to build a lasting marital relationship with Jang-mi noona.

2
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's tragic, really, the love is there, he just didn't know what to do with it. He still doesn't!

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@frabbycrabsis,

I'm coming to see Yang-chon and his father as Everymen who bear the spiritual wounds of the times and societal changes they have lived through.

There's no way Yang-chon could learn to express love in a healthy way because he probably never saw it modeled at home when he was growing up. And that's not simply because his father was a wife-beater. Think of what his parents had lived through: Japanese domination and cultural suppression, the Depression, WWII, civil war, dictatorships, rapid industrialization and urbanization, along with the accompanying social upheaval and displacement -- for starters. Add to that the conflict between patriarchal tradition and Confucianism on the one hand and globalization, materialism, and modernization on the other.

Yang-chon isn't so different from American Baby Boomers whose Greatest Generation parents grew up in the aftermath of WWI and endured the economic rigors of the Depression. Boomers' fathers lived through WWII and the Korean War, and most of them don't talk about what they saw, let alone did or experienced. Their psychic wounds are deep, and cast long shadows over the emotional lives of their families. Infants, being little sponges who soak up everything to which they are exposed before they can even talk -- because that is how they are wired by Nature to survive -- internalize their parents' pain and suffering, and think they are the cause. Lather, rinse, repeat. Alice Miller's Prisoners of Childhood and other works give insight into family dysfunction and its propagation from one generation to the next.

Take a gander at Terrence Real's I Don't Want to Talk About It: Overcoming the Secret Legacy of Male Depression for another piece of the puzzle. It fits Yang-chon and his father to a T (and probably all the cops at the precinct to varying degrees). Not to mention Mu-han in SHOULD WE KISS FIRST. (Details on my fan wall.)

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Y'all, today's episode of Live was really good! I'm happy we kept recapping it (thank you Lee Kwang-soo fan for telling me not to drop it!) because it feels like things are starting to converge.

I love how this episode had a slight focus on Yang-chon. It also looks like Yang-chon is starting to understand why no one likes him. But we also understand why YC is a hard head when it comes to cases due to the high schoolers case from years ago. It also seems like SS is just like YC. Did anyone else feel that from episode 7? It seemed like both YC and SS are impulsive, maybe that is why YC is so hard on SS but also why he takes a lot of the blame for SS as well.

I love how the human trafficking case is playing out, though I was a little bit confused by what happened today. It seemed like JO broke up and undercover operation but they were still able to get some critical information and then at the end of the episode, they were also able to find their new house due to JO's CCTV sleuthing?

3
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I’m so glad you’re continuing to recap this on your Drama Milk site. Ep 5-6 were tough for me. Human trafficking is hard for me to watch, as is child neglect and abuse—I’ve see it played out in real life more than I would like to admit—and then the woman and her disabled daughter. I actually know someone whose mother tried to get her and her brother to eat rat poison with her to kill themselves when they were children. Her brother would have done it because he was very young, but my friend refused, so her mother didn’t go through with it. I can’t imagine being so destitute to kill yourself and your kids. Horrific. But the daughter in this had no choice because she had an NG (nasogastric) tube, and her mother just put the poisons down the tube. Too real. However, I’m glad the show has given me a lovely love triangle. I’m looking forward to ajealous Sang-soo, because Myung-oh is so good being so cool, and it’ll play off well. I laughed out loud when he walked in and said, “You shouldn’t be touching her!” And then citing the manual, to (unsuccessfully) hide his infatuation with Jeong-oh. And the roommate saying exactly what I was thinking afterwards: “You lost to Myung-oh.” Yes, looking forward to this, immensely.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Sand-su will be hilariously jealous all the time and that will be a treat to watch. Though he really needs to get his act together in order to compete with Myung-ho. Honestly, it will be an uphill battle because Myung-ho is everything someone would want in a partner he is kind, understanding, trusting, has integrity, hard working, caring, handsome, and tall. Sang-su is just Sand-su. He is caring, but he is also jealous with Jung-oh's abilities. The writer has an uphill battle on her hands to make me fall for that paring. So she can either make SS amazingly great over the course of the show, or she can bring in some more weaknesses to Myung-ho.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you for recapping over at Drama Milk, V!

