Rating:
Average user rating 4.4
47

Come Here and Hug Me: Episodes 29-32 (Final)

Do you really have to be a monster to defeat a monster, and what if turning you into one is the monster’s goal in the first place? It’s time for the final battle as the show pits the killer without a conscience against his desperate son who has lots of people he needs to keep alive. Too bad the killer is one of them…

EPISODES 29-32 WEECAP

Over a montage of Do-jin dealing with discrimination through adulthood, he narrates, “For twelve years, I reminded myself I’m a murderer’s son. I couldn’t smile at myself in the mirror because next to me, Yoon Hee-jae is always there. But even for people like me, there is a paradise.”

In a similar manner, we get a montage of the things Jae-yi endured after losing her parents while she narrates, “For twelve years, I lived as a victim’s child, suffering from memories of that night. But even for someone like me, there’s a person I can rely on.”

Finally, we see the missing pieces of that tragic Christmas Eve. Yoon Hee-jae knocks Na-moo down and drags Nak-won away. Na-moo tackles Dad into a table, surprising him into anger. Dad raises the hammer against Na-moo while the latter begs Nak-won to run, but she’s frozen at the sight of her parents’ bodies. It’s a good thing Dad can’t actually bring himself to kill his favorite son, instead throwing Na-moo on the floor and telling him to go home so he can kill Nak-won. Na-moo tells Dad his ten minutes are up as the police sirens wail on cue. When he turns his back on them to check, Na-moo takes out his own hammer and bashes his father on the head.

The rest of it is stuff we know. Dad proudly congratulates his son for being ruthless and tells him to remember this moment. Then he escapes after promising to meet Nak-won again. Nak-won crawls over to Na-moo and cries as she holds the hand he used to hit his father.

In the present, we see an unconscious Jae-yi tied up inside Dad’s old dog farm as her voiceover continues, “When will our long nightmare end?” Yoo-ra leads Do-jin to the dog farm, hammer in hand, as his voiceover answers, “Our nightmare will end now.”

We rewind to a few days before Jae-yi’s abduction, right in the middle of the Yoon Hee-jae manhunt. Even Reporter Han does her part by publishing an article that highlights the victims’ suffering to emphasize that Yoon Hee-jae needs to be caught to pay for his crimes. Nam-gil is mad because he wants articles that focus on the murderer and his “violent” son. But Han wants to start treating Do-jin based on how he’s lived his life so far. Thanks to Do-jin’s bitter lesson pills, she realized she was using journalism as an excuse for her biased assumption that she’s better than a murderer’s son by default. A view that Nam-gil still holds on to, as she points out.

Moo-won, possibly the only prosecutor in the district, drops by Hyun-moo’s hospital room and reads out his list of crimes. He knows Hyun-moo was injured trying to save So-jin and Mom and tells him that just like how they will be scarred by Ji-hong’s and Dad’s attacks, Hyun-moo’s victims’ lives will never be the same too. Moo-won gets up to leave after telling Hyun-moo to pay for all his crimes.

Hyun-moo knows Moo-won didn’t visit just to review his case. He asks Moo-won to tell him how he paid for his crime. A convict like him wouldn’t have anyone to tattle on anyway. Moo-won shares that he was twelve years old when he stabbed his parents’ murderer–it was only later that he learned he’s also a murderer. The judge ruled it was self-defense but Moo-won was deeply troubled as a kid. It took him a long time to open up to his adoptive family. He was too scared to even look at his hands, but Nak-won held them like his past didn’t matter.

To answer Hyun-moo’s question, Moo-won knows a lifetime isn’t enough, but he’s paying by protecting the people who took him in and gave him a second life. Which is a segue to warn Hyun-moo that Nak-won is his family and he’d better not hurt her, or else.

Hyun-moo is not to be out-older-brothered as he says that Na-moo was probably operating under the same thought. Whatever he did that night, he did it to protect Nak-won so Moo-won should stop treating Na-moo like he’s a monster who’ll suddenly hurt Nak-won. Then Hyun-moo awkwardly adds an apology for Jae-yi before Moo-won leaves.

Moo-won runs into Do-jin outside the door. They exchange details about Yoon Hee-jae’s case before Moo-won mans up and tells Do-jin to take better care of Jae-yi who has a habit of hiding her own pain. He also checks that Do-jin is okay with hunting down his own father.

Do-jin catches Hyun-moo trying to act tough and attacks him with awkwardness by thanking him for saving Mom and So-jin. He promises to forget everything his brother has done so far, except hurting Jae-yi. For that, Do-jin asks him to apologize in person. He also asks him to let them visit him in prison. And to not go far because he has a place to return to now. We know Hyun-moo likes that but for the sake of accuracy, we will put down in writing that “Hyun-moo doesn’t answer.”

Instead, he asks if Do-jin was really planning to kill Dad that night, wondering if the idea didn’t bother him. Do-jin answers by asking why Hyun-moo threw away his hammer. Hyun-moo scoffs that it’s obvious: hammers and glaring isn’t Na-moo’s thing. Hyung knows Dad and him are monsters, but Na-moo is human–he’ll never cross the line… is what Hyun-moo hopes for, but he gets a worried look as he remembers Dad’s plan to break and “fix” Do-jin. He tells him to be careful because Dad is weirdly obsessed with turning him into a mini-me.

Do-jin comes home to Jae-yi’s not-so-stellar cooking but he slaps on a smile and surreptitiously drinks water while she happily chats about her work. Jae-yi coos over her perfect boyfriend, from the perfect eyes to the perfect nose to his pretty hands that save lives. After dinner, Do-jin offers to visit Jae-yi’s mom together.

Later that night, Jae-yi has a nightmare about Na-moo hitting Dad, while Do-jin is busy worrying over how to catch Yoon Hee-jae. But they cope by reassuring each other and just staying together. Jae-yi says in voiceover, “When I was sixteen years old, time stopped. Twelve years later, it started moving again. We’re trying to be happy again.”

Do-jin is dressing up to meet with Jae-yi and visit her parents’ memorial when he gets a call from Yoo-ra. She claims to be taken hostage and wants to surrender. Do-jin smartens up and tells Jong-hyun to look out for a trap. He also calls Jae-yi to let her know he’ll be late. She tells him not to worry since she’s with Manager Pyo and a police escort.

