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69

Suits: Episode 2

With introductions out of the way, we finally get to see both Kang-seok and Yeon-woo in action. It’s interesting how similar they are when it comes to sheer stubbornness and determination to win, yet they’re miles apart in the way they approach a problem. Is it better to come from a place of compassion and understanding, as Yeon-woo believes, or is Kang-seok correct that the fastest way to results is to exploit your opponent’s weaknesses? I have a feeling that they both have a lot to learn from each other.

 
EPISODE 2: “If you have a chance to throw a die, throw it without hesitating. The moment you throw it, you’ll advance at least one square.”

When Kang-seok gets to work, he finds that his promotion to senior partner has been rescinded. Ha-yeon explains that President Park complained, and that Geun-shik has gone to try to placate him. Kang-seok says that it’s not as if they’ll go bankrupt if they lose one lousy client, but Ha-yeon says that she can’t promote him to senior partner if he’s lost them their biggest client.

She fusses at him for lying that they’d already been paid, reminding him that he’s not the only one who could be in serious trouble. She warns that if he ever puts her in such a position again, she’ll haul him in front of a judge herself.

So, wary of making any mistakes, Kang-seok fires Yeon-woo as soon as he shows up for this first day at work. He explains that he’s on a knife-edge, and that if anyone discovers Yeon-woo’s not really a lawyer, Kang-seok will be the one who’s cut.

Yeon-woo marvels that he thought Kang-seok would be different, and he begs him to reconsider, promising not to be the one who gets him stabbed by that knife by proving that hiring him wasn’t a mistake. Kang-seok tells him that he thought Yeon-woo might be a weapon, but from the edge of this knife, he looks more like a weakness he can’t afford.

Annoyed now, and with nothing to lose, Yeon-woo says that if Kang-seok is on the edge of a knife, then Yeon-woo is standing on the edge of a cliff. He continues, “If you push me off, it’s like you’re saying I should shut up and die.” Kang-seok asks sarcastically if he plans to pull him down with him, and Yeon-woo’s defiant glare makes him sit up and pay attention.

Yeon-woo says that he has lots of ways to take Kang-seok down. He asks, “Have you already forgotten what I’m like?” unknowingly echoing Kang-seok’s words to Ha-yeon when he’d threatened to go work for another firm if she doesn’t reinstate his promotion. Kang-seok tells Yeon-woo that if he tries blackmailing him, he’ll only go to jail for dealing drugs, but Yeon-woo just says they’ll go down together.

He adds that he’s not blackmailing Kang-seok — he’s just desperate for this opportunity. Just as Ha-yeon reinstated his promotion (though she’d insisted it was not because of his bluffing), Kang-seok tells Yeon-woo that whether this was a deal or a threat, he’s got no choice but to tell Yeon-woo that he passed.

He says that Yeon-woo is on a six month probationary period, in which he expects him to spend every moment making sure he’s qualified to take the bar exam. He tells him not to worry about the money, and although money is Yeon-woo’s primary concern, he agrees to the terms.

Ha-yeon’s terms for Kang-seok’s promotions are that he must resolve things with President Park, he must bring in Congressman Jo as a client within a week, and he has to take on a certain pro bono case (a case done without payment). It’s the last one that makes Kang-seok balk.

Kang-seok gives the pro bono case (for sexual harassment and unfair dismissal) to Yeon-woo as his first case and tells him to keep it a secret from Ha-yeon, pfft. He says that his goal is to never let cases go to court, then notes Yeon-woo’s ill-fitting suit. Likening a good suit to a set of armor, Kang-seok hands over his credit card and tells Yeon-woo to get a new one, and whatever else he needs.

As luck would have it, the woman that Yeon-woo splashed mud all over is a paralegal at the firm, and she’s in charge of his orientation. Her name is KIM JI-NA (Go Sung-hee), and Yeon-woo further insults her by asking if she’s his secretary. Ouch.

In the elevator, Ji-an catches Yeon-woo staring at her chest and informs him that he’s one of those jerks who think that women who aren’t attorneys must be secretaries who have flings with attorneys. He says meekly that he just thought there was something on her shirt, but she sneers that he’s like a new recruit while she’s been in the trenches for three years.

He wonders why everyone is talking like this is a war and mentions that he was exempted from army duty, making Ji-na ask if there’s something wrong with him. He just says there are a lot of things wrong with him and wonders if she’s biased against men who didn’t serve in the army.

Secretary Da-ham is the only one who knows that Yeon-woo doesn’t have a law license, and she asks Kang-seok why he hired him. Her guess is that Yeon-woo is Kang-seok’s secret son, and the incredulous look Kang-seok levels at her is priceless.

Ji-an shows Yeon-woo around, and at one point she deliberately whirls his direction, trying to spill her coffee on him. It doesn’t work but she snaps at him to pay attention, only for him to sarcastically agree that that was all his fault.

She shows him to his tiny cubicle and starts telling him how to find other departments, and she gets annoyed that he doesn’t write it all down. Yeon-woo just flawlessly rattles off which departments are on which floors, earning a narrow-eyed glare from Ji-na as she sails off.

Kang-seok learns that President Park has already started the process of suing him, although he hasn’t even hired a lawyer yet. He goes to Geun-shik’s office to ask about his recent golf game with President Park, obliquely accusing him of giving President Park inside information because of his grudge against Kang-seok.

Geun-shik almost gives himself away, but he stops and asks if Kang-seok has proof. Kang-seok asks in return whether Geun-shik can handle Ha-yeon’s disappointment if he proves him guilty. Geun-shik looks chastened at the thought, and Kang-seok says he’ll forget what he did this time, cheekily plunking a golf ball into his goldfish bowl.

Yeon-woo’s friend Chul-soon is chased by some scary-looking men, and one of them surprises him with a brick upside the head. Yeon-woo gets a call from Chul-soon’s phone, but he ignores it.

Meanwhile, Kang-seok meets with a woman who seems to be a regular informant. She tells him that President Park has a trouble-making son, who’s narrowly escaped prison three times due to his father’s connections.

She also gives him a tip that Congressman Jo wants to be the leading elder at his large church, an extremely powerful position, so Kang-seok shows up at Congressman Jo’s church that weekend. He offers to help Congressman Jo and shows him the financial statements of his primary rival, noting that they seem to have been tampered with.

Skeptical, Congressman Jo asks if this is a trick, so Kang-seok instructs him to smile as he texts the statement to the rival, who suddenly looks very nervous and scuttles away. Congressman Jo calls his office right then and there and tells them that Kang & Ham are their new legal advisers.