I finally remembered on Friday that the Netflix subtitles are out. I watched ep. 7 raw last weekend, but completely forgot about 8 because of GRAND PRINCE and SHOULD WE KISS FIRST.

Yes, I most certainly realized that Yang-chon and Sang-soo are birds of a feather, and that's one of the reasons why they lock horns. I loved how their little slumber party at Dad's house resulted in a meeting of the minds. As both episodes played out, it became clear that Yang-chon has had some difficult karma with his own mentors. Their injuries in the line of duty, and his own, are never far from his mind. I think he actually worries a great deal about the safety of all his colleagues, not just the rookies, but he doesn't like to admit it.

There were tantalizing bits of background information on various characters in episode 7, along with progress in teamwork between mentors and rookies. After the unremitting bleakness of earlier episodes, this week's installments felt a little lighter to me. Maybe that's because although one undercover operation appeared to be blown (the stakeout of the sex trafficking ring), it actually was salvaged. Meanwhile, an undercover sting at a night club successfully bagged the target. At last Sang-soo's efforts bore fruit, and Hye-ri helped bust the pickpocketing operation with her old fogey mentor. The rookies' hard work is beginning to pay off.

Yang-chon's personal and professional history has been marred by paternal violence at home and apparent errors of his own that led to his mentors and partners being injured and killed in the line of duty. His father's violence towards his mother propelled him into a career as a police officer, but it was a case involving a 15-year-old who was lost (literally, or did the child die?) that turned him into a relentless "mad dog." Might that also be the cold case that he and his former partner, Detective Ho-Cheol, finally solved? It makes me wonder.

The sauna scene was revealing. In a nostalgic moment of surprisingly brotherly fist-bumping, we learned that Yang-chon and Senior Inspector Eun Kyung-mo had been partners. (IIRC, in an earlier episode it was stated that he even outranked him at one time.) Did rivalry over Jang-mi drive a wedge between them, or did something else? The other revelation: Yang-chon's back sports numerous scars. It's not just his mentors and partners who've been wounded in action. He's also caught grief repeatedly because Sang-soo has been impulsive or because he himself has been an inadequate mentor.

(end part 1 of 2) - continued -

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

- continued - part 2 of 2

At the precinct (in an apparent pre-sauna flashback?), Chief Superintendent Ki Han-sol noted the leg wound peeping through Yang-chon's torn trouser, and tells him to clean himself up. He commented that Yang-chon's zeal for police work -- and propensity for getting wounded in the line of duty -- made it especially hard on Jang-mi. It seemed to come as news to Yang-chon.

Interestingly, Senior Police Officer Choi Myung-ho was mentored by Yang-chon. Is that why he has only one friend in the precinct? Is he tainted with guilt by association?

Rookie Hye-ri finally turned a corner in her rocky relationship with retiring mentor Inspector Lee Sam-bo. She has been so prickly and politically correct that I've found her to be off-putting. We got a glimpse of her back story (witnessing her father's loss of a hand in an industrial accident), but still don't know why she decided to become a police officer, as far as I recall.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Does anyone by chance know what song plays in episode 6 at around the 3:20-30 minute mark ........SPOILER****right after JO shoots the woman with the taser? ****END SPOILER.........

The song continues until we see the mother with mental health issues calling JM. Is this an unreleased OST? The voice sounds like Jusin Bieber to me actually, but I couldn't really place it.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Someone asked in a comment and I couldn't find it. Now it's bugging me because it sounds so familiar.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

My usual google-fu couldn't turn up an ID for the song. I had a hard time hearing the words.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for checking!

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

So this is where beanies spazz about Live? Assa~ Found the place~
I watched till ep 7 now, and I have to say I like Oh Young Chon. Used to kinda hate his character previously but now I like him (and the actor, too, although he is not a familiar face to me. I looked him up, and it seems like he has more movies credit under his name than dramas. That explains). Especially when he has Sang su's back and everyone just assume he was at fault. He's just a misunderstood soul. Poor him.