Apparently, that isn’t enough since it only take a damsel-in-distress shtick for Yoo-ra to lure one cop out of the car while Yoon Hee-jae sneaks up on the other. Dad breaks Manager Pyo’s window and Pyo opens the door to meet his dea– err… go head to head with Yoon Hee-jae to give Jae-yi time to escape. But Yoo-ra is already opening the passenger’s side to knock Jae-yi out.

Do-jin answers a call from Jaeyi’s phone and goes berserk to hear Dad talking instead. Dad drops the hint that he visited Jae-yi’s parents and says he wants to meet his son. Alone. Do-jin of course disobeys Dad and calls Moo-won right away, telling him to keep looking for Jae-yi even if he loses contact with Do-jin. Moo-won is shocked to hear that his sister is in danger again, but he tells Do-jin to hang in there. He won’t be late this time AND he’ll save them both.

Do-jin arrives at the columbarium to find Yoo-ra there. She discards his phone and tells him to go inside for Dad’s gift. This is the hammer we saw him picking up among the flowers last week as he prepares to “become a monster” once again to save Nak-won.

Jae-yi wakes up to the sound of Dad improving his hammer’s grip. She asks about Manager Pyo, whom Dad didn’t bother to check on but thinks is probably dead. When Jae-yi starts to cry, Dad leans in just like in the past and tells her not to. She can do all the crying when she’s dead. But these are tears of anger, proven by Jae-yi slapping him, something she says she’s always wanted to do. With fire in her eyes, she orders Yoon Hee-jae to apologize to her and the other families for making their lives miserable and stealing all that time they could’ve spent living a better life. Dad asks what’s the point? People die every time. There’s nothing special about it.

Jae-yi says that’s only the case for him, whose life is so empty he thinks everyone else’s isn’t worth living either. Even Jae-yi knows life is worth something and tried her best to live well the past twelve years. “But you? You’re just a murderer who preys on the weak,” she ends smugly.

Dad wipes that smile off her face by agreeing with her. The people who died are the weak ones. Which Na-moo won’t be once she dies. Jae-yi claims complete confidence in Do-jin’s un-Yoon-Hee-jae-ness but Dad thinks he was close to converting Na-moo that night, if only he managed to make his son a bit more angrier. Jae-yi says that was a different case. Na-moo was protecting her, not killing for fun. Dad trained him for sixteen years but never managed to turn him into a killer because there’s nothing there for him to “wake up.” Dad rewards her confidence by promising to kill her in front of Do-jin.

Meanwhile, word spreads among the reporters that there’s been another Yoon Hee-jae attack. With the cops being mum about details, one correspondent wonders if they should just write about Jae-yi’s death in advance, earning him a lecture from Han, “Are you a reporter or not? Go out and get facts. Don’t kill people with your fingers.”

Moo-won visits Hyun-moo to share the bad news and ask for more leads in finding Dad. It’s a good thing Hyun-moo is a jealous kid who holds grudges because he points them to the dog farm where Dad used to take Na-moo but not him. He asks Moo-won to bring both of their baby siblings back. He tries to follow him out but is stopped by the cops guarding his room, and as he’s forced to wait for news, he calls Do-jin an idiot for making him repent. Because now he’s helplessly trapped again while his family is in danger.

At least he has Mom and So-jin with him this time. They meant to surprise him with a good meal but end up crying with him after hearing the news. Mom reveals her guilt at not turning Dad in sooner. Hyun-moo wipes her tears, “What do you mean it’s your fault? That monster is the one who shouldn’t have been born.” Who are you and what have you done to Hyun-moo?!

Dojin’s voiceover starts, “Evil cannot be nurtured” as he finally meets Dad who tries to go through the pleasantries which Do-jin repeatedly answers with “Where’s Nak-won?” He’s fed up with the “people and affection make you weak, killing is the best” lessons and threatens Dad, making him very happy because he’s twisted that way. Dad stokes Do-jin’s anger by saying Jae-yi is dead.

Do-jin sees blood behind Dad and attacks while Dad stands there and lets him. He doesn’t mind dying to make his son stronger. Do-jin pauses when he hears the ghost of Jae-yi’s voice–it’s when she stopped him from killing Ji-hong. He lowers the hammer now, saying there’s no way Dad would kill Jae-yi without making him watch (proving that there are benefits to knowing the sick workings of Dad’s mind.) Dad doesn’t deny that she’s alive somewhere, but he still commands Do-jin to kill him or Jae-yi will die. Is it just me, or does that sound like a win-win?

Speaking of, Jae-yi is currently being guarded by Yoo-ra in a back room. She’s delighted to help Yoon Hee-jae punish the kids, especially Do-jin for betraying the father who did so much for him. Jae-yi laughs at her blind worship and reveals that Park Hee-young’s theory is true. Dad really did hurt Na-moo and vice versa, and Dad ran but got caught anyway because he’s weak, not because he chose to give up for his son.

Yoo-ra says the world forced her and Yoon Hee-jae to be monsters. They had to be strong, otherwise the world will forget them. Jae-yi answers that the world will still forget them, but now they’ll just be forgotten monsters. Yoo-ra is fine with that as long as Yoon Hee-jae is beside her, but Jae-yi points out Yoon Hee-jae doesn’t really care about her if he’s making her do these things. In response, Yoo-ra angrily loads a syringe with more drugs.

Dad pokes at Do-jin’s shaky resolve by listing aaall the weak people he wants to protect (and Dad wants to hurt), making Do-jin raise the hammer once again. This time, it’s a flood of memories that stop him. From Chief Go’s last words to Mom defending him from the victims’ families, saying he’s not like Yoon Hee-jae, to Jaeyi saying she loves his pretty hands that save lives. He remembers telling Nak-won why his mother named him Na-moo–so he can endure things and not get in trouble growing up–and how meeting Nak-won inspired him to live up to his name.

