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Suits: Episode 16 (Final)

The final episode of Suits is about as good as a finale can be, and is probably my favorite episode of the entire drama. Nothing is forgotten, and everything is wrapped up in a realistic, sometimes even melancholic, way, with no easy answers or quick fixes. But room is left for hope, and a future for the people at Kang & Ham… and maybe, if we’re lucky, even a second season.

EPISODE 16: “Life will not tell you where the destination is.”

Kang-seok arrives to visit Yeon-woo in jail, as Yeon-woo narrates: “Last night I had a dream. I dropped on the floor because I didn’t know where to go. That’s when you came to visit me.”

We back up to the day that Director Ham texts the entire firm that Yeon-woo never graduated high school. Kang-seok storms to Director Ham’s office, and Yeon-woo tries to stop him as everyone gathers to see what will happen. Kang-seok orders Yeon-woo to get out of there, and Yeon-woo starts to follow him, but he sees the anger in Geun-shik’s eyes and the confusion in Ji-na’s, so he turns and flees.

Director Ham taunts Kang-seok for failing to protect what he cares about. He says he kept his end of the promise by not sending Yeon-woo’s secret to Ha-yeon (just to everyone else). Kang-seok grabs a paperweight and slams it into the wall, and he growls to Director Ham that this was never his law firm, even for a second. Swiping everything off Director Ham’s desk, he storms out, while Yeon-woo leaves the building as quickly as possible.

Ha-yeon and Geun-shik find Kang-seok in his office, and Ha-yeon tells Kang-seok to turn in his resignation. He hands it to her immediately, having written it the day he hired Yeon-woo. He refuses to answer any more questions now that he no longer works for Kang & Ham, though he fibs that Da-ham didn’t know anything.

Ji-na is still stunned when she leaves for the day, and she meets with Yeon-woo so that he can explain. He says it’s true that he’s a fake, and that she’s the one he wanted to open up to the most, but he couldn’t.

He tells her that it kept him from being honest about his feelings for her, and she swallows a sob. He says he’s been working in a place he doesn’t belong with people very different from himself, and that he might even still be lying now.

Ji-na gasps that she can’t seem to forgive him, but when he says he understands, she says he doesn’t. She explains that she’s not angry because he’s a fake, or because he lied to her, but because he’s lying right now. She asks why he’s telling her everything now, when he’s never been honest with her before, and Yeon-woo says he’s sorry.

She tells him not to apologize, because she’s not ready to accept it yet. But she says she’ll wait, then she walks away.

Yeon-woo goes straight home and starts printing out everything that was on the USB file that David Kim gave to Kang-seok. He gets to work trying to figure out the connection between Kim & Jo offering Ha-yeon a merger, and Taeyang Law Firm taking over Kim & Jo’s cases, then goes to see Kang-seok.

The next day, Ha-yeon calls Kang-seok in and tells him that they managed to keep the partners from leaking anything. She thinks they need to report Yeon-woo, but Kang-seok says they should focus on saving the firm first. Geun-shik spits that if he cared about the firm, he wouldn’t have hired a fake in the first place.

Kang-seok asks angrily if they think Yeon-woo is to blame for what’s happening to the firm, and says that in fact, Yeon-woo is the reason the three of them came this far. Ha-yeon asks for proof that the merger is a trap, and Kang-seok starts to say that Yeon-woo is working on it, but Geun-shik snaps that he’s sick of hearing that name.

So Kang-seok says he’ll reveal everything at the partners’ meeting, and after that, they can do whatever they want. He grumbles that the firm will probably go down no matter what they do, and leaves.

Yeon-woo dresses in his suit, choosing to wear his father’s broken watch and taking with him the Joker card that Kang-seok once gave him. He stops to see Grandma, and he tells her that he’s going to study abroad for several years. She says she’s proud of him, and he tells her that he’s paid for her living expenses and to stay well until he comes home.

He tries to say that he’ll find them a nice house when he gets back, but he breaks down sobbing and confesses that he made a mistake. Grandma says that she already knows the hardships he’s gone through, and that she pretended not to know because she can only imagine the agony he’s been in all this time.

Yeon-woo apologizes, but Grandma wipes his tears and says that he can be hurt or have a broken heart, but that he needs to sort it out and start over. He lays his head in her lap and cries while she comforts him.

Yeon-woo stops on a bridge to look out over the river. He recalls what Kang-seok said on the day he hired him, when he gave him the Joker card: “That card, which is nothing at the moment, is you. Depending on your choices and effort, your card can turn into an ace or some meaningless number. It’s up to you to choose what kind of game and rules you’re going to play and follow.”