Loving the club undercover scenes. Can't wait for more episodes! I don't have the urge to fast forward any scenes, so that's saying a lot.
Officer Choi and his partner, I love you both~~

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Welcome aboard, @mrsdimple. You've come to the right place.

I agree with you about Yang-chon. The dude is turning out to be less of a jerk than he appeared at the start of the show. He's hampered by unfortunate communication and social skills. Is there some way to mainline the memes from Dale Carnegie's How to Win Friends and Influence People directly into his brain?

I second you in your adulation for Senior Officer Choi and Han-pyo. ;-)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the episode 8 recap on Drama Milk, V!

This was a great episode, with a nice balance of cases, back stories, (mostly) good-natured rivalry, and a couple of bumps along the way to the team-building retreat. LOL at the relay races as a tip of the hat to RUNNING MAN. Although there's foreboding in the preview for episode 9, I'm feeling much less stressed-out than in the aftermath of most of the earlier episodes. My curiosity about the boys and girls in blue continues unabated.

We found out why Jung-o recognized Jang-mi, and it wasn't what I expected. I can see how the rookie might have been inspired to become a police officer, but it's not as if it were a long-term dream. It wouldn't surprise me if she eventually moves on to the Women and Juvenile Affairs beat.

We got to see quite a bit of Myung-ho, along with his uncharacteristic loss of cool while roughing up the sex-trafficking honcho. (Shin Dong-wook is in fine form. Manseh!) Did he pick up one of Yang-chon's hot-headed character traits... or perhaps know someone who fell afoul of traffickers? The refusal of those in the know to reveal his unfortunate story to the rookies really makes me wonder what gives with him. I suspect he got busted down in rank for an infraction possibly related to his mentor. A past anger-management issue that still rears its head on occasion? That's only a guess. He's getting pretty chummy with Jung-o, which is driving Sang-soo out of his tree, and it's mighty entertaining.

Speaking of Yang-chon's iffy track record as a mentor, it's disturbing to learn that crooked Detective Ju-yeong (Jang Hyuk-jin) had also been one of his charges. Dang! Talk about bad luck with proteges. Jang-mi and Kyung-mo are already onto him. I wonder if he were involved in that case that turned Yang-chon into a mad dog? No wonder the police haven't been able to shut down that ring -- they've been infiltrated for years.

I was totally floored when Jang-mi informed Kyung-mo that she still had feelings for Yang-chon. That was most unexpected. I had to chuckle to myself when she told him to keep it under his hat because Yang-chon would become a pest if he found out. She really has his number.

Although Yang-chon's father used to beat up his mother, he has an amazingly cordial relationship with his daughter-in-law. I thought it was sweet that he made a kite for her (maybe even two, if the one that escaped had been intended for her) -- and she enjoyed flying it with him. And he cooked seaweed soup for her birthday. Maybe we'll get some insight into his earlier life. He's in his early 80s, and would have been born circa 1935-1938. His childhood must have been traumatic. -- I was concerned when he told Jang-mi that her life would be easier when he and Yang-chon's mother were gone. Later, when he examined Mom's bedsore and hematoma(?), he eyed the on-off switch on her ventilator. That did not bode well.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I thought the Yang-chon's father was going to turn it off.

Also now that you mention it, I'm curious about Myeong-ho's past as well.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

6-8 Thoughts:
-Lee Kwang-soo's smile lights up my world.
-Don't get me wrong, Myung-ho is adorable, but I don't want to focus on the romance here. That prostitution case was so gratifying. Good work, Team!
-Ooh, what is going on with Yeong-eo's back story??
-I'm warming up to straight-talking and loud Hye-ri, her relationship with her Mentor is great.
-Those races made me laugh.
-Noh Hee-kyung has a habit of writing her characters volatile. I'm getting sick of trying to guess whether Yang-chon and that other guy are going to be good today or not.
-Can Sung Dong-il just be goofy all the time?

Sorry for the lack of detail here, Guys, I'll come back when I can think.

3
9
reply

Required fields are marked *

me as well with Yang-chon's character. I kinda like him as a mentor and police but when he comes home, he becomes a total gruff jerk.

