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Average user rating 4.6
92

Come Here and Hug Me: Episodes 21-24

Now that our leads have had their small bit of happiness, it’s Dad’s turn to be very pleased. It means more unpleasantness for our leads, but we’re not here for the happy things, are we? We’re here for a good fight and shifting loyalties and guilt-torn characters (and a certain brother’s redemption arc)–all stuff that the show sets the stage for with this week’s twists.

(Note on names: the show switches between Jae-yi/Nak-won and Do-jin/Na-moo often, depending on the speaker and how they feel. We’ll stick to using Jae-yi and Do-jin for the adult counterparts and only switch to Nak-won and Na-moo when the name change is relevant to the scene.)

EPISODES 21-24 WEECAP

The dashboard clock ticks down to 12 midnight (fixed by the production team!), ending Do-jin and Jae-yi’s date. Jae-yi closes her eyes as Do-jin leans in for a kiss… and chickens out, leaning on her shoulder instead. Jong-hyun’s phone call breaks the awkwardness as he tells Do-jin to take time off work. The station is swarming with reporters because of Park Hee-young’s theory that Na-moo has his father’s violent streak.

After Do-jin drops Jae-yi off at home, she gathers the courage to open Yoon Hee-jae’s letter sent from jail. In it, he acknowledges that he ruined her lovely family and tells her that the best way to get back at him is to live her life well. Jae-yi remembers Do-jin’s request to use him if she needs something. Meanwhile, Do-jin thinks of the similar promise they made in their childhood: for him to come to Nak-won if life is too difficult. He turns the car around and reaches her house just as Jae-yi is leaving to go to him.

As soon as he’s inside, he tells her what we’ve known for the past twenty episodes: that seeing her kills him with guilt, but not seeing her drives him crazy because he likes her so much. Jae-yi kisses him before answering that she likes him too. They kiss some more and move on to her bed where they lie down fully-clothed, just staring at each other. Jae-yi makes him promise to say sorry whenever he’s feeling guilty so she can assure him right away that she’s fine and she likes him over and over.

While all that sweet staring is happening, we switch to a frantic Hyun-moo with blood on his sneakers. He ends up in front of Mom’s shop again. This time, Mom is there to talk to him. He scolds her for working very late (she’s been waiting for you, fool!). Mom realizes that he’s been watching her all along. She begs him to surrender and pay for his crimes, promising to wait for him to get out of prison again. As usual, he pushes the tempting offer away. He just wanted to check that she, So-jin, and “Na-moo, that jerk” are safe. Mom’s safety now comes before his loyalty to Dad as he tells her to stay close to Chief Go and report this visit so they’ll assign more cops around her.

Do-jin ignores Jong-hyun’s warnings to hide and is greeted by Reporter Han at the station with her usual “Park Hee-young wronged you, why not work with me to write a defense?” tack. He isn’t interested but the traitor informant sunbae (KANG NAM-GIL) takes note of Han’s offer.

Jae-yi is back to auditioning for side roles when her image takes a hit from the news. After the director passes her, he fishes for gossip while pretending to be concerned that the scandal (she’s dating her parents’ murderer’s son) can’t be true, right? Jae-yi readily answers, “It’s not… a scandal,” before cheerfully excusing herself. Manager Pyo begs his charge to act less happy in public. Her story is all over the news and people are calling Do-jin “Dojin Gamrae” (a play on gojin gamrae meaning bittersweet/pain before pleasure). Jae-yi snickers at the pun and speedwalks away from poor Pyo who speedwalks to keep up and put a lid on this indecent happiness.

Do-jin’s team impresses me with how competent they are as they compare the victims of the hammer attacks. They figure out that the first non-fatal one was by Hyun-moo while the actual deaths and Jae-yi’s Christmas surprise were committed by a different guy. They also conclude that the two are working separately. Knowing that Christmas Guy could only have heard the details from Dad, Do-jin directs his colleagues to check Dad’s inmates and cross-reference with psych evaluations and residents of their jurisdiction.

Moo-won is getting warmer too. He’s narrowed down a list of inmates including Lee Seung-woo and asks his detective to track down the members of Yoon Hee-jae’s fansite. Meanwhile, he’s off to interview the idol murderer in the flesh for the Park Hee-young vs Yoon Hee-jae assault case.

Dad recognizes Moo-won’s name and keeps derailing the investigation by “feeling sorry” for the prosecutor who lost his biological parents in a tragedy before losing his adoptive ones to him. Moo-won “feels sorry” for Dad too: he was betrayed and beaten by his sixteen year-old son whom he trusted so much. Dad denies Park’s story, claiming a parent won’t hurt his kid and vice versa. Moo-won says he’s not a parent but a monster, which Dad points out is better than having no parents at all. Ouch. Also, I beg to differ.

He gets under Moo-won’s skin by asking who’s gonna die from his bad luck this time. He blames his laxness as an oppa for Nak-won and Na-moo’s relationship, playing on Moo-won’s fear that Na-moo is dangerous. Moo-won loses it at the mention of his sister’s name. He hauls Yoon Hee-jae up and slams him against the wall, threatening to kill him and his favorite son if he hurts Nak-won. Cops enter to break up the fight and let Moo-won know that Park Hee-young was found dead in her apartment (Oh no! It’s final?!). Dad leaves with a smug smile and the observation that Moo-won is also dangerous–he should stay away from his sister too.

Watch the video

Stay away from my sister

 
Do-jin is currently nearby. He’s out on the steps apologizing to Chief Go who’s subject to an inquiry for covering up Na-moo’s attack on Dad. Chief assures him that he’ll be fine. He did it for Do-jin and Mom who showed him there are still good people in the world when he was losing hope in mankind.

Dad’s prison transport passes by during this heartwarming moment. At first he lights up to see Do-jin in the flesh, even from afar, but his eyes turn murderous to see Do-jin smile while Chief Go ruffles his hair. Dad remembers Na-moo resenting the fact that his father is a monster, and I’m very worried for Chief right now even if there are three guards, safety windows, and handcuffs between him and Dad.

Do-jin gets a call about Park Hee-young’s death and heads over to her house. He sees the discarded hammer and the partially burnt rug and figures out that it’s a copycat crime of Yoon Hee-jae’s. Traitor sunbae Nam-gil rummages through Park’s desk until he finds a recording pen which he secretly pockets. He then joins the team as they watch the CCTV and mark two suspects matching Hyun-moo’s and Seung-woo’s profiles entering the apartment the previous night.

If you’ve ever wished for Hyun-moo’s redemption, now’s the time to cross your fingers as he hunkers down at a PC room to watch a hidden camera video of that night, the contents of which we see as a flashback.

Park fearlessly lets Hyun-moo into her home. She turns on the recording pen and hides it in her desk, angling for an exclusive. The doorbell rings to interrupt the unfriendly chat and Hyun-moo accuses her of reporting him to the cops. She rolls her eyes at the idea that she cares about a murderer’s capture when there’s a scoop at stake. Yeah, Hyun-moo, don’t you know she has no soul?