Do-jin throws his hammer away, telling Yoon Hee-jae that he’ll end him in his own way. Killing him will only make lots of people suffer. (Okay but can’t he at least knock Dad unconscious first? Just a tiny tap on the head?) Dad is fine with being “ended” by his son in whatever way. That’s what family is for, right? Do-jin refuses to call him family. Family is for back when he was human. Before he murdered people for fun and ruined his sons’ lives. Do-jin points out that it’s Dad’s actions that made Do-jin weak and pitiful, unable to live a normal life. Dad shakes his head at Do-jin’s guilt. No, no, no. Fear is good. People hate and fear stronger persons like them.

“So do you fear me?” asks Do-jin, saying Dad is trying hard to control him because he revealed he was the stronger one twelve years ago. Echoing what Jae-yi said earlier, Do-jin says Dad’s paranoia about “strength” just reveals how insecure he is. Even his victims are better than him. At least they stood on their feet and faced reality.

Dad attacks in earnest but Do-jin easily beats him off. He even has time for a chat, sharing how he’s no longer scared of his father. He may have swung the hammer as a kid, but he’s not a monster. And having Yoon Hee-jae’s blood doesn’t make him his father either. “You’re just a weak murderer.” Dad is losing the fight so he plays dirty by revealing that Yoo-ra has instructions to kill Jae-yi if he doesn’t show up. Do-jin hesitates, giving Dad the chance to bash him properly on the head. Now Do-jin is the weaker one, dazed on the floor.

Yoo-ra approaches Jae-yi with the syringe, using the “you don’t know our pain” card to rationalize her actions. Which is funny because Jae-yi is probably one of the world’s top experts on a painful life. But whatever, an opportunity is an opportunity, and Jae-yi waits for her to get near before wrestling the syringe and stabbing her captor. She runs to call the police as Yoo-ra loses consciousness. (Wow, did she kill her?)

Dad offers the weakened Do-jin back his hammer which he still refuses to take, so Dad prepares to metaphorically and physically break Do-jin for “fixing.” Jae-yi arrives and shields him, “I called the cops. This time they’ll come in less than 10 minutes.” Dad swings at her anyway. Do-jin does what he does best and blocks the attacks with his own body. The hits look painful, but Do-jin is in beast mode with Jae-yi in immediate danger. He manages to break Dad’s hand even while being strangled. With Dad’s hammer gone, they’re on an even footing and resort to strangling each other just as the cops arrive. Do-jin cuffs Dad to a cage and reads him his rights before leading Jae-yi away from the mess.

With Jae-yi now safe, Moo-won tells Yoon Hee-jae, “Even though I want to kill you now, I won’t. You’ll experience suffering anyway.” As expected from the well-adjusted boy with a dark streak.

Do-jin and Jae-yi hug in relief outside. Prematurely, it seems. Because as Nam-gil uncuffs Dad for transport, Dad quickly twists his arm and steals his gun, using him as a hostage to demand for a getaway car. I’m sorry but hah! This is probably Nam-gil’s worst nightmare, caught by his own incompetence and under the mercy of a monster.

Dad looks directly at Do-jin in challenge as he marches Nam-gil out. Do-jin grabs another cop’s gun and trains it on Dad. (PSA: Don’t grab a gun that’s pointed at someone.) Moo-won worriedly calls Do-jin’s name but Jae-yi is unperturbed. Do-jin lowers his sights and shoots Dad’s leg instead, allowing the others to tackle him. I’m pretty sure that’s not a safe thing to do, but maybe he looked at the hostage and considered it a calculated risk. I kid, I kid.

Just like before, Jae-yi holds the hand that shot the gun. (Not safe! His finger is still on the trigger!) As they watch Dad being taken away, Do-jin completes his earlier thought, “In the end, evil only destroys itself.”

An unknown time later, Do-jin drops by Jae-yi’s house on the way to work and sees her school qualification reviewer on the table. She’s in bed herself, having fallen asleep while talking to him last night. She wakes up and pouts that she’s so lonely and bored without Do-jin sleeping on the couch anymore *hint hint* and they start kissing and hugging, wishing they don’t have to go to this pesky thing called work.

Han greets Do-jin at the station, promising to write his and Jae-yi’s story properly. When she complains that he’s been mean to her, Do-jin softens and beams a smile at her, telling her to take care and once again leaving her speechless. This time for very different reasons.

Nam-gil snaps her out of it as she spots him and needles him for acting out of character. Is it atonement for his prejudice? Nam-gil says atonement is shooting your own Dad to stop him hurting more people. What Nam-gil did is just relieving his own burden. I don’t know what they’re talking about exactly, though we see Nam-gil listening to the recording of Park Hee-young’s murder. Then it’s Nam-gil’s turn to taunt Han for not delivering on the grand promise to be Park Hee-young 2.0. Han says it’s not that she can’t, but she chose not to be.

Jae-yi is in cop uniform, worried that she’ll get in a fight right after graduation as she subdues a pervert–CUT! It’s just a scene she’s shooting. A very much alive Manager Pyo scolds her for not telling the director that she hurt her arm from the action scenes. She tells him to worry about his own injury, but Pyo brags that his bones heal fast. It’s all cute but just an excuse to tell us his story: he was a thug saved by Moo-won after he mistakenly joined the police’s side in the middle of a gang war/raid. He thanks his lucky stars for meeting Jae-yi and Moo-won and turning his life around, while Jae-yi says they also feel lucky to have met him.

Ship alert! Moo-won finds Do-jin’s cop hoobae Yeon-ji waiting in his office to complain about a case. He tries to dismiss her with his trademark stoicism but she’s not cowed and continues arguing her point. Moo-won’s staff members actually giggle at his baffled look when Yeon-ji doesn’t run away from his laser eyebeams.

That night, Moo-won cooks at home to apologize for leaving Jae-yi alone. She scolds him to date instead of worrying too much about her. Speaking of dating, Moo-won brings up Do-jin and assures her he’ll support her dating or dumping (lol) Do-jin. She need not worry about losing her brother over it.

Meanwhile, at the station, Do-jin is promoted to Sr. Inspector for catching a major criminal. So in the end, Dad did make him stronger, just not in the way he wanted.

Dad now walks with a pronounced limp as he is escorted to trial. He passes by Hyun-moo going to his own trial. This time, Dad’s the one who lingers while Hyun-moo walks on without looking back. Hyun-moo enters the courtroom looking scared until he looks up to find Mom and So-jin there. He watches as both ladies humble themselves, bowing and apologizing to the victims’ families. It’s probably more effective in making him regret his crimes than any prison sentence, though of course he still has to go to jail. Moo-won prosecutes him meticulously, no shortcuts, but he’s fair considering the guy tried to kill his sister.