Kang-seok shows up at the partners’ meeting that’s been called to vote on the merger, and whether to fire Kang-seok. Ha-yeon allows him to speak first, and he passes out packets of information as he says that if they still want to vote on the merger after what he has to say, he’ll step down willingly.

He repeats what Yeon-woo told him last night — that Kim & Jo has had financial difficulties, and Taeyang Law Firm is in the process of buying them out. Kang-seok says that two years ago, Kim & Jo suffered a similar misfortune as Kang & Ham. Their plan is to merge with Kang & Ham, which will stop Taeyang’s acquisition and make Kang & Ham responsible for their financial issues.

Geun-shik asks why Kim & Jo would do that when Kang & Ham is also having financial problems. Kang-seok says that it’s because Kang & Ham’s financial standing is slightly better at the moment. He says that their original offer of a takeover was just a feint (because they couldn’t afford it), so that Kang & Ham would accept the merger when it was offered.

Ha-yeon looks ill as she remembers how Director Ham urged her to agree to the merger. Kang-seok repeats that if they merge, they’ll be financially responsible for Kim & Jo’s failing situation. Given that the financial information they released seemed to be so compatible with Kang & Ham’s, Yeon-woo guessed that someone inside leaked information.

Interestingly, Yeon-woo also learned that CEO Jo’s properties in Los Angeles have been transferred into Director Ham’s daughter’s name. Geun-shik asks if Director Ham would really give up his firm for a couple of houses, but Kang-seok says he never intended to regain control of Kang & Ham — he wanted to destroy it. Ha-yeon admits that if not for Yeon-woo, they wouldn’t have known about Director Ham’s plan in time to save the firm.

In flashback, we see Yeon-woo asking Kang-seok to take care of his grandmother. He says it’s too late, and that Kang-seok shouldn’t let him be his weakness anymore.

Ha-yeon asks the partners if they still want to vote on the merger and Kang-seok’s dismissal. Not one person speaks up, and Kang-seok says he has something else to say. He tells the partners that Yeon-woo isn’t a lawyer, and that he wasn’t even a good fake lawyer — he was too sympathetic, and sometimes even sided with the opposition.

But he also reminds them that Yeon-woo saved the firm twice, and they all nod agreement. Kang-seok asks them to acknowledge Yeon-woo as a colleague, and a real associate, and he requests that they let him defend Yeon-woo on behalf of Kang & Ham.

Ha-yeon calls for a vote, though she says that it must be unanimous. She asks who agrees with Kang-seok, and hands start to go up. Geun-shik sits with his arms crossed, but after a minute, he also raises his hand.

Standing on the bridge, Yeon-woo tosses the Joker card into the water, then walks to the police station and turns himself in. He requests a lawyer, but the prosecutor says that they received a report on him this morning, disqualifying him. Yeon-woo quotes that he’s still entitled to representation since he turned himself in, even though it was after a report was made.

The prosecutor is offended at being quoted the law by a dropout, and asks if Yeon-woo thinks he’s a lawyer just because he read some books. Yeon-woo retorts that he doesn’t have to prove he’s a lawyer — the prosecutor has to prove he’s a fake.

Even though he voted in favor, Geun-shik is concerned that Kang-seok will be prosecuted as Yeon-woo’s accomplice. Ha-yeon says that Kang-seok started this, so he’ll be the one to end it, but she orders him to back out if it hurts the firm in any way. On his way to see Yeon-woo, Kang-seok gets a message that worries him.

Meanwhile, Prosecutor Nam offers Yeon-woo a deal — probation, in exchange for his testimony that Kang-seok knowingly hired him as a lawyer. Yeon-woo knows that Kang-seok’s punishment would be severe, and Prosecutor Nam acknowledges that he’s smart.

Yeon-woo’s lawyer arrives, but it’s Geun-shik, not Kang-seok. Prosecutor Nam sneers that Kang-seok is distancing himself from Yeon-woo, and Geun-shik hisses at him. He tells Prosecutor Nam that he has 48 hours to question Yeon-woo, after which he’s taking Yeon-woo out of here. Yeon-woo asks where Kang-seok is, but Geun-shik just asks him to trust him for now.

Oh no… the message Kang-seok received is that Yeon-woo’s grandmother passed away. He identifies her body and holds her funeral, where Ji-na and Da-ham come to pay their respects. After two days, Geun-shik gets Yeon-woo released as promised, and takes him to the funeral.

Yeon-woo bows in respect, crying as he remembers Grandma’s promise not to die until he returns home. Later, Yeon-woo thanks Kang-seok for holding Grandma’s funeral when he couldn’t. Kang-seok just sighs, like he’s not sure what to say.