She makes sure Hyun-moo is safely hidden before moving towards the door, but the keypad lock starts beeping before she can reach it. The passcode works and the knob turns and in comes Seung-woo who only has time for one jolly greeting before he hits her with a hammer.

Hyun-moo listens as Seung-woo drags Park towards her stalker wall. Seung-woo announces that she’s outlived her use and caused trouble. Now Dad wants her dead. She fires questions at him while looking towards the door hiding Hyun-moo. I’m screaming for Hyun-moo to come out or call the cops or something, but he only listens as Park grasps at Seung-woo’s adulation of Dad, offering to make him famous too. Seung-woo demurs since he’s more interested in actual killing, emphasized by bashing Park’s head in a couple of times. Hyun-moo finally jumps out at that, but it’s too late.

Hyun-moo stops watching the video in the present. Meanwhile, Do-jin figures out the following: one of the suspects entered with Park Hee-young before hiding in the closet. The second suspect entered without forcing the door and attacked as soon as he came in. He then dragged the injured Park further inside before killing her and setting fire to the rug. From the blood spatters and Do-jin’s memory of Dad’s killing attire, he deduces that the killer was the one wearing a raincoat: Seung-woo.

The team heads out to track him down. Reporter Han asks for Do-jin’s thoughts as one of Park’s victims. Do-jin asks her pointblank if she thinks that Park deserved to die when she’s a reporter herself, striking Han speechless again. You know, if she doesn’t stop talking to Do-jin, she’s gonna end up feeling too guilty to do her job.

Do-jin thinks of how Jae-yi’s photograph was deliberately marked by the suspect and heads over to check on her right away. He scolds her for waiting outside which, thank goodness, because our girl has no concept of safety at all. Do-jin gets a call about Seung-woo’s possible whereabouts so the couple hugs once more before he leaves. Moo-won who’s watching from his car the whole time grips the steering wheel in anger, Yoon Hee-jae’s poisonous words about Na-moo being dangerous ringing in his head.

In a series of short flashbacks, we see how Dad spent his years in prison, always looking in the mirror and greeting a smiling Na-moo. But in 2018, after reading the articles where Do-jin seeked Jae-yi out in the hospital, Dad’s imaginary Na-moo isn’t smiling anymore. Neither is Dad. Seung-woo mentions the article in one of his visits and asks for permission to finish Dad’s story. Dad instructs him to meet JEON YOO-RA first and let her know that her wish will finally come true. We see Dad reading one of Yoo-ra’s letters, complaining that she’s been waiting for three years now.

In the present, Dad adds Chief Go to the list of Na-moo’s weaknesses which include Park (now eliminated), Jae-yi, Mom, and So-jin. Moo-won’s and Mom’s words about him no longer being Na-moo’s father haunt him. And in a daydream, he meets this better, adult Na-moo. He growls out Do-jin’s name before strangling him.

Seung-woo in a mask kindly interrupts Do-jin’s investigation to greet him with (you guessed it) a hammer. But Do-jin’s a more formidable opponent than innocent civilians as he easily dodges each swing and taunts Seung-woo for being a corny copycat of Dad. Seung-woo’s lunges get more desperate as he faces off with Dad’s favorite son. Do-jin grabs him and pushes him against the fence, creeping out even the actual killer as he leers at him and greets him by his real name, Yeom Ji-hong. Ji-hong only gains the upper hand by attacking a passerby, forcing Do-jin to use his body as a shield. (Why?) But he’s at least smart enough to cause a commotion and scare Ji-hong away.

Watch the video

Nice to meet you, Yeom Ji-hong

 
Hyun-moo is late for So-jin-watching duty. She’s walking home alone when a stalker grabs her wrist. It’s an unwanted suitor who backs off for now when she threatens to call her Cop Oppa. But almost-killer Oppa is just as effective as Hyun-moo later grabs the guy into an alley and frightens him, “Does it scare you? Then why did you do it to her?” Aww, look at you, teaching empathy and all.

Jae-yi is distracted by hate messages while reading her new script. She ends up playing hooky and visiting Do-jin at work. At first, she teases that she’s just making sure he sees the real her instead of that coffee standee Jae-yi. But this couple’s date won’t be complete without checking if the other is okay. Jae-yi hears about the scuffle and confirms that he went to the hospital before ordering him to get some rest. He tells her the details of the case which he initially hid from her. In return, he asks Jae-yi not to hide her problems from him.

Moo-won comes home to his small apartment and looks sadly at both his parents’ pictures. He recalls stabbing the murderer in his childhood and his hands start to shake as he hears Yoon Hee-jae’s words that he shouldn’t be around Nak-won.

The next day, Ji-hong shows up at the station, lawyer in tow. They block any questions unrelated to his fake ID. It’s the only offense for which they have solid proof against him for now. But Do-jin gets through to him by bringing up Ji-hong’s Bible studies with Dad. Ji-hong pretends to recognize Do-jin from the news and asks why he won’t visit his nice, remorseful father in prison. Do-jin turns the question on him. “Why won’t you visit the father you supposedly live with? Is it because you resent him being weak, unlike Yoon Hee-jae? Is that why you wish Yoon Hee-jae is your dad?” (OMG he can read him like a book and it is awesome but I am a-feared he’s gonna unhinge him further.)

His lawyer stops him from answering but Ji-hong can barely hide his excitement at this conversation as he asks Do-jin to continue. So Do-jin shares the story of meeting a pathetic guy last night who wants to be another Yoon Hee-jae but only ever hurts weak people. Then he asks Ji-hong, “What are you really, without Yoon Hee-jae?” Sunbae listens to this conversation and recognizes Ji-hong’s voice from the stolen pen recorder. (Which why in heaven’s name isn’t he submitting for evidence?)

Reporter Han sees Ji-hong walking out of the station and redeems herself a little bit by telling Do-jin that she saw the guy hanging around Mom’s shop. Do-jin calls Mom and asks her to close shop early, promising to explain later. Explain now! There’s no later in dramaland!

Hyun-moo proves he’s just a cinnamon roll as he gets a nightmare. It’s the part he refused to watch in the video after he burst out of the closet. Ji-hong, armed with a bloody hammer, recited Mom’s and So-jin’s daily routine, “worrying” that they’re so careless, what with crimes being so common lately. Ji-hong then told the frozen Hyun-moo not to dawdle, it’s not like he can report the crime himself. Hyun-moo stumbled after Ji-hong left, breaking a trophy and revealing the hidden camera by accident.

Moo-won finds out Ji-hong’s real identity too (uhm, why aren’t you and Do-jin’s team working together?!) But Moo-won does one better and checks anyone else who’s had contact with Yoon Hee-jae, which is good for us and bad for this Yoo-ra character. He stupidly ignores Jae-yi’s call, thinking of Yoon Hee-jae’s words to stay away. Which, why? She could be in danger right now with 1% battery left and she will die because you’re a fool.