Dad’s trial isn’t as peaceful since Ji-hong and Yoo-ra are being tried along with him. Or they would be tried, if they can stop insulting him for ten seconds so the trial can continue. Ji-hong is mad that Dad kept saying he’s the only one who can fight Na-moo when the kid already beat him years ago. Yoo-ra is also livid that Dad pretended to stay by her then put the blame on her during interrogation. The hearing is postponed because of the disturbances. As Dad is escorted back to jail, Mom, So-jin, and Do-jin stand watch, unmoved, while the families pelt Dad with eggs.

More time passes, and Do-jin comes home to Jae-yi’s house (ooh did he move back in?) to find her crying in secret over her Mom’s picture. She apologizes for crying, thinking it will hurt him to see her still in pain. He assures her that he’s been waiting for her to feel comfortable enough to cry in front him because he’s not going anywhere–she has someone she can share her pain with now. In a reverse of the promise she made, Do-jin kisses her forehead and tells her he loves her as she finally cries with abandon.

As we see clips of their sweet (sekshi?) life at home, Jae-yi’s voiceover says “Twelve years ago there was a wall so thick, I thought it would never come down. Twelve years later, it crumbled because of us.” Do-jin continues, “The era of evil has ended.”

Dad can only stew angrily in prison as he reads Han’s latest article “It was salvation, not a bad connection: the son of an assailant and the daughter of a victim were each other’s savior.”

In a fantasy sequence, Jae-yi and Do-jin meet their younger counterparts. He narrates, “Twelve years ago, the tree stopped growing. The tree must have waited…” he tells Na-moo to come closer so he can hug him as Jae-yi continues, “… for rain and sunshine to nourish it. And for someone to give it a hug.” She gives the same invitation to Nak-won who walks over tentatively before letting herself be hugged.

In real life, Do-jin and Jae-yi meet up at a park with lots of people for their date as they finish the narration, “The moment it is touched, the tree grows energetically. Everywhere the leaves touch will become paradise.”

COMMENTS

Well, that finale was… anti-climactic. And frustrating. Don’t get me wrong, I’m glad that we didn’t lose even more people. But for a show that started out with a lot of creepy undertones (remember Dad’s friendly hammer lessons and “saving” Lucky?) and some impressive dialogues in the middle, the last two hours felt draggy with too much talking. And not even mind-stimulating banter, at that.

While some of the topics discussed were a bit new–like the idea that Dad is trying to control Na-moo to hide his weakness, or that he was hiding that weakness from his minions–I can’t tell if the writer deliberately saved those for the finale or they just misjudged the pacing. It’s good to pop a few surprises in the final hour, but imagine if they revealed Yoon Hee-jae’s insecurities a few weeks ago and we watched him unravel, trying to manipulate everyone as Park Hee-young gets closer to the truth and his minions lose faith.

Another unfortunate effect of cramming the reveals during the drawn-out Dad/Do-jin showdown is it gave us us reveal-fatigue. If it will all be resolved in half an hour anyway, why should we care? There’s also the unintended hilarity of watching two “monsters” holding hammers for hours while they talk each other’s ears off.

Then there’s the bigger problem with the show not even answering the question it posed: is Do-jin capable of being a monster? I know we’re sick of hearing it from Park Hee-young to Nam-gil all the way to Judgemental Bystander #15 in the cast, but I do want that question answered clearly. If only because the show asked it a dozen times per episode, leading us to think that it’s the point of the whole thing.

Yes, Do-jin threw away the hammer while Dad was threatening to kill Jae-yi for the hundredth time, but this isn’t new for us. What we want to know is what Do-jin will do when he thinks Jae-yi is actually dead. And no, figuring out that she’s being held hostage somewhere doesn’t count. I still have this lingering doubt that Do-jin could only afford to be merciful because he knows she’s alive. Dad should’ve at least drugged her unconscious and arranged her atop a pool of blood for Do-jin to look at. I can’t believe I have to lecture Dad on dramatic displays. Come on, Dad, you’re more diva than that!

And let’s not forget the multiple sins against basic safety that this show committed just to get our main characters together for a final confrontation. What happened to Jae-yi’s smartwatch? What’s the use of having a gangster manager who’s easily subdued? When you’re a cop with a full squad of officers looking for an escaped serial killer, will you really just stand by the gate and peer at a building that used to be the killer’s murdering ground and go, “Looks unoccupied, let’s move along.” *sigh* I suppose we should be grateful that Do-jin even bothered to call Moo-won and Jong-hyun instead of trying to save Jae-yi all by himself.

But even though I complained too much about the last two hours, I still like the show for its parts (more than the whole). Specifically, the parts with Park Hee-young and Dad manipulating each other, Dad manipulating Moo-won, Dad manipulating Hyun-moo, Do-jin manipulating Ji-hong… okay, maybe I like mind-tricksy stuff. This show was great at it. Remember how scary Dad was, just sitting in that faux confessional room, getting everyone to visit him so he can emotionally scar them some more?

I also loved Do-jin’s makeshift family. We all cheered for Hyun-moo when he found the courage to go over to Mom’s side, but I’m also glad that Mom found out her efforts to reach out to her stepson weren’t in vain. Now there’s one less potential murderer in the world and one new mama’s boy.

Though I complained a couple of times about putting the pining scenes offscreen, Jae-yi and Do-jin’s relationship still ended on a beautiful note. I love the idea that they’re emotionally “un-pausing” now that Dad is no longer influential enough to keep dragging them back to the past. They didn’t magically become okay, but they’re surrounded by supportive friends and family. More importantly, they still have each other. Moving on is just a matter of time (and kisses! Lots of kisses!)

All in all, it was an enjoyable watch and an even more enjoyable discussion with beanies. Though I don’t have the urge to rewatch it anytime soon, it was made likeable by some great moments, standout characters, and interesting questions (which we’ll have to answer ourselves) delivered by a cast that did solidly with the roles they were given. I’ll be happy to see their names pop up in future casting news and check out their next projects, just please let it be another decent show.