Yeon-woo visits the victim of the harassment case, a woman named Mi-sook, at her dishwashing job. She doesn’t have much faith that he can help her, so Yeon-woo pulls on a pair of gloves and starts helping her.

His unusual tactic gets her attention, and later she tells him that she worked for a company called Geumjeong Digitech as the president’s secretary. He started making inappropriate comments, so she made a complaint. She was given no work to do after that, so she cleaned a bathroom in an attempt to be useful, and she was fired on the spot for being absent without leave.

She tells Yeon-woo that the other employees accused her of trying to seduce the president, calling her a gold-digger, so she gave up on suing. But then her daughter said that the world has changed and women can be confident and free, so she changed her mind.

The men who were chasing Chul-soon drag him to his apartment and ransack the place, with Chul-soon lying on the floor bleeding from a bad head wound. They continue trying to call Yeon-woo, probably looking for the drugs he disposed of after meeting Kang-seok.

Yeon-woo goes to visit his grandmother that evening. He climbs into her hospital bed and snuggles up with her, and she sighs that it’s nice here. Yeon-woo tells her she can stay as long as she likes because he got a good job.

His grandmother pats his hand sleepily and says she’s proud of him. He asks if she wants to know about his job, but she’s too sleepy and nods off. Yeon-woo says softly, “I’m sorry, Grandmother. When I become a real lawyer, I’ll tell you everything then.”

In the morning, Kang-seok swipes Yeon-woo’s breakfast from the toast truck and asks him how the pro bono case is coming. Yeon-woo says that Mi-sook seems like a good person, but Kang-seok says that the moment he empathizes with the client, he’ll start making mistakes and lose the case.

Yeon-woo reminds Kang-seok that he said he’s good at reading people, asking if it wouldn’t be ideal to empathize with the client and win. Kang-seok clarifies that by reading people, he means reading their desires and finding their weaknesses.

Yeon-woo concludes that this probably isn’t the offender’s first time harassing an employee, but nobody else at the company has reported him. Kang-seok says that that’s probably because anyone who did was fired, and that those who stayed just accepted it.

Yeon-woo decides to ask Mi-sook for a list of people who’ve quit or been fired from Geumjeong Digitech, but Kang-seok stares at him until he realizes that it won’t be that easy. Kang-seok says that they have to roll the dice to make a move, and when Yeon-woo complains that they have no dice, Kang-seok says, “Then you have to start by finding your die.”

Yeon-woo spends the morning making a website to bring attention to Mi-sook’s lawsuit against Geumjeong Digitech ‘s chairman (and still ignoring calls from Chul-soon’s phone), but at the end of the day the site still hasn’t had any hits. He asks Ji-na for help after work, and she laughs in his face,.

Baffled as to why she’s so hostile towards him, Yeon-woo asks if Ji-na is always this angry, which just makes her madder. She tells him that Geun-shik wants to see him, and he wanders out of her office only to stick his head back in to ask who that is, ha.

Geun-shik glares at Yeon-woo aggressively and says that he’s heard Yeon-woo is a genius, but he says he’s not impressed. They’re joined by another associate that Geun-shik called to his office just to make a show of firing him for Yeon-woo’s benefit. He says that the instant Yeon-woo makes the tiniest mistake, he’s out.

He tosses Kang-seok’s golf ball to Yeon-woo with instructions to give Kang-seok the message that the dice have been thrown, and they’re at war. Yeon-woo obediently delivers the golf ball, but Kang-seok interrupts the message, knowing what he said about dice and war already because it’s been Geun-shik’s motto since college.

Yeon-woo goes on alert when he sees a picture of President Park and his family on Kang-seok’s tablet. He tells Kang-seok that the son is Joon-pyo, who set him up to get caught with the drugs. Kang-seok murmurs that this is fun, and he asks Yeon-woo if he’s a good actor.

Yeon-woo calls Joon-pyo while he’s out clubbing and doing drugs, and when Joon-pyo asks who he is, he says, “I’m someone who wants to teach you how scary people can be.” Suddenly Kang-seok enters Joon-pyo’s private room, while at the same time, Yeon-woo finds President Park in a fancy sauna.

Kang-seok informs Joon-pyo that a witness saw him abusing drugs a few weeks ago and reported it to the cops. He tells Joon-pyo to sign a contract right now, and he’ll defend him himself. Hearing a commotion caused by police in the hallway, Joon-pyo quickly signs.

Kang-seok calls President Park to tell him that he’ll be representing his son in court. President Park says he has plenty of connections to keep Joon-pyo out of jail, but Yeon-woo replies that this time there’s enough evidence that connections won’t help him.

Still on the phone, Kang-seok offers to represent Joon-pyo if President Park drops the lawsuit against him. President Park says that any lawyer can represent his son, but Kang-seok points out that he’s the only lawyer at the scene right now.

He sighs that it’s a shame that President Park is taking his deal as a threat and offers to rip up the contract Joon-pyo signed and let the police in. Joon-pyo scuttles over and grabs the phone, screaming for daddy to save him.

President Park snatches his lawsuit from Yeon-woo and tears it in half. The police arrest Joon-pyo as his father watches from his car.

Yeon-woo joins Kang-seok and sighs that they should have let the scumbag get the maximum sentence, but Kang-seok says that his father would only have gotten him out again. Yeon-woo fishes for praise for his acting, holding out a fist for a bump, but Kang-seok just walks away, ha.

When he gets home, Yeon-woo finds Se-hee crying on the front stoop, and she sobs at him for not answering his phone. She tells him about Chul-soon’s attack, wanting to call the police, but Yeon-woo says that if they do, then Chul-soon will also be arrested.

Se-hee is confused (she doesn’t know about the drug deal) but Yeon-woo says he’ll explain later. She picks up his Kang & Ham employee badge when he drops it and assumes that he’s been studying to be a lawyer. He starts to explain, but she says sadly that between him and Chul-soon, she feels like she’s always in the dark.

In the morning, Da-ham is intercepted on her way to work by Geun-shik, who asks what she’ll do after Kang-seok leaves the firm. She gets the pleasure of telling him that President Park withdrew his complaint, and that Geun-shik can’t even call him because it was a clause of the agreement that he’ll have no contact with any Kang & Ham attorneys from now on, Geun-shik in particular.

Ji-na delivers the Kang & Ham protocol manual to Yeon-woo, clearly expecting his gratitude for her magnanimous gesture, but he doesn’t even notice her there, hee. She raps on his desk and reminds him that he needed a favor, then she’s insulted all over again when he asks her to help drive traffic to his website.