It’s a good thing Jae-yi is only in danger of being gossiped about as the staff call her names. Her more popular actress friend/sunbae Se-kyung arrives on set and out-bitches the staff before following Jae-yi to the dressing room. Jae-yi’s ex-costar tags along and grabs Jae-yi’s wrist, pretending to teach her how to do the scene better. Do-jin shows up and grabs his wrist as Jae-yi smiles sweetly and introduces her cop boyfriend. The actor concedes he’s good-looking for a cop and Do-jin pettily concedes… he’s not good-looking for a star. Hah! This is the sass we needed twenty episodes ago! Manager Pyo looks like he’s about to cry as Do-jin scolds the top star, explaining the concept of NO and recommending a seminar on sexual harassment prevention while Jae-yi proudly looks on.

She later teases Do-jin about getting mad then pecks him on the cheek, turning his pout into a smile. She’s happy to be fighting about petty things like a normal couple. But Do-jin has other coupley things in mind, like smooching, which he asks for more of.

So-jin is walking home when she’s greeted by a different stalker. It’s Ji-hong, calling her using Dad’s nickname “our young princess.” The sight of the hammer triggers her childhood fear of Dad. She freezes as Ji-hong raises the hammer. Hyun-moo appears out of nowhere and pulls a Do-jin by shielding her with his body while Ji-hong just keeps hitting him like a stubborn nail. Which, why?! Call for help! When I imagined him saving So-jin, I didn’t imagine being this frustrated. Thank goodness for a couple of ajummas scaring Ji-hong off and leaving Hyun-moo alive to live out my dream heroic moment at a later episode.

So-jin tells her Oppa to go to the hospital. Surrender if he has too. Mom and her know he’s innocent of murder. He refuses as per usual and just warns her to be careful because Ji-hong is crazy, making So-jin accuse him of being in cahoots with the guy.

Do-jin hears the story from Mom and So-jin. They all worry about Hyun-moo’s injuries and feel the urgency of catching him before he gets into deeper trouble. Hyun-moo is self-medicating with soju when he sees news of Moo-won assaulting Dad during interrogation. He glances at the hidden camera recording as he remembers the quiet classmate who warned him against killing people. Yes, Hyun-moo, you can trust him!

Jae-yi is tired of Moo-won ignoring her calls and visits his officetel to find him sick. He asks her to stop dating Na-moo, promising to be there for her instead if she’s in pain. He knows the murder isn’t Na-moo’s fault but their relationship can only end badly. She’ll remember his father every time she sees Na-moo until one day, she won’t be able to look at Na-moo anymore and the guilt will consume her–like it does him.

In a flashback, we see Moo-won during the funeral, arguing with a bunch of angry elders. He’s asserting his right as Nak-won’s older brother and promising to take care of Nak-won without using up their money. Nak-won hears this and cries herself to sleep. She wakes up with Moo-won watching over her and assuring her the nightmares will stop after some time.

In the present, Dad walks out to a waiting transport, presumably for another hearing. But he stops and takes one last look at the prison before leaving. It’s intercut with scenes of Yoo-ra (Bae Hye-sun) shopping for new curtains and men’s clothes. Dad spots a marker on the road and braces himself. The bus trips a wire, triggering a trap and causing the bus to crash. Everyone is knocked unconscious except for Dad who breaks the window and steps out, breathing in the air of freedom. Some time later, he’s still standing there smiling when a couple of cops pull up and surround him. Ohno ohno ohno…

The next day, So-jin is busy milking her injury and being spoiled by Do-jin while Mom nags at her to stop. The happy family breakfast is rudely interrupted by news of Dad’s escape last night. We see Jae-yi and Hyun-moo in their respective rooms also watching the news in shock.

Moo-won gets dressed for work and the camera lingers on the hidden camera on top of his bag. Omo! Did Hyun-moo already send it?!

Dad climbs up the stairs to Yoo-ra’s apartment and has a neighborly chat with a little boy, telling him about his own sweet and smart son that he’s gonna visit soon.

COMMENTS

The escape couldn’t have come at a better time. The show was starting to lag with Park’s recycled headlines and Ji-hong dancing around everyone with his hammer. And the less said about the prolonged romantic angst, the better. We also know Dad had to get out at some point, because there’s no way his last encounter with Na-moo would be that hurried ten-minute fight on Christmas Eve.

It’s a bit horrible, but now that Dad is out and Do-jin has more people to protect, I’m even more excited for the second round. On one side, we have Dad and his psychopath friends armed with home improvement materials and a lack of conscience. On the other side, we have Do-jin’s and Jae-yi’s family and friends armed with love and forgiveness, featuring Do-jin and Hyun-moo as human shields. It doesn’t seem like much, but the two brothers are both half a Yoon Hee-jae, adding up to one whole Yoon Hee-jae for the good side. Well, once Mom and So-jin convince Hyun-moo to jump to the good side.

There’s also the tortured Moo-won who’s probably incapacitated with guilt, but it’s nice to know that there’s someone on our team with more practical killing experience. (I’m horrible, I know.)

In all seriousness, he’s another tragic character. His melo eyes are apparently out of guilt (and not fake-cest as I assumed). He’s spent all these years protecting Jae-yi from the public and their own family, all while worrying that there’s something wrong with him. Which, no! There’s nothing wrong with defending yourself. What’s up with the people in this show? I know Dad is a psychopath manipulator who’s leveraging the guilt to play with his victims, but the “public” in this show seems to share this twisted idea that hurting your attacker means you’re a monster too. It’s a bit annoying as a conflict because people don’t think that way in real life. Right? Don’t disappoint me, World.

Speaking of monsters, what’s up with the new She-vil, Yoo-ra? Is she another one of Dad’s fans? If so, I pity her a tiiiny bit. We know Dad doesn’t care about her because he tore up her letters. She’s been waiting for him to escape for three years but Dad kept her at bay. It was only until Do-jin found a proper father figure and is moving on with Jae-yi that Dad decided to go out and “fix” his son’s life. Because apparently, Na-moo can’t have friends unless they’re psychopathic minions like Ji-hong and Yoo-ra.

I think in that regard, Dad was honest about wanting Jae-yi to move on and find someone else so he won’t have to kill her. But Jae-yi chose to stick with Na-moo and be a “weakness,” and now all bets are off.

Finally, I’m a bit pissed that Park Hee-young is dead. I know she was grating with her repeated cries of “Na-moo is the devil’s spawn!” but now that she’s been killed off without much history, I appreciate Kim Seo-hyung’s acting even more. There were lots of scenes where I was led to believe that Park had a backstory. Something in the way she lets her mask fall in front of Yoon Hee-jae. It just seemed like there was more, a reason she was so disgusted by killers, to the point that she thinks she’s entitled to ruin the lives of murderers’ families. It’s a bit disappointing to find out that the writer didn’t intend for her to be more than an opportunistic journalist. Oh well, goodbye, Reporter Park. You deserved more in terms of character background AND suffering, but I’m sure we’ll see Kim Seo-hyung in another fun-to-hate role anyway.

 
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Even though i hated that reporter i still feel she deserved better (than being hammered to death). I'm glad we got some time to breathe with our main leads but now the escape is probably going to be a stressful thing to deal with.

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*rubbing hands together* It's gonna be fuuuun

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Yes it's gonna be fun for the next episode. Glad that the staring contest between Namoo and Nakwon is over 😁. Dojin is playful character and know how to be savage....