 
RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , ,

47

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recaps @mary!

The show kinda flat out towards the last episodes but I’d remember it for its solid actors.

6
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ahhhhh that ending line was perfect. Everything was put together for that one line. Lol. But really, it salvaged the drama for me. All this time, I thought Come and Hug Me was meant to be said by one character to another so it was really a pleasant surprise that it was actually for their younger selves. They needed closure more than anything else. That trauma from then made their world stop. Everything after that was centered around that incident and no matter what they did, it just never fully went away. In the end, they were finally able to embrace that part of themselves and say, "Okay, we're moving on." And I love that. It's so beautiful.

I admit to doubting Namoo when he started his bouts of evil faces and actions. Like is he succumbing to it? Has he always been like this? And maybe that's what they wanted viewers to think. However, I felt really guilty when Hyunmoo made the parallel of Moowon "killing" the murderer to Namoo going after his dad. Both can be seen as violent but they were a result of wanting to protect those who are dear to them. That makes so much sense. I might have had the realization the same time Moowon did.

The drama became redundant in the middle when all they did was worry, hug, worry, hug. The preemptions didn't help as well. Still, overall, this was a great watch. Watching it with beanies obviously made it more enjoyable. Thank you, beanies! Couldn't have done this without you (literally)!

P.S. So glad they didn't do the adopted brother secretly has romantic feelings for younger sister route. Thank you! I love how Moowon genuinely loves Nakwon as his sister and the only family he has. It explains so much why he did things a certain way. Moowon and Hyunmoo definitely stole my heart by the end of this.

7
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Didn't even have to mention acting. These actors played their characters so realistically. Everyone was spot on. Dad still takes the cake though (and will probably smash it into pieces). If I ever run into this guy on the streets, I'd run away instantly.

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Moo-won, possibly the only prosecutor in the district

commands Do-jin to kill him or Jae-yi will die. Is it just me, or does that sound like a win-win?

That’s what family is for, right?

LOL

Nice to see you having fun...

7
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It lost steam in the middle and a bit more but totally made up for it the last episode. Happy to see two people maneuver such an impossible relationship. I wished the romance was a bit realistic though. I mean what couple sleeps in the same house in different rooms?? Not saying they should have jumped to do the deed but you know...

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Season 2 will be Come Here and Smooch (and More!) Me

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks @mary for the recap. I can feel the "frustating" things about the finale. There's so many lack in detail and I can't satisfied with this ending. Although I love how Dojin and Jaeyi lovely stand for their lover. This drama remind me of I Remember You from some reason but still can't beat the detail in I Remember You.
The theory about monster is created or monster is genetics still need to be answer. How capable Dojin as a cop, Dojin fearless with any violence, and he is capable to manipulate someone are the prove that Dojin and his father is same in different way. They face the same thing in differents POV.
Oh, I ship Mowon with Dojin's hoobae cop. They suit each other.
Jang Ki Yong nail his character and can't wait to see him in different role. He has a big future with his ability, may be he can be the next Lee Jong Suk or Kim Wo Bin as Model turns actor. And imagining him in Bad Guy the Movie as criminal/phyco is interesting.

4
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Noooo!! Its so sad it doesn't beat I remember you.
I still remember it.
*Sorry, goes back into hiding, I have dropped it, I need to remember*

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes, it's so sad. With the solid cast but the story..... Ehm 😒 I off to re-watch I Remember You ASAP

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes it didn't beat I remember you which will be forever one of my favorite drama but this one was chilling and gripping too with it's own range of emotions.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recaps Mary!!!!
"I still have this lingering doubt that Do-jin could only afford to be merciful because he knows she’s alive" < okay but if he was gonna snap (which we won't get now cos show is over lol) but if he WAS then I think they would've had to have written the entire last half differently and delved MORE into whether or not Do Jin had such "darkness" in him at the beginning.
Because as it was, as we saw, what we got, in canon, I don't think there was enough, if anything I think they were pushing for the opposite. And that's partly why I was annoyed in the last 3 episodes- because they kept trying to push that Do Jin is some monster with no real backing and I was never convinced anyway.
So if they were gonna do that they would've had to have written it differently.
I too miss the tenseness and the manipulativeness and the creepyness of the first half. It was nerve wracking but it was GOOD. The end just kinda wandered downhill.
I didn't hate it and I was, as usual, expecting a lot worse, but I wasn't nearly as invested in the last half as the first.
Will post my wall ending rant in a sec ^-^

6
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

More thoughts (some from my wall)

Shockingly not as bad as I was expecting. They sort of redeemed themselves and I wasn\’t left feeling too bitter. Although I still think up till the Annoying Reporter Lady died, it was a better show.

Good Things-
All Hyun Moo\’s scenes. His A+ character development. Him not dying. His lines. My heart. Kim Kyung Nam, you have come a LOONG way from being a random extra in AOY.

Nak Won vs Crazy Dad and Crazy Lady. Uhm? When did you get so badass young lady!? I feel like I should nickpit this but I was just satisfied mostly hahaha Actually if I wasn't at work I would totally nitpick this bit, but shhhh lets uhm... just pretend she was badass and not stupid all along and that this Nakwon is totally in character ok? Ok.

Okay so I actually thought the confrontation wasn’t bad - but it probably could\’ve packed more of a punch if the lead up was better and had it not been oh I don\’t know, interrupted every 5 seconds by unnecessary flashbacks???

But also now having read @mary's comments, it’s making me think about what that conflict would’ve looked like had I actually believe Do Jin was capable of despicable things.
Because I did not.
It felt like they were forcing a lot of the later moments of him “almost snapping” and so it felt fake. Especially since in my opinion, they hadn’t ever properly set him up to be a monster. They could’ve, sure! Then it would’ve been nerve wracking and then I’d have had more conflict about whether or not he’s a good guy and what makes a man good. But I didn’t. I just thought he was all round the hero, a very well written and acted one, but he was and is the juxtaposition to dad and because the show lost its creepy nerve wracking tone of the first half- half heartedly trying to convince me, Show, that this man has darkness in him NOW, is not going to fly. It comes off as forced, rushed and weak writing.
I don’t mind that he’s a good guy- and the he chose to do that right thing- like that also serves for good conflict. So I don’t mind the dialogue direction the final scenes took. Because it was ultimately believable. But it ALSO still didn’t have enough set up or development… because we did stupid things for three episodes instead...
So neither our possible Do Jin Is Monster ending (which ultimately would’ve been much darker and maybe more interesting but not likely in a kdrama) or the Do Jin Is Not A Monster ending were developed or written as tightly as they could’ve have been. Or well one didn’t even exist, but you get what I mean.