Also among the the three rookies, I kinda relate to Hye-ri the most. Not overly talented as Jeong-o or even as eager and competitive as Sang-su but wanting to be recognized all the same. And as episodes flow by, she is gradually warming up to her mentor.

3
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hye-ri has a bad habit of getting an idea in her head and not being able to get rid of it. It's clear from how she reacted to having Sam-bo as her mentor rather than one of the younger guys, and how she treated Jeong-eo after she stumbled upon a homicide case. She wants big things for herself, and isn't afraid to admit that. I wish I had her boldness - so few female characters in drama actually talk back to their elders. She can admit when she's wrong, and when they're wrong, she'll tell them that.

4
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

@frabbycrabsis, thanks for hitting the nail on the head. I couldn't quite put my finger on what it is about Hye-ri that has turned me off at times.

Hye-ri has a bad habit of getting an idea in her head and not being able to get rid of it.

I have that problem, too. ;-)

Hye-ri's disdain for Sam-bo really bothered me. Maybe because I'm around his vintage, I take exception to her ageist attitude. His hard-won field experience and the sixth sense it confers is nothing to sneeze at. If she's lucky, she'll live to be his age.

She wants big things for herself, and isn't afraid to admit that. I wish I had her boldness - so few female characters in drama actually talk back to their elders. She can admit when she's wrong, and when they're wrong, she'll tell them that.

There's nothing wrong with dreaming big. But there are implications when it comes to exactly what is involved in achieving one's dream. Jung-o's problem with Hye-ri's aspirations is that other people have to suffer crimes in order for her to make a name for herself. Jung-o isn't looking for fame and glory -- she wants to serve and protect, catch the perpetrators, and prevent them from victimizing anyone else.

If it were merely a matter of talking back and rebutting what her elders say, it would be one thing. But Hye-ri occasionally shoots her mouth off first, apparently without thinking things through. Sometimes she strikes me as aggressive and abrupt -- and without sufficient forethought. That was one of the things Yang-chon razzed Sang-soo about when he came to his home to complain.

I do like that she admits when she's wrong, although she doesn't sound very sincere at times. She does dish it right out when others are wrong, just to keep the record straight. The way so many of the guys holler, she really does need to be able to put up her verbal dukes and stand her ground. How un-Confucian.

One thing that does bug me is how quick she is to reprimand others for not using politically correct lingo while being oblivious to the important stuff. The case of the mentally ill man in the taxi comes to mind. The older cops either recognized a local resident, or immediately sized up the signs and knew to get a blanket. Hye-ri used the currently acceptable terminology to refer to the person in need of assistance, but didn't really look closely at him or his circumstances. She was about to roust him out of the back seat, which was the last thing he needed. The older guys were so gentle with him, it was really touching. Then Sam-bo gave the driver some money for cleaning up the taxi, which was kind, and acknowledged the cabby as a human being, too. The good news is that Hye-ri learns quickly. She's lucky to have Sam-bo showing her the (many) practical ropes that aren't mentioned in the manual.

1
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

My take on the incident of the mentally ill man where Hye-ri was trying to be politically correct... Her dad lost his hand during that saw accident and is now disabled. She didn't like it when her mentor said that the man was not normal. She pretty much has a soft spot for the handicap/disabled.

1

@Jenmole April 11, 2018 at 3:06 PM

I like your interpretation of Hye-ri's having a soft spot for the handicapped/disabled because of her own father's accident. That's a good insight into her character. ;-)

The rub for me is that merely using non-perjorative terminology doesn't mean squat if she doesn't take into account that the person she's dealing with does not have the mental capacity to comply with her orders. It amounts to denying reality, instead of truly looking at the person as an individual with specific capabilities and needs -- and modifying standard operating procedure to accommodate him.

1

@pakalanapikake Oh, I agree with you totally on her use of terminology and can see where it rubbed you the wrong way. I think she was just so reluctant and annoyed to be with the old assigned mentor at the time, she just threw it at him. And her lack of experience dealing with the incident obviously showed how "green" she is. Her mentor seemed delighted that she knew her terminology...which just shows he's such a good teacher for her. :)

I'm looking forward to the subs for episode 9 and 10. Glad I read this thread from the bottom up and saw your warning of #36 below!