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I love Hyun-moo! <3

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Me three :( Please hurry over to the good side.

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Me four.
Still scared for his lyfe though...

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I find it funny and petty of him how he prefers giving the hidden camera to Moo-won instead of his brother.

@sicarius I’m afraid for his life as well, and I think he’s going to die before the finale.

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*which one do I fake hate more* lol

Shhhhh (same him or Moo won) BUT SHHHHHHHH
Nah in all seriousness though I feel like it'd be kind of weird if they ALL stayed alive... so one of the Brothers is what I'm thinking. *internally cries* *but I like them so much*

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Ha! I didn't think of that XD He gave it to his classmate whom he hates less than "Na-moo, that jerk".

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10 day absence and I just caught up on this show to THAT cliff hanger.

What you said about Reporter Park- so true. I wanted to know why she was doing what she was doing. She was so convincingly annoying and manipulated and then NOTHING. Like sure, so now I can propel all my disgust and hate onto Dad, and I did warn you Reporter-nim, messing with dad was A Grade Estupido, but would've liked to see you taken down... idk... on your own turf... oh well.

Nam Woo-yaaahhh- you sure do know how to play the verbal parrying/manipulation game as good as the psychopaths do, if not better, don't you.
At least one of you doesn't flinch in a fight, because, as I'm sure is obvious, the final show down has to be between Dad and Nam Woo.

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I wonder how many psychopaths this drama will have until the finale. Reporter Park died but another psycho appeared. Is Yoo-ra his old aquaintance or just a fan like copycat killer?

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I'm just here being like "should I place bets on which good guy will die just to you know... prepare myself for the worst with all these psychopaths around?" hahaha

... my current Yoo ra theory is that she's a fantatic ex lover. But I don't really know haha.

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She's probably a fan? But it looks like they've only known each other since 2015. I don't know why I think she's a nurse (hello, Yongpal!) Maybe because she smelled of disinfectant. She could've met Dad while working in prison.

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She’s also a nurse in Greasy Melo.

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Oh right! The VIP client! I wonder if the casting PDs are having fun giving her these tiny nurse roles...

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I don't know why the psychopath convos excite me so much (I'm not a psychopath, I swears!) But when Do-jin toyed with Ji-hong just like Dad toyed with Moo-won I was in awe. He really is his father's son, no matter how much he hates it. That's okay, Na-moo, we know you're using your powers for good!

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I really love seeing the savage side of Do Jin. And how it comes out so easily, just a slight flip of the switch. People in the show will argue that its in his genes, but I see it as him being able to mimic his father rather than being like his father in nature. You can't grow up with a psychopath and come out totally unscathed emotionally.

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I tried to express why I enjoyed this side of Do Jin so much yesterday, compared to his father who just makes my skin crawl, and what it is about these traits in certain characters that make them my favourite characters and in others that just make them the bad guys... I haven't quite figured it out yet haha... so I'll keep trying hahaha

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*whispers guiltily* I'm fascinated when Dad does it too. He makes my skin crawl but at the same time it's a bit like watching a master at work when he's mind-hoodoo-ing people (like Moowon and Mom) into feeling shitty about themselves.

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@mary why would you be guilty about that?! haha he is a most interestingly written and played character. He's horrible but brilliant. Do Jin is also brilliant but less horrible.

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@sicarius,

When Do-jin starts channeling Psycho Dad, he becomes animated in a way we've rarely seen. He gets a diabolical gleam in his eye that is a far cry from his usual depressive/apologetic state.

Depression has been described as "anger turned inward." It takes tremendous psychic energy to suppress anger -- and grief -- the way Do-jin has. If he didn't have the Hammer of Dadocles hanging over him, he would have some breathing room, and might have a chance to heal. But with Fanboy and Groupie now in the picture, the pressure is even greater.

Despite his loving relationships with his family and Jae-yi, Do-jin has been reminding me more and more of Prosecutor Jang Do-han in LOOKOUT. In the event that Psycho Dad somehow meets his maker, I'm still concerned that Do-jin has sustained too much lethal emotional radiation. I'm afraid he might resort to mutually-assured destruction to rid the world of Psycho Dad once and for all. It would be a self-inflicted twist on "death by cop."

I'm also concerned with Moo-won's emotional state, which is a shambles. A 12-year-old having to kill in self-defense is horrendous. I don't understand the thinking of the armchair warriors who condemn him. At the very least, he saved the taxpayers of Korea a bundle by keeping his parents' murderer off death row. Heaven only knows how many innocent lives he saved.

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@pakalanapikake *jumps up and down* Yes yes yes!~!! I so wanted to mention Do Han (aka currently my favourite character in all of dramaland). I'm glad you made the comparison for me. The only thing is I would clearly label Do Han as an Anti-Hero, where as Do Jin is much more of a hero than an anti one. Also the general watcher consensus (minus me apparently) was to hate Do Han, and I don't see anyone hating Do Jin. But the similarities in how they act under pressure, and how they can manipulate people just as well as their enemies, I kinda just love seeing that on screen?
That's what I was trying to pin point though- where you have three different characters who all are a) smart b) manipulative when need be and c) mentally strong despite also being messed up, but whilst I like that Dad is so hateable I don't like him at all, whereas I actually like Do Han, even though he's not written likably, he's so nuanced, same with Do Jin- even though he is probably capable of non "likable" things, I really like his character.
So is it the fact that Do Jin especially, and Do Han have some kind of righteous end in sight and are ultimately good people (DJ) or could've been good people (DH) in comparison to Dad who is... clearly a psychopath.
And then you have to ask yourself what makes someone good and bad, and where does THEIR canon sense of morality come from and where do ours, and don't answer that question hahaha I'm not expecting an answer to this, I just find it fascinating.
Gosh I hope all that made sense... pfft
*also Depression is Anger Turned inwards- I have depression and have never heard it described that way but boy is it fitTING*

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@ultramafic,

I see it as him being able to mimic his father rather than being like his father in nature.

That's a great point -- and an important distinction. It makes perfect sense that Na-moo knows how to give the Evil Eye and the spiel -- he was on the receiving end of it for 16 years himself. Do-jin's ability to channel Psycho Dad may help him extract information from his deluded acolytes.

On the other hand, he may also be skating on thin ice. And he's hyper-aware of that possibility, just as Moo-won is about himself.

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I guess the ultimate question in this show is whether or not Nam woo is like his father or not and if it's hereditary.
Thing is, so far it just seems to me that Do Jin chooses to act like that when the situation requires. Rather than just twisting everyone round his thumb and making them cower before him like dad does.
But I just don't know if they're going to go that route or have him snap or what. I don't really feel like the deepness of that whole "is psychopathy hereditary" thing has been explored yet.

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I too find the romantic angst a bit much, but Do-jin tapping out of the kiss was actually pretty perfect. Fortunately it didn't lead to another enormous extension of suppressed feelings.

Also, Hyun-moo is my precious, misguided baby. I'm here for his redemption arc, and ready to flip tables if I don't get what I want.

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B-b-but... what if his redemption arc comes five minutes before his death?

