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Mr. Sunshine: Episode 22

Whatever you’re expecting from this episode, heighten your expectations now because whether you’ve been following this show, dropped the show, or just picked this random episode to watch, you will be overwhelmed. The Righteous Army operations are in full swing in response to the Japanese invasion, and everyone is ready to sacrifice for the resistance. Fasten your seatbelts, everyone. This bulldozer doesn’t plan to stop until it reaches the end.

 
EPISODE 22 RECAP

After confronting Hotaru about her betrayal, Dong-mae determines that he must go to Japan. Yujo stands in his way, and Dong-mae tells Yujo to run away with the gang if he doesn’t come back in a month. Yujo won’t let Dong-mae sacrifice himself just for some woman, but Dong-mae tells Yujo that Ae-shin isn’t just some woman to him.

Yujo begs to accompany him, but Dong-mae yells that he just abandoned his people because he knows this is a suicide mission. Hotaru blocks his path, her tearful eyes pleading him to stay. Dong-mae turns away, unable to control his emotions at the sight of their desperation, and he takes a detour off the balcony to head for Japan.

In Japan, Eugene and Ae-shin sprint toward the American embassy as the Musin warriors chase them through the streets. With his last bullet, Eugene shoots the window of the embassy building, prompting the response of armed American soldiers rushing out to confront the attack. Eugene and Ae-shin kneel with their hands raised in surrender, and Eugene announces his identity and Ae-shin as his wife. The soldiers express suspicion about his claim, so Eugene asks for Kyle to confirm his identity.

The Musin warriors catch up to the embassy, and their attack on an American soldier opens fire against them. After a load of casualties, the Musin warriors retreat, and Kyle, looking confused, steps out of the gate to identify Eugene, who smiles in relief. But even with their identities confirmed, Eugene and Ae-shin are escorted in a jail cell.

Kyle argues with the ambassador to keep both Eugene and Ae-shin safe at the embassy, but the ambassador wants to release both of them, lest the Americans become enemies of the Musin Society. The ambassador expresses fear about meddling in diplomatic affairs, and Kyle indignantly asserts that the U.S. didn’t hesitate to involve themselves in diplomatic affairs when he lost his hand in the war. The ambassador agrees to be less of a hypocrite and allows both Eugene and Ae-shin to remain in custody.

In the cell, Ae-shin and Eugene sit side by side, and Eugene calmly tells her to get some rest. Ae-shin compliments his composure despite the chaos, but Eugene admits that his heart is racing because she’s sitting so close to him. Ae-shin apologizes for all these detours, and Eugene says that it’s unfair that she won’t ask him to stay even while knowing that he’s taken these detours for her. He offers his shoulder for her to sleep, and she gladly leans on him and asks that they stay like this until the morning. While she closes her eyes, Eugene looks at his ring tearfully.

As Dong-mae sails his way toward Japan, he thinks about his encounter with Sang-mok, the Righteous Army comrade who shot him. With his sword at Sang-mok’s neck, Dong-mae explained that he saw Ae-shin at Jemulpo and knew that she’s involved in the Righteous Army. He plans on saving Ae-shin, like he saved Sang-mok, and he demanded to know where Ae-shin is staying in Japan. He claimed that Ae-shin cannot be saved without the help of a Japanese person.

Dong-mae’s right about the need for a Japanese insider, as we see the Musin warriors report their failed mission to capture Ae-shin. Musin Boss knows that the Americans won’t protect a Joseon person and orders his lackeys to keep a watchful eye on the embassy for her release.

The next morning, Ae-shin wakes up leaning on Eugene and quickly scrambles to her feet, scolding herself for sleeping so well in this dire situation. Eugene says that he’ll help Ae-shin escape and that it’s time for his farewell, since he’ll be leaving for home. He embraces Ae-shin, and she cries on his shoulder, holding him tight.

They part, and Eugene gently wipes the tears on Ae-shin’s face. Instead of a goodbye, Ae-shin requests a “See you,” and Eugene says, “See you again.” The cell opens, and Eugene says that he’ll have her back — as he always did – and will trust that she can handle the rest of the escape on her own. She nods with her brave face as he leaves, but she breaks down into tears once she’s alone in the cell.

The Musin warriors watch Eugene leave in handcuffs, and they also see another carriage with a casket leaving with Kyle. Suspecting that Ae-shin is hiding in the casket, the Musin warriors stop Kyle’s carriage and open the casket, but it carries the body of an American soldier. Kyle smacks the Musin leader across the face for disrespecting a fallen American soldier and says that the Musin leader will die for this. In a quick flashback, we see that Eugene requested to Kyle that the casket leave with him because he knew the Musin warriors would take the bait. Kyle looks at toward the port and wishes Eugene good luck.

Thanks to the distraction, Ae-shin successfully escaped the American embassy, and she meets with Apprentice, who informs her that a bearded American soldier (Kyle) stopped by. Apprentice warns her of the dangers of returning to Joseon, as masses of Musin warriors are scouring the streets for her. Ae-shin opts to stay at their hideout and asks Apprentice to send a telegram for her.

Japanese ambassador Hayashi and Duk-moon, the former assistant to Wan-ik, wait at the port for Ito Hirobumi’s arrival. Hayashi says that Emperor Ito likes white porcelain, and Duk-moon assures him that he has all the white porcelain that he inherited from Wan-ik, who pillaged them from Nobleman Go. Hayashi comments that there must be a mourning ceremony in the Mori family, since they haven’t seen Takashi, so it seems that they don’t know about his death yet. Emperor Ito arrives and admires how Joseon has become a more civilized nation, thanks to Japan.

Japanese Emperor Ito meets with Joseon Emperor Gojong and commends him for allowing Japan to be the bridge to the Western world. Emperor Gojong looks disappointed at his inferiority and orders his minister, Lee Wan-yong (later one of the five Eulsa Treaty traitor), to assist the Japanese emperor during his stay.

Hee-sung receives a telegram from a Japanese stranger, and the telegram reads: “I hope to meet you on that day at that place.” He’s confused by the telegram, and he returns to the hotel to find Hina holding an 8-ball from the pool table. Hina asks him the meaning of a ball behind the 8-ball, and Hee-sung says that it means that you’re in danger. Remembering the significance of this phrase, Hee-sung asks if Hina received a telegram that day. He shows his telegram to Hina, and she immediately understands the message. The telegrams were switched, but they’re both a call for help from Ae-shin.

Hina immediately informs Emperor Gojong via telephone speed dial that Ae-shin is in danger, and he orders Minister Lee Wan-yong to prepare a diplomatic trip to Japan. Once the pleased minister leaves, Emperor Gojong returns to his phone call with Hina and asks her to send word to Ae-shin about the emperor’s rescue mission. Hina says that she knows a man who just left for Japan and another man with connections in Japan to reach him.

Once Dong-mae arrives at Shimonoseki port, he’s approached by a lady who flirts that she needs a handsome man to go to the beach with. He shakes her off and walks away, but he stops when she reveals that Hee-sung sent her.

Ae-shin packs the items that Kyle left her — the passport, money, and bullets — and she wears the ring on her neck with a shoelace. Then, she hears the Musin warriors downstairs and shoots them as she tries to escape the shop. It’s an unfair battle, and she hides behind a counter in desperation until she hears another person fighting off the Musin warriors. She stands up and can’t believe her eyes when she sees Dong-mae fighting off the enemy, and she helps him until they defeat their attackers.

Dong-mae leads Ae-shin and Apprentice to Hee-sung’s Tokyo house, and Ae-shin expresses relief that they’ve found another route to survive. But Apprentice takes a step back and reminds her that he’s a Japanese person with family waiting for him in the countryside. He won’t be accompanying Ae-shin any further and tearfully asks that she send Eun-san his respects. Ae-shin thanks him sincerely for everything, and before he leaves, Apprentice orders Dong-mae to protect Ae-shin well.

Dong-mae informs Ae-shin that many people in Joseon are trying to save her: Hina planned the mission, Hee-sung offered his house, and Emperor Gojong is sending a diplomatic procession that Ae-shin will join to return to Joseon. Ae-shin adds that Dong-mae came to Japan to save her as well and asks if he’ll be joining them back to Joseon. Dong-mae reminds her that he’s a traitor and assures her that he knows how to survive in Japan, having spent more time here.

Then, Ae-shin notices his bloody arm and rips a cloth to wrap around his wound. Dong-mae looks at her with angsty gratitude, and she promises to deliver her payment in three months. She demands that Dong-mae receive the payment directly, and he comments that she’s saved him once again. He leaves the room to let her rest, and outside, Dong-mae sits against the building, looking at the bloody cloth that Ae-shin wrapped around his arm.

The Joseon procession arrives in Japan the next morning and makes its way through the streets. Ae-shin picks up a book written by poet Heo Nanseolheon and reads a poem about falling flowers feeling cold in the moonlight. She says that Hee-sung was right about words having power.

Ae-shin hears footsteps approaching and immediately grabs her gun. An unknown woman enters, and Ae-shin points her gun at the woman but quickly lowers her gun when she realizes that the woman was sent by Emperor Gojong. Ae-shin joins the Joseon procession as a court lady, and Dong-mae watches her from afar.

Eugene is brought to court to testify about his reckless actions in Japan. He reveals that he was helping a Joseon woman who was fighting for her country, and he expresses gratitude for the U.S. legation in Japan for protecting him and Ae-shin. The judge accuses Eugene of treason, but a letter from Kyle revealed some mitigating circumstances.

Surrounded by the Musin warriors on the beach, Dong-mae prepares to fight to death and wields his sword. In the U.S., Eugene is escorted out of the court in handcuffs, as we hear the judge’s ruling of Eugene’s sentence for three years in prison and a dishonorable discharge.