Ha-yeon confronts CEO Jo about her trickery and says she should have just asked for help, and CEO Jo says she would have if they hadn’t been in trouble. She goes down to see Ji-na, who asks what will happen now, but CEO Jo tells her to worry about herself. Ji-na nervously asks her mother to lunch tomorrow, and CEO Jo accepts.

Attorney Kim apologizes to Kang-seok for betraying him, and she asks why he chose to hire Yeon-woo. He simply says, “Because he’s different from you.” She sighs that if that’s how he saw her from the beginning, then there was never room for her. Kang-seok says that Yeon-woo turned himself in, and tells Attorney Kim to try making a different choice next time.

She packs up her things, and as she leaves, she finds Geun-shik waiting for her. He tells her not to forget that he acknowledged her as his associate, which means he’ll never abandon her. He asks her to be by his side when he eventually goes to war with Kang-seok.

On their way back to the police station, Kang-seok tells Yeon-woo that he’ll be sent to the prosecution to finish their investigation, then to prison. Kang-seok asks if Yeon-woo thought he was offering him a legitimate opportunity back when he hired him, but Yeon-woo replies that he knew it was dangerous and wrong, so Kang-seok asks why he accepted.

Yeon-woo says he wanted to be powerful so he could boast, even if it was fake. He says he wanted to show everyone he could make it, it was just that he was never given an opportunity. He adds wryly that considering where he is now, he wasn’t off to a good start.

Kang-seok says not to worry because he’s defending him, and he’ll keep him from going to prison. But Yeon-woo sees that he doesn’t look confident, and he tells Kang-seok that it’s okay, and that he doesn’t want to end as a coward. He says he wants to pay for his wrongdoings and not cause any damages to the firm, and he asks Kang-seok to grant his last request.

Kang-seok nods, and Yeon-woo holds out a fist, and Kang-seok finally, finally bumps it. Awww.

Kang-seok goes back to Yeon-woo’s desk at the firm, where the other cards he gave him, and Yeon-woo’s employee badge, are still on his desk. He finds the recruitment corruption pro bono case in a drawer, which was Yeon-woo’s last request.

Yeon-woo goes inside alone, and he tells Prosecutor Nam that he thought about his offer. He suggests a different offer, recalling the exact date that Prosecutor Nam took the bar exam. But then he says that Prosecutor Nam didn’t actually take the test that day — someone else took the test under his name. Oooh, this is the guy that Yeon-woo took the test for.

Yeon-woo grins and asks if Prosecutor Nam thinks this is a coincidence. He says that they’re meeting again today because they both made a mistake, and offers an agreement — that he’ll confess to what he did, if Prosecutor Nam promises not to touch Kang-seok or Kang & Ham… which is now named Choi & Kang.

Geun-shik leads a meeting regarding the fraudulent recruiting practices, which involved a rigged screening process that gave certain job applicants an advantage. The victims already lost the case due to lack of representation, but Kang-seok says the prosecutor’s office has agreed to retry the case. The Taeyang lawyers suggest that they could lose more clients if they pursue this case, but Ha-yeon says she doesn’t care if she loses all of them, and Geun-shik adds that when they win, the clients will return.

Director Ham is at the airport, preparing to leave the country, when Ha-yeon calls. She says that he’s been put under a flying ban, and that he’s not headed to Los Angeles, but to prison. Director Ham hangs up and stands in the middle of the airport, at a loss.

As Ji-ah studies at her desk, she sees Ha-yeon, Kang-seok, Geun-shik, and Da-ham heading out to Yeon-woo’s trial. She pushes Yeon-woo’s stuffed bunny face-down on the desk, but she’s lost her concentration. She flips to a page in her book where Yeon-woo wrote, “If you made it this far, you should know by now how much I like you,” and she jumps up to follow the others.

At Yeon-woo’s trial, Kang-seok allows Yeon-woo to make a final statement in his place. Yeon-woo stands and admits his wrongdoings, and doesn’t ask for a reduced sentence. He says:

There were many times when I felt lost in my life. And every time, I think I made the wrong decision. The whole reason I’m here at this moment is solely due to the decision I made, not because of the opportunity that was presented to me. My grandma said it takes time to become a decent man. That you can get hurt and become brokenhearted, but you need to give it time to sort it out and start over. I think today is an opportunity for me to undo what I’ve done wrong and start over.

The judge acknowledges that even without a license, Yeon-woo was superior to many who do have a license to practice law, and that he tried his best for his clients and appears to be sincerely repenting. But he says that doesn’t make it right that he impersonated a lawyer, and sentences Yeon-woo to two years in prison.