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The table flips I guess! (ノ°Д°)ノ︵ ┻━┻

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We need to order extra tables. One for each treehugger beanie.

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That's a lot of tables...

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One each? I'll need at least 3.

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Oh, I think that will definitely be the way it goes. #melo

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Nothing says redemption like the ultimate sacrifice. Or just serving your time and then moving in with Mom, So Jin, and Na Moo Full House style and being happy forever. But whatever, show, do what you want.

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Am I the only one who is not that bothered by the romantic angst? (At least not at the moment)
I mean, It's not entirely unreasonable. Relationships have angst under normal situations let alone when one's dad is a serial psychopath who killed your gf's parents and left you both emotionally scarred and with the very least PTSD and anxiety... oh and he hasn't ever HAD a relationship before? and hasn't properly talked to herin 12 years until a few months ago? And even 12 years ago he barely talked!!!!
So... it's kinda understandable that he's hesitant and also scared of what will happen since LAST TIME he followed the girl he liked two people died... like ... that's still gonna create some mental and emotional obstacles if you ask me, no matter how hard they're trying to get over them...

But hey I guess it can drag for some people and not others.

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oh, I am with you on this point, I find it pretty understandable actually!

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LOL at your “he barely talked!”

And yes, I totally understand Na-moo too, and in fairness there’s less staring contest this episode. :D

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Well he did! Barely talk that is hahaha. Even now Nakwon's unnie was like "is he usually this chatty?" and she's like "lol NO!"
Very tree like in his not talking kekeke although I love it when he DOES talk because he has great lines!!

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Na-moo is a poster child for "still waters run deep." ;-)

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I prefer the family stuff but I'm not bothered by the romantic angst. Given the circumstances, it's understandable.

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It is understandable for the first twenty episodes but imagine if they spent 15 minutes each episode until the finale staring angst-ily at each other. It makes sense in real life but it's frustrating to the watcher. T___T

That's why it's a good thing that they're moving forward now and we can say goodbye to that phase. (Also, remember last week when Nak-won staaaaared at Na-moo while he was panicking in the amusement park? No more of that, PD-nim!)

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Then I would give it all the awards available for best stares hahaha *there there Mary, not much longer now and much less staring hahaha*

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I never minded all the longing stares or angst, even if it was quite a few episodes. Like you said, it was understandable. But I did feel they dragged it out a little too long. It started to feel like they weren't getting together because the writer didn't want them to, yet, not because there was really any reason any more for them not to anymore.

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Maybe being away for a week and a half on my end helped me cope with it better, idk haha

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I really love the mother, even she left with So Jin, she never gave up on Na Moo and Hyun Moo. She still cares about Hyun Moo and is worried for him :)

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First of all, I am glad Dad broke out of prison. I know that sounds terrible but he is a much more compelling villain than all our other villains combined. And it feels like there needs to be one final showdown for all of our characters to finally be able to move on. It seems like Dad could have escaped whenever he wanted, but seeing his Na-moo smiling at the Chief when he only had contempt for him pushed Yoon Hee-jae over the edge; not to mention Do-jin's relationship with Jae-yi.
Speaking of Do-jin and Jae-yi, I love them so much more when they are being honest with each other. Their moments are so cute. Like when Do-jin wouldn't lie down and Jae-yi threatened to leave, he sure kicked his shoes off real quick to comply with her. He is smitten and everyone knows it.
I still have hope for Hyun-moo. It feels like once all the good guys start actively working together (and I do put Hyun-moo in the good guys column) then they will have a fighting chance against Dad. He's got his network of people, they are going to need theirs.

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Re: shoe-kicking, I giggled. That boy is absolute putty in Nak-won's hands.

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He’s so whipped and Nak-won knows it. ^^

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I am yet to see the episodes, I will watch them today and get back. Thank you @mary for the recap :)

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Here are a few thoughts on Ep 21:
I liked how the show works with words and their impacts and meaning for our leads and how they desperately hang on these said words. They have a relationship were each said word has so much importance and a wrongly said word would have so drastic consequences.

I enjoyed the scene and mind games between Gil Nam won and Our Serial killer.
It was almost so funny to hear our serial killer: "I think you should also stay away from your sister!"

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Ep 22:
-Dad stares were deadly !
-The rain coat deduction was cool!
-And the end smile! All Hail!!
Let the fun begin! *also rubbing hands standing next to @mary*

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I love that final scene. You can see that Na-moo isn’t someone you can easily mess with. He’s soft and staring around his family but pitted against a soulless criminal, he’s very scary himself.

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And If I am not mistaken we could see the copycat shivering in fear !

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Hahaha that whole fight he’s like the character at the start of zombie movies who hits the zombie with different weapons but nothing works and he’s just left scrambling in panic.

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What is this intangible thing that makes us root for Hyun-moo?? I distinctly remember everyone IMMEDIATELY and continuously rejecting the brother in WWWSK (direct quote: I don't want them to redeem him), and yet Hyun-moo's sins are MUCH greater but we still want him to be good?

That being said PLEASE HYUN MOO SEE THE LIGHT

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I'm behind on that show but isn't the Hyung someone who's not so nice pretending to be nice?
Meanwhile Hyun-moo is nice and trying hard to be bad and getting all torn up about it. He brings out the Mom in all of us.

Or... it could be the acting. I'm sorry, Lee Tae-hwan, I like you in other shows!

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And Hyun-moo is an immediately recognizable character to me. Who hasn't known a young man or young woman who you can see might have turned out totally differently if given more love during formative years or a stronger foundation in their family life?

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i work with kids so constantly i see this and now i'm even more in love with the character

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Yup. I was a teacher for 14 years. Saw this often. I've known many Hyun-moos.

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I'm honestly not sure what's going on with Young-joon's hyung in WHAT'S WRONG WITH SECRETARY KIM. Has he been harboring sour grapes for all these years simply because his kid brother is such a brainiac? -- My hypothesis is that he is dad's bastard son who was forcibly taken from his mother to be crown prince before Young-joon was born. Then he was dethroned when dad's legal wife gave birth. I suspect his mistress mother kidnapped Young-joon. But I could be wrong.

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The sentiments started ever since he was introduced (in like ep 4). I knew it'd be messed up to spoil anything recent). Your argument seems like the best one. Hyun moo is trying to be bad while the brother is pretending to be nice, thus he gets under our skin

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Yes, that's a good way to put it! We like to see people fighting against and overcoming their unfortunate circumstances, also.

Though really, it's all in the writing. We've been shown from the beginning little moments of humanity from Hyun-Moo--sadness, longing, vulnerability. And they've made sure not to have him really hurt anyone. We are at the place where the writer wants us to be with his character.

I think LTH is playing his WWSK character well, his character just sucks. We've seen nothing but pettiness, selfishness from him. People say they don't want to see him redeemed but if he actually started to show real remorse, bet people would jump on that train pretty quick.

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I cannot believe that they killed her! I don't know why I thought that everyone would live until the last couple episodes and then maybe one person might die with everyone crying around them for like 3 minutes straight. But nope they offed her and some other citizens like it aint no thing. This show continues to flip me around by going against what I expect from Kdrama's. I love it!