Back to Japan, Dong-mae fights off the last warrior, looking close to death himself. But he’s approached by another fleet of warriors escorting Musin Boss. With a disappointed look, Musin Boss calls Dong-mae arrogant for valuing someone more than his own self, when he never truly owned himself. Musin Boss strikes his sword, and Dong-mae sinks into the ocean with his sword.

Eugene sits solemnly in his prison cell while his package from Tokyo arrives at Glory Hotel. Hina delivers the box to Hee-sung, and he opens it to find a camera. Hina informs him that Takashi was murdered in Japan by an unidentified assassin and comments that a black-haired American must have lingered in Japan. Hee-sung says that Eugene’s gun was always pointed in the right direction and looks touched at Eugene’s gift and support for his newspaper.

Yujo and the gang wait at the dojo for Dong-mae, but he doesn’t return. Following Dong-mae’s orders, Yujo order the gang to evacuate the dojo and leave Hanseong.

Ae-shin arrives in Joseon safely and thanks Emperor Gojong for his help. He informs her that Song Young and the other comrades arrived safely in Shanghai, and he now intends to utilize the banknote funds. He offers a gift to Ae-shin hidden in a box with a layer of Western dress, and she looks delighted to see it’s a gun. As the emperor who’s experienced the sorrow of losing his son, wife, and country, he orders Ae-shin to stay alive with this gun.

Ae-shin meets with Hina at the bakery, their rendezvous location, thanks Hina for her help. Hina tells Ae-shin to save her gratitude, since she lost her father, but Ae-shin lost both her parents. Hina reveals that Wan-ik was her father and further explains that Wan-ik was the man who killed Ae-shin’s parents. Ae-shin realizes that her and Hina couldn’t be on the same side from the beginning. Hina tells Ae-shin to visit the foreigner’s graveyard and says that this is her last repayment to Ae-shin.

When Ae-shin arrives at the graveyard, she finds her maid and servant waiting for her. Yay! She runs into her maid’s arms, and her servant explains that they came back from Ae-shin after safely escorting Aunt and Ae-soon to Manchuria. Ae-shin looks relieved to have them there, and they savor their happy reunion… at the graveyard.

Hee-sung’s mother continues to search for a satisfactory wife for her son, but her lady friends comment that Ae-shin is too beautiful to beat. A seamstress bows to the lady of the house before leaving, and Hee-sung’s mother looks at her curiously. The lady explains that the seamstress was hired to help with the newborn twins in the house, but they discovered that she was the daughter of a noble. Now, she’s working as a seamstress to support her two younger siblings.

The seamstress goes to the pawnshop and asks the duo to help her marry, since the matchmaker services are too expensive. She points to Hee-sung at the back of the shop and asks to set her up with him, knowing that his mother is searching for a proper wife. Hee-sung blames his own charm for this inconvenience and turns down the offer because he has no intention to marry. The seamstress pleads him to help her because she needs someone to sponsor her younger brother in the military academy.

The pawnshop duo asks if her brother’s former sponsor was an American soldier, and they realize that the seamstress is Joon-young’s older sister. They quickly agree to forge Hee-sung’s signature for the sponsorship documents without his permission, and Hee-sung finds the seamstress calmly embroidering at the shop. She noticed the shriveled flower on his sign, and she offers the finished embroidered flower to him, saying that it won’t wither.

Hina practices fencing in her hotel courtyard after receiving news about Dong-mae’s gang fleeing Jingogae. She remembers Dong-mae’s parting words at the beach and how he said them like his will. She hears a march of soldiers approaching, and she finds a new fleet of Japanese soldiers at her hotel. The leader demands that Hina clear out the entire second floor for the soldiers, as a service to her nation. The Japanese flag on the hotel replaces with the Joseon flag, and Hina wonders if she should bite after losing this much. She ponders if she should dip her toes in the Righteous Army.

Three years later, in the early summer of 1907, we see Ae-shin sitting on a wall in the hills with her gun. She reaches for the ring, which still hangs around her neck. The Joseon streets are lined with Japanese flags, and a young boy runs through the streets with a newspaper extra. The baker picks up the paper and reads the shocking news that a Tokyo exhibition charging adults 10 jeon and children/soldiers 5 jeon to see a locked up Joseon man and woman. The paper also exposes the Tokyo Asahi Newspaper for their review, which reads: “It’s very amusing to see two Joseon animals caged up at the exhibition.”

Japanese soldiers march through the palace, and Joseon people are captured and beaten for calling the Eulsa Treaty (the Japan-Korea Treaty of 1905) a forced agreement. One of the five Eulsa Treaty traitors, Minister Lee Wan-yong, tells Emperor Gojong that Joseon is still an independent nation temporarily under the control of a foreign nation. We see the future seven traitors of the 1907 treaty, including Minister Lee Wan-yong, who expresses outrage about Emperor Gojong betraying Japan by sending secret agents into the country.

The Minister of Agriculture, Song Byung-joon, demands that Emperor Gojong take his life to save his country, and the other traitors agree that the emperor must take responsibility for jeopardizing the country. Hee-sung reads the traitor’s bold statement in a Japanese newspaper — that if the emperor doesn’t take his own life, then he should beg forgiveness from the Japanese Emperor or surrender in a war against Japan.

Hee-sung crumbles the newspaper in rage, and a staff writer (Ae-shin’s friend from the language school) urgently reports that the pro-Japanese forces have surrounded the palace, with all the ministers already inside. At this news, Hee-sung presumes that the ministers are planning to dethrone the emperor. Hee-sung guessed right, as we see the ministers inside the royal court demanding that Emperor Gojong give up the throne to the prince.

The emperor yells at the traitors for siding with Japan, and Minister Lee Wan-yong steps in front of the emperor and points his gun at the emperor, reminding him of the times they’re living through. Seung-gu steps in, and aiming his gun at the traitor, he asks Emperor Gojong for his command. That prompts another minister to point his gun at Seung-gu, along with a group of soldiers, who enter the court with their dirty boots on.

Recognizing his lost battle, Emperor Gojong abdicates his throne. When the Japanese soldiers approach Seung-gu to capture him, Emperor Gojong commands the traitors to lower their guns that point to Seung-gu. Though he gave up the throne, he’s unwilling to give up Seung-gu.

In New York, Eugene is released from prison and walks to the music shop, where he spent his childhood crying at the sad tune of the music box. We see that he still wears his ring. He visits Joseph’s church to deliver the bible from Joseph’s belongings, and he asks God if there was a reason why his whole life was shaken. Eugene oversees the water deep in thought, when a stranger solicits him for directions to Columbia University. Eugene recognizes the intonation of the stranger’s English and speaks to him in Korean, offering to walk him to his destination.

As they walk to the university, Eugene asks the stranger about news on Joseon and the Russo-Japanese war. Stranger shares that Japan won the war, and Joseon is now forced under Japanese rule through the Eulsa Treaty. He comments on that the U.S. was the first ally to Joseon and also the first to retreat from Joseon. With Japan seeking to annex Joseon, Stranger says that many of his compatriots are trying to spread word about this invasion.

Upon reaching their destination, Stranger asks for Eugene’s name, and he introduces himself as Choi Yoo-jin. Stranger introduces himself to be Ahn Chang-ho (a historical Korean independence activist), and they shake hands. Eugene assures Chang-ho that Joseon will not surrender easily because the people of the Righteous Army are protecting the nation. Chang-ho knows this and reveals that he’s a Righteous Army comrade.

As Eugene walks through the night, he tells God, addressing him as Joseph’s father, that he will live out the rest of his life. Since he lived his entire life relying on futile hope, he hopes for Ae-shin to remain alive.

In Joseon, two Righteous Army comrades blow up a building, and flee from the scene. The police chief arrives with his forces, but they’re blocked by gunshots from Ae-shin on the rooftops. The police chief is then urgently summoned to the bombing at Minister Lee Wan-yong’s house, and he directs his soldiers the opposite direction to search for the Righteous Army rebels while he goes to save the minister himself. The fallen sign reveals that this was burning building belonged to the pro-Japanese newspaper.

Hee-sung looks at the sketches of the wanted Righteous Army members, and he fixates on the one of Ae-shin. Seamstress is with him and calls him by his name, though Hee-sung insists that she call him older brother. She notices him staring at Ae-shin’s sketch and says that she must be the woman in his heart.

Hee-sung remembers his confession to Ae-shin that he knew about her other lover, and he says that she must have felt how he’s feeling now toward Seamstress. Aww, she likes him.

As Joon-young and his fellow soldiers run toward the palace, Joon-young stops to tell his sister and Hee-sung the news about the emperor’s abdication. The Joseon people hang signs of mourning and they lay prostrate on the ground, crying for their lost emperor and nation.

Hina watches the mourning on the bridge with a real estate agent, who then brings her to Dong-mae’s hideout. It’s been empty for a while, but no one dared to touch it because it belonged to Dong-mae. Hina offers to buy it, and she walks over to the robe hanging on the chair. She remembers telling Dong-mae not to die before her, and she cries with the robe in her hand.

In Manchuria among homeless strangers, we see a familiar hand rubbing a coin. It’s Dong-mae, and he sits limp, barely alive. But he’s alive!

Eugene visits the American embassy in Japan, and Kyle welcomes him with a warm embrace. Over beers, Kyle asks why Eugene is in Japan, and Eugene says that he plans on going on another picnic to Joseon, where he’ll be a true foreigner. Kyle asks if Joseon is his true homeland (yes, asking the real questions!), and Eugene claims that his homeland is America, even without his uniform. He’s leaving his homeland again, but not to run away. This time, he’s leaving to move forward, he says. (not a clear answer but ok.)