BTW, I love that you got to experience that kind of bubble love scenario. That must have been so romantic!

2

@jenmole April 12, 2018 at 3:41 PM

I'm waiting with bated breath for the 9 & 10 subtitles, too.

Glad you dodged the spoilers. ;-)

As I recall, my real-life bubble session wasn't romantic, but playful and fun. We could make bubbles that lasted much longer than the old-fashioned kind. And that was in the broiling heat of July or August in New Jersey. ;-)

(For DIY bubble juice, I think adding glycerin to the dishwashing detergent solution keeps the membranes from drying out quickly.)

1

I loved that moment of connection between Hey-ri and her mentor in the club. I didn't really like her up to that point because she seemed to me too ambitious and to want to run before she could walk.

But when they worked together on that arrest, you could see she got real satisfaction out of a job well done, and it endeared her to me.

I liked Yeong-o working together with Yang-mi but her backstory has got me completely puzzled, I have to say... That came completely out of the blue.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@cloggie April 9, 2018 at 9:44 AM

Yes, I also warmed up to Hye-ri after she and Sam-bo busted the guy hiding the stolen phones and wallets in the toilet tank. I was glad that her old codger of a mentor came through. Progress is being made. ;-)

I agree with you about Jung-o's collaboration with Jang-mi. Her first cases with Myung-ho (sexual assault and homicide) showed the women recognizing each other, but not saying anything. I didn't see this twist coming, either. I can only interpolate that growing up with her emotionally-disturbed single mother may have led to Jung-o's staying away from home to avoid her, and falling afoul of criminal elements in the process. Having been in that position herself will make her a better officer, assuming she has come to grips with it and doesn't suffer from untreated PTSD.

I wonder if her mother even knows this happened to her. It wouldn't surprise me if she begged Jang-mi to not inform her mother, who was already enough of a basket case.

0

Episode 9 is another action-packed installment. It starts out quietly with the continuation of the police Membership Training at that lovely lake as Myung-ho and Jung-o blow bubbles by the pussy willows and Sang-soo morphs into Lance Armstrong. It winds up with the gambling bust and Yang-shon driving like a bat out of hell. Along the way we learn that Myung-ho’s girlfriend was killed in the line of duty, and are confronted with Sam-bo getting beaten up by two riders on a motorcycle. Is one of them that obnoxious teenager who was busted for underage purchase of cigarettes through an elderly proxy? It’s possible that he’s put away so many crooks in his career that any number of them could be hunting Sam-bo.

Things aren’t looking too good for Yang-chon’s father, who seems to be a small-scale farmer or maybe a market gardener. Was he digging up the lettuce because he didn’t expect to live long enough to harvest it? He seems to be losing the will to live, and frankly doesn’t look too healthy.

It seems that fences have been mended between Nam-il, Min-seok, and Jong-min. Even Sang-soo is letting bygones be bygones with Myung-ho. Yang-chon is still Yang-chon. Maybe those MT retreats actually do some good after all. ;-)

This episode (like all the others) grabbed my attention and didn’t let up. Bravo, Show!

1
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Addenda to episode 9:

Like @veee on the Drama Milk blog, I'm concerned over the abdominal issues two of the senior cops have been experiencing. Methinks adhesions from Han-sol’s having been gut-stabbed would be better than some of the alternatives I can think of, which range from various cancers of the gastrointestinal tract to bleeding ulcers. Given the amount of soju he puts away, bleeding esophageal varices are a worrisome possibility as well.

After another rewatch, I confirmed that Sam-bo seemed to have abdominal pain before the bikers kicked the stuffing out of him.

We got to see how Jung-o drew upon her own real-life experience in dealing with several cases. In the home invasion/sexual assault incident, she assured the victim that her privacy would be preserved when the woman worried how her fiancee would react. I’m willing to bet that young Jung-o had begged Jang-mi to keep her own close call secret from her mother, whose precarious emotional state was volatile enough. Perhaps meeting a single solitary adult who took her seriously and understood her situation was what kept Jung-o from rebelling and getting into deeper trouble.