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Beware of Rampant Speculation
Part 1 of 2

Thanks for your recap and comments, mary!

Yay, Hyun-moo, for looking out for Mom and So-jin. He's slowly coming around. Now if only he can learn to be a better fighter. Has he forgotten everything he learned when being beaten up as a kid?

Boo at So-jin for just standing there when Fanboy went after her and then started pounding on Hyun-moo Oppa. Maybe I'm being a bit harsh, but shouldn't she at least try and run away from danger? (Ya know -- Stratagem 36.) Or call 119? I was likewise about to tear my hair out while watching Jae-yi flitting around outdoors in the dark after so many people have been attacked. The level of situational obliviousness by past targets of stalkers in this show is driving me around the bend.

Reporter Park met her final deadline indeed. I was kind of mystified that Fanboy aka Yeom Ji-hong aka Seung-woo entered the passcode on the first try. Have I missed something? (Or did he pull the old “fake smoke detector outside the front door" ploy to obtain the code -- which was used by a perp in LIVE?)

Oh, goody. Psycho Killer Dad's fan club (yes, "fan club" -- the irony of the term just "hit" me) loses a founding member (Reporter Park), but groupie Jeon Yoo-ra crawls out of the woodwork into the light of day. (And I do mean groupie in the original '60s sense of the word.) I had a bad feeling about her when she bumped into Mom outside her restaurant in the market. She was passively-aggressively threatening a rival -- all in her own warped mind, of course.

Now I suddenly have cause for optimism. Wouldn't it be sweet poetic justice if Psycho Dad were offed in his sleep by a Woman Scorned of the "Hell Hath No Fury" variety? She has been writing to him in the slammer for years, and all he does is rip up her love letters. He's killed several of his wives, IIRC -- so turnabout would be fair play. That way Na-moo, Hyun-moo, and Moo-won (what is it with all these "moo"s?!) would be off the hook. They've suffered more than enough at Psycho Dad's hands, and shouldn't have to euthanize him and go to jail for it. I think it would be hilarious if the groupie turns out to be a black widow who has been below police radar. I can't wait to find out that she's taken out numerous life insurance policies on him and is going to make a killing in more ways than one. (I learned about that trick from watching MAD DOG.)

I found it refreshingly creepy when Do-jin pinned Fanboy against the fence and unleashed that killer smile as he addressed him by his real name. I'm not sure whether I'm supposed to read that as Na-moo's rumored Dark Side making a strategic appearance, or Detective Chae's calculated mind game to upset the copycat killer's equilibrium, or what passes for equilibrium.

- Continued -

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I was going to ask the same thing regarding Reporter Park’s password, how did copycat psycho know it? Door opened in one try.

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He's probably been stalking her for some time now.

Or it was something terribly obvious for Park like N4M00153V1L

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That’s a hard password though. 😆

One of Do-jin’s colleagues even mentioned that it looked like Park knew the killer and vice versa.

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There was a comment last week guessing that Ji-hong is Park's son. >___<

It's so hard to believe they offed Kim Seo-hyung just like that. I thought she'd warrant a personal visit from Dad at the very least.

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LOL at "Namoo is evil"!

It could have been 666, which would explain a lot. ;-)

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@mary July 11, 2018 at 11:53 AM

I, too, was surprised by how quickly Reporter Park was dispatched to Hades by Fanboy. Then again, he's bucking to displace Na-moo as Seja, so he's a model of homicidal efficiency. Talk about a fine howdy-do.

Besides, Psycho Dad had already attempted to strangle Reporter Park in the visiting room at the prison after she disrespected him. In a fit of pique, he dispatched Fanboy to bump her off. She was now officially beneath his notice. As well as water under the bridge.

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Beware of Rampant Speculation
Part 2 of 2

It's not clear to me whether Fanboy and Groupie know about each other. Might they take each other out in a hissy fit of jealousy when they each discover that Psycho Dad has in essence been two-timing them?

In the "Aw, so cute" category, Detective Go's affectionate pat on the head for Na-moo. As soon as I saw Psycho Dad's gaze falling on then, I feared for the good detective. Has he been fired or only suspended for shredding the report of the Christmas Eve Killer's head injury? There was a scene of him working with Mom at her restaurant, and it made me wonder if he's been drummed out. Or maybe he helps out on his day off.

Is that lovely cottage on the hill where Mom & So-jin were eating breakfast when the news report of Psycho Dad's escape aired their own place, or are they staying with Do-jin? I seem to recall his telling them to stay at his place when Hyun-moo got out of jail. It's such a nice bright, sunny house and yard that it seems too bucolic for our depressed detective. Not to mention too pricey for a police officer's salary. Prosecutor Moo-won, on the other hand, is crammed into an officetel, presumably downtown. I would have thought he could afford a nicer place, but he's even more depressed and guilt-ridden than Do-jin. – I'm really confused about the house because it contrasts so sharply with the grungy location of Mom's restaurant.

I didn't understand how Psycho Dad actually escaped following the crash of the prison transport. Maybe we haven't seen the whole scene yet. Was Jeon Yoo-ra standing around with a submachine gun a la Patty Hearst at a Symbionese Liberation Army's bank heist? (Iconic photo in link below.) Otherwise I cannot figure out how he went from being tied up and just standing around outside the bus as two squad cars full of cops arrived at the crash site to talking with the little boy in the stairwell of Jeon Yoo-ra's apartment building.

[Historic note: In 1974, California newspaper heiress Patty Hearst was kidnapped by a terrorist group and went on to rob banks with them. Stockholm syndrome was cited in defense at her trial. Somehow her case seems relevant to Psycho Dad's kin and targets. https://www.cnn.com/2018/02/07/opinions/patty-hearst-kidnapping-toobin-opinion/%5D

Thanks again for a great recap!

-30-

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Here's how you do it in style:
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-44673753
with a helicopter actually! Everything else is boring :P
(And obviously most of them wrote books about it, no surprise here)
And here is a list as well on wiki: Amazing
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_helicopter_prison_escapes

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@rket593 oppafangirl,

ROFLMAO! That French armed robber is a hoot and a half. Life imitates art! And this guy takes it seriously.

Unreal...

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Ok, there’s no way I can watch this one with all the “home improvement” going on, so I’m just reading the recaps. I just have to say, mary, your recaps are hilarious even with all the death and violence. I can just imagine you sitting and watching and yelling at the characters.

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@blnmom,

I laughed my butt off at @mary's "home improvement" comment so far removed from Tim Allen's brand of DIY mayhem.

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I'm really surprised Dad had his new son go after his precious daughter, though it may have just been to reassert control over the family. Hyun Moo is my tortured fave and I can't wait for everyone to team up against Team Monster.

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I wonder if Seungwoo/Jihong/Whatever his name is this week is sometimes acting independently. Remember when he asked Dad for permission to finish the autobiography, citing Jaeyi's and Dojin's meeting at the hospital for an excuse? Didn't they meet at the hospital because Seungwoo sent the hammer?