Random Other-
OH GOSH FINALLY SOMEONE SHOT THE IDIOT HOLDING A GUN TO SOMEONES HEAD IN THE LEG do you know how annoyed I get in film and tv at how often that doesn\’t happen? Yikes.

Would have it been more satisfying to watch our heroes set up a trap for Daddio and catch him that way, by baiting him and using him against himself, OR Nam Woo Yah just not bringing the hammer to the dog farm at all so that Dad gets zero...

10
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

On some notes, I disagree! I don't think Do Jin ever had it in him to be a monster. For a lot of the drama, while his dad was talking about it being second nature and in their blood, Do Jin was adamant that it was a choice to be a monster. I think the part where he's about to hit his dad and stops, thinking about Jae Yi calling out his name, proves that he would never be that monster even if Jae Yi wasn't there. Her love isn't transformative but rather it's a reminder of who he really is and that's not his dad. I liked that a lot. Do Jin made a choice, he made several actually. Shooting his dad in the leg when he could have easily killed him was another too.

I binged the whole lot of episodes, so I didn't really feel much a slow down like everyone else watching week to week. I do think we could have explored the father's vulnerabilities more and earlier but I don't think it took much from the drama that it was not. I feel really good about the show and the performances. I can only hope it opens more doors to Jang Ki Yong and Jin Ki Joo to star in leading roles as well.

6
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ya know, hammers are good for more than just smashing skulls.

I promise I won't call you a monster if you smash a serial killer's fingers and kneecaps until he tells you how to save an innocent kidnapping victim.

8
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

i think the head bashing with hammers was so unnecessarily overused... as if none of them suffered from brain damage, hellloooo....

i think i would've tolerated bashing other body parts as you mentioned more easily... wait, did i just say that?
: O

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

yeah... it was super anti-climactic, sadly...
: [

but... i couldn't figure out how else it would have a happy ending. but, it was seriously BLAND..... of course, i'm not complaining that they managed to live "happily ever after"... it's just that it was done so... so... flat.

but i love the OTP and so i won't complain, oh... but i just did. whooops....

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

What was the point of random YHJ fangirl to be introduced at the last second? They didn't explain what made her like that, why was she such a nutcase. Her only purpose was to help him escape, I suppose, but it felt like such an unnecessary addition to the cast.
Why wasn't the sunbae police punished for hiding evidence? And what changed his mind? Oh the fact the very guy whom he despised for being a murderer's son saved him from his murderous father? I didn't understand his purpose in the show at all.
How did JY's manager survive after being hit on the head? Don't tell me, daddy dearest left his work unfinished, how could he?
See, I still have so many questions left. Anyway....

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I have those questions left too I wish we could have gotten those answers. -_-

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I know the father-son showdown was anti-climactic, but I personally thought it was fitting that Dojin was able to beat his father in a non-violent way. All this time the father was able to manipulate and scare the heck out of everyone from a distance, so I loved that Dojin turned the tables; it was like the monster under the bed was reduced to nothing during their 'fight'. But my favorite scene was definitely brave Jaeyi, letting out all the anger she's kept in and telling off the psychopath!

4
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I watched this entire show this weekend and I'm fairly sure I wouldn't have finished if I tried to live watch (usually it's the opposite for me where I give up on shows while half way through bingeing and never go back) but I think this did some interesting things:
-I'd been watching a show for a mind-numbing 8 hours already so I didn't notice it slowing down in the middle I just thought it was me
-I didn't have time to think about things in depth so I kinda just accepted them how they came
-when really repetitive scenes happened and I was like oh okay we're still on this stage where as if I was live-watching I'd be like...I waited weeks for the same thing?

I think I agree with Mary that I won't have the urge to rewatch it any time soon but I can totally see myself going back and watching the beginning couple of episodes then watching the last 20 minutes to remind myself of the happy ending lol

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Just popping in (with my eyes closed and my fingers in my ears) to thank @mary for the recaps. I swear, one day I'll catch up with this show and get to read them! 😂

5
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I hope you catch up the episodes and recaps soon coz this one is underrated but one of the best drama of 2018.❤️

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree! XD

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you Mary for taking the time to recap this show: it wasn't quite as angsty as I wished, but it was quite good the way it was.
Too bad Dad felt more dangerous inside the prison rather than out. And what happened to his slip about killing more people than he was sentenced for?
The face-off made me reach for I hear your voice (ep. 17): it never felt like Do-jin could snap the way Su-ha almost did when he thought Hye-sung had been killed. Of course the audience knows that Do-jin has a strong support system that will keep him in the non-monster category, but I wanted to see his unhinged look one more time (so good! So scary!).
But I do love how Do-jin shot his father in the leg: it was business as usual, his father was just another criminal who needed not to be killed for revenge or catharsis - Do-jin in now free from his father's shadow.
Hopefully Do-jin now feels confident enough in his humanity to let Jae-yi marry him (because I know it will be this way around); I am mentally looking forward all the family meals with everyone, once Hyun-moo has apologized as promised to Jae-yi and the big Bros can loosen up a bit once they see their little brothers and sisters have turned up just fine.

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

This was a lackluster ending to what could have been a great storytelling experience.

And whatever happened to the storyline where NakWon couldnt fully express herself to anyone? She was supposed to tell NaMoo something when this was all over, right?? I guess the writer forgot about that storyline... oh well

All I can say is that I’m glad it ended ok even though I ended up sighing 10000X during the long conversation between NaMoo and Yoon HuiJae.

Thank you CAHM for showing me how amazing Kim KyungNam can be!