She calls him a genius at making people angry, and again he’s completely confused at her (to his mind) overreaction. He accidentally addresses her too informally, and she blows up and storms off. But this time, Yeon-woo stops her and addresses her with her title, and she slows down enough for him to tell he about Mi-sook’s plight.

By the time he’s done, Ji-na can tell that he sincerely wants to help Mi-sook. Kang-seok finds them and gets a look at Yeon-woo’s website, and he tells Yeon-woo that he’s found his die, so now it’s time to make his move. It only takes him a few seconds to email his clients a link to the website as Yeon-woo gapes at the famous celebrities that Kang-seok knows.

Once they’re alone again, Ji-na stammers an apology to Yeon-woo for her behavior earlier. She shares the link on her social media, and as the evening wears on, the site starts to gain visitors. By morning, the site is trending, but Da-ham warns Yeon-woo that Geumjeong Digitech will retaliate.

When he gets to work, Kang-seok learns that the site is a success and that news sites are even writing about it. He takes Yeon-woo to the courthouse to speak to a judge, who reprimands Kang-seok for publicly calling out Geumjeong Digitech. Kang-seok passes him a folder of evidence they’ve received from the company — it’s empty.

He says that they had no choice but to set up the website because the company wasn’t cooperating, but the website got popular very quickly, so they sent out a news release to make sure that readers don’t get the wrong idea. When the judge asks what he wants, Kang-seok requests a list of female employees who were fired or resigned while Mi-sook worked there.

On their way out of the courthouse, Kang-seok tells Yeon-woo that without that list, the case would have been dropped, so he used the media to stop that from happening. But he warns Yeon-woo that getting emotionally involved can be dangerous for his client.

He says that things will get trickier now, and Yeon-woo guesses that it’s Geumjeong Digitech’s turn to roll the dice. They do that by not just sending a list of dismissed employees, but full personnel records of all employees, including payslips, and even vacation records, lol.

Yeon-woo complains that it’s a ploy to waste their time, but Kang-seok just quips, “You remember everything you read, so this won’t take you long.” HAHA, Yeon-woo’s face.

A terrified Chul-soon calls Se-hee, begging her to help find Yeon-woo or he’s dead. We see that he’s being held in a filthy warehouse, looking half dead already as he tells his captors that Yeon-woo works at Kang & Ham law firm.

Ji-na finds Yeon-woo still at the office late that night, slowly reading through the mountain of employee files. Without a word, she joins him and starts reading. Yeon-woo walks her downstairs later, and when she notices that his watch face is broken, he just says vaguely that there’s a story behind it.

He asks if she’s interested in him, because he’s heard that when people act like they hate someone for no reason, often it’s really because they’re interested. Stammering a little, Ji-na assures Yeon-woo that she had a very valid reason for disliking him when they first met.

In the morning, Ji-na arrives at the office to find that Yeon-woo has located a Geumjeong Digitech employee named Eun-young who was fired while Mi-sook worked there. Yeon-woo has gone to speak with her, but she’s afraid to testify.

Yeon-woo psays that he understands that she has no reason to trust him, but swearing that he knows how she feels. He goes back o the office to report that Eun-young refused to testify, so he asked how she would feel if her daughter were in her situation. Kang-seok snaps at him to cut to the chase, and Yeon-woo announces that she agreed to testify. Aw, he’s so adorably proud of himself.

Eun-young arrives for a deposition, but she’s not happy when Geumjeong Digitech’s chairman shows up along with his lawyer. She shuts down when the lawyer mentions that before her secretary job at Geumjeong Digitech, she worked at a series of bars, and that one even sued her for threatening to report the owner for rape if he didn’t give her money.

Instead of answering, Eun-young runs out of the room. Yeon-woo chases after her to ask why she didn’t tell him about the blackmail lawsuit, but she just yells at him for making this all her fault. She says she won’t testify, so Yeon-woo slumps back to the building, defeated.

He’s joined in the elevator by Chul-soon’s attackers, and he gets a text from Se-hee saying that Chul-soon knows where he is and that his attackers will probably come after him. He finally notices the two men and recognizes their faces from when he saw them outside Chul-soon’s apartment.

He exits the elevator as soon as the door opens, and the men follow him. He runs into Kang-seok, who takes in Yeon-woo’s nervous breathing and the men who suddenly stop a short distance away. Yeon-woo tries to keep walking, but Kang-seok grabs his arm and demands, “Who are you?”

 
COMMENTS

We got to know Yeon-woo a bit better in this episode, which confirmed a lot of what I suspected about him after the first episode. He seems to have hit a rough patch when his parents died in a hit-and-run and ruined his chances of going to law school. I can’t help but wonder if his desperation to fix some terrible mistake that he made is related to his parents’ deaths — maybe he was involved somehow, or maybe he was even the drunk driver who caused the accident. His apology and promise to his grandmother to tell her everything someday leads me to believe that he at least feels responsible for his parents’ deaths. Regardless, I can’t see yet how a job pretending to be a lawyer would make things right, unless his goal is to honor his parents’ loss by becoming successful. And I could be way off and his mistake is something else entirely… we still have a long way to go before we get answers.

Yeon-woo seemed so withdrawn and detached in the first episode, so I liked that we got to see a bit more of his personality. I’m particularly entertained by his bewilderment at the inner workings of the law firm, but you can also feel that he’s carefully analyzing everything he observes and that he’ll be fitting right in before long. Yeon-woo seems to have a lot of facets to his personality — he was cool and factual when he talked Kang-seok out of firing him, dryly witty with Ji-na, and warm and compassionate when listening to the harassment victim. Then he went to see his grandmother and instantly became so sweet and childlike, it made my heart ache. There’s a lot of love there, on both sides, and I’m looking forward to seeing Yeon-woo extend that love outward to others.

There’s something about Kang-seok’s slick, effective way of handling every situation that makes me want to admire his intelligence and quick thinking, but I’m definitely concerned about the way he goes about manipulating people. His tactics are misleading and tricksy at best, illegal at worst. And now he has Yeon-woo under his wing, a kid who knows the letter of the law from books but has no experience actually applying those laws to real-life situations, and who’s listening and absorbing his — frankly terrible — advice. I mean, it was Kang-seok’s idea to hire Yeon-woo to illegally impersonate a lawyer in the first place, and the fact that the plan is to get Yeon-woo to pass the bar exam within six months doesn’t make it any better (and anyway, why does he need six months when he’s already passed the bar with a nearly perfect score?). I’m concerned that Kang-seok will stamp out Yeon-woo’s instinctive compassionate, human approach and teach him all the wrong things.