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@mary,

Fanboy has delusions of grandeur, and seems to have taken it upon himself to fill Psycho Dad's shoes. He may have gotten too big for his britches by going after Na-moo, Dad's Only Begotten Son. And he failed in his mission to kill Jae-yi at the film studio.

I see Dad's escape as tantamount to his saying, "If you want anything done right, you have to do it yourself."

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Thanks for the recap @mary
Bye-bye Reporter Park, you are such a fun-to-hate character. Though I honestly want her to survive for a few more episodes, I guess the drama writer says otherwise.
Evil dad finally on the loose, am I the only one who is curious about how he managed to outrun a group of police and prison warden? I'm pretty sure guns are drawn out.
When I saw the evil dad smile fade out prior Do-Jin smile, I seriously think the 1st target to kill after he got away is Chief.
We should give Hyun-Moo a big hug for his effort in rescuing So-Jin from Ji-Hong!

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Heo Joonho why are you such an electric powerful fully-in-control phenomenal actor who crushed my soul in that scene where your unrepentant murderous Yoon Heejae is watching your son with the detective?

Actually that should have been written in the past tense because by the end of these two episodes you went with crazy eyes, that lazy actor's crutch when portraying psychopaths. The abrupt change in performance style crushed my soul in a different way.

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Aww true, the crazy eyes was jarring. He was doing so great as is. I wonder if the PD made him do it.

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Maybe it was supposed to be jarring as something inside Psycho Dad's warped mind snapped.

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Honestly, I read the recaps for @mary's comments. I get so much laughs every time, it's enough to balance all the angst in this show. (Which I love, surprisingly. I'm Team Fluff all the way but what is with this drama hahaha)

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Am I the only one who does not miss Report Park? I never liked her for the same reason Mary is sad she's gone already--she had no actual character. She was just there to cause problems and rile people up. I didn't even hate her that much. I find characters that are extreme like that with no explanation so boring. Goodbye and good riddance, lady.

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I think it's a testimony to the actress's performance that she was able to give such a strong impression that there was something of substance to the character even when she basically functioned as a plot device.

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I finally got around to looking up the OST for COME HERE AND HUG ME. I've posted all 5 pieces and their instrumental versions on my fan wall.

Rod Stewart's "Sailing" plays in the background of Ep. 28, which I watched last night.

Sadly, my favorite instrumental passage seems to be incidental music, but I was able to find it in a Kocowa clip.

Enjoy! ;-)

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After this drama, Yoon Jong Hoon and Kim Kyung Nam has become my fav actor. What a performance of both of them....

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Beware of Spoilers!
Page 1 of 5

In reply to @sicarius July 13, 2018 at 1:52 AM
http://www.dramabeans.com/2018/07/come-here-and-hug-me-episodes-21-24/#comment-3271480

I moved it here to reclaim the Reply button and a wider column. ;-)

I guess the ultimate question in this show is whether or not Nam woo is like his father or not and if it's hereditary.
Thing is, so far it just seems to me that Do Jin chooses to act like that when the situation requires. Rather than just twisting everyone round his thumb and making them cower before him like dad does.
But I just don't know if they're going to go that route or have him snap or what. I don't really feel like the deepness of that whole "is psychopathy hereditary" thing has been explored yet.

First off, I agree with you that Do-jin chooses to act and speak like his father when he deals with white-collar-crook-turned-copycat-killer Seung-woo. He is a spiritual weakling attracted to the charismatic Yoon Hee-jae, and now deeply in thrall to his master “father.” I cannot help but wonder if he has some kind of personality disorder. He is a fanatic willing to kill, and a bit better at it than Hyun-moo. What he lacks in follow-through and success he makes up for with initiative and unbridled enthusiasm. His attacks mainly succeed because his targets are drunk, distracted by their handphones, or are situationally clueless. Do-jin communicates in an alpha style to which Fanboy is accustomed to submit, and the latter blinks and backs down. It's like watching a pair of wolves decide which is dominant.

Although the question of the heritability of psychopathy has been superficially bandied about in this show, I don't think I've seen even one psychiatrist in a white lab coat expound on it. (Unlike, for instance, the shrinks in OH HAE-YOUNG AGAIN, who valiantly struggled to figure out what was going on with Park Do-kyung's premonitions of death.) Instead, the drama is addressing different – but related – topics. By this point, there's no time for a deep philosophical examination of any of them. Instead, the drama all along has been holding up a mirror to society and highlighting the hypocrisy of “good” citizens who fail to see how their own behaviors and mean-spiritedness make them as evil and spiritually bankrupt as serial killer Yoon Hee-jae. In fact, the holier-than-thou types are even worse than him because they deny their own savagery and culpability. (Not to mention Do-jin's sunbae's criminal theft and suppression of evidence as part of his crusade to wangtta his subordinate. Arg!) MISS HAMMURABI has been doing similarly thought-provoking things with its cases. The scarcity/inaccessibility of mental health and alcoholism treatment facilities in ROK has been raised in that drama, and is tangential to this one.

- Continued -

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Beware of Spoilers!
Page 2 of 5

I see the ultimate questions posed by COME HERE AND HUG ME as more along the lines of:

Is Yoon Hee-jae's psychopathy (sociopathy?) the product of nature or nurture or volition, and is it heritable / transmissible to his children? Can it be stopped?

What is the nature of evil, and the role of free will in those who commit evil deeds?

To paraphrase Jiddu Krishnamurti, “It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society family.” Do-jin has always resisted his father's efforts to seduce him into becoming a killer. Hee-jae is actually an emotional weakling who compensates for his own horrendous childhood by bullying his sons, intimidating his wife and daughter, seeking Na-moo's approval – and killing innocent strangers. Na-moo refuses to validate his father's murderous lifestyle by emulating him. Psycho Dad spurns Hyun-moo, who desperately seeks his acceptance and validation and would be only too happy to follow in his footsteps. His fatal flaw is that he lacks the killer instinct that Dad prizes – and can clearly see from a mile away.

How did Psycho Dad become so warped? According to his autobiography, Yoon Hee-jae's family of origin was afflicted with alcoholism. I'm willing to bet that addiction, maladaptive behaviors related to it, and maybe even brain damage from fetal alcohol syndrome, are at the root of his repulsive hobby, or contribute to it. Not to mention the physical violence and verbal abuse that is depicted as part of everyday life in Kdramas. Was he clunked on the head once too often when he was a kid? Was he emotionally brutalized the same way he now treats his own family?

-Continued -

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Beware of Spoilers!
Page 3 of 5

According to Swiss psychiatrist Alice Miller in Prisoners of Childhood aka The Drama of the Gifted Child, For Your Own Good, and Thou Shalt Not Be Aware: Hidden Cruelty in Child-Rearing and the Roots of Violence, brutality disguised as child-rearing practices is the mechanism of transmission of untold violence from generation to generation. Victims grow up to become abusers themselves. In a conversation with Miller published in OMNI magazine, interviewer Diane Connors, herself a psychotherapist, writes:

Alice Miller's stories portray abused and silenced children who later become destructive to themselves and to others. Adolf Hitler, says Miller, was such a child. Constantly mistreated by his father, emotionally abandoned by his mother, he learned only cruelty; he learned to be obedient and to accept daily punishments with unquestioning compliance. After years, he took revenge...