Note: It appears that the perpetrator is a repeat offender with a tracker on his ankle. I wonder if Jung-o's zapping him with her taser shorted it out?! Whatever. I'm glad that she zapped the perp when he appeared to threaten her and the victim, and that Yang-chon backed her up. I hope they lock this guy up and throw away the key.

In the spousal abuse case, Jung-o was concerned that the family’s two daughters were at risk because their father’s daily drinking and violence towards their mom made them reluctant to go home. In attempting to be loyal to their suffering mother, they put themselves at risk. It drove Jung-o to advocate on their behalf. I’m willing to bet that her attempts to avoid her own mother’s volatile emotional outbursts led to her becoming entangled with the prostitution ring from which Jang-mi rescued her.

I’m also reminded of the domestic violence to which Sang-soo was exposed as a child. Although his mother is no longer out of control, she drunkenly beat both him and his hyung upside the head after their father died. I think that’s one of the reasons why he shied away from Jung-o when she patted him on the head during their bike ride. (As if learning that he’s been consigned to the friend zone in apparent favor of Myung-ho weren’t upsetting enough.) Until I see the episode with subtitles tomorrow (Friday the 13th!), I won’t know for sure.

Yang-chon's father seems to be losing it, especially after learning that the neighbor ahjussi killed himself. Is he only hanging on because of his comatose wife? When he started digging up the lettuce plants in the field, I got the impression that he didn't think he'd be around (or maybe strong enough?) to harvest them in the future. Yang-chon's family is falling apart, and I feel for him.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Jung-o’s tazing ! I loved the reaction of the other officers in this incident. It was wrong and right at the same time, lol.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

And she didn't warn him this time, either. ;-)

The good news was that she hadn't been slammed against a wall like the time she zapped the pregnant woman who was about to kill someone.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I forgot that we actually have a space where we can spazz over Live, thanks for reminding me @pakalanapikake

And they're inserting romance now, omg, I really don't like it but its still not being the center of the story so I'm okay with it so far.

That ending scene tho, Sang-su witnessing Myung-ho making his moves on Jeong-o, aw, I feel bad for him. He has mentioned to Jeong-o that they want to date and was rejected. I hope Jeong-o rejects Myeong-ho as well because she said last time that love is not her main priority. Otherwise, it would look like she just lied to Sang-su because she already likes someone else.

Anyway, enough of the love line. I love every scene with Eun Gyeong-mo and Oh Yang-chon on it. As Chief Hansol said, they actually are the same more than they realize. They don't like each other and yet they still talk to each other. Also Yang-chon telling his colleagues that they can't divorce each other is one more thing I like among the many jokes in this show.

And An Jang-mi, I like that she is clear to Gyeong-mo when he asks why she doesn't take her seriously. It might be that Yang-chon can stay in her heart but its better if he's out of her life.

On a side note, can Shin Dong-wook stop being so damn soft and handsome in this show, I can't concentrate, goddamit. XD

4
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

@xhuizini, you're welcome for the LIVE discussion reminder. ;-)

Re: Myung-ho/Jung-o proto-romance, it might be a false alarm. After losing one significant other in the line of duty, he might actually be better off with a civilian. If LIVE is supposed to be a healing drama, then maybe the mere fact that he meets anyone who catches his attention is great progress for him -- kind of like Choi Young thawing out in FAITH after meeting Eun-soo.

Maybe they'll decide to be just friends. On the other hand, Jung-o has had to be a hardass to get through her life, and may be noticing that that particular adaptation no longer serves her well. It will be interesting to see how the situation unfolds.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

now you just made me miss FAITH.

yeah, i'm interested in the story and am also crossing my fingers that they just do decide to just be friends

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yang-chon telling people they can't divorce cracks me up. I like that Live's characters know how to laugh at themselves! Well, everyone except Nam-il, who's just a sad sack at the moment.

2
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

yup, very much describes nam-il. Someone give this guy a hug

2
reply