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Going completly off-topic @acacia, but I recently binge-watched Prison Playbook after you said you liked it so much. And I loved it, I absolulty adored it, so thank you so much for your recommandation!!! I wouldn't have watched if it weren't for you, and it is so far my favorite drama of the year (technically mostly of the previous year, but...). It is staying with me long after I've finished it, which sadly means that I haven't been really invested in other dramas since, but I love the feeling! :) Also, it is funny that fanboy little brother in Prison Playbook is the same actor as Broody older brother Hyun-moo in Come and Hug me: such different characters, I hope to see more of him soon!

4
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Delsatu!!! Off topic, but we missed you on our posts!!! It’s kind of hard to join in on the translating posts now huh?
I’m so glad you liked Prison Playbook!! It is truly one of my top favorite dramas for sure 😍 and who would’ve though Kim KyungNam could play such polar opposite characters so well!! I feel lile he even bulked up a bit for this role. He didnt look this big in PP, perhaps its his acting? Either way he’s awesome 😍

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you @mary for the recaps. The ending was flat there could have been better scenarios. I was anticipationg something epic and chilling though with some happiness at the end. Though I'm that everyone got their best ending.
Finally we got to know what exactly happened that night.
Nak Won has grown much stronger through her pains and suffering, she did and said what she wanted to do. I loved that slap scene. I 'm so proud of her for defending herself after being shut for so long.
Yoon Hee Jae is utterly despicable, his reasoning for murdering people are his own delusions.
I was glad the reporter brought up the fact that Nam Gil was like she used to be toward Na Moo. Why was that horrible detective not punished for his obstruction of justice?
I really love the last scene at the end when they hug their past selves and how they finally forgave themselves for what happened in the past. The way they tied that together through that hug was so heartwarming. They accepted the past and embraced it. Love endures all things.
Hat off to all the crew for doing such a amazing job. Such wonderful combination of tragedy and redemption. The story was excellent and acting was brilliant.❤️

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@mary, thank you so much for the recap. I loved your sarcasm filled posts! They made the second half of this drama more enjoyable!!! 😘😘😘😘😘😍😍😍😍.
I, in the end, was unable to keep up with the show but I loved your recaps. I will look forward to seeing Jang ki Yong and the guy who played hyun moo.

See you at another recap.

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Huh. I guess sometimes shows have to be a lot more explicit because I thought it was clear that DoJin does have it in him to be a monster... but then so do all of us. That is, if the definition of monster is to kill and destroy.

Anger can lead to revenge, fear can lead to hystery, panic can blind and when someone who's the world to you (like JaeYi, Mom and SoJin was to DoJin) is in absolute mortal danger, an intense pain can rip through you and you start growling and hissing for blood even before you know it, wanting to rip the danger piece by piece, smash it into a million shards... to make sure it never comes for your world again. It's part self-defence, self-protection and a whole lot of protective instinct. But what stops him and stops us from becoming true monsters like Yoon HeeJae are people, and the ability to feel guilt.

Yoon HeeJae doesn't feel guilt. DoJin, HyunMoo and MooWon do.

Yoon HeeJae kills to show the world that he can subdue people and therefore, in his mind, he believes that makes him feared and thus strong and powerful, which is what tickles him actually, cause he craves for that recognition. But he never picks someone his own size or bigger. In his mind, he conquers all. But in reality, he's just a coward who picks on those he can only win. He's got no guts for the full force of what the world can bring.

DoJin on the other hand, will kill, no matter who, no matter how strong, any opponent who dares attack his loved ones. And he's strong, because even when the world was unfair to him, he just took it, and never crumbled or lashed out. That fortitude earned him recognition in the end, a respect and position that he never had to obsess over for.

When DoJin becomes a monster, there will only be one reason for it: he wills himself to be strong in order to protect all that make him weak and pathetic... and therefore strong, as a human.

DoJin did become a monster - to Dad, to YooRa, to JiHong. It's just that he didn't do it physically - he only smashed their fantasies and all that kept the going. JiHong has to come to terms with the fact that he's just a fool who got tricked, YooRa has to come to terms with the fact that her idol is exactly what she derides - a hypocrite. And Dad... well. He has to endure a life where he's nothing. And for a guy who thinks nothing of death (so killing him would have been pointless anyway), that's absolute hell.

So actually, what's the definition of a monster? Is it based on provable actions? Black and white? Or is it based on whether you understand the other person or not, whatever his actions may be, and thereby making the awarding of the label "monster" a biased one? A soldier who kills the enemy is a protector to his country. But he's a monster to the mother of the person he killed. Is what I think.

[I'd say NakWon has the ability to be a monster in her too. But she stops DoJin from killing because she knows that he will regret it very...

4
9
reply

Required fields are marked *

Does that make sense? Abstract concepts like this are incredibly hard to explain and convey and I'm not sure I'm doing a good job rather than just rambling.

1
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

It makes perfect sense. You said exactly what I was thinking but so much better.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I understand what you're trying to say, but consider this: the show has always "theorized" that Do-jin has a breaking point. We all know he won't really go so far as kill a person. But the show keeps repeating he will (or Dad does). So for the show to be able to say, "No, Do-jin will never be a monster no matter what happens" the show has to give us the worst case scenario AND let Do-jin overcome it. But it didn't deliver. It's like this:

Show: Woooo~ Do-jin might be a monster.
Us: Nope, not buying it.
Show: Bbbut... look! He almost killed Jihong! He gets this scary look.
Us: Nope. He's not his father.
Show: Bbbut... we want you to doubt it. He could be! If you push him far enough!
Us: Okay, show us his limit then.
Show: You know what, never mind. You're right, he probably wouldn't be a monster. No need to go that far.

4
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh, never mind. It seems you were saying the exact opposite. That they were monsters in their own way. I beg to disagree. Do-jin "breaking" Ji-hong by shattering his delusions doesn't make him a monster. And just because Ji-hong thinks Do-jin is a monster doesn't mean he actually is. It's like that mean about 6 or 9 trying to say that perspective matters, but not in all cases: https://imgur.com/gallery/pleGM

Your example about war is good, but it doesn't apply here, because Ji-hong isn't fighting to protect himself or gain more territory to feed his people or something. He was just killing others for fun.

4
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

That's exactly what I was trying to say though.

What IS a monster? How do you DEFINE, without bias, a monster? What characteristics do you have to tick to be labelled fairly as a monster? In history, I have always seen the label "monster" used on individuals or groups that the majority do not understand and therefore fear. So, if someone does the same thing but for purposes that you understand, that makes him not a monster?