Time passes, and Choi & Kang wins the recruitment case. Kang-seok visits Yeon-woo in prison, and Yeon-woo tells him about a dream where he dropped to the floor, not knowing where to go. He says Kang-seok visited him and he asked why he chose him.

Handing Yeon-woo a sandwich from the toast cart, Kang-seok says that he knew everything at Kang & Ham would crumble down soon — not because of Director Ham, but because of everyone there, including himself. He says that none of them knew what pain is, so they didn’t understand the people around them.

He says they were all out for themselves, and didn’t know they had to protect each other in order to protect the firm. But he met Yeon-woo, who knew what pain was, and tried to understand the hearts of the victims before the cases themselves.

Yeon-woo asks why Kang-seok kept telling him not to be swayed by emotion. Kang-seok says that’s how Yeon-woo works, and he still doesn’t like it. He tells Yeon-woo that on the day of his interview, he was reading a book which said, “The awful things of the world that we’ve seen thus far, and the worse things that will happen in the future, aren’t caused because there’s an increase of rebels and untamed people in this world, but…”

He forgets what comes next, and Yeon-woo pipes up, “… because there’s an increase of gentle and submissive people.” He jokes that Kang-seok shouldn’t try to be like him if he can’t do it properly, and Kang-seok responds with his usual, “Are you crazy?” Heh.

He says that he knew Yeon-woo wouldn’t do things like the so-called elite lawyers, and that he wouldn’t blindly obey when something horrible happened. He knew Yeon-woo would understand others’ pain and wouldn’t back down, and would fight back in his own way. He says that he thought if they had someone like that, and he could protect that person, then the company might not crumble.

He says lightly that it’s not like he needed that person or anything, and Yeon-woo starts to say that this all sounds like something he said once, but Kang-seok interrupts, “I didn’t need that person! But you seemed a bit like that guy.” Suuure you didn’t need him, ya big marshmallow.

Grinning, Yeon-woo says it sounds like he’s saying Yeon-woo was like him, but Kang-seok denies it like always. He brags that he’s just good at reading people, and Yeon-woo wants to know what he thinks of him. Kang-seok says that he broke the law so they can’t say he did well, and Yeon-woo huffs indignantly.

Kang-seok takes out his deck of cards and spreads them out, and Yeon-woo is all, “Don’t do that! Everyone hates that!” LOL. Kang-seok orders him to choose which card he wants to be, but instead, Yeon-woo says he wants to be the one holding the cards and shaking up the game. Kang-seok gapes, remembering that he once said exactly the same thing, but he tells Yeon-woo, “NO, you are not me. You’ll never be like me.”

After two years, Yeon-woo is released, and Kang-seok is there to pick him up. He holds out a fist for Yeon-woo to bump, and Yeon-woo reaches out… and pushes Kang-seok’s hand down. HA, got him.

He trots out to Kang-seok’s car, asking where they’re going. Kang-seok narrates, “Life will not tell you where the destination is,” and Yeon-woo finishes, “Therefore, what changes your life isn’t coincidence, but your choice.”

COMMENTS

Who would have thought that a simple fistbump could say so many things? Yeon-woo used it throughout the show to ask Kang-seok, “Acknowledge me,” and “Support me,” and “Believe in me.” Kang-seok withheld when he couldn’t say those things to Yeon-woo, but when he finally responded, I think he was telling Yeon-woo all of those things and more. And I love that Yeon-woo got to turn the tables on Kang-seok, as if they were starting over from the beginning and a fistbump is again something to be earned. I like that in the end, it symbolized a new beginning with new parameters for Kang-seok and Yeon-woo, and that now they can go forward on more equal footing.

I loved the way this drama ended, with a lot of hope for the future, but no pretty bows and promises of happily-ever-afters. It felt true to life and realistic, and human in a way that I hoped for but was afraid to expect. I even liked that there was a bittersweet feel to the final episode, as if to underline the fact that even though things turned out in Kang-seok and Yeon-woo’s favor, it wasn’t without sacrifices and hardships. And I appreciate that there were very few loose ends left dangling… even the bar exam that Yeon-woo took for someone else came around to benefit him in the end.

I even liked that, while the people at Kang & Ham (or I should say, Choi & Kang) found a better focus, a lot of things didn’t change. I started out assuming that Kang-seok and Yeon-woo would change each other, each making the other less extreme, but in the end they are still mostly the same people as when they started out. Kang-seok is still rigid and unwilling to admit when he’s wrong, and Yeon-woo is still starry-eyed and idealistic, and neither seems likely to be any different in the future. What changed was their relationship, and how they grew to appreciate and respect each other for their differences, even though it’s true that deep down, they’re very much the same.