On a lighter note, I absolutely adore the female characters in this show, so I hope that they get a lot more screen time going forward. Jin Hee-kyung is always wonderful, and I love how her Ha-yeon is so smart and clever, running this powerful law firm all by herself. Chae Jung-ahn as Da-ham is hilarious, both with Kang-seok and without, and I hope we get to see a lot more of her sassyness. But it’s Go Sung-hee as Ji-na who really makes me laugh, especially when she was so irritated by Yeon-woo’s obliviousness that she was actively trying to get his attention without even knowing why. It cracks me right up whenever she hits him with a zinger and prepares to gloat, only for Yeon-woo to be all Oh, okay, well bye now and leave her floundering even harder. I’m a bit sad that they started getting along so soon, because I could have watched several more weeks’ worth of Ji-na being annoyed and Yeon-woo having no earthly clue what’s wrong with her.

I liked Suits after the first episode, but I love it after the second. My only real complaint is that some of the law procedures seem very rushed (for example, no way would a lawyer let their client be questioned without having thoroughly questioned them themselves), but it seems to be the way of things in dramas, so I can overlook that for the sake of entertainment. I feel like the show hasn’t quite hit its stride yet, but the introduction of a case and a purpose for Yeon-woo to use his intellect got things focused in the right direction. In addition, the side-plot of Chul-soon and the drug dealers looking for Yeon-woo has me concerned, because as much as Chul-soon is bad news and he knows it, Yeon-woo will still feel betrayed that his friend got him in this situation, then ratted him out. I’m eager to see Kang-seok break his own rule of not getting emotionally involved as he tries to help Yeon-woo out of a situation that’s gotten out of control.

 
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Thanks for the recap @LollyPip ! I'm looking forward to this week because based on the second episode I can see this show picking up as we get to know our characters!

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Thank you @lollypip...was waiting for the recap.
Liked the first two episodes...waiting for the 3rd...I think Yeon-woo said sorry to grandma as he is working as a fake lawyer and not a real one. He needs money, he needs a beginning which he has got with this opportunity...so far PHS is rocking in this role...makes me believe in his character and root for him to succeed. And I like it that his character is not a complete copy of Mike and as usual he makes it his own.

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I'm just here to drop on how puppy Yeonwoo is when he tell such a long story on how he got the victim to testify to his parents and mom's just like "pls just listen to our adorable kid" and daddy's like "so what's the point?"

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Da-Ham and Kang Seok as Mom and Dad to cute little Yeon Woo is a good idea indeed! :D

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Oh thank you so much @lollypip. I plan to read the recap for about two more episode before watch this drama.

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I really like PHS in this, I feel like finally a good role in a good drama for him. Like LollyPip said, he got to show different sides of his character this episode. I think PHS has tons of unrealized potential, both in singing and acting, hopefully this role is up to it!

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Totally agree with you. I also like PHS as yeon woo a lot more than his previous roles. I even like Yeon woo more than Michael Ross. I know it's still very early and maybe my opinion is really biased since in general I prefer kdrama more than us series. I love that the writer and the PD decided to make yeon woo more broody, or maybe it's PHS' interpretation of the characters. yeon woo already won me since the first episode and am sure I will stay until the end.

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Same here. Suits usa is a fun watch because of mike and harvey's bickering and camaraderie but story-wise, it is just the usual US dramas you will find.
However, here in suits korea, i love the style, the cam work and the pacing. I also do like that the seriousness it exudes compared to the original.
If it is Gabriel Macht who shines in suits usa, i think it will be Park Hyung Sik who will shine in this version.

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Same. I like Harvey, Donna and Louis a lot in the original but was just okay w/ Mike. I didn't like him that much because I find his portrayal unrealistic. But I actually really like Yeonwoo. I like Hyungshik portrayal more. The reason is because I have always wanted a more angsty Mike. I thought it would make more sense given his background and past. He got so much trouble before, he got kick out of school (in the original), he have to take care of his sick grandma, he lost his parents early on etc. with all this issue Mike should be more stiff and angsty. I thought that's more realistic. Also I don't get how Mike was able to talk like a lawyer at the start when he isn't one and have no experience yet which is why I like it when Hyungshik talk like a robot or talk like he is reading books when saying the law or articles and acts on law books he read and memorized. That makes more sense to me. He isn't a lawyer so he shouldn't talk like one yet. He just have a photograhic memory so he memorize the law book so it makes more sense to me that he rack his brain for the book he reads and imprint on his mind and recite it like he is reading a book. Isn't that how a person with photographic memory should be?!

Ofcourse as he work w/ Kangseok he should get better at it. But for now, he should be stiff and like reading a book when saying law terms. That is what I believe and want to see.

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Thank you, @lollypip !
I like the fast pace in this story and am just waiting to be beguiled by it even more...

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Loving hyungsik's interpretation of yeon-woo... but i felt his female lead was overacting. (A first impression but i have not clearly made up my mind) The law lingo WAS fast, but our leads are solid. Also, the antagonist in charge of the interns bit was hilarious.

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I got the same vibe from Ji-na. Either the actress was overreacting, or the character's emotions are a roller coaster, swiftly changing from upset to cool to heart eyes.

However, I still found her scenes with Yeon-woo to be charming. Who can hate a bickering couple?

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I too felt she overdid it to much. It seemed like she had mood swings but towards the end she toned down so maybe she was just really annoyed that he ruined her day before by splashing her and then not saying sorry and therefore it translated into anger towards him.

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In my case I wrote over-acting ^^^willingly. Because I felt her over-reaction slightly justified... but her interpretation-acting of it- off. Usually actors settle more into their characters as time goes, so hopefully it'll be fixed. Yesss! Their back and forth in the elevator was sleek and cool ;)

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Jina is my only complain with suits Korea. Rachel was very cool. Pls writernim, don't make jina into a streotype of female caharacters in kdrama. Jina's attitude would be fit in weekend drama, but not as a paralegal in Wednesday-Thursday drama.

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I can't wait till Yeon Woo realizes Chul Soon is bad news and let's him go as well. He truly doesn't need a friend who constantly gets him in bad situations. I don't know it was shown, but do we know why YW went to jail?

Also I'm loving Secretary Da Ham LOL. Her interactions with everyone are hilarious.

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The part where YW went to jail is in the present and all of this (where he becomes a fake lawyer) is the past. The drama is telling the story through flashbacks.

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And this way of storytelling can't be anymore k-dramaish :)

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Agree! It was honestly more confusing- the first 20 mins

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Right??

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OH MY GOD!! Thank you for that clarification LOL. I was so confused. I didn't watch the first part of episode one properly but now it all makes so much sense. That makes it even more interesting though.

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😂@naelap No problem. The opening really was confusin

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Daham's clothes! I envy whatever she has on her wardrobe.