Miller uses the phrase "poisonous pedagogy" to describe what we inflict on children "for their own good" out of our hypocrisy and ignorance. She perceives that we instill humiliation, shame, fear, and guilt as we are "training" children. By encouraging conformity, suppressing curiosity and emotions, a parent reduces a child's ability to make crucial perceptions in later life...

Miller:
Pain is the way to the truth. By denying that you were unloved as a child, you spare yourself some pain, but you are not with your own truth. And throughout your whole life you'll try to earn love... Yet nobody can confront being neglected or hated without feeling guilty... The guilt is really protection against the terrible realization that you are fated to have a mother who cannot love. This is much more painful than to think, "Oh, she is a good mother, it's only me who's bad." Because then you can try to do something to get love. But it's not true; you cannot earn love. And feeling guilty for what has been done to you only supports your blindness and your neurosis.

Interview with Alice Miller: “The Roots of Violence” by Diane Connors in OMNI magazine, March 1987.
https://www.naturalchild.org/alice_miller/roots_violence.html

What Dr. Miller says above is exactly what we see playing out in COME HERE AND HUG ME. Hyun-moo tries to alienate himself from everyone except Dad, from whom he fruitlessly attempts to earn recognition, if not love. At the opposite end of the spectrum, Na-moo is freighted with guilt and shame over what his father has done. He throws himself into a dangerous profession in which he frequently gets severely injured in the line of duty – a socially-acceptable form of risk-taking behavior.

Meanwhile, double-orphan Gil Moo-won is drowning in guilt for killing his biological parents' murderer in self-defense, as well as survivor's guilt towards both sets of dead parents.

- Continued -

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Beware of Spoilers!
Page 4 of 5

Is Yoon Hee-jae an alcoholic himself? Based on his personality and predilection for violence, I would not be surprised if he is, although he doesn't need to drink to inflict pain and suffering on others. (See “dry drunk syndrome.”) Although he dishes it out while sober, Hee-jae does exhibit some classic alcoholic behaviors and attitudes. He is an epic control freak. In his own warped way, he's a perfectionist, which is why Hyun-moo can never make the cut as his heir apparent. Deep down, he is a very angry person who denies his own vulnerability.

Hyun-moo and Na-moo are grandchildren of alcoholics, which puts them at risk of developing the disease themselves. Their family's dynamics have been screwed up for at least two generations. Plus it may have nothing to do with being metabolically-challenged. Curiously, alcoholism is not only a physical disease, but one with mental and emotional aspects. It has been described as a “physical manifestation of a spiritual illness” – which is Hee-jae in spades. Apparently he did not have even one person in his young life – a teacher, neighbor, or other emotionally-healthy adult – to throw him the kind of life line his sons received from Mom and So-jin, Nak-won and her parents, and Detective Go.

Aside from being an introvert with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression, Na-moo is a classic example of an overly-responsible, (academically) perfectionistic, tightly self-controlled, over-functioning adult grandchild of an alcoholic who has sacrificed himself to the point of near-martyrdom. He chooses to confront shame and guilt head-on rather than denying or trying to escape it, which comes across as wallowing in those emotions. He places others' well-being and safety above and before his own. Na-moo is a rescuer.

- Continued -

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Beware of Spoilers!
Page 5 of 5

The thoroughly excellent Kdrama MAWANG / THE LUCIFER / THE DEVIL deals with evil, redemption, and forgiveness. A copy of M. Scott Peck's landmark work People of the Lie tellingly appears in the hands of the mysterious lawyer. I discussed it in the thread that popped up around the end of 2017 when I watched it in January. This post mentions other Kdramas I commented on with reference to family dysfunction and Alice Miller's writings:
http://www.dramabeans.com/2007/04/devil-mawang-wave-of-japanese-support/#comment-3160308.

LOOKOUT is another excellent drama that features a father-and-son team of sociopathic predators and the antihero who seeks to avenge his father. OH HAE-YOUNG AGAIN has a horrendously parasitic and abusive Mother From Hell, as does TEMPERATURE OF LOVE, which also sports a father who dishes out physical and emotional violence. The female lead in BECAUSE THIS LIFE IS OUR FIRST engages in convert emotional manipulation that really rang my chimes because it felt so predatory. I commented at length in that show's ep. 15 recap comments.

In BEAUTIFUL MIND, Heo Jun-ho turns in a powerful performance as the adoptive neurosurgeon father of a child with a brain injury. Based on the location of the surgical accident, Dr. Lee Gun-myung devises a stringent educational program for Lee Young-O, who is in danger of becoming a psychopath incapable of feeling emotion. Young-O grows up to become an accomplished healer in his own right, but pays a high price.
http://www.dramabeans.com/2016/07/beautiful-mind-episode-12/#comment-2345653

Comments on Chef Jung-sun's mechanisms for coping with his abusive parents' dysfunctional marriage in TEMPERATURE OF LOVE.
http://www.dramabeans.com/2017/10/temperature-of-love-episodes-13-14/#comment-3104781

As for the genesis of human evil, it was examined in VOICE vis-à-vis serial killer Mo Tae-goo. I commented on the subject in the recap threads (ep. 13 in particular), especially with regard to Goethe's poem “Der Erlkönig” (The Alder King). As soon as I saw the book on a side table, I knew it dealt with the making of the monster. Subsequent episodes bore out my hunch. I've posted literary sources on my fan wall. This gives an overview of my take on what made Mo Tae-goo tick:
http://www.dramabeans.com/2018/03/voice-2-offers-role-of-new-team-leader-to-lee-jin-wook/#comment-3222714

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... You know I was thinking the other day, what if word count contributes to Dramabeans levels- that would certainly explain your rise through the ranks so quickly ;)
So... is my other much longer response to your other reply above going to result in a five or maybe ten page essay as well? hehe

I'm teasing, but you make great analysis and great points, I just don't know if I have anything particular to say about it right except for bravo and WoW.

It's very rare that I will go into such character analysis depth for anything, mostly because I'm a writer and I tend to blame and praise anything in a drama first and foremost on the writer and then on the director. And if one of those holds up then perhaps I can get around to analysing a character itself, which is in fact the creation of another human being.
Because in all reality I don't actually think the majority of writers go about writing character arcs with everything you just said in mind. Some do, and some are smart enough to know what it is they want to say, but I do not have enough faith in the intelligence of the current modern literature/screenwriting sphere to believe that everything that comes out of their pens is intentional and as brilliant as watchers, readers and fans would like to believe.
Actually having written screenplays and the better half of a book before, I can tell you, we writers half the time do not do the things on purpose that literary critics will say we did.
Occasionally though you get a writer who (particularly in this case and in LOOKOUT's), knows how to write characters well, and actors who do them much more than justice, and you get something worth analysing. CAHM has that character depth- and I think you've hit pretty much all the right points.

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thank you so much for this recap! i just recently started the show and i am already caught up. everyone's acting is superb!! new fan <3

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