Yeon-woo did change in one significant way, though I think it was not so much from Kang-seok’s influence as it was from the clients and opponents he worked with. He started out wanting to be a lawyer to right a wrong — the wrong that was done to him and his grandmother when his parents died, and the lawyer pressured them into putting a price on his parents’ lives. Yeon-woo wanted to prove to himself that he could be a lawyer but not become corrupted in that way, and I think he accomplished that.

But I also think that Yeon-woo learned that being a lawyer isn’t about always doing the right thing, but about doing the best he can within the law. That’s why he turned himself in — because he realized that doing his best for his clients didn’t mean much when he was breaking the law in the process. I believe that Yeon-woo’s change was that he learned to respect the law, when before, he always looked on it with contempt for allowing people to be treated the way he and Grandma were all those years ago. It went from something to be conquered and proven wrong, to something to be upheld and respected.

All in all, a solid ending from a solid show. I don’t think law dramas will ever be my cup of tea, but Suits is one of the better ones I’ve seen, which I think owes to the fact that it never forgot that its characters were the show’s heart and soul. There were interesting cases and exciting inter-office machinations, but the show always kept its focus on how these things affected the characters themselves. I really think it’s that simple, and that the show stands on its own without detailed analysis… it and its characters are just solid and real, and that’s all there is to it.

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I demand a second season! And I like that it ended like we’d get a new one.. i really hope it’ll happen!

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Thank you, LollyPip, for a lovely recap and summation for SUITS.

As I had hoped, we finally learned the identity of the party for whom Yeon-woo sat the bar exam. How cosmic that it was a prosecutor of all people. Knowing him, he tracked the guy down to his current assignment and turned himself in at the appropriate precinct -- specifically so he would be dealing with the cheater. Im Do-gyoo's cameo as the hypocritical prosecutor follows his appearance as Jang Hyuk's sleazy chaebol nephew in MONEY FLOWER.

I liked how Yeon-woo remained true to himself and faced the music as soon as he ensured the survival of Choi & Kang & Ham. His heart-to-heart with Grandma was truly touching. I'm glad he got to see her before surrendering. Her statement that it takes time to grow into a decent human being was just what he needed to hear. I was dismayed by her death, but concluded that it was for the best. She wasn't going to miraculously get younger. And without her hospital bills, Yeon-woo was relieved of the financial pressure that prompted him to work as a fake lawyer in the first place.

Before Yeon-woo trundled off to the hoosegow, however, he engineered a successful defense of the firm, in the process revealing Director Ham's fingerprints all over the Kim & Jo merger plan. I was surprised that Ha-yeon, who had formerly been so on the ball, had been hornswoggled by Ham into buying into the merger.

When I think back to the drama's premiere, with Yeon-woo hanging out with his drug-dealing "friend," and consider how much progress he's made since crossing paths with Kang-seok on that fateful day, I'm pleased with his character arc. His essential nature has not changed, and neither has Kang-seok's. Nor anyone else's -- although I was glad to see Lord Goldfish vote to defend the fake associate. If the drama continued, it wouldn't surprise me to discover that Geun-sik is really a marshmallow in disguise, which is hinted at by his conversations with goldfish Ninette.

All in all, I enjoyed SUITS much more than I expected to, being as it's a tale about lawyers. I suspect that marinating the characters and plot in Kdrama Special Sauce is what made it so appealing to me.

Thanks again, LollyPip, for recapping. As always, reading your articles gave me insight into the show that I would have missed on my own. Your wit and humor enhanced an enjoyable drama. Thanks to my fellow Beanies for high-caliber discussion, too! ;-)

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Very nice summary @pakalanapikake. I concur.
(You pointed out several times that "who" Yeon-woo took the bar exam for at the beginning would come into the story and it did.)

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Thank you, @marcusnyc20 Bong-soo.

The ending worked for me, and was relaxed. And after all this time, we found out who he took the bar exam for. That has been bugging me since it appeared on screen. Of course, it had to be a highfalutin' prosecutor who cheated. Oh the humanity! ;-)

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Wow PakalanaPikake, I've learned some new words here from this post of yours - now I need to figure out when and where to use hoosegow and hornswoggled so that my listeners get gobsmacked. That is, if I can still remember the existence of this two words in my vocabulary :D

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@bizzybody,

Thank you for your kind words. ;-)

I'm pleased as punch to meet a fellow aficionado / aficionada of superannuated vocabulary. There are so many wonderful words that deserve to be dusted off and put back into active circulation. This is my humble attempt at recycling marvelous low-tech verbiage.