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Finally someone said this! :D

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Thank you for the recap, @lollypip ~!!!! I still come to DB to read the recaps of a show even if I am also watching the show, just because I like to keep my mind and my thoughts about something open and like to know about the same things I am into, but from a different perspective =) And I am also glad that this is being recapped by a recapper that has not seen the original, so is not biased and is able to give insights with a new set of eyes and perspective =)

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Yes! I feel like since I've watched the original I keep on comparing it but if I detach myself I can enjoy it's individual merits more. Like when Kang dropped the golf ball into the fishtank as a warning sign I was all like "Show them who's boss!"

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Yea 😊😊😊 It was like that for me when I was watching “Scarlet Heart: Ryeo”, I love the original Chinese version, but going into watching the Korean version, I decided to detach myself from the original and keep an open mind, and I think I ended up being a part of the VERY small group of people who liked the Korean version 😂

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😂 The group must be really VERY small because I only here people criticizing that drama and directing me to watch Moonlight Drawn By Clouds instead.

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Yea T...............T

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Started watching because of Jang Dong Gun, and now this is the only show airing that holds my interest. Hopefully it will add its own Korean drama flair that will elevate this to more than just a remake :)

Weakest link so far seems to be the female lead (Ji Na). When I first watched the American version, I was blown away by Meghan Markle's looks and portrayal of her character. So far, I'm underwhelmed by the Korean counterpart. Hopefully her character will improve over time.

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I had the same thoughts. Ji Na doesn't seem as confident and magnetic, more annoyed and flustered at everything. But maybe she changes as she gets to bond with YW in the future.

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I thought the same. I am expecting the moment Ji Na shows us what a badass paralegal she is supposed to be. In the American show, we never doubted of Markle's ample competence as a paralegal in the firm, so it was even more frustrating that she wasn't a lawyer yet. On the contrary, Ji Na told us but never showed us that competence. But I am sure we will see it.

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I agree with you.
So far I'm liking korean version so much, then I watched the US version, the characters are the same but definitely has different vibe, but in a good way, I believe they are the best fit for the role.
Sadly I feel Jina's character is surprisingly different than Rachel, seems like GSH potrayal almost the same with her character in While you were sleeping, the short tempered woman, even YeonWoo kept asking "are you mad at me?"
Tough maybe it's the writer make it that way, since GSH succesfully made an impression in WYWS.
But I can't wait to see the rest of the story, YW must have many scenes with JN, I hope their chemistry will explode...

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Thanks for the wonderful recap @lollypip :)

My favorite scene in this episode was definitely when Yeon-woo snuggled up to his grandma at the hospital. There's so much emotions on his face that I can't even begin to describe. The love in his eyes and tranquility of being next to her (his grandma is his only family), the guilt and the fear he's shouldering (a fake lawyer earning money to pay the bills).

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Lollypip's screen cap of the scene is the banana peel that is threatening to send me down the slippery slope of Too Much Live-Watching. Har! (Does Yeon-woo have a long-lost cousin named Han-gyul?!)

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Thanks @lollypip!
Actually, I think the terrible mistake Yeon-woo made was to take the exam in place of another person. If I remember well, in the American show that was what led to his expulsion from law school –taking an exam in place of another is a very serious offense in the academic world. Yeon-woo chose to do that in a moment of desperation (having lost both parents, his grandma in the hospital) because he needed money and lost his chance to become a lawyer himself. What is even more tragic is the waste of talent: he would have been a 100+ times better lawyer than the cheater that paid him. That is the mistake he has to fix to redress his life.

On another note, I am glad that this version still has the strong premise of the American show but has its own characters. I don't know if it is because of the difference in cultures or the actors, but the characters feel very different to me. Thank God, because I didn't want to see the same show twice.

And last thing: it is a testament to Park Hyung Shik's skills in acting that I can't believe he is the same actor that did Strong Woman Do Bong-soon. Min Hyuk is totally different to Yeon-woo. I only ask that he imprints the same force he showed when acting as Min Hyuk in this new show (I swear he lived that character, his casting was totally on point).

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe in this drama Yeon-woo's mistake that resulted in him not being able to just go to law school isn't clear yet. It seem like maybe it's related to money troubles as a result of his parents' death. But they actually haven't said that he was in school and then got kicked out. Or did I miss that? I'm getting muddled with the original.

In the American show, I think Mike actually gets expelled from undergrad and was planning to go to law school. But he memorized a math exam and sold copies to other students to help them cheat. Only that one of the students was a dean's daughter or something like that. He wasn't actually caught for taking exams for other people, since he was making money doing that before he met Harvey.

I agree with you, the characters feel very different and I've really found it interesting how they are adapting the story to fit the culture and also, of course, Korean audiences.

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Yeah, you're right! I didn't remember the business Mike had with cheating. I'm excited to know more about Yeon-woo in this version and see him flirt with Ji Na...
Regarding the adaptation to Korean culture, I'm anxious to see some more cases and see how they go. On the other hand, I've always thought corporate intrigues in kdramas to be boring and too simple, so I'm scared this show will repeat all those cliches and we won't get that high-stakes feel that the American version did sooo well. Let's have faith in the writer because, right now, this show is the only one that interests me besides Live. It isn't the best season for dramas right now...

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This drama is starting to take its own shape, I think. Hopefully in the future episodes they will develop the female characters more, since from what I've seen in these first two episodes, the ladies of Suits Korea are downplayed severely compared to their U.S counterparts, especially Jina (Rachel).

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After watching both eps at once, I'm convinced PHS chose the right role to flex his acting chops more. Mike from the original Suits is one of my fave TV characters, with many layers to his character. Really loving PHS' interpretation so far and can't wait to see how the rest of the series will pan out.

JDG is killing it as Harvey Specter and I actually think the way he plays the character (slightly toned down smartassery) fits in perfectly with this Korean remake.

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I loved the fact that Kang-seok used Yeon-wu's "You can't fire me" reason with Ha-yeon!

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Thanks for your first two recaps, Lollypip! I'm not watching K-SUITS at the moment, but it sure is a pleasure to read your take on it. I've missed your writing and sense of humor. It's good to be back. ;-)

I didn't watch the original version of SUITS, but you're severely tempting me to take a gander at this remake. LAWLESS LAWYER with Lee Joon-gi has been on my docket since it was announced, and I'm leery of going into attorney overload... so will try to stick to reading along for the nonce. But I might be fighting a losing battle after seeing that homage to Choi Han-gyul and his feisty grandma. ;-)

One of the things that made watching the remake of CRIMINAL MINDS a bummer for me -- aside from serial killer overload -- was the way Penelope Garcia's counterpart was watered down to technical incompetence, at least as far as I watched before dropping it. I've noted the reservations expressed here by other Beanies with regard to Ji-na. Here's hoping the distaff members of the team are portrayed as having every bit as much chops as the guys wearing the suits. Granted, this is only the second episode, and the cast and crew are still settling in. I'm keeping my fingers crossed for an excellent reinterpretation with all the uniquely Korean touches that make Kdramas so satisfying. Hwaiting!