Kyle makes Eugene promise to come back, and Eugene asks why Kyle wanted to be his friend, even fighting with other Americans to defend him. Kyle says that Eugene was a good soldier while the other bullies were idiots, and he believes in God. Chocking up, Eugene thanks Kyle, “My boss, my friend, my honor. May God be with you always.” They raise their beers, and Kyle wishes him luck.

Ito Hirobumi expresses his sympathy for Minister Lee Wan-yong, who lost his home in the Righteous Army attack. He decides that these seeds of resistance must be eliminated and orders the minister to dissolve the royal military.

This command is carried out the next morning, with the Japanese army dismissing the military trainees and offering them a small severance for their service. They announce the dissolution of the royal military, and the commander shoots himself in front of the Joseon flag in his office, having failed to serve his country.

Joon-young and his comrades stand surrounded by Japanese soldiers, when they hear about the commander’s suicide. Joon-young remembers Eugene’s warning that the Japanese forces will first target the royal military. Joon-young realizes why they’re surrounded and yells at his fellow soldiers to make a run for it, as the military is being disbanded. While being attacked by the Japanese soldiers, they all head toward the storage closet to grab artillery and whatever bullets they can grab.

Emperor Gojong helplessly listens to the chaos outside, and Seung-gu enters the emperor’s quarters to announce his leave from his position to fight alongside his comrades. We see that Seung-gu still carries his gun with the innkeeper’s red ribbon tied to the muzzle. The emperor understands Seung-gu’s resolve, but he refuses to let Seung-gu die. Seung-gu says that his dream was to be a rebel, and he intends on becoming a rebel. Emperor Gojong cries in desperation to keep Seung-gu alive, but he knows that can’t stop Seung-gu.

The Japanese soldiers have slaughtered almost the entirety of the royal military, and Joon-young quickly drags his injured friend to shelter. He checks his gun and realizes that he’s out of bullets, but suddenly, the Japanese soldiers above them are shot dead. Seung-gu comes running toward them, and he joins Joon-young to help them fight. He orders Joon-young to run for his life while Seung-gu shoots at the enemy.

When Joon-young asks if Seung-gu will join them, Seung-gu remembers his father’s stubborn loyalty in a losing battle. Echoing his father’s words, Seung-gu says no one will be left to protect the post if he leaves with them. He delivers his last command that Joon-young and the remain forces flee the area. Surviving is winning, he says. Tears falling at Seung-gu’s willing sacrifice, Joon-young takes the command and orders the surviving soldiers to move swiftly and help any injured soldiers.

With a last nod to Joon-young, Seung-gu runs toward the palace with his gun, the innkeeper’s red ribbon guiding his muzzle, while Joon-young and the surviving soldiers escape in the opposite direction.

When Seung-gu enters the palace courtyard, he’s shot in the back and stumbles toward the fire. He takes out the bomb in his uniform and falls to his knees at another gunshot. The Japanese soldiers surround him, and Seung-gu crawls toward the fire, reaching for a piece of wood the light the bomb. He remembers the war in his youth, when he brought the flame to soldiers with guns. He lights the bomb with a smile, and the courtyard explodes into flames.

Joon-young’s friends look back at the smoke and yell for Seung-gu, but Joon-young remains focused and instructs his friends not to turn back.

In the village, dead royal military soldiers line the streets and surviving soldiers surrender to the Japanese soldiers. A Joseon soldier tries to board to trolley, but he’s pushed off by a passenger. A Japanese soldier aims his gun at this Joseon soldier, but the tailor runs to tackle the Japanese solder. The tailor is beaten to the ground, and just as the Japanese soldier aims his gun at the tailor, he’s shot dead. The gunshot came from the trolley, where Hina shoots at the Japanese soldiers like a total badass.

Joon-young carries his injured friend to the hideout with the baker, and Ae-shin quickly collects them for treatment. The baker tells Eun-san that the decision to dissolve the Joseon royal military was determined last night and executed this morning. The Japanese forces expected this revolt and prepared to massacre the masses of Joseon soldiers. He also delivers the news of Seung-gu’s death, to which Eun-san and Ae-shin respond with disbelief.

That night, families of the fallen soldiers and rebels mourn the death of their loved ones. Seung-gu also lays among the dead. Meanwhile, the Japanese soldiers celebrate their victory at Glory Hotel, and Hina instructs her worker to fill their tables with enough beer and food to last them until morning. Hearing the news of the celebration at the hotel, Ae-shin heads there with her gun for revenge.

A man in dress shoes and another person in sandals walk through the masses of dead bodies, and they stop simultaneously. We see that the man in the dress shoes is Eugene, and his counterpart is Dong-mae. They both comment that the other looks like they’ve returned from a long journey — a true statement for both men. Eugene confirms that Ae-shin wasn’t on his side, and Dong-mae reports the same for his side. Then, they hear a gunshot.

The Japanese general pulls Hina’s hair as she tries to escape the hotel, and he demands to know where the gunshot came from. Then, he’s shot dead, and Ae-shin grabs Hina to run away before the bombs explode the hotel. Eugene and Dong-mae arrive at the hotel just in time to see Ae-shin and Hina running from the hotel. Then, the hotel explodes, and the two men watch the monstrous burst of flames in shock.


 
COMMENTS

Show, you can’t give us alllll the emotions at once like this! I’m overwhelmed with emotions, but I think it’s kind of in a good way. The ending sequence with Joon-young and Seung-gu was extremely powerful, and I was distraught as soon as that moment happened because I knew this would be Seung-gu’s end. But I appreciate how we saw reflections of Seung-gu’s youth as he crawled toward the flame to complete his mission as a rebel, and I love that the innkeeper’s red ribbon was highlighted as he bravely protected his post as a Righteous Army comrade. In continuation of the red ribbon, Seung-gu’s last moments were almost symbolic of him passing the torch to the next generation of resistance fighters who will stand on his shoulders.

Then, we were shown the genocide of the Joseon soldiers in the streets, and my heart just dropped. It was such a demoralizing sight, and I was bracing myself to see the blind courage of the tailor be punished by the relentless violence, when Hina showed up and ruined me. There was something so unexpectedly moving about Hina stepping into the resistance, and her characteristic badassery from the trolley almost moved me to tears. Hina’s commitment to the resistance was incredibly timed, and it showed that the oppression had become so unbearable that apathy was no longer an option. Hina was a character who was always deliberately distant from allegiances and calculating to a fault, but her deep dive into the resistance shows that no calculation was necessary here, that she had something to fight for. But goodness gracious, I needed a break as soon as I saw Hina on screen because damn, someone was cutting onions!

Dong-mae was another highlight for me, especially in the irony of him claiming to be saved by Ae-shin, when he’s always the one protecting and saving her. Dong-mae’s words always carry more weight and baggage, and I love how the simplicity of his repeated phrases encompass everything he’s feeling. So when Ae-shin told him to meet him directly to receive her payment, his simple response that she once again saved him conveyed his gratitude, love, and a promise. Ae-shin’s hope for his survival was more than just futile hope — it was almost a command for his survival, and that was enough for him to fulfill the promise of survival. After faking Dong-mae’s death twice, the show is making me expect great things for his death. Until then, Ohyabong lives to see another day in Joseon.

This episode was chock full of history and emotions, and I wish we had more time to digest this hearty content. I can’t understand how you squish all this history and a three-year time jump into this episode when you had so many episodes prior to fill with substantial content. The Eulsa Treaty traitors and the mention of Ahn Chang-ho were so full of dramatic potential, and while I know this isn’t a historical drama, there was more to work with than just brief captions and name drops. Like with Ahn Chang-ho — even a quick Google search led to a fascinating read about his role in the Korean Independence as an immigrant in the U.S., and I’m bummed that there were no further interactions with him and Eugene. Though the pacing was unfortunate, this show knows how to drumroll crescendo towards an epic finale. More steamrolling through the ending, here we go!

 
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You're not kidding when you say it's chock full of emotions. I'm tearing up just reading your recap. Which, by the way, meant a lot: Knowing that was Ahn Chang ho, a real independence fighter. Wow. So glad you added that tidbit. And since Netflix doesn't do English subtitles when they speak English, I hadn't realized Eugene was sentenced to three years in prison. I was waiting for your recap to tell me!
Since the writer has ramped up all emotions for the last few episodes, I'm wondering how much more we can take in the last two. Hope it won't be anticlimactic.
As for each individual story, so well told. Each and every one. And I've come to care about each and every one too.
Actually, I'm only suspicious of Dong mae's arc. It looked like he genuinely was supposed to die and I wonder if they redid some scenes and let him live because he has such a huge fan base. I'd love to see him redeemed and also fight for the Cause. Perhaps they're all meant to live until the end.
I loved that Hee sung has a possible love interest. And that his job is the newspaper. Wonder if he'll have to go underground.
I've come to love and respect Ae shin and her devotion and bravery.
Eugene, what a journey for him as well.
This is the second episode there were no preview scenes. Does anybody believe for a second Ae shin and Hina are dead?
This is the absolute first drama by KES that I'm so impressed with.
Now we have to wait two weeks..

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I've seen Lovers in Paris, The Heirs, Descendants of the Sun, Goblin and I'll say Mr. Sunshine is her best work yet! The writing, you can see her efforts and hard work in it, notwithstanding historical inaccuracies. But this is a work of historical fiction and a damn good one!

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Many times, when characters are speaking English in this show, I need subtitles as well. I rewind and rewind and still can't make out what they're trying to say.

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I had to turn up the volume very loud, like when Eugene told Kyle that the Russian ambassador had left.