A few vocabulary tips for your edification:

Hornswoggle was Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day on 01/04/2018. What a surprise.
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hornswoggle

Proofreader's / Copy Editor's Note: The M-W Collegiate Dictionary is a standard reference in publishing in the USA, along with the Chicago Manual of Style. (The last time I checked, which was about 14 years ago.)

I think I was in 4th grade when I received a paperback Roget's Thesaurus for Christmas. I loved reading it, especially for slang. I used to laugh my butt off at some of the colorful phrases.

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Thanks @LollyPip for a great recap and review. I can wholeheartedly agree with you. I thought at first that we'd have an ending with many loose ends, but the series has been tied up rather neatly, with the right kind of open-ending that does not annoy a viewer.

The core of this show was whether Yeon Woo would be able to make good use of the opportunity that he had been given, and the heart of it was the relationship between Kang Seok and Yeon Woo. That both the core and the heart are amply resolved, makes this a great show or a good show with a great ending.

I also agree that this was a really solid show. It didn't aim to make any particular statement of great moment or give us convoluted conflict, but remained focused on consistent 'realistic' reactions and responses of the characters, that moved the plot along at a comfortable pace.

The fist bump and almost fist bump got me laughing out loud. I liked what you say about it being a symbol of acknowledgement and support.

“Acknowledge me,” and “Support me,” and “Believe in me.” Kang-seok withheld when he couldn’t say those things to Yeon-woo, but when he finally responded, I think he was telling Yeon-woo all of those things and more. And I love that Yeon-woo got to turn the tables on Kang-seok, as if they were starting over from the beginning and a fistbump is again something to be earned. I like that in the end, it symbolized a new beginning with new parameters for Kang-seok and Yeon-woo, and that now they can go forward on more equal footing.

- so true, and therefore... if there's any going forward to do, there really should be another season!!! 😆

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season 2 please!! PD-nim, writer-nim lets make this happen!

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Thank you LollyPip for recapping this show ! That was greatly appreciated.

I haven't watched the original show , and although I couldn't always follow all the legal jargon and stuff, I did enjoy it.

The final was good despite the fact I was saddened by Grandma's death and the fact I was wondering about the following:
-- what will YW do now ? Will be go back to study ? Will he keep working in the law industry?
-- will YW and JN get back together? I'd think so but ... will they ?
-- is KS going to pursue DH now, or will their relationship remain as it is ?
-- what happened to Se-Hee ?
-- wasn't there a young woman whom KS tasked of finding some information? She was in the early episodes. Or am I confusing this show with another? Just wondering why Show didn't use her character anymore (probably because YW is able to do the same research?)

I wouldn't mind a second season with the same leading actors!

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KS still ask a favor to the informan woman in some episodes, the one when KS ask about Director Ham bank account. He talked to the phone and her name is jaehee, just didn't show on screen

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Thank you for the recaps, I enjoyed reading your recap from episode 1 till now. Always waiting your suits recap every week.

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This was the best episode of the season for me!!! So I am glad it ended well.

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I liked the American Suits but I really enjoyed the korean one, so different because there are no drugs and another relationship between elder and younger people.
Yeonwoo, who unlike Mike didn’t do drugs, was lonely due to his photographic memory and suffered being a circus freak to his so-called friend, whom he spoke harshly, although he needed him to get jobs. Except when he was drunk with Bewhy, he only let off steam in the car park and to a lesser extent on his bicycle. The tone of his voice was so different and soft with his beloved sick grandmother.
I really appreciated his growth first by listening and observing the unknown world at Kang & Ham, then using his memory to seize it and finally save it, being eventually an open and smiling person after he decided to be reborn through jail time and having now not only a mentor but a great friend or big brother.
It was also a pleasure to see Kangseo rediscovering his old self and being more human through the process.
I really liked Jang Dong Gun’s acting but Park Hyung Sik was really pretty impressive. His acting was like an impressionist painting with small brush strokes and it was wonderful to see how Yeonwoo had taken hold of him.
There are so few comments. Don’t be blind, like Yeonwoo remove Kairos’ blindfold to dispel prejudices and watch this drama not as a legal drama, not as a remake but as a drama portraying the growth of a man and a beautiful bromance.

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Hear, hear!

...watch this drama not as a legal drama, not as a remake but as a drama portraying the growth of a man and a beautiful bromance.

IMHO, this drama is best watched as a character study of people who work at a law firm, just as LIVE is a character study of people who work in law enforcement.

Holding onto one's humanity in an environment of powermongering, materialistic competition, and egos running amok is a tall order. Using one's talents to constructively help others -- be they organizations or individuals -- is a far cry from vainly strutting one's intellectual stuff.

I think the best lesson imparted in the course of the drama was voiced in Grandma's final conversation with Yeon-woo:

... he can be hurt or have a broken heart, but ... he needs to sort it out and start over.

After years of scrabbling and scrambling to make a living, Yeon-woo will now have time and space to mindfully consider his next steps. Being benched for 2 years will give him opportunity to earn his GED, and maybe take some continuing education courses. Those are luxuries for which he never had time. For him, jail time has a silver lining if he chooses to regard it as such.

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Beautifully said...
I didn't watch the American Suits but after watching the Korean version, was curious to check it out. After 1 episode, I don't think I'm going to continue and rather wait for Season 2 of Korean Suits (if I wish hard enough, I'm sure it'll come true).

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Grandma 😭😭😭

I agree, this was one of the best final episodes I've seen. I'm always bracing myself for a disappointing ending, but this one was great, probably because they focused so much on the bromance. I would love a second season also.

Thanks even more than usual to our lovely LollyPip, who took the time and effort to explain this drama to me so that I could properly enjoy it. Thank you!

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“The awful things of the world that we’ve seen thus far, and the worse things that will happen in the future, aren’t caused because there’s an increase of rebels and untamed people in this world, but
… because there’s an increase of gentle and submissive people.”

Well, I'm not sure what to take away from that.

LollyPip, thank you so much for recapping Suits. I joined late due to the difficulty of finding a way to watch it and never caught up to comment as you went along. The recaps really helped me understand what the heck was going on because it wasn't always easy. Sometimes one must persevere to enjoy 16 hours of PHS and I appreciate the help 😉

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@bbstl,

My understanding of that quote you cited at the beginning of your post is this:

Gentle, submissive people contribute to the awful things that happen in the world when they do not oppose and resist them, but follow orders and "go along to get along." I think the following quote from Reverend Charles F. Aked is germane to the discussion:

...It has been said that for evil men to accomplish their purpose it is only necessary that good men should do nothing.(2)

(2) https://quoteinvestigator.com/2010/12/04/good-men-do/#note-1664-2

Just my $0.02, but when viewed from that perspective, it made sense to me. ;-)

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That seems an entirely valid interpretation. How much of the evil in the world today could be stopped if good people stopped being submissive and only talking about what they disagree with, and started taking action?

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Thank you and yes, I agree with the interpretation. What's really bothering me is that I'm taking it personally. A lot of us have made efforts that the world become a gentler and more peaceable place, or at least that we ourselves manage to do so. Sigh. And whatever "side" of today's issues you stand on, you think the other side are the bad guys. So we all think we are the 'gentle and submissive' ones who now need to become 'rebels and untamed people'.

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@bbstl, @echidnaofparadise,

I'm pondering Kang-seok's quotation further, but am too tired to think straight at this time. Will have to continue later. ;-)

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We don't have to 😘. My head hurts from it all, every dang day. It's really because I applied it so personally. 💐For you, my dear.

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I think this is one of the kdrama series that i look forward for the 2nd season. But i want the same actors and actresses!

Kudos to all the Suits korean team for the solid episodes from the start till the end.

Thank you @lollypip for the recaps :)

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A few random thought at the conclusion of SUITS. As I said before I would never had made it as a lawyer.
1. I really enjoyed this drama. It was well written with a terrific ensemble cast. I made a quick look but could not find out anything about writer Kim Jung-min;
2. Episode 16 was an excellent final episode. It also had the highest AGB Nielson Nationwide rating for the series (10.7%). About half way through it's run I thought the drama could use a couple of extra episodes but now I think it finished perfectly;
3. I loved Yeon-woo's scenes with Grandma. Park Hyung-sik and Ye Soon-jung acted so natural together. They were just beautiful together. The final scene of them together where YW breaks down was heart-wrenching. YW had held everything in for so long;
4. This was only the third drama I have seen Park Hyung-sik in after HWARANG and STRONG WOMEN DO BONG-SOON but I think this was the best performance I have seen him give;
4. This was my first Jang Dong-gun drama and I was really impressed with his performance. I hope to see more of his work;
5. I did not see the original version of SUITS but I think everyone involved in this production can be proud; and
6. Thanks again @lollypip for recapping every episode and to the loyal beanies who stayed with SUITS to the end.

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#3 and #4 - Yes, totally. That scene was amazing, and Hyungshik was really good.

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Thank you LollyPip! Very nice recap and closing comments. Not often that I'm looking forward to a second season but this is it. While most loose ends are covered it kinda provide continuation as well.
My only gripe is all the assumptions I made - most were not accurate hahaha... Apparently the twin Kim's were not as evil as I thought they'd be.
I've also never thought that the prosecutor who's going to be in charge of Yeonwoo is the one he took the exam for. Now I'm curious if Prosecutor Nam being assigned the case is somehow planned (and we get to know this via flashbacks only in Season 2, if there is one).

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I had the same question @bizzybody ... I was thinking it was too much of a coincidence that the prosecutor was the very one YW had taken the exam for. YW was very confident from the very beginning of his interrogation, ... perhaps he knew which prosecutor would be assigned to him. 😉

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I bet that Yeon-woo looked the guy up on the Prosecutor's Office website and surrendered to whichever precinct he was assigned to.

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@PakalanaPikake
Yup, I saw your comment above that said this too... but I was wondering if he might even have pulled some strings that got that particular prosecutor to take on his case. :)

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I definitely want a second season!

KS was totally right about YW being a terrible lawyer. To law school with you, YW, for polishing and training! ;D GS has some marshmallow (or some other soft substance) at his core, I know it. He hides it well, but it's there, and he gave us a glimpse in this episode. I *loved* his hiss at the prosecutor. Hee! I still think he's a tool, but not an entirely irredeemable one. There may be hope for him, but he needs to remove his lips of HY's ass and put as much effort into improving himself as a lawyer as he does on trying to undermine KS/whining to HY and harassing her about KS.

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Yes, Lord Goldfish's hiss was timed just right.

And I agree that he's not yet beyond the pale. Geun-sik does have his good points. It's just that they're obscured by his inferiority complex.

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The show ended really well, and I must say that the bromance was more central in the Korean version than the 7 season long original - (i) it was Kang-seok who informed & who was there for Yeon-woo when his granny passed on, (ii) it was Kang-seok who saw Yeon-woo out from the prison. These two stark differences compared to the US version has made smiling like a fool :)

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Has me smiling like a fool*

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But to be fair the American version also focused on other relationships between them. Harvey and Jessica, and Donna and Louis is one of my favorites. I actually like more this way.
The American version focused a lot on bromance in the first two seasons.

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First and foremost, many thanks to LollyPip for recapping this from beginning to end. Really enjoyed reading your comments and observations.

Between Kang-seok's self-assuredness and Yeon-woo's idealism, not to mention Yeon-woo's precarious employment situation, you constantly wondered if today was going to be the day it all came crumbling down for both of them. Luckily, we were treated to a story of two individuals who, you could say started out as mentor and mentee, but ended up forging a friendship that will most likely last for the rest of their lives.

Also a treat was watching the cast of other characters who inhabited the law firm and who showcased very real human behaviors. From Da-ham's unwavering loyalty, to Geun-shik's need for professional recognition, to Director Ham's no holds barred underhandedness. We saw the good, the believable and the bad.

I never saw the original series so I went in having no preconceived notions about it. I have no idea if it held up better or worse. What I do know is that I enjoyed this show and wouldn't mind if in the future we could have another opportunity to revisit these characters to find out what decisions they made for themselves.

Finally, I want to also send out a big thank you to all our fellow Beanies who participated in the comments for this show. I really enjoyed participating with you as well as reading your comments and insights. All of you made it so much fun!!

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Thanks @korfan for the nice wrap up. Like you I was unfamiliar with the original series but I would also like to stay in touch with these characters.

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@marcusnyc20 Bong-soo and @korfan,

I'm with you guys. I didn't watch the original US show, but have grown to love these characters. I know that second seasons rarely are made for Kdramas, and when they are, they often just aren't the same. Much as I'd love to see what happens in the future, I think I'll just have to compose that fanfic in the back of my own mind.

In the mean time, I'm just glad that Yeon-woo made good on his debt to society and now has a clean slate.

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I DEMAND A SECOND SEASON I WANNA SEE JINAH AND YEON WOO TOGETHER AND MISS HONG AND KANG SEOK

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dear LollyPip, thank you so much for your professionally written recaps: excellent review of this Suits ... simply excellent!

looking forward to follow your recaps, LollyPip 🌹

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Such a good drama. Like there's no other word to describe it. Simply love love love it! Season 2,please show?

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I enjoyed the show tremendously. It is like Descendants of the sun, a show that I can watch again and again. It has the right ingredients - great actors in Jang the mentor and Hyungsik as the illegal lawyer, the bromance btw them as reflected in the fist " challenge " the tug of war in emotions btw Hyungsik and his love interest and his touching relationship with his grandmother. His "swagger as typical of a yg brilliant Arrogant tho untrained lawyer makes him interesting and humanise him. As he said at the end - he wanted to feel great so he took the chance however wrong
At the end his integrity stood out -- it was so charming to see the 2 lawyers" fighting " over the sandwich and the fist move. Far far better than the Original Suits

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Where can one watch this in US?
How and what app?

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