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Aside to @marcusnyc20 Bong-soo,

Now see what you've done... finagled me on the first step down the primrose path to Kdrama madness. The rabbit hole can't be far. Heaven help me. LOL! ;-)

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Hi @pakalanapikake. It is good to see you over here. Welcome. Please stay.
Listen, we are only two episodes in. Early days. I happen to know that GRAND PRINCE is wrapping up this weekend. I think that will open up 4 hours on your "docket" (the 2 hours spent watching GP raw on Sat. and Sun. mornings and then the 2 hours for the subbed versions).
1. You are in the position like @lollypip and a lot of us who have not seen the original version so that we can watch and judge SUITS on its own merits;
2. From the little I have seen so far this part of Go Yeon-woo is a break out role for Park Hyung-sik;
3. In reference to 2 of your comments above, when PHS snuggled up with Grandma my reaction was
"Oh.. my ..word!" (I wonder how many texts Grandma got the day after that episode aired.)
Btw, the snuggling was in context-he needed a place to crash that night.); and
4. Have you seen Jang Dong-gun's work before?
This is the first drama I have seen him act in but I am very impressed.
I will leave it at that for now.

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@marcusnyc20 Bong-soo,

Thanks for rolling out the red carpet. I think. ;-)

Most of my reservations have to do with wanting to avoid Simultaneous Genre Overkill: two legal dramas might do me in. Live-watching TWO COPS and DOUBTFUL VICTORY led to unconsciously transplanting characters and plot points between the two shows. LOL.

GREAT SEDUCER is pau today, and SHOULD WE KISS FIRST has already wrapped, so I'm already getting more breathing room before GRAND PRINCE's finale. WOK OF LOVE / GREASY MELO premieres Mon., May 7. LAWLESS LAWYER kicks off on Sat., May 12. Ryu Deok-hwan returns to Kdramaland in MS. HAMMURABI on Mon., May 21. Ye gads! Not two, but three legal dramas. My goose is already nuked.

The only production I've seen Park Hyung-sik in is SHE WAS PRETTY, and I don't recall him. Must have been a cameo. Lollypip's pointer to his playing the younger version of Lee Jin-wook in NINE, however, is enticing, especially since it's from the team behind QUEEN IN-HYUN'S MAN, one of my all-time fave time-travel fantasies. Reading Javabeans's ep. 1 recap of NINE gave me some vibes of WILL YOU BE THERE?, a 2016 time-travel flick I enjoyed greatly. It sounds like one I would like. Will have to check it out.

I've never seen Jang Dong-gun in anything.

Thanks for the explanation that Yeon-woo was crashing at Grandma's for the night. Context is everything. ;-)

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I guess I am in the minority - not too big of a fan of Yeon-Woo's personality when comparing him to Mike (I really tried not to compare, but couldn't help it). Mike is a smart ass, sweet and has this innocent side to him and I don't see that in Yeon-Woo. He kind of comes off as rude and bored to me. And really don't like the hate vibe right off the bat with Ji-Na.

What's also throwing me off is the overall vibe with it having darker tones scenery wise as well as not being a 'busy' law firm (the associates, other lawyers, other divisions, etc.) with only a few people here and there at the firm.

I do like Kang-Seok , Ha-Yeon and Da-Ham - they are hitting good notes of Harvey, Jessica and Donna yet have their own charms as well with this version.

For what it is so far, it is keeping my attention and I will definitely keep watching cause I have been a Suits fan from the beginning so, I am very curious with how this will go.

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The reason you like Mike is the exact reason I don't like him that much and why I like Yeonwoo. There is no way at all that a person with Mike's dark past will be sweet, innocent and playful. No way. No person who have gone through what Mike have gone through will remain like that. This is the reason why I find Mike so unrealistic. I always criticize Mike before when watching Suit US because of this. I want him to be more stiff and angsty. The way it should be for a guy with photographic memory. Remember photographic memory is still a mental health issue but Mike never portray it as such. Which is why I like it a lot that Yeonwoo is more angsty. That is pretty stiff and like reading books when he talk about law etc. That is how a person with photographic memory should be.

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I think the reason why they sorta change korean mike's personality is because mike, as a character may not sit well to korean audience. And for me, yeon woo has a lot more innocent vibe in him compared to usa's mike.

I did enjoy suits usa because it is light and fun to watch but i am liking the korean version more because the story has more depth and because I am not annoyed at korean Mike's overbearing personality.
I also try not to compare but in this version, my opinion is suits usa's weaknesses were remedied here in the korean version.

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@mintiefresh You are not alone at all! Despite loving Hyung Sik as an actor, I also am not a huge fan of this portrayal. I did not like the bored angle to his character at all. It's so overused when it comes to 'genius' characters. At first I thought I was being harsh because Mike was my favourite character in the US version of Suits, but I went to re-watch the scene when Mike first meets Harvey and it confirmed what I thought. Mike was genius in a way that felt more natural - yes, he was repeating lines from books, but he wasn't a robot. Like he said in that first meeting, he remembers all this information because he first understands it. So he repeats as someone who's recalling information they stored, and not as some bored robot. That Mike was more spunky, alive and fun to watch.

And most importantly, I could understand why Mike was doing what he was doing. I find Yeon Woo's motivations not well spelled out at times. For example, he already knew he had to pay the hospice where his grandmother is staying, and yet he still got angry when Chul Soon asked him to take the drugs. But for some reason when the nurse tells him "you should feel sorry towards your grandmother" (paraphrasing) he goes to Chul Soon and accepts the deal. I don't think the progression towards that point was well done. You can't go from throwing away money because it's from a drug user (the scene with the CEO's son) to being part of a drug deal simply because of what the nurse said. If those words really hit him that hard, then they should have showed it better than just having him say "I may be young but opportunities don't come to me" (paraphrasing).

The fighting for the lawyer job also felt a bit iffy to me. I don't see at what point exactly this job became so important to Yeon Woo. In the US Suits, you could see the exact moment where Mike realised that although his drug plan was bust, he could still actually get something out of the situation when Harvey makes the off-hand remark that his firm should hire Mike - Mike's eyes go wide and he says "I'll take it". He's the one who grabbed on to the opportunity and showed Harvey he wouldn't regret hiring him. Mike fought to convince a reluctant Harvey. You could see how much he wanted(/needed) that job from the second that off-hand comment came out of Harvey's mouth. Here, Kang Seok is the one who first pretends to hire Yeon Woo, and then tells him it can't happen because he's not qualified, and then offers him the job again. Yeon Woo is only reactionary, accepting Kang Seok's offer and saying he'll redeem himself through this job. Yeon Woo says he's desperate to find a way back in - but they don't make this desperation very apparent. He doesn't have to give much arguments for Kang Seok to hire him despite his lack of qualifications. But yet suddenly the next morning Yeon Woo bargains for the position like his life depends on it. Again, it's like we're missing the progression. I don't...

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(Cont'd)...know, Yeon Woo's character just didn't come together all that well for me. I'm sad because I was looking forward to Yeon Woo the most as I absolutely love Park Hyung Sik and I really loved Mike as a character.

Also, I don't think Mike/Yeon Woo "has" to be broody. Not everyone reacts to situations in the same way. French-Canadian singer Corneille saw his family killed in front of him during the Rwandan genocide, but he's one of the most positive persons I've ever seen. And I don't think it's fair to say that the original Mike was unrealistic - he just coped in his own way, making his own kind of mistakes. Neither are unrealistic portrayals, they're just different portrayals.

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I am loving this show. It has a got a 'darker''sadder' tone overall, but somehow it really makes you get hooked.

I am liking Yeon Woo. He is one mysterious character and the truth about his parents death is going to come around soon. He seems to have taken a very wrong path in the past and his haunting past is coming to meet him in the present and that is going to a be a full ride.

I just wish they showed more of the legal stuff. The show doesnt have much of it going on as of yet. I want a full raw legal drama with good thrilling points.

PHS is nailing the role of a Yeon woo, who has so many different emotions/masks shown to different people. This is his best character so far.

BTW. i like his best friend's GF with him than JiNa. They seem to have such a great chemistry together, though i know they wont end together.

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As excellent as Yeon-woo is at memorizing, he seems lack the ability to anticipate. This is certainly a concern given who else is in close proximity.

We have the friend/roommate Chul-soon who seems to be in over his head, involved with drug dealers and who knows what else and at the office there's goldfish lawyer, Geun-sik. Put these two characters in desperate enough situations, and granted, Chul-soon is in a pretty desperate one now, and who knows what they're bound to do. ..... Geun-sik strikes me as someone who'd take it upon himself to do some digging on Yeon-woo, which certainly wouldn't lead to anything good if he catches Yeon-woo off guard. Yeon-woo should beware.

Finally, there's the druggie chaebol son who just got arrested. Of course it may not happen, but it's possible we haven't heard the last of him. He's bound to be bitter, so he may return and just cause more havoc. Yeon-woo should keep this in mind.

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Part 1 of 2 – Beware Rampant Speculation.

@korfan,

You raise very good points about the disadvantages that may lead to Yeon-woo's downfall.

Eidetic ("photographic") memory may give him a leg up on gathering data, but he still has to sift through it. It doesn't necessarily help him at pattern recognition, particularly when it comes to other people's behavior. Even if he carries a law library around in his head, that's just the letter of the law, and not its spirit, interpretation, or application in real life.

Yeon-woo's failure to recognize that he was being set up by vengeful druggie Joon-pyo was surprising, given what he already knew of the druggie's habit and nasty temperament. On the other hand, that also speaks to his (too) trusting nature. He strikes me as still being a babe in the woods, unlike boss Kang-seok, who has undoubtedly seen the worst of human nature during his years in the profession. He needs to cultivate a healthy sense of skepticism if not unvarnished suspicion, and the ability to look below the surface and read between the lines. His own motives may be honest and honorable (despite his desperate actions to survive), but he seems to assume the same is true of others. It is a dangerously false assumption.

Yeon-woo was also caught short when the witness in the sexual harassment case was being deposed. It seems that he hadn't gotten enough background information from her, and failed to ask the right probing questions. Frankly, I was surprised that the assailant was allowed to be present at the deposition. It struck me as a form of witness intimidation. And it wasn't being done in court, was it? I expected her statements to first be taken at the firm and then ripped apart by the plaintiff's lawyers before her testimony was admitted in court. Was this Kang-seok's way of putting the young pup in his place -- and possibly giving the slimy assailant and his counsel a false sense of security? But it came at the cost of the witness's reputation and personhood – and willingness to testify. It was a brutal way to invalidate her as a witness.

Yeon-woo's assumption that he knew how she felt as a person who had been stomped on by the system was wildly off the mark. He empathy cost her dearly, just as his boss warned. I can only hope that he somehow wins the pro bono case, thus opening the door to a class-action suit that will successfully represent all the victims the assailant has harmed. Given current developments in the real world, that is not a pie-in-the-sky prospect.

- continued -

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Part 2 of 2 – Beware Rampant Speculation.

The sense I get is that Yeon-woo is too innocent and honest to be a lawyer, at least in the criminal sphere. He might be better off dealing in patent law.

I agree with the other troublesome issues you pointed out. Joon-pyo may well come back to haunt Yeon-woo. It will not be pretty. More worryingly, Yeon-woo is now on Goldfish Geun-sik's radar, through no fault of his own, but rather via guilt by association with the former's nemesis. I have a feeling that Yeon-woo will end up collateral damage in the rivalry between his boss and Lord Goldfish.

My biggest concern is Chul-soon. I have a hunch that the bad decision that has blighted Yeon-woo's life is his having made friends with Chul-soon back in kindergarten. His loyalty to his “friend” will be the death of him, if not the legal career of his dreams. In chasing after the almighty won, Chul-soon seems to be totally oblivious to the dangers of catering to the whims of unsavory clients. He himself doesn't seem to have anticipated that Joon-pyo had an ulterior motive for specifying that Yeon-woo make the delivery. He is not the sharpest pencil in the box

As we have seen, Chul-soon is the one who pushed Yeon-woo to take the bar exam in someone else's name in exchange for money. He's tried to help him survive economically, but at the cost of subverting the legal system and Yeon-woo's morals. Who knows what havoc that cheating, unqualified barristard (barrister + bastard = bastard lawyer) has wrought already? I'm sure that one of the things Yeon-woo knows he has to set right is ensuring that the person for who he took the bar exam is permanently disbarred, just as he himself will be. Maybe he will become a renowned jailhouse lawyer who successfully defends unjustly-imprisoned fellow inmates after he is framed and sent away for years for a crime he did not commit. I hope that scenario doesn't come to pass. Who's going to pay Halmoni's hospital bills?

PS: I suspect that the reason why Yeon-woo was exempt from military service was because he is the sole support of Grandma. When Ji-na retorted that there must be something wrong with him, and he evenly replied that there are many things wrong with him, I had to ruefully chuckle. He's too honest for his own good.

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I completely agree with what you've stated here. At this early point, I'm willing to give Yeon-woo a bit of a pass given that he's in, what we'd call, the learning stage of things. He's new at the office and he has to learn who's who, the office politics, case protocol, etc. But certainly, the sooner he picks up on things the better off he'll be and by extension, so will clients.

Speaking of clients, yes, the sexual harassment case highlighted everything you don't want your lawyer to be ---- unprepared. Yeon-woo's is our newbie in the story, but Kang-seok is our seasoned pro. I want to believe Kang-seok would have known how the deposition would possibly play out (possible questions, who would be present, venue, etc) and informed Yeon-woo. If this is a strategy, to falsely calm the assailant and as a teachable moment for Yeon-woo, Kang-seok better have something mighty good up his sleeve because it seems almost impossible to get that witness back for another go around. Who'd go back?

I also hope we get backstory on why Yeon-woo has stuck with Chul-soon for so long. Maybe early on Chul-soon was the one who paid for Grandmother's bills. Who knows.

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@korfan,

Oooh, I like how you think -- as usual. ;-)

That's a good point about Chul-soon possibly having paid Halmoni's hospital bills so far. I have a feeling that they've know each other since they were small kids. Maybe they were neighbors. Chul-soo has too much influence over him to be a casual acquaintance.

I'm still shaking my head over that "deposition." When you use a nuclear option, it's supposed to be against the opposition, not one of your own. Kang-seok looks like a truly loose cannon.

I really liked Yeon-woo's question to him: Why can't you be empathetic towards a client and also win.

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Thanks @lollypip for the recap. Looking forward to this week's episodes!

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Just finished watching ep. 2, and really enjoyed it. I haven't seen the original series, so I'm just going with the flow.

I suspect that the story behind Yeon-woo's broken wristwatch is that it was his Dad's, and got broken in the accident that killed his parents. That's what it feels like to me.

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Excellent. I am glad you were able to view the first two episodes.
Good point about the wristwatch. As @andy reminds above, so far we are seeing events in flashback (or at least I think we are).

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I'm happy to report that both installments were well-paced and held my attention. The characters are interesting, and will hopefully become even more so as we get to know them better. I like the tenor of the show, which feels Korean and not like "Gotham-on-the-Han."

The question in my mind is how we get to that scene in the prison, and what it leads to.

Exposition via flashback is indeed a typically Korean way of storytelling, as opposed to the linear, chronological manner that is more usual in the US. I think this will be fun to watch. ;-)

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I know you are pretty observant of detail.
Re: the second to last image above where Yeon-woo's chin is resting in the palm of his left hand.
Any idea what that is on the back of his wrist. Tattoo? I enlarged the image and it looks to me to be a bar code of sorts.

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I was also wondering whether that tattoo was significant. It wasn't in the original so I'm guessing there must be some backstory?

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@marcusnyc20 Bong-soo,

Thanks for the reminder. I had noticed that apparent barcode on the inside of Yeon-woo's left wrist. (And also that he looks like a younger version of LIVE's Bae Sung-woo aka Yang-chon. LOL!)

At first I thought it might be an ISBN number for a book, or an EAN barcode upon which the former are based. EANs are the ones that are widely used outside the USA. They both have the longer outside "guard bars." But there's blank space to the left of that final digit 2, which is odd. Hmm. A cursory scan of the various barcodes in use makes me think this is actually a bogus one. All of them have unbroken strings of numbers within the guard bars, while some have one additional check number outside the right margin. Something is fishy.

https://www.activebarcode.com/codes/

It's in such a visible location, unlike the impressive ink of ex-thug Ko Nan-gil in SWEET STRANGER AND ME. Or maybe it's normally concealed by the wristband of his watch with the broken crystal -- which I suspect was his father's. Oops. Methinks his watch was nearly cropped out of the screen cap. I think I can just barely see the edge of the watch at the lower margin of the picture. So much for that idea of concealment by watchband.

Why would a guy with an eidetic memory need such a thing? It might be an identifying mark of his own. A memorial to his parents? Or did Yeon-woo and Chul-soon get blood brother matching tattoos when they were young and stupid? And now that he's in a position to start working at a prestigious law firm, he's too broke to get it removed. One guess as to whose bright idea that would have been. ;-)

Dang, episode 3 has finished airing!

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Hi @pakalanapikake. Good stuff as always.
For a moment I thought it might have been a quick way for Yeon-woo to get through security into his office building.
However his office building doesn't have a gate system to enter through.
Sidebar (as they say in court) and a bit of thread: When CEO Ahn (PHS) in SWDBS (2017) made this move entering his company's offices it generated a lot of buzz:
https://favim.com/image/5175621/
That is a little treat for those not familiar with PHS.

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@marcusnyc20 Bong-soo May 2, 2018 at 10:48 AM

LOL at that GIF of CEO Ahn's flamboyant entrance.

One other possibility just occurred to me. Maybe it's a temporary scanner code for subjects in clinical trials of new pharmaceuticals or some such. He may have been desperate enough to do that, too. I recall seeing announcements for young male test subjects back when I was in college (which were not open to women of childbearing age).

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Liking what I see so far but still have some lingering reservations about the K-remake. Was a huge fan of Suits US but I'm trying to let the Korean characters be their own individuals.

Liking the main male leads and PHS is a-dork-able. lol Although he seems to be missing some social cues? Certainly, his character is more "innocent genius" than the "charming genius" of Mike Ross. (Mike Ross has this charm and confidence regardless of social situations that was magnetic on screen).

Will say that I'm not sold on the Korean female counterparts yet. Suits US female protagonists were arguably the best parts of Suits. Donna and Rachel were ICONIC. Ji-na and Da-ham will get their own developments and show their mettle as strong, confident women who excel at their jobs.

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I already watched this episode but I'm curious the meaning of serial code around Yeon-woo wrist. He hides it with his watch.

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That intrigues me also.

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I finally survived watching episode 2 but not before falling asleep halfway and then resume watching it.

As much as I love Park Hyung Sik to the moon and back, I am so sorry that I have to drop this show. The story not captivating enough and probably the show feels too sleek for my taste. Episode 1 was pretty good but down to episode 2, I feel totally disengaged.

See you in next drama, Hyung Sik.

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