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For me, it's not the volume that's the issue. It's the attempts at English. I wish they put the subtitles even though they're speaking English. Even LBH. His English can be very clear like when he shouted his identity at the American embassy to get them to hold their fire in him and Ae shin. But for some reason in this show I find him not as clear as I've heard him in unscripted interviews. Maybe because in interviews he'd using his own words and so would choose words and phrases he's familiar with and maybe the dialog of the show is a bit less familiar.
Here's a funny example of how clear he CAN be
https://youtu.be/YgHwTuz0b4M

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I was gonna answer but I can't. I'm too busy rolling on the floor laughing.

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ok so now i'm done laughing, and i'll give you my thoughts.

Is it possible that LBH is trying to give an accent like what you'd imagine an immigrant of nine years, picking up his english on the streets (and what schooling there was back then), and in the service, would have?

I came over as a kid, but I was pretty young, and I still get some people asking me, "where you from?"

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Dang why can't this be a real movie? I'd die halfway through the movie from a permanent stitch in the side

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Here he is unscripted and he's really good at English and completely clear:
https://youtu.be/WYU9DAFKoV4

https://youtu.be/8q8iIZQrb3Q

I couldn't find another ingenue he did (I don't remember which of his Hollywood films it was for), but he and the interviewer were did the fact that his fellow American actors had difficulty with Korean name order so weren't sure how to address him (Lee? Byung? Hun?) so he jokingly said he told them to call him "Hyung". Which as we know means you're avoiding him the respect of being Big Bro on set! 😆

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Darn it! The ad on Dramabeans made me hit "send" as I tried to close it before I had a chance to proof all the autocorrects.Hope you guys can understand what I was trying to write.

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How do we contact Netflix to let them know most of us even need subtitles when they're speaking English? Who did the subtitles anyway? Some young person with hearing as good as the female cop in Voice?

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We can sum up this whole episode with: Ae-shin spends the whole night sleeping with Eugene. Yep that happened folks! LOL.

OMG Dong-mae lives!? Fudge me! I thought Dong-mae falling into the ocean was a beautiful way for him to go. But hells no KES is not gonna let Eugene be the forlorn lover left to tend to Ae-shin, cos he just can’t get the job done folks!

Things that made this episode a bit silly for me.
1. So they had this plan to get Ae-shin into Japan but no plan to get her out? What? They even have a plan to get Minister Lee out (and he is a high profile individual!) but not Ae-shin?
2. Dong-mae is alive, like whaaaa??? I literally giggled hard in disbelief (jaw dropped physically when I saw this). WTF? I love you Dong-mae, you cutie-pie you!
3. Dong-mae coming back to Hanseong on the same day as Eugene – oh c’mon! Cinematic yes okay…but sooo crazy unrealistic.
4. Ae-shin realizes that words have power over a poem? Hmm…ok seemed very abrupt. [I think it would have been more interesting for her to find a diary that explained why Hee-seung never came for her timely. Or just discover more about Hee-seung. But it seems like HS has been tabled for this episode.]
5. Seung-gu dying, felt too early, I feel like they could have given him a death somewhere beside Ae-shin alongside her. [Are they killing off all the people who were against Aeshin and Eugene (due to class) so they have an ending together?]

Things that made this episode memorable for me.

1. Ae-shin’s face when she sees Dong-mae in Japan. Love Kim Tae-ri AF.
2. Eugene incarcerating himself for 3 years over temporarily saving Ae-shin from death for a few hours (something which seemed could have been avoided had they not been walking around near the wharf), literally hours until Dong-mae comes to the rescue. Side note: I just love KES when she makes Ae-shin say “you reckless man” – yes he is Ae-shin! But I still love that you, Ae-shin love this flawed pouty man, who does not deserve you!! I really feel like KES continues to re-enforce that Eugene is just a typical lover who wants Ae-shin but Ae-shin is way more than that.
3. Eugene trying to work up the courage to kiss her *nope* not happening you chicken! Eugene saved again by KES.
4. Ae-shin grabbing Eugene coat tail when she hugs him *cry*. [Between Ep 21 and 22 there were too many times when Ae-shin and Eugene said goodbye – it was emotionally draining to say the least.]
5. Ae-shin bandaging Dong-mae’s arm. Like whaaaa??? Totally did not see that coming! But again emphasizes Ae-shin’s enigmatic character.
6. Ae-shin still wearing the ring around her neck. If there is anyone who still doubts Ae-shin’s love for Eugene you just don’t get her folks!

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"...the oppression had become so unbearable that apathy was no longer an option." I love this line and this entire recap! My goodness! I'll be a wreck in two weeks.

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Kim Min-Jung has found her life character. What a turn around from Man to Man.

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No kidding. I've been meaning to mention how impressed I've been with her acting this time out. She's been really good except for that emotional beach scene when she's having trouble bringing up real tears. This should be a turning point for her in her career because so far she's been a very ho hum actress.

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Even though I hated her in Merchant (hated that entire monstrosity of a time stealer) but in Mr. Sunshine she's great. I'm so glad they didn't get Kim So rang. Nothing against Kim So rang but Kim Min jung is killin' it!

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I didn't watch Merchant, too many episodes even though I do like Jang Hyuk. Man to Man was terrible. I couldn't even watch it. The last time I saw her in a drama I liked was Gap Dong. But not because I like her performance. She's redeeming herself to me this time. I think she's improved. She struggled with the beach scene but overall she's been good this time.

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Yes so true! I loved how this role allowed her to display her acting chops. She doesn't lose in presence compared to the other leads. It's wonderful seeing her character that is so badass and emotive. Gotta wipe her character in Man to Man from memory.

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I think she has always been good as expected from a child actress.
She can be a show stealer like her role in "The Merchant: Gaekju" etc. I was watching for Jang Hyuk and stayed for Kim Min-jung.

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The Merchant: Gaekju. Or as I like to call it - "the soul strealer"

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To me in Man to Man, she just had a bad hair day

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OMG, I did not know Hina is the same actress as lady lead in Man to Man! Wow, yeah, I need to wipe her Man to Man character out of my memory.

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Gunner Jang! You finally get to fight as a rebel! That really got me. Also, his going from wanting to kill the king--to protecting the king--to the king protecting him--then begging him not to go--then him going and sacrificing himself. (I knew this show was going to do this to me--yet I still watch it.) But the notification that there will be no episodes next week and that I have to wait 2 WEEKS to see the conclusion? That made me cry too!

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What?? Were did you hear that? Why?
Waaaaaaaaaa😭😭😭😭😭

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At the end of episode 22 there was a notification that there would be no episodes aired until September 29.

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Gunner Jang and his love-hate relationship with the King. I'm glad they were able to join the same side.

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is it because of Chuseok?

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I wondered the same thing. Is Chuseok the reason for the rescheduling?

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regardless, it's going to be TORTURE...

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I realized time passed pretty fast in this drama. Can someone tell to the lazy person I am how many years passed since the beginning of the story ?

I think after torture, shot by bullets, cut by a sword and drown, I think Dong Mae deserves to live :p

I didn't think the justice would convict Eugene to prison and they didn't even know that he killed the coward.

The last scene was great ! Two badass women and the return of our hero and big explosion !

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So after rereading the recaps, Eugene came in Korea in 1902 and Gojong was deposed in 1907. So five years ! (If we don't count the start when they're young and after when Ae Shin started to practice shooting)

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Just here to scream, PARK JUNG MIN!!!!!

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Same. He is becoming one of my favorite actors and I was really excited that his character was Ahn Chang-ho.

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I watched this episode for his cameo :).

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Which scene did this character appear in? Was he part of the young trio that Eugene trained who took their last stand with Seung gu?

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He's the Korean immigrant Eugene meets.

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Ahhhh. Thank you!

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Whoa. I’ve put this one on hold but your first sentence drew me into the recap, @dramallama! So, a quiet moment I read here that held more profound meaning was between Hee-Sung and the noble seamstress when she embroidered that flower telling him it would never wilt. That’s a steadfast woman. As he would never be able to leave or forget Ae-shin, she is telling him that she would never leave him either. But what a great little family they would make, brother-in-laws Hee-Sung and Joon-young! I want Hee-sung to survive this and I believe he will, especially since he has someone who is this devoted to him and seems to respect him.

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Hey, ally, that scene of Dong Mae in the opium den reminded so much of Brad Pitt's character in Legends of the Fall...remember he had a decadent scene with a lot of women, and was lying there drunk, and miserable. Dong Mae's scene reminded me of it, strangely enough.

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Oohhh, I can’t unsee that now. Great parallel there.

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I thought the same thing. It surprised me when the recapper didn't recognize it as an opium den but called it a place with "homeless" people. It made me think maybe younger people aren't familiar with the term or the place.

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My first introduction to opium dens was in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories. I voraciously read all of them in high school. It made me realize that very gifted people with very complex brains are very likely to fall into the trap of drug use and depression. It colored my black and white world with shades of gray. I love how literature and art do that. I should go back and read them again. I’m sure the me of 25 years later might have a different view of these stories now.

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Forgive my ignorance. Was Manchuria a popular hiding place for Koreans in those times?

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Only if you'll forgive mine. \_(ツ)_/¯

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Yeah and he is rubbing the money that Ae-shin paid her debt with.

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I completely agree. Seeing her embroider those flowers in just a few seconds made my heart. And he came to her all indignant, and she just gave it to him. She saw right through him.

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Ugh! Sorry no. Hee-seung and the noble seamstress are a terrible pairing. I think they inserted the seamstress just so HS could realize Aeshin's feelings toward him. It was actually abrupt and too late for the viewers to even care.

Hee-seung is in love with Aeshin. He's not going to get her. because he is going to live the prophecy that the "child must bear the sins of the parents".

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My heart was breaking along with the citizenry when they grieved for their country and their emperor.

Ae sin and Eugene continue to be true heroes. Her devotion to Joseon causes her to sacrifice her love of Eugene, and his sacrifice of his military career (and good name) to keep her safe reflects the soul of a true marine.

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Same here. That scene reminded me of the movies Taxi Driver, Ordinary Person/People and Battleship. All of which were based on true stories of the Koreans. Really, really sad

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My heart was also breaking for the people. But I also felt really angry with Gojong. It's just so strong in my heart that the king's job is to protect the people. But then again I couldn't even get mad at him, because historically how bad his position was, who his father was and what he'd done as the Daewongun, the unequal treaties that had already been forced on them, and the corruption and greed already almost institutionalized in the court, the Yangban.

This is something that, as a westerner, I have a hard time understanding. I grew up with the oligarchy in South America, and watching six year old barefoot kids, run up and down planks on the side of a wall, carrying these great blocks to the top as they were putting up the building. I'm sure they got paid, some pittance, but it was nowhere near the three dollars a month their parents made, as shopworkers, seamstresses or tailors, carpenters or policemen. I was five years old the first time I saw that, but it was by no means the last time. I never forgot it.

That's also why my heart went out to the people of Chosun, people like Su-mi or Do-mi, or even that gentle tailor's assistant, who wasn't allowed to even be a tailor because he was from Chosun.

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@grumpyoldman I apologize for not recognizing your sarcasm for what it was. (Which is why when writing these types of opinions, it's good to give an indicator when you're using sarcasm.)

I must say though, that you tend to give replies that attribute things to commentors here that nobody is saying. Nobody asserted any of the characters are black and white as your posts "respond". It's fine to make the observation that the characters are not b&w, or that Hataru was not willingly a prostitute IF it doesn't infer that one of us said she was.
It tends to put your fellow commenters on the defensive. Maybe some others commentors DID say something like that but then, you should say "some other commenters said..."

That's my viewpoint on his our discussions kind of went sideways there a little.

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@ramonathepest, this conversation kind of got away from me and i never meant it to go there.

Regarding the use of clues, esp. with sarcasm, I've seen that other people can post imogees or smileys along with their text, but I don't know how, if it's this editor that supports it, or if i use an editor that does, then just cut and paste.

I guess, even though I don't even like Dong Mae as a person, his character reminds me too much of the too many children I've seen raised in brutality, and I've lived around them long enough to see the arc of their lives, and it fills me with such sorrow and despair to see how the lives of these children are destroyed, and some do grow up to become monsters, and many more grow up to lead normal lives, but the scars they carry are still with them, even 60 years later.

So again, I apologize. I was reacting to internal emotions and not your post, and that wasn't right. In future, if I feel that way again, I will step away from the keyboard for a few days before I post anything.

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@grumpyoldman
These are my thoughts.
First, I love reading your opinions.
Then, navigating recaps can be challenging as there can be two distinct conversations taking place. Korean actors engender this wonderful emotional bond with their fans, so there's a whole 'nother layer of discussion outside of the actual story, where critisizing the role can be misconstrued as dissing the actor.

I feel the writer was *brilliant* to put YYS in the role of Dong mae as he's so well-loved......so there's this massive conflict in the hearts of the viewers; "he's a good guy,... no, he's a bad guy"!

The writer stated she wanted to break down societal divisions amongst koreans. This is an excellent way to create sympathy for what would normally be a repellent character.

P.S. No sarcasm was sacrificed in writing this comment😎

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@beantown, thank you, and I'm so jealous of your imogees.

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@grumpyoldman
I'm jealous that you have a drama buddy in your daughter.

A Samsung tablet is my portal into the world of k dramas and emojis. And sometimes, its even used for work.

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@beantown, does the Samsung let you insert imogees? Darn my old technology!

My daughter more humors me than anything. She puts my success rate at recommending good movies at around two percent. She was quite surprised that she enjoyed Mr. Sunshine so much. Now if I could only get her started on Goblin and Thirty But Seventeen. -sigh-

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@grumpyoldman - please don't "step away". Passion comes along with the territory. May I suggest using quotation marks or [sarcasm] or *sarcasm*.

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@grumpyoldman - I, personally, wouldn't recommend Thirty but Seventeen to a newbie because the ending fizzled, imo. Once you've been around K drama, you get used to great journeys that the end destination many times lets you down.

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You mentioned that you're male and that is so awesome because most of us Kdrama fans tend to be female. Have you seen my top favs, which I think men would really enjoy as well? :
1) Healer (Rom-com, action)
2) Chicago Typewriter (little bit of everything - rom-com; ghost story; time travel in a sense because it revisits the 1930's past)
3) Tree With Deep Roots - very interesting take on how the Korean alphabet was created
4) Six Flying Dragons (too amazing for words and a prequel to Six Flying Dragons but should be watched afterwards, IMO)
5) Chuno (aka The Slave Hunters) The ultimate saeguk that I've watched multiple times. Jang Hyuk feeds and fuels this drama on pure hubris, machismo and charisma.

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Thank you for the list. I'm slowly finding my way through the Kdrama world, and am currently digesting Goblin and Thirty But Seventeen. But I will add these titles to the ever-growing list. I am so glad that people point out the good ones, which saves me from muddling through one or two that might be not so good, before I can get to the gems.

What did you mean by number 4, Six Flying Dragons - a prequel to Six Flying Dragons?

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I think @ramonathepest (awesome handle btw) means Six Flying Dragons is a prequel to Tree With Deep Roots.

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Yes, @egads has the correct answer. I meant Six Flying Dragons is a prequel to Tree With Deep Roots. But I always advise people to watch things in the order they aired. For instance, I believe watching Star Wars saga should be done by watching the 1970's episodes first. I've experienced seeing different kids introduced to Star Wars both ways and inevitably the ones that watch them in the order in which they came out become HUGE fans of the franchise and the ones that watch the new ones first are blase about it.
I believe prequels build their characters based on how they are created based upon the original creation. I appreciate the prequel better because of certain things the prequel plays off of that was established in the first one. Another example is River Phoenix as young Indiana Jones - would his falling into a train car full of snakes be appreciated as much without first already knowing how adult Indians Jones feels about snakes? The scene is funnier because you already have that knowledge from the first made "sequel". I'm not doing a good job of explaining this very well but trust me that while Tree With Deep Roots is very good and Six Flying Dragons is AMAZING, I still think Tree should be watched first to really enjoy SFD.

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True so true. If you had a dishonerable discharge you were shunned. Look how thin and ragged he looks in his street clohes. Here is the law as it still apppers: A dishonorable discharge is considered one of the most shameful ways to leave the military by other military personnel. Some states consider a dishonorable discharge the equivalent of having a felony conviction. This can make finding a job or housing difficult,
I'm sure that EC knew all of this as he was leaving AS but he doesn't tell her. He is a man about it even when he is facing a personal Hell.

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So far Eugene's dishonorable discharge has been the only part of this story that I'm really disappointed in. I didn't see that coming! Can someone tell me exactly why he was discharged, in detail? I'm assuming it's not because of the shot into the legation, as that would've been understandable under the circumstances, right? Was it for assisting a Chosun woman? Was it for forging an official American document (the marriage paper)? And even if the forged document was not the reason, did the Americans realize it was a fake and Ae shin was not his wife?

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@ramonathepest My understanding is that yes, he was charged for shooting at the legation, and the fact that it was deliberately done (to protect Ae-shin) is was turned the charge from "accidental friendly fire" to treason. Eugene did this with full awareness of what consequences would be.

However, please keep in mind this is a Korean production, written, directed and acted by koreans. I do not expect them to nail down the nuances of the american military.

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This was the best episode of the season so far!!!! It brought out all sorts of emotions in me. Despite the tragic events and the outcome of the wars, I am still hoping for even just a semblance of a happy ending for all of the characters. I know this may be an unpopular opinion here but my heart is just ROOTING for DONG MAE & HOTARU! someone mentioned before how dong mae was harsh towards the other female leads, even ae-shin and hina sometimes but with hotaru he was nothing but gentle. even after her betrayal of him, he still couldn't bring himself to hurt or kill her. i even hoped that there will be a scene where it will be hotaru who will find him in the opium den and ultimately nurse him back to health, somehow repaying what he has done for her when he "rescued" her in japan. i hope this won't be the last we've seen of hotaru with dong mae. sorry everyone, I just really want those 2 to end up together...

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I was sobbing when Dong Mae was nursed by Ae Shin, who tended to his wounds...he said, you always save me like this, his face...oh, it was so so sad, I just started sobbing, and when he fought all those men until nightfall, and he sat down, and then the next batch of men came, and surrounded him, and he was so helpless, I couldn't help myself I bawled my eyes out.

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As much as I love Dong mae, I thought the scene falling from the cliff was epic and would have been a fitting death scene. I almost wish they'd left it at that or at least let us suffer in thinking he was dead for at least another week.

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The writer is really playing with our emotions. It was a beautiful scene and I accepted his death and then he was back. They will probably kill him again in the final episode.

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I think they'll kill him off twice before the final. Once per episode.

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I thought Dong Mae's stature as a warrior really shone through in this episode. I counted that he killed at least thirty Musin Society swordsmen between the two encounters. I only counted because I didn't want to be the person who said, I once caught a fish and it was This Big.

I remember Ae-shin's face when she saw Dong Mae at work in the little room where she was trapped. I couldn't help thinking, I guess he doesn't look too bad all covered in blood now, does he?

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In the scene where Dongmae saved Ae-shin the Music society gang members had their backs turned when he first started killing them so that probably gave him an advantage. The other scene where he is surrounded and still survives is less realistic, unless they were dumb enough to take turns fighting him.
Dongmae he is covered in blood almost every episode.
Aeshin's surprised expression when she sees him was great to see.

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@modestgoddess, that was my point. Ae-shin was so disgusted by Dong Mae when she first saw him, after he killed those 2 Japanese men, even though he only did it because they were planning on raping her and disposing of her.

Granted, she said it was because he was a traitor, but Seung moon used those same words to Eugene. And to me it seemed a little bit hypocritical of her. Like when she asked Dong Mae, are you always like this, or only when i see you? Well yes, he's a killer. But so is she. She gets to go home and bathe and put on pretty clothes, but what they are on the inside doesn't change. And before somebody says she was a patriot, I'm pretty sure some of the times she pulled a gun on Eugene, it wasn't because he was a danger to the cause, but because she was embarrassed by him and she was angry.

Even Eugene treated Dong Mae with more respect, though they were almost always on opposite sides in the beginning. Whether that was the respect one warrior gives another, as they eye each other passing in the street, or the respect of one Chosun outsider, rejected by his country, for another, I don't know.

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@grumpyoldman I couldn't disagree with you more. Ae shin pulling a gun on Eugene (that she didn't pull a trigger on), whom she considered her enemy (once she discovered he's not Chosun); and her killing as a patriot who is at war is TOTALLY different from Dong mae who kills for money and is a scourge and terror to the citizens of Chosun. Take Do mi's sister, for instance - he may not have raped her himself, but what was he planning to do with her? Sell her to the Japanese as a comfort woman? Even if his intentions toward her weren't as bad as that, he didn't tell her nor Ae shin what his intentions were. He always let Ae shin to think the worst of him so what else CAN she think other than what she SEES him doing right in front of her?

I've said before, when and if Ae shin does marry Eugene, Dong mae will be kicking himself with his thongs thinking "He is lowborn and she married him?! Maybe if I'd not acted like such an azz in front of her, I would've had a chance?!"

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@ramonathepest, I completely understand your view and respect it.

Dong Mae on the surface, he completely is the person who terorized the Chosun people, and not above selling Su-mi into sexual slavery with the Japanese. But Dong Mae was also the one who was not able to bring himself to seek revenge against the woman who falsely accused him of killing Joseph, the woman who allowed herself to be used as the tool to put him in that chair to be tortured.

When he pushed Hina to get the register, which was not right, she moved to stand up to him, using nothing but herself. It was like she said to him, I dare you to hurt me. And he couldn't do it. And I felt that that was what he was making up for when he helped her twice, when she needed to steal that autopsy report from her father's house.

Even Hotaru, who betrayed him the worst, for whatever reason, and placed the woman he hopelessly loved in mortal jeopardy, he couldn't bring himself to hurt her. You could even make the argument that she was the reason he was almost killed, because she forced him to betray the Musin.

I don't think Dong Mae is pure. Far from it. He's a killer for hire. But Ae-shin is not lily white either. She did pull a gun on Eugene many times, many of those times just to threaten him. At the mud hut, she pulled her gun on him over that boar meat comment, just because she wanted his answers and she wasn't going to answer his questions. That was power dynamics pure and simple.

At the apothecary she pulled his own gun on him because she was angry with him, that She had asked him to do 'love' with her and he had finally agreed, and then when she finally understood what she had said, she was blamed him. When he said, why did you ask me if you didn't know what it meant? or Why are you angry now if you did? she got even more angry, and he was 'this' close to getting shot in the face.

You may feel that she 'only' pulled her gun on him and didn't pull the trigger, but I can tell you, for those who've looked down that barrel, the difference is not that big. It's about a quarter inch movement on a finger. That's it.

Regarding Dong Mae, I've said before, how can anyone expect Dong Mae to have grown up like Eugene? To be honest, how could anyone have expected Eugene to grow up like Eugene?

Dong Mae was born into violence and oppression, and grew up in that violence and oppression without anyone lifting a finger to help him. Even his own father would not defend him or his mother. He saw his mother suffer through that selfsame fate all the time, and there's no way of knowing if he himself didn't suffer that fate as well. Because after all, no man would have raped a 12 year old boy in that time.

He escaped after having watched his parent's murder in front of his eyes, where he learned the lessons of community and compassion at the hands of Chosun. He lived on the streets, fighting for his own survival, and somehow made his way to Japan, where he was...

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@ramonathepest, part two, again.

He ... somehow made his way to Japan, where he was inducted into a society of violence and oppression, and as he told Ae-shin, he lived in the dregs of that society. From there, he fought his way to the top, where the master called him his own son.

What lessons could he have learned in his life? How could he possibly have come up like Eugene? How could he have possibly seen things like Ms. Haman, or Mr. Haengren. Is there any way that Dong Mae, who lived in such oppression, would wilingly place himself under the power of another? Is there any way that Dong Mae would ever have been able to show mercy to anyone who thwarted him, and survived?

And yet Dong Mae did sacrifice himself for another. He did hold back his hand when someone thwarted him or even shot him, or betrayed him. And he was nearly killed for it.

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@grumpyoldman - Someone else must've said something about Eugene vs. Dong mae's upbringing so I'm assuming that part is not directed at me.
As to this statement "Because after all, no man would have raped a 12 year old boy in that time."
That's a very naive and innocent viewpoint and I wish, so very much, that it was true. 😢
No offense, but that explains some of your viewpoint when it comes to Hataru, as well. (Although I never said she was voluntarily a prostitute but it's fairly obvious she was used by her owner as a prostitute.)

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@ramonathepest, I want to back up first of all and say that I do understand where you are coming from. It was completely unknown what kinds of horrific things Dong Mae might have done to Su-mi when she was screaming for help against the shop window. And the sexual enslavement of women and children was well documented back then and it exists even today, to such an astonishing degree despite the many laws against it, around the world. This is one of the things that I can't talk about because it fills me with such a rage that I can't stand it. I'm too old for that now. I spent many decades fighting this and other issues, and I just can't do it any more. I'm too old.

Regarding my comment about the 12 year old boy, that was my excessively sarcastic, heated remark about the dangers Dong Mae lived through and the possible things he had gone through, even before he had been forced to run away. So I do apologize to you. My sarcasm was uncalled for. I can tell you though that I'm neither innocent nor naive. I'm an old man who's seen some really horrible things.

On the other hand, Regarding Hotaru, I was only referring to her sending the telegram to the Musin Society head, telling him about the Righteous Army's plan, and identifying Ae-shin to them. I never thought of her as a prostitute or otherwise, though I remember someone mentioning that in an earlier recap discussion about her style of dress, not as a geisha but as a prostitute. But either way it didn't matter to me. Like Dong Mae, what he saw was that, up to that point, she was living in hell. Regarding the prostitution, I don't judge. I don't come from the Puritan side of America. I come from outside. I don't see prostitution as 'evil women, the scourge of our communities.' I see it primarily as a human trafficking, sexual enslavement issue. Not because all prostitutes have to be 'saved.' But because prostitution, like gambling and drugs, attracts predatory people. And again, I have to stop there, because I'm just too old to revisit these things in detail.

You were right that Dong Mae was a monster. He was a killer. He was a scourge to Chosun and the Chosun people. But Ramona, you yourself posted the youtube video where he discussed his character and his character's development in the story.

My point is that none of these characters were black or white. Dong Mae is not wholly a fallen man. Ok so maybe he's 90% evil and 10% good, even 97% evil, but there is some sliver of good in him. Even if it's been corrupted. Even if, when his yearning is too strong, he reacts with anger to destroy his hope and push the object of his yearning even further away. Even his own master told him before he slashed him and threw him into the water, so you finally found someone you care for when you don't even care for yourself, how sad.

My point was also, though, that neither was Ae-shin lily white. She has her own flaws. Aside from excessively pointing guns at Eugene ( smiley imogee...

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@ramonathepest, (part 2 again) ...

My point was also, though, that neither was Ae-shin lily white. She has her own flaws. Aside from excessively pointing guns at Eugene ( smiley imogee ), she is stuck in her world view, a world view which, by it's nature, restricts people and harms them. She is very bratty and self-entitled sometimes, and she does sometimes treat even Ms. Haman in a threatening way. Also, even though she didn't identify Dong Mae as a butcher aka untouchable aka lowest of the low, like Ms. Haman did, she does seem to have this idea of social roles being only the ones she knows. When Ms. Haman said, you gave him a new chance and what did he do with it, and Ae-shin said nothing, I imagined her thinking, he's one of the people, he could've done what one of the people do. Like be a rickshaw driver, or an a-frame coolie, or a laborer, or someone else that carries things or works in the fields.

When Ae-shin first saw him, I guess it was in episode 3, he had just killed those 2 men in the market. The stage had already been set, 'oh he's going on a rampage again.' So to her he was a monster. As you said, that was probably his reputation, and based on what she saw she had no reason to disbelieve it. But to me, the look that she gave him was one of disgust, that he was covered in blood and he was a monster. When she said it's because you're a traitor, it didn't quite match up to me.

To me, that look of disgust she gave Dong Mae in front of the French bakery was a bit hypocritical. Like you said, she could only go by what she observed on the surface, so even though he had just saved her life, she didn't know that. By the same token, an outside observer would've seen that, when Eugene had killed the American traitor, he had already leapt behind the roof line when she turned around and killed four of the Japanese guards.

I'm pretty sure they weren't part of the mission. In the beginning, in response to Gunner Jang's question, her answer was 'shoot again?' And Jang told her repeatedly, and she herself told Eugene later, the thing to do is take your shot and run. Eugene didn't need her help. He was already behind the roof line. He popped his head up to see who he'd have to kill to slow down the pursuit, and saw her already cutting them down. He was like, that's cool, but who is that person over there doing the shooting? Then he took off. So, maybe she thought he was a comrade. Maybe she was trying to protect him. But to the disinterested, outside observer, it could've looked like she wanted to kill Someone that night, and if the American was already killed, then the guardsmen would do.

I have already talked at length about how I saw Dong Mae's story, and how I believe that his life, from his birth to that night on the beach in Japan, was a straight line, almost like fate. As much as he tried to change it, it never did. But I will say one thing. When Ae-shin told him he should protect the people of Chosun and...

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@ramonathepest, (part 3, -sigh- ) ...

When Ae-shin told him he should protect the people of Chosun and help the people of Chosun, his answer to her, even though simply given and simply dismissed, was profound and true. In Dong Mae's eyes, Chosun subjected him and his family to unending torment. The people of Chosun regularly raped his mother, and left his father and himself helpless to protect her, and the people of his own village killed his parents in front of his eyes because they had the nerve to defend themselves.

I can tell you, the kids I grew up with, if that had happened to them, they would've had burned into their hearts that the people responsible, the community responsible, were their mortal enemies. And they would've done their utmost to destroy them all. But it's been said before, and the French Reign of Terror is just another example, that when you treat your people monstrously, you will have created monsters in turn.

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@ramonathepest, finally, I'm sorry for being so windbaggy today. I guess it's true the older you get, the more you talk.

I guess going forwards I'm gonna try to be like Tenchi Muyo's grandfather, and restrict myself to "is that so?" "You don't say." With the occasional "my goodness."

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@grumpyoldman Please don't "restrict" the length of your answers, especially on my account. Just please indicate whom it's directed to or indicate if it's an independent observation that's not necessarily a direct response to the person you're responding to. 😉

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I was so tired for Dong Mae when the second wave of samurais showed up with the Boss. I was a bit relieve that he can now rest after drowning in the ocean but he pops up again. :)

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That was a shock. I didnt even see him make it to the beach.

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@ grumpyoldman The difference between EC and DM is who their adopted fathers were. DM was raised by a Master Samurai, sword for hire, with twisted ethics, that are self serving, and EC who was raised by Joseph, a man of the cloth, with Christian ethics who was honor bound to help the King. Interestingly they both grapple with ethical dilemmas and both are punished severely for being true to themselves. DM is left for dead in the ocean and EC is thrown into prison. Both commit treason based on personal situational ethical scenarios.
Not to go off topic but did you see AS's look at EC when he brings up the encounter with Grandpa as a slave boy. Yet EC did not withhold information from Grandpa, he was perfectly honest. Another ethical decision under duress.

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You are not alone! I too would like to see them end up with each other. Though a lot of people say that DM only sees hotaru as a sister/friend and looking at the way the story is going, it makes more sense that dong mae & hina will end up together.

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oooooh, this won't be the last we'll see of dong mae & hotaru! i actually follow the ig account of the hotaru actress (Kim Yong Ji who i found out is professional model) and 3 days ago she posted a pic of her wearing a traditional kimono just like on the show with her hands all bloody and the (google translated) caption "sorry buy dong hing" Hmmm does this actually mean "sorry bye dong mae"? OMG did she kill or help kill DM??? also, how true is it that Kim Yong Ji and Yoo Yeon Seok are together in real life? if that were true then I wouldn't care who they would end up with on the show. lol

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Just jumping in here to say that the pic that Kim Yong Ji posted was a behind-the-scene from her backstory scenes where she stabbed DM with the hairpin. Her caption said “I’m sorry DM-ya”. They are all professional people, there’s no way they will post spoilers of their own drama :P Where did you hear that YYS and her are together though? I’ve never seen that rumour anywhere.

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I also support a Dong-mae/Hotaru union. Let's keep our fingers crossed! :)

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I am willing to bet Dong-mae does not end up with Hotaru or Hina. Dong-mae loves Aeshin. People in love like that just don't settle. It'd be totally uncharacteristic.

Why does he need to end up with some one anyways? Why can't ya'll just accept that loving someone is sometimes enough (for some people).

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I agree that people shouldn't just settle. I think it's just wishful thinking on my part for those two to fall in love. So I have no problem accepting that "loving someone is sometimes enough." I won't lose sleep if a Dong-mae/Hotaru union does not come to fruition.
;)

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You are not alone. I’m all for DM and Hotaru since many many episodes earlier. I’m intrigued by their relationship and how the writer leaves the nuances of this relationship open to imagination by viewers. She is truly his one soft spot. We get to see why she’s so devoted to him, but we don’t know why he’s so tender with her. I still have a small hope for them.

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Hmmmm. She may be another, secondary, soft spot but Show has shown us, unequivocally, Ae shin is THE SOFT SPOT.

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Yeah but obviously Aeshin is the more complicated case. I'd say Aeshin is his weak spot rather than his soft spot. He's always conflicted when it comes to her. He can give his life for her yet that doesn't stop him from being violent with her. At a quick count, he shot her, cut off her hair, grabbed her skirt. Even with Hina, he can be pretty rough (shoving her aside when she refused to show the guest list). With Hotaru though, he's always gentle, up to when he confronted her. And even then, his reaction in the aftermath is way too gentle, by DM's standards.

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He wasn't positive it was her when he shot her. He waiting at the train station to confirm her identity.

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DongMae's soft spots in order of priority
1. AeShin
2. Hina & Hotaru
3. Eugene
4. HeeSung

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Ugh. Boo Ae-shin. Yay Hina!

just kidding (but not really)

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I think the reason why Dongmae was nothing but gentle towards Hotaru is because she very much reminded him of his mom. One thing Dongmae clearly hates more than the word “butcher” is sexual assault, which his mom went through but couldn’t do anything. Dongmae practically killed the two men who were planning an assault on Aeshin the next second after he heard their conversation. He also killed Hayashi who forced Hotaru to sleep with him at Hwawollu.

Dongmae used the same word as how he described the life of butchers in Joseon when he talked about Hotaru to Hina, that she “lived a life worse than an animal”. I see that Dongmae treats Hotaru as one of his own and stood to protect these people like his own family whom he failed to protect as a child.

I was really touched when Dongmae told Hina “By the way, her name is Hotaru” before he started the story. To me that sounds like “Hey, she’s also a person with a name, just like you and me”, not just some mute b*tch, burden or quiet friend like how people previously called her. I love you Dongmae! ><

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"practically" killed? I saw no evidence they survived.

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they are very very dead

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Lol

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really most sincerely dead.

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I must be honest in saying I initially looked forward to this show when it was advertised because of Lee Byun Hyeon, and he is as expected a truly amazing actor! However, the secondary lead in the form of Dong Mae stole the show for me. I wasn't even familiar with the actor (Yo Yeon seuk) who is playing him, but the intensity that he brings into each scene was at times hypnotic. Oh! Come on! Weren't you holding your breath as well when he bent down supposedly to help pick up things but ended up touching, and holding the hem of her skirt ?! It's creepy and obsessive, but so compelling that you just wait for the next Dong Mae scene. He is the anti hero. The bad guy that one actually roots for, where the viewer often wishes that he ends up with our heroine.

The story is a step away from the usual romcom and shows us, though I'm sure not accurately, some of Korea's turbulent past, and how it helped shape what it is today.
I cheer for Eugene, but I am with bated breath for Dong Mae. Cheers all.

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Yoo Yeon Seok is why I picked this show up. And he NEVER disappoints. When he cries, he makes me die inside—in a good way.

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you sum up perfectly how I feel about YYS's portrayal of Dongmae. I waited episode 10 to start watching the show after the reviews were good and Dongmae had me intrigued from the start.

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And his chemistry with the main led actress Kim Tae Ri, is just off the charts!!

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I posted this video previously in the early episodes recaps but I think it got lost in the sauce. But now that we're all on the Dong mae bandwagon -
Here is a behind the scenes video of the actor playing Dong mae discussing his character :
https://youtu.be/wc1Tj-No0Yc

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Thanks for the link, @ramonathepest. If I weren't already a fan, YYS's thoughtful, articulate discussion of the character, sword fighting, and the BTS aspects of the production would make me a true believer. ;-)

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Big hug, and thank you. Just watched that now.

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Thank you. A soft-spoken man playing a man with no heart, but beneath that a heart filled with love for those he cares for.

For some reason it also reminded me of the scene where Dong Mae and Eugene drank the beers together, on the wall next to the cliff face, and Dong Mae couldn't stop threatening him. I guess in that moment, Eugene had become like Hui-sung.

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thank you so much, I enjoyed hearing YYS talk about the character he plays.

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Watched, thanks. However, I still think Dong Mae is a boring character. I really like the actor's soft spoken voice though and for that reason, thanks for the link. I might try (once again) Romantic Dr Kim though I thought it boring the first time and gave up. But due to @pakalanapikake rec'd I'll retry it.
p.s. obviously I'm quite easily bored.

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If you retried and still didn't like Dr Kim, come to my camp. We might be able to find more things in common!

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I'm 99.9% sure I won't like it, so I'm very interested in your camp! Tell me more...

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Ha! Welcome to my camp! Today looks like the day I'm spilling the beans left and right! I have been admitting to not liking most of the Beanie favorites on another thread!

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Sometimes I like the Beanie favorites and other times I just don't get it. For instance, since Dong mae is my least favorite character I just don't get the love, except different fans find different things to like and I do get that. I find him pathetic.

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@linda-palapala I'm not watching Mr Sunshine yet, but to take a cue, I love R88, but I find Taek manipulative, like a spoiled child. I just don't get how I was supposed to see him as a rival for JH!

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I don't know your cup of tea flavor but if boredom is an issue, I recommend My Beautiful Bride. I avoided it for years because it just sounds like another rom-com (I love rom-coms but they must have at least one actor that I already like). My Beautiful Bride is dark and keeps you guessing and after the first couple episodes, on the edge of your seat. I can't say more without ruining all the things that make it "not boring ". lol But once I began watching it, I regretted waiting all this years to watch it because the people recommending it to me couldn't give me clues as to what it's really about, just like I can't say more here either!

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My Beautiful Bride: I must have watched it a half dozen times! One of my very favorites. (Now that you mention it, I feel like watching it again...) If you like dark, noir revenge plots, have you seen The Devil (Mawang) with Ju Ji hoon? Also one of my favorites.

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@linda-palapala
Actually I do love (and prefer) romantic comedy fluff. It's just that if a show tries to be dark, I expect it to not play around and have real grit to it.
It took me a while to find a synopsis for "Devil" , but I finally did under "The Lucifer". But then I see it's starring Uhm Tae-Woong. I just won't watch anything he's in. Sort of like John Cusack. A movie can get rave reviews and I'll look and go "John Cusack? Nope."

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Oh, and I should've mentioned, during your rewatch of MBB, if you like recaps (although these are more like reading a group of friends commenting as they watch the show and great gifs), you can find that here http://dr-myri-blog.blogspot.com/2015/07/my-beautiful-bride-episode-1.html?m=1

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@ramonathepest re uhm tae woong, he's the jerk, the bad cop, the self-righteous guy who's more guilty than the guilty and thinks he's a good guy and thinks he can do anything illegal to find the criminal. The guy who got away with murder because his dad was rich. The "poor me, I'm misunderstood" and I didn't mean to kill him..." I wanted to be a cop to change, no, you're still a jerk, self-righteous ass. It was delicious. Other than that, I agree with you about him.
Ju ji hoon was the lawyer who wants revenge for the family that killed his brother, caused his mom to die, became an orphan who starved on the streets. But how he does it: he sets up the guilty ones who had a part in his brother's murder with a choice, to do good or evil, and they always choose evil. Shin Mi na is the "Bringer of Light". Some thought it was a love story, but no, it was her job to bring Ju ji hoon out of his darkness into the light and give up his revenge. Is Ju ji hoon redeemed in the end? Does Uhm T change and repent in the end? Great ending, as it wasn't contrived but followed to its logical conclusion.

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In answer to your statement "they must have at least one actor I already like". Oh, yeah. For sure. And I think I waited to watch mbb for the same reason you did.
I don't like most rom coms, but I remember how much I liked Heart to Heart. I've watched it a few times.

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@linda-palapala I couldn't find anything on AsianWiki titled Heart to Heart. Does it have another name? And who starred in it?

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@ramonathepest
Heart to Heart: http://asianwiki.com/Heart_to_Heart
Chun Jyung myung and Choi Gang Hee. I loved her character as I've had the same problem in the past so I could identify. He treated her seemingly badly at first, as in some thought he was a jerk, but actually the way he treated her made her mad so that she changed. There was also a cop who liked her but he treated her like a child, which was a good contrast to the way Jung myung treated her to show why the cop wasn't good for her, he wouldn't have helped her to heal.
and btw I wouldn't watch something with Cusack either. And I won't watch anything else with Uhm, not even Queen Seonduk.
The Devil: I just re-watched the first episode and almost immediately they show the contrast between the "good" cop (Uhm) and Ju ji hoon as the "bad" guy. Uhm says hello, how are you to another cop but only in passing and very indifferent, not really caring. Next scene, Ju says hello how are you to a prison guard and the guard thanks him for the fairy tale book Ju gave to his daughter. Hadn't noticed little details like that before.

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@linda-palapala - Oh-Mo-oh-mo. You picked the only acts that is the female equivalent to John Cusack in my book! Perviously, I had only seen her in two projects - a movie where she's a virgin giving sex advice and the rom-com Protect The Boss. She irritated me in both but I could tell the reason I didn't care for her was that I felt she was too old for the roles. But I loved her in the more age appropriate Mystery Queen (let's pretend Mystery Queen2 did not happen).
I might check out Heart to Heart because it does have the delicious to look at Lee Jae-Yoon.

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@ramonathepest - Ha! We must have the same dislikes of certain actors. I never like her either. Except her portrayal of the granny and the female with the social anxiety/red faced/unkempt hair suited her perfectly. She isn't attractive at all, and (imo) Jung Kyung Myung is attractive, but he has heavy issues too. She was perfect for this particular part.

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@linda-palapala - she reminds me of Renee Zellweger (except I like Renee Zellweger ok).

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@ramonathepest I'm re-watching Heart to Heart. I'd forgotten what clever writing and perfect casting it is. If you like Lee Jae yoon, I think he's the guy who plays the cop and his part is perfect and his acting is perfect for the role. The whole ensemble is good.

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@linda-palapala I'm convinced. Heart to Heart goes on my watchlist. Thanks.

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@ramonathepest I'm up to 4th episode of Heart to Heart and wow, I'd forgotten what an absolute jerk Jung Kyung Myung seemed to be in the first several episodes!

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Ah, I just looked him up and didn't realize he was in the movie "Perfect Proposal". A dark movie but I liked it and him in it. There's hope for me changing opinions of YYS after all (but not Dong mae).

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@Dr.Elizabeth,

You might want to check out ROMANTIC DOCTOR, TEACHER KIM -- which is not your average medical drama by a country mile -- if you've become a fan of Yoo Yeon-seok.

It was my first time seeing him, and his performance made me an instant fan. YYS looks and acts every inch the part in his hospital scrubs. His thoracic surgeon Kang Dong-joo wields a scalpel with the same intensity of tangled emotions as those driving Dong-mae and his katana. He and noona ER surgeon Seo Hyun-iin's 10-alarm chemistry just about burns down the house as the OTP whose rocky romance takes a distant back seat to the hurdles they and their colleagues face individually and collectively in a hospital in the boondocks.

Han Suk-kyu is phenomenal as the titular character whose mysterious past prompts him to challenge his proteges to become the doctors their patients need. In the process, there is much locking of horns and tough love, but none of it is mindless, trivial, or unnecessary. It is gripping.

Yang Se-jong's highly nuanced first outing is as a tsundere hospital-heir rival to YYS, who is from the other side of the tracks and carries a deep grudge because of his father's death. YSJ's Do In-bum holds his own against the more volatile and expressive Kang Dong-joo. (See YSJ in DUEL for an absolutely stunning 4-way performance.) The ensemble cast is dynamite, right down to the cameos by the patients and hell-raisers of the week. Kim Min-jae is terrific as a young, no-nonsense ER/OR nurse.

I cannot speak highly enough of the realism of the surgery scenes, for which Beanie anesthetist @michykdrama lovingly produced wonderful "Medi Caps," as she had done for the equally stirring BEAUTIFUL MIND.

The OST and vintage BGM are dandy, too.

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Noted. Thank you for the recommendation. Will definitely check this one out once we get through this adventure of Mr. Sunshine.

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I ain't late, am I? hehehe... Beautiful Mind and Teacher Kim are two of the best medical drama for me, previously was New Heart. Well, there are some complaints about the lead actress's character in BM though she got better till the end while TK is solid from the beginning. Han Suk Kyu and Jang Hyuk need to be in a drama together, again! A spin off of Dr. Lee Young Oh and Teacher Kim together would be amazing! LYO will need his wifi to butt head with TK. hehehe...

I watched BM as it airs but since I haven't noticed YYS that year I skipped TK. I am still bitter over what befell BM e.g. underrated ratings and ep cut. It was regretful because JH and his adopted father were mind blowing in their performances. And that the presentation of the drama was unique at the beginning of each of its episodes. I only started realising who YYS was earlier this year despite I had watched all his thriller/villain acts in films e.g. Hwayugi, Werewolves boy, Perfect proposal like years ago. I still can't believe he was that sweet Chilbong because of what he used to play in films. I believe he performs better in a character which requires high emotional intensity. I think he still can improve in the comedy department though. The sky is the limit. ^^

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I live-watched RDTK because Seo Hyun-jin is one of my favorite actresses -- and in the process met a passel of great veteran actors as well as up-and-comer Yoo Yeon-seok and rookie Yang Se-jong.

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In the last scene, the two women get blown away in the blast.

Hina dies in a blaze of glory. It was so epic, and so sad to see the Glory Hotel explode in that fiery end. It began with the hotel, and it ended with the hotel. I think she dies because the hotel is her; she lived because of it, it was her reason for living, after her mother disappeared. I think she dies because in that prophetic scene with Dong Mae last episode, she said, "Don't die before me. Promise me that you won't die before me." And so she dies first.

Ae Shin lives, but is badly disfigured. She undergoes major reconstructive surgery on her face in America. When they take off her bandages, she braces herself for what she will see in the mirror. She sees...KYLE, and Eugene says, "My boss, my friend, my wife."

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LOL

Thanks for making me laugh. :)

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Nightmare

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I was all sad reading your paragraph about Hina but when I reached Ae Shin's paragraph only then I realised I'm reading your future-cap series lmao

MY LEE YANG HWA UNNIE CANNOT DIE. NOOOO :( Like, I don't mind if the others do, even Dong Mae (lmao), but no no no no to my queen.

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Lol on the last line ;p I don't want hina to die yet... sob sob sob... but the explosion looked like it engulfed both girls... i cannot~~~

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Has anyone else noticed in that jail-in-the-embassy goodbye scene right before eugene is called away, he moved as if he was going to kiss aeshin, but then it didn't happeeeeennn,,,

Also, we know that aeshin is devoted to the cause and would die for it, but during the last 2 episodes, many characters, like her newfound uncle and the Emperor, have urged aeshin to keep on living and not throw her life away easily..so i hope onwards (or at least the next 2 epsd) she would at least consider before diving in to a life threatening scene. especially knowing that eugene has given up his career and freedom and gone back for her after three years..

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I think they all meant fight and try to stay alive as long as possible. I don't think they advised her not to jump into a dangerous situation. At least reg. the emperor...since he is powerless, she is one of the few that can act and fight since she is not part of his court like gunner Jung was (and that is why he wanted to keep him close and protect him from the inevitable).

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