Because in my definition and understanding, there're only two characteristics that a person has to tick to become a monster - monsters strike fear and monsters destroy. Both things DoJin did to JiHong. Both things DoJin did to Yoon HeeJae. Both things NakWon did to YooRa.

Both DoJin and NakWon tore at the very fabric of HeeJae, YooRa and JiHong's existence and ripped them from the warped "reality" that they took comfort in. Especially Yoon HeeJae, who now knows the world sees him as a worthless stupid nobody criminal when he only feels alive when he feels powerful, which he achieved through violence and manipulation.

The three of them don't kill others just for fun - they kill others to validate themselves. But DoJin and NakWon turned those killings into nothing. In fact, they turned those killings into evidence of the three's cowardice, which they cannot even comprehend themselves having. How do you live, when you cannot.live with yourself?

1

In effect, I just wanted to mean that in my opinion, the usage and labelling of the word "monster" is not fixed in stone. It's subjective.

Before we decide who is a monster, we have to decide and agree collectively on what defines a monster.

1

I believe DoJin really could kill a person though. Because every time he stops, it's only because of some reminder by an imaginary loved one or because of some flashback of some loved one. It's never because of hesitance, like "I can't bear to strike", like HyunMoo does. Without the loved ones, he'd have continued with the rage and the killing blow to completely annihilate the danger. But then again, he wouldn't have been murderous if he had no loved ones to get protective over.

In this case though, I really believe, ever since DoJin's first scuffle with JiHong, that DoJin, while he can kill, knows that the greater hell for the three deluded ones is making them face someone who's bigger than them - something they've never confronted before - and ripping apart their delusions. To them, death is just a game after all. Glory and recognition is more important. (YooRa's "otherwise the world will forget us" speech anyone? Seriously, why do you need the world to remember you when you're dead?)

HyunMoo is rash, dishing out revenge in the way he thinks will destroy the opponent the best. DoJin is more calculative, dishing out revenge in the way the opponent fears the most.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

... ... very intensely, even if it's to protect. It will hang over his entire existence and no one deserves to live with all the bad dreams like MooWon.]

Was what I was going to say.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ah, that's not to say that DoJin and NakWon are monsters in my opinion, like how MooWon and HyunMoo (see this guy, he's complicated) are not.

I just really believe that they could become monsters... but they just always (except HyunMoo) choose not to go full monster, all the way. And therefore they're all stronger than Yoon HeeJae, who couldn't even pull himself away from the trap of his murderous temptations like how rabid animals don't and cannot choose to not give into their destructive desires. Yoon HeeJae's not even human. He's a rabid animal.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

-I wished they had shown a scene with the family visiting Hyun-moo in prison. But seeing them support him at trial was beautiful. He still has to go to prison but he finally found his way out of the darkness to find/accept what he always wanted: a family.
-On a purely superficial note: Kim Kyung-nam (Hyun-moo) is BEAUTIFUL. He has the most gorgeous eyes. I love him.
-I totally ship Moo-wan with Yeon-ji. Why didn't they introduce this pair sooner?!
-Note to those fighting a murderer: when the killer offers you his weapon, TAKE IT AND THROW IT FAR AWAY! DON'T LEAVE IT IN HIS HAND!
-I loved bada** Jae-yi who slapped a serial killer, fought back from being injected and marched right over to protect her man.
-I loved the parallelism between that night 12 years ago and the present when Jae-yi came over to protect Do-jin just like he did for her years ago. And whenever these 2 are together, Dad is bound to lose every time.
-People mentioned how Do-jin wasn't fighting like a trained cop when fighting his brother and I think it's because he didn't want to hurt Hyun-moo. But he had no qualms about hurting the other person when it came to fighting Dad.
-I really enjoyed this show (I wish Chief Go had lived *tear*) and will miss it. I'll especially miss my favorite character . . . Hyun-moo. I lived for his scenes. Goodbye Show, thanks for the ride! <3

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It wasn't the best show but it was good at what it did, which was hurting me.

7
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

LMAO

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

There were a lot of flashbacks... It's like they resumed all the drama in the last two episodes. If they don't have enough story, they could make less episodes...

I liked how Jae Yi was badass at the end. It was nice to see it :)

For Nam Moo, it's not like we doubted that he will take the wrong decision, he was perfect since the beginning...

The point that bothers me the most is the cop who stole the pen. Because of that they couldn't arrest the false son (I'm not good with name..) , he was free and helped the Dad to escape, the Dad killed a lot of people but the most important he killed the cop Go Yi Seok ! And the cop doesn't feel guilty for the death of his chief O_O

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I liked everything about the ending except for that confrontation between Na-moo and Psycho Dad. I was yawning while watching them talk, talk & talk some more. I honestly enjoyed the scene where Na-moo is breaking fake son’s fingers more than his final scene with his dad.

Still, drama is one of my favorites this year. I enjoyed it a lot, not gonna rewatch it though. :D* Thank you for your awesome recaps, Mary! <3

3
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

overall such a great drama, cannot wait for more from these actors and writers !

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's ended.
I feel that the second half isn't as stellar as I hoped. Some characters got very late development, while others got unexpected (and a bit unwelcome) change. And yet, somehow it still left me satisfied. I guess this is another case of feelings over logic? Because while I can see all the plot holes and the withheld 'secrets' had become a bit stale by the last couple of eps, it still made me strongly feel for all the characters. I cried, I laughed, I swooned along with them. By the last eps, I realized that Come and Hug Me could've been a 11/10 drama with the intriguing questions it posed about monster and nature vs. nurture. It fell short of my expectation, yet it was still a drama that touched my heart deeply.

@mary, I enjoyed reading your witty and thoughtful recaps. And I'm glad I can read many beanies' thought about this drama. Also, whoever responsible for writing the title and short description for CAHM videos, you're a genius. Now, I'm off to find all the Theme of the Month's posts for this drama and appreciate it anew.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The characters had closure but the viewers didn’t. There are some loose ends like what happened to his brother ( court scene is cut off and leaves viewers guessing) and what about nah moo’s mom and sister? Why not show them getting married? Weak ending

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *