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Beauty Inside: Episode 4

True to its genre, the romance and comedy step up a notch, as Do-jae and Se-kye negotiate a contractual agreement about their secrets. The two begin to open up to each other, and their honesty starts to melt their defenses. While the bickering continues, having another insider to their secrets also leads to new aspects of their business partnership, like a reliable speed dial, relatable confessions, and someone who’s got your back.

 
EPISODE 4 RECAP

Do-jae opens the van door and proposes to Se-kye that they sleep together. Se-kye remains calm as she asks why, and Do-jae explains that he wants to witness her transformation again. Since her last transformation occurred while she was sleeping in the airplane, he reasons that sleep must be the mechanism.

Se-kye laughs in relief and amusement at Do-jae’s simple reasoning. Do-jae says he wants to confirm that she’s not fooling him and that he’s not crazy.

Woo-mi meets with Secretary Jung to receive official documentation forgiving Se-kye’s debt, and she finds an error in the spelling of Se-kye’s name on the document. Secretary Jung hands her another document, this time with a new albeit wrong spelling of Se-kye’s name, and Woo-mi almost curses him out. Then, he reveals even more documents with alternative spellings and tells Woo-mi to take her pick. HA!

Secretary Jung warns Do-jae that Woo-mi is on her way, and Do-jae tells Se-kye to decide quickly if she’ll join him. She packs her things and grumbles audibly about Do-jae’s fickle claims about his condition. She complains that nobody knows that she’s this kind, and when Do-jae affirms this, she haughtily claims that she’s always been kind. Do-jae offers his hand, and Se-kye takes it as she steps out of her van.

Driving his car, Do-jae asks about her elbow injury from when he had pushed her out of the truck’s way, and Se-kye amuses him with her exaggerations. When Woo-mi calls, Do-jae turns off Se-kye’s phone and also turns off his phone to make things fair. Se-kye seems content and childishly throws his phone to the back.

Upon finding the van empty, Woo-mi calls Eun-ho, who suggests checking if Se-kye transformed into a baby under the seat. He quickly hangs up, as he’s busy at a confessional. He confesses that he lied to his mother about seminary and ponders which calling to follow. The priest assures him that God will always be with him, and Eun-ho sees that it’s time to follow another calling to his part-time job.

Do-jae brings Se-kye to his company, and he pretends to call Secretary Jung about taking care of Se-kye’s contract so that his employees don’t find them suspicious. In the elevator, Do-jae asks Se-kye if she brought her seal to sign the “big contract” and eyes the crowd around them. Se-kye plays along and offers to sign the big contract with a big signature because she forgot her seal. HA.

In Do-jae’s office, Se-kye explains that her transformation happens once a month for a week without consistent warning. Do-jae decides that their solution is simple: be together from the moment they wake up until the moment they sleep.

Se-kye can’t trust him yet, so Do-jae offers to reveal his weakness first and a contract to keep their secrets. He rushes Se-kye into the contract because she tends to run away in decisive moments, and Se-kye reminds him that she doesn’t like to run away.

Se-kye promises not to run away, and Do-jae makes that the first clause of their contract. Next, Do-jae adds the clause about keeping their secrets, and he tells Se-kye to change his caller ID and her phone password from 1004 (pronounced like “angel” in Korean — what she considers herself lol) to something unrelated to her. Se-kye asks for Do-jae’s birthday and decides to make that her password, since he has nothing to do with her. Petty!

Do-jae adds a clause about picking up calls within three seconds and then one about the termination of this contract upon their end as business partners. He decides that they can decide the matter of sleeping together after Se-kye has grasped Do-jae’s weakness.

He hands her the contract and requests that she respond before her next transformation. With that, he dismisses Se-kye from his office, and she sheepishly leaves without her manager or a car to get home.

When Se-kye arrives at her house, she assuages Woo-mi’s anger by suggesting a peaceful discussion over ddeukbboki. Se-kye shares that she was with Do-jae and asks Woo-mi what it means if a man asks to sleep together. Woo-mi initially reacts with shock but then encourages Se-kye to sleep with him because she’s getting old. Se-kye says that she’ll think about what he meant and promises to not disappear again.

Se-kye tries to practice her lines, but she’s distracted by Do-jae’s contract. As she reads the clauses, she adds her own edits — to not run away from questions and to expect retaliation if their secret is leaked. As requested, Se-kye changes Do-jae’s caller ID from “Jerk” to “Uncle” and changes the three-second rule to picking up the phone as soon as possible.

She also adds that the counterpart must cooperate with requests and that they must forget the other’s secret upon termination of their contract. Do-jae receives a delivery from “Aunt,” and he smiles when he finds Se-kye’s edited contract.

Do-jae meets up with agricultural Professor Kang Dae-shik, his stepfather, to attend a family gathering, while Sa-ra prepares with excessive shopping. She runs into Eun-ho, who hands out samples of perfume. Sa-ra suspects Eun-ho is following her, but Eun-ho implies that it’s the other way around because she keeps showing up at his workplaces. He says that he’s used to it and continues to charm other ladies with the samples.

Do-jae’s family gathers for a chef-crafted meal, and Do-jae disapproves of the extravagance. Gramps takes offense to Do-jae’s comment, and his mother quickly assuages his anger. Then, Gramps criticizes Do-jae for failing to recognize his VIP guest at the aircraft launch and knows that Se-kye saved him from embarrassment. But he’s not worried about Do-jae failing because he can trust Sa-ra to run the business.

Sa-ra takes the opportunity to announce that her airline within Sunho Group just won a bid on an aircraft for half the original price. When Do-jae grills her on the aircraft, Sa-ra answers that the aircraft passed the safety exams in one go and that she’ll be using timeslots from Do-jae’s airline. Do-jae snarks that he’s learned to enjoy the act of giving because that’s all he’s ever done for Sa-ra.

Speaking of giving, Sa-ra distributes her shopping spoils and hands Do-jae a fish, since he likes them so much. Do-jae takes that cue to leave and scolds Gramps for wasting money when Gramps reveals he bought more cars. Gramps leaves the meal in a tantrum, and Do-jae’s mother walks Do-jae to his car, leaving Professor Kang and Sa-ra at the table.

Professor Kang tells Sa-ra that she doesn’t need to fight to win and be acknowledged among family, but Sa-ra bitterly says she’s spent ten years as baggage to her father’s marriage. She claims that this is her way of adapting to a family she’s unrelated to.

As Do-jae walks with his mother, he asks if she’s happy with his stepfather. She admits she’s happy, as Do-jae’s father only ever loved pottery. He even gave his favorite piece to Do-jae, and she says that he was a poor husband. Do-jae adds that his dad was a poor father, who tried to alleviate the burden of Do-jae’s birthdays with a mere white porcelain vase. That night, Do-jae glances at the porcelain vase as he looks over Se-kye’s edited contract.

Se-kye participates in an entertainment news interview, and the interviewer spills the rumor about Se-kye reuniting with the director of her debut film. This is news to Se-kye, and she pulls aside Woo-mi afterwards to clarify this rumor. She tells Woo-mi to call Director Lee, but Woo-mi reluctantly shares that the director doesn’t want to see Se-kye.

Do-jae adds Sa-ra’s fish to his tank, and when Secretary Jung learns it’s from Sa-ra, he steps back and asks if he checked for any bombs. He jokingly requests Do-jae to spread his ashes if he dies.

In her office, Sa-ra regrets not adding a wiretapping device on the fish. She hears a voice calling her name outside her office. It’s a deliveryman with a familiar voice.

The helmeted deliveryman insists on delivering the document directly to Sa-ra and barges into her office for her ID. After checking her ID, the deliveryman comments that she’s his noona. He takes off the helmet, and it’s Eun-ho, who assures her that this run-in is pure coincidence. She’s annoyed by Eun-ho’s persistence and comments that he must be busy with all his jobs.

Woo-mi snaps Se-kye out of her misery by giving her Director Lee’s new script, but she says that the cast has already been decided unofficially. Se-kye knows that the director rarely produces films and demands to meet with Director Lee because she wouldn’t be here without him.

Se-kye forces her way into the director’s office, where he’s meeting with another actress, CHAE YOO-RI (Ryu Hwa-young). Director Lee addresses Se-kye formally to create intentional distance, and Se-kye seems shaken by his formality. He claims to not know this Han Se-kye, as she’s changed too much.

Director Lee scolds her for rudely interrupting the meeting, and Se-kye explains that she was rushed because she didn’t want to lose this opportunity. He calls her efforts futile because she had no chance to begin with. Director Lee tells her to leave, and when she hesitates, he assumes that she only leaves and runs away on her own will.

Se-kye bites her tongue and kneels in front of the director. She accepts the criticism but explains the change wasn’t her choice. She asserts that she’s the best actress for this role and promises to work hard. Seeking validation, Se-kye insists that Director Lee should know her best, but he says that he was mistaken.

Director Lee returns to his meeting with Yoo-ri, and Woo-mi helps Se-kye back on her feet. Before she leaves, Se-kye leaves her portfolio with the director, but he doesn’t give it a second glance.

Se-kye drinks soju with Woo-mi and Eun-ho and admits that she was super pitiful earlier. She’d always thought that people had wrong perceptions of her because they didn’t know her, but today, she wondered if the people’s perceptions were the true her. Eun-ho assures her that the Se-kye he knows hasn’t changed and reminds her that she has other opportunities. Se-kye agrees, and they all cheers to the movie’s ruin, with Eun-ho hilariously asking God for forgiveness before raising his glass.

Behind them, the pojangmacha ajumma asks a group which soju they want based on the model: Han Se-kye or Chae Yoo-ri? Woo-mi and Eun-ho loudly praise Se-kye’s generous donation and her kindness, much to Se-kye’s embarrassment, but they successfully convince the guys to choose Se-kye’s endorsed soju. Se-kye raises her arms in a heart and treats the guys to an extra dish.

That night, Do-jae receives a video call from Se-kye and reluctantly answers after glancing at the contract terms. Drunk Se-kye sobs to Do-jae about being rejected from the movie and cries that it’ll probably go to Cannes — she’s always wanted to go. She explains the movie is about clones and proceeds to act out her interpretation for Do-jae. Using her dog as her counterpart, Se-kye switches from weeping lover to gun-wielding gangster and adorably looks to Do-jae for approval.

Do-jae commends her acting in hopes to hang up, but Se-kye continues on about the director being the person who created her, referring to him as the father she never had. Se-kye says that she feels like she’s just been abandoned by her father and asks if Do-jae understands the feeling. He says that he does, but Se-kye begins to wail that he couldn’t understand.

Then, suddenly Se-kye wipes away her tears and compliments her own ability to cry. Do-jae hangs up on her, and drunk Se-kye falls asleep calling Do-jae a jerk.

Do-jae goes on a run the next morning and smiles at the sight of a dog similar to Se-kye’s dog. He calls to ask for a favor of Secretary Jung, who’s eating breakfast with Sa-ra. She tries to bribe him to work for her airline, but Secretary Jung remains loyal to Do-jae. He just came for the free food from his school sunbae.

Se-kye wakes up to the memory of her drunken call with Do-jae and cringes in mortification. He summons her to the mall with her passport and reminds her of the clause she added to the contract about being cooperative. So she peels herself off her bed to meet him in her hungover state.

Se-kye notices that the mall is empty, and Do-jae says that he had the floor cleared out for him. A worker greets Do-jae, and he chooses to buy the whole season collection. Se-kye attempts to follow suit, but the worker informs her that she needs to make an appointment. Do-jae says that she won’t have time and hands her a plane ticket to Paris. He says that it’s for the same flight as Director Lee and clarifies that he’s just helping her as business partners.

Se-kye immediately runs out of the mall and catches a taxi to the airport. On the plane, Director Lee’s ticket upgrades to business class, where he finds Se-kye waiting for him. He finally talks to her informally, and she insists that she’s the same person that Director Lee knew in her early days. Se-kye asks him to trust himself because Director Lee created her. Director Lee says that if he created this Han Se-kye, then he’s disappointed in himself. He walks back to his economy class seat, leaving Se-kye speechless.

In Paris, Se-kye sulks alone in defeat, and a group of touring Korean ajummas recognize her. They ask if she ran away again, and she responds that she’s come to catch someone who’s run away. The ajummas claim that her reputation has caused people to run away from her, and they advise her not to run away next time. But Se-kye knows that isn’t possible.

Sa-ra receives a telemarketing call about a loan, and she hangs up saying that she’s young and rich. She receives a consecutive call and answers saying she’s rich, but it’s a different caller who already knows this. It’s Eun-ho, who got her number from the delivery service, and he tries to ask for her help in desperation. Sa-ra hangs up in annoyance and comments that he keeps acting cute.

Eun-ho’s sister, Aram, sits up in surprise when Eun-ho admits that he was calling a woman. He says that he needs money, and she lies back down, not surprised by his motives. Hm, curious.

Do-jae picks up Se-kye from the airport, recognizing her with her clothes and gait. He asks about the meeting, and Se-kye shares that it failed. Regardless, she’s glad she saw it through and thanks Do-jae, who brushes it off as another contribution to her debt.

He hands over their finalized contract to sign, and Do-jae asks why Se-kye continues to act despite her condition. Se-kye answers that she acts to not forget herself, so that she doesn’t lose herself entirely.

It’s Se-kye’s turn to ask, and she makes Do-jae pull over to watch a movie to confirm his face-blindness. They sit in an empty movie theater, and as Chae Yoo-ri’s movie starts, Se-kye asks if she’s better than Yoo-ri. He closes his eyes, and Se-kye wonders if he’s sleeping. Do-jae explains that it’s easier for him to listen to the actors’ voices, since he can’t distinguish them onscreen.

After a moment, Do-jae says that Se-kye is better. She asks why, and he says, “Han Se-kye is better because she’s the only actor I can recognize.” Se-kye seems satisfied with his response and closes her eyes to experience Do-jae’s movie-watching perspective. Do-jae looks at Se-kye as she admits that solely listening to the movie is difficult. She says that he’s sick and hurting just like her.

Se-kye dozes off from jetlag and leans her head on Do-jae’s shoulder. She promises to repay this debt and she continues to borrow his shoulder to sleep on. Do-jae continues to listen to the movie, and we see him nervously tapping his fingers.

When Se-kye and Do-jae exit the theater, they’re coincidentally met by reporters, who immediately recognize her. As clamoring cameras flash at them, Se-kye turns around and puts on her sunglasses. Do-jae says that standing in front of cameras seems to be Se-kye’s fate and asks if Se-kye has a plan. She remains silent in panic, so Do-jae wraps his hand around her waist and pulls her close.

Do-jae pulls off her sunglasses, and the reporters ask if they’re confirming the dating rumors. Se-kye looks concerned, but Do-jae holds her hand and tells her to smile like she’s happy. Do-jae flashes his smile, and Se-kye looks at him in shock.

 
COMMENTS

There’s nothing like a good contract relationship to blur the lines as business partners, and I’m delighted that Do-jae made the first move. Though Do-jae’s prickly personality takes the limelight, I think the show has given us a few hints of his nervousness in intimate moments with Se-kye. It may still be pure fascination or innocent admiration now, but I sense that Do-jae’s cold exterior is starting to melt as he relates more to Se-kye. Her sense of abandonment from her father figure director reflects his own experiences, and I’m interested to see how this white porcelain metaphor pans out.

I’m amused by Se-kye’s duality as a thick-skinned troublemaker and sensitive marshmallow. She’s unafraid to cross boundaries and step on people’s toes to get what she wants and to pursue what she believes. She’s stubbornly unapologetic upfront, but then crumbles into her feelings when she’s alone. Her drunken wailing over video call to Do-jae was the highlight of this episode, and I applaud Seo Hyun-jin for her adorable portrayal of this tantrum. She’s a comedic goldmine, and I’ve got to give some credit to deadpan Do-jae for elevating that scene.

Eun-ho and Sa-ra’s encounters felt delightfully random, and I enjoy them on screen together. I’m preempting giggling at the growing web of misunderstandings between the two, which seem so trivial but perfect for the tone of the show. Eun-ho’s multiple part-time jobs is a bit curious, as he seems to need to money for a “good cause.” If it has anything to do with funding his priesthood, I’m already cracking up. I pray to the pagan gods that this pairing is as amusing as our main one and that Ahn Jae-hyun only plays these characters for the rest of his career.

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The scene where they have the sad - funny video call made me really happy in the trailer, with no context. Now, actually seeing it, I wish they'd been closer when it happened. It was so intimate and nice. You know, since she showed him her 'real face', so to speak.

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I wasn't expecting a contract relationship. I don't know why - now that I think about it, I should have seen it coming. :D But it took me by surprise nonetheless.

On that note, I'd like to flex my legal muscles and state that these contracts are useless. There's no way they can be enforced in a Court of law.

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There's greenfields throwing her logic blanket around like it has a place in dramaland. :)

Honestly, she should have added much more to that contract.

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There's space for logic everywhere. XD
Ikr - I don't quite know what she added, but that seems like an awfully small/tiny agreement to me.

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It is only fair to use logic. And then throw it away so you can enjoy the show when things don't add up.

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As a fellow legal person, can I challenge that assertion?

Counterargument: This particular contract seems enforceable to me. There's nothing unconscionable, unreasonable or unduly burdensome within its terms. It isn't restricting the rights of either party, and both were legally able to consent to it. I mean, there is certainly an argument in regard to contractually being obligated to be in a relationship with a person, but this particular contract seems more to govern the nature of their relationship rather than create and enforce a romantic relationship between the parties.

I mean, sure, they probably don't want to have it go before a judge, but I can't actually see any reason it would be null and void.

I could be missing something - it's been a while since I studied contracts. But in the spirit of drama discourse, and the fact that I'm a bit of a contrary person, I thought I'd throw this out there.

Lord, look at me, talking contracts before I've even had my morning caffeine. This is what drama does to me.

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Of course you may challenge that assertion. In reply, as far as I know (I don't work with contracts either):

One of the fundamental principles of contract law is there must be offer and acceptance with the intention to create a legal obligation; that leads to legal consequences. Social and domestic agreements do not fall within the purview of this.

This is admittedly, a part of common law, which I have studied. I am not aware of SK would make of this.

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I feel like maybe in the States contracts perhaps the idea of a legal obligation either isn't present (it simply needs to be an offer/acceptance agreement between the parties) or else is much more broadly construed. Sure, this may be a really shitty, low stakes contract, but it still meets the basic requirements of offer/acceptance, consideration, mutuality, and competence of the parties.

And I would also argue in the alternative that there is a legal consequence: if either party discloses the other's secret there will be dire consequences to the other's career and well being. That is most certainly enforceable in a court of law.

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Interesting idea. We can perhaps say then that whether legal obligation is required is difficult to assess in view of differing laws among countries.

Re: the alternative argument - dire consequences are true but there's one more essential element to contracts apart from the ones listed: lawful object. One could argue that their contract relationship is not for a lawful object.

They're pretending to be in a relationship to deceive people; presumably to keep investors invested in the company and the public invested in Han Se Gye. A relationship to deceive. Deception. Essentially a fraud. With monetary consequences for investors who will be affected (as he claims) if his career fails. And with conequences for Han Se Gye's career, her other obligations, dramas, ads, if any, should her reputation fall.

Even without legal obligation, this is a relationship to decieve people into thinking something that isn't true; is true. The object is unlawful - there are consequences sure; but what they gain from the deception, is gain from well..a deception.

Lawful object? I think not.

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(gosh - I can't make head or tail of what I wrote. In sum, it's an agreement to lie together. This is not a lawful object, therefore nope - not enforceable to say the least)

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Rebuttal to your deception argument: It's not actually illegal to have a relationship that is not real, for all it may be untasteful.

Moreover, falsehood regarding public image seems like a weak argument since we purchase things all the time based on this concept: what do you think we're doing when we watch dramas and movies and plays? There are hundreds of false relationships being used to market a product (i.e. the show) to the people. We aren't suing production companies because the relationships aren't real. Sure, it's a deception the public is aware of, but I would argue it's a comparable deception nonetheless.

As for fraud, there is personal gain, but it isn't to the detriment of others, which may remove the criminality of it. Additionally, proof of falsehood must be shown, and let's be real, these two are totally into one another.

Ugh, I have to go off to work now and do actual legal crap, but I look forward to your response counsel.

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Bravo Bravo! Loving all this legal mumbojumbo, which somehow I managed to follow!
And I'm on my 3rd or 4th cup of coffee so my brain should be awake.
But thanks anyway!!!

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[hehe I was at work too - hence the late response]

We may need an external, impartial judge to decide this point. I find that fundamentally, while they may be the only parties to the contract, it is clear without it being expressly stated that the object of the relationship by contract; is to decieve other people. Therefore, any gain at all is a gain made out of that deception. And regardless of the element of criminality (though investors who invest in Do Jae's company because of the relationship could certainly sue), that contract is not something a court will enforce.

Re production houses that decieve people about actors being in relationships to see a drama. Sure. But is that expressly written in a contract? Has anyone ever taken that clause in a contract to court? I think the Court would throw them out and possibly fine the parties for wasting its time.

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I'm not talking a deceptive relationship between co-stars to sell a drama; I'm talking about the actual fictional one within the story.

A production company is selling a lie with this form of visual storytelling, are they not? They require us to gain enjoyment from this fictional relationship on screen/stage in order to profit from it. Even though we are aware of the deception, it still exists as such. In the same way this false relationship between the leads is sold to the public in a way that we consume it for enjoyment regardless of its truth -- remember, they were connected prior to the contract. It's a deception created by the people they are deceiving, not vice versa.

Moreover, if protecting their image protects their company, how is that a negative benefit or harmful deception? The issues they are not disclosing are personal in nature, and not really a part of the businesses they seek to protect, though they do arguably effect those businesses. I feel like the benefit outweighs the harm in this deception. (There are other terms which I'm ignoring here, such as the fact that they each seek to learn more about their conditions, which is another one of the reasons I think the contract may be enforceable.)

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Do you email shows like "We got married"? I think they are fundamentally different what's going on in the drama - in WGM, the public is told this is a scripted show. That's not what Do Chan and Se Gye are doing.

Benefits to the parties to the contract outweighing the negatives isn't a justification for a contract with an unlawful object. If that logic were true, then a contract between two conmen to split profits of a successful con in a particular way, would also be a valid contract.

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Mean not email.

Also, it was night time on my side of the world and I fell asleep. >_<

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As a third legal person, your argument is sound, and the court might even contemplate it, but I'm with @greenfields on this one, non-enforceable.

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Hehe - may I ask you to explain why. ^^;

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Wow, so much legalese. I agree with you for the comments you made. There has to be a legal consequence to what is happening. I don't know Korean corporate law, so I can't say whether the secrets affect stock prices etc etc, which would be harmful and be of legal consequence. That is a different argument. At this point their secrets only affect them and nothing about their secrets have any baring on legality. Answering a phone quickly has no legal consequence, if it did that would be slavery. So a court would look at the contract, laugh and throw it out. That being said I think the contract is useful because it sets up boundaries in their relationship, which initially they both want. I hope this makes sense haha. I'm at work and kind of sleepy.

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But do courts throw out contracts for such content? I mean, and again this may be a thing in the States, the content isn't relevant to viability unless the content is unconscionable or unreasonable in some way e.g. if she had to answer the phone right away. A court may think that the content is stupid, but a binding agreement between the parties is still an agreement. They each derive a benefit to the others detriment in an agreement. If courts threw out any agreement that was silly then that creates a standard that is impossible to define. Legal consequences have to do with the ability to enforce agreements, all opinions on content aside, because if agreements are not honored we would have no reason for contract law.

Moreover, even of the only effect is on the parties that is still an effect and therefore that party has been deprived of something in return for nothing, while the other part has benefitted without deprivation.

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I just came here to say that this is exactly the content I'm on DB for 😂 you're all mad. I love you.

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This thread epitomizes the awesomeness of Beanies.

I do have to ask though: Would the contract need to be notarized or signed with witnesses in order to be binding? Otherwise, coercion (physical and/or psychological) or one party not being of sound mind when it was drawn up seems all too possible.

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I hate that I can say this -- but I think I answered this question below...

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I saw your reply after I posted. I should have read the whole thread because obviously Beanies are on top of all things today.

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Procedure is too techical a point that varies across jurisdictions - and different types of contracts have different requirements. An agreement to sell a house for instance will involve what we call stamp duty, should ideally be registered, taxes etc. A simple contract of employment between me and my boss just needs our signatures.

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Hehehe those were some big words here and I am laughing at the solemnity of all this conversation!

Lemme add my two-pence as a complete lay(wo)man when it comes to laws but as a person who has watched way too many kdramas: Korean laws seem to work differently and personal contracts seem to have some sorta validity. There have been waaaay too many dramas which had these sort of extra- legal contracts and ppl did take them seriously as if they were binding on them.

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P.S. I am not watching the show. I am just basing my comment on all the comments above..

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Personal contracts often are valid and enforceable even without the formalities of a writing and witnesses etc., (at least on the States) once either party has taken steps to carry it out. But the issue is more whether the terms themselves are enforceable based on the most basic and fundamental contract rules. It always comes down to the basics and never logic. Law is weird like that.

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(ah! and I answered above to egads)

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I feel like I need to go ask my friend who actually was a contract lawyer for a large company to see if any of these arguments hold up. But then I’d have to ask him to watch this drama, which he is Korean, so maybe he would. And then his wife who is a trial lawyer would weigh in about the fraud statements, and then this conversation would ensue in real life and they would undoubtedly be on opposite sides of the court. And now I really want to see what would happen. “If you give a mouse a cookie...” Looking forward to your rebuttles!

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Please do! And update us with their answers!

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...and I feel like I really need you to do this, too. And report back, of course.

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Oh, please, keep us posted.

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Oh please do. And be sure to tell that Beanies all over the world want to know their opinions!

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I have to say, I am finding this conversation to be much more interesting than the drama, which I dropped half way through the last episode. I haven't followed the terms of the contract in the drama, so I am not sure if I can give a very solid legal opinion (plus I only know U.S. law), but I do think that 1) with regard to their relationship, it is valid in that they are defining the terms of a relationship which they have every right to have 2) regardless, the investors could probably sue him if the relationship causes harm to the company based his duty to the company and the fact that the terms indicate that the public perception is being purposefully misled. If it doesn't cause harm, I think that he is in the clear because there are no damages and 3) I really wonder if there are any court cases where such a thing came up. With all the kdramas using this trope, I wonder if anyone actually tried this and then sued over it.

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That's it. Now all I need is a drama where the contract of a contract relationship is taken to Court. 😂

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YES! I want this with a scenario of @ally-le's lawyer friends arguing about it as a subplot.

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What hath the Drama Gods wrought?! All I can say is, youse guys sound like a bunch of Philadelphia lawyers. ;-)

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well if there is no legal supervising, wouldn't it be become pointless?

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Thanks @dramallama
I'm not sure what to feel about our Do Jae taking Se Kye out from her van and leaving her to go back by herself, without escort or even calling her a cab. On the one hand his behaviour can be gallant, but then he does this kind of thing leaving Se Kye in the lurch, and he doesn't seem to know or care. A strange character, our Do Jae.

I was amused by Sec Jung's meeting with Woo Mi and his buying of time for Do Jae by producing envelope after envelope of documents with variations of mis-spelling of Se Kye's name, with a play on naming her as 'dog' or some animal or other.

Eun Ho is another interesting character, more so, because he's relegated to side character, and yet is playing an even bigger role that BFF Woo Mi. He may publicly avow a vocation as priest, but his actions do not seem to be in line with this, especially his great love for money. He is likely still following Se Kye's orders to keep Sa Ra out of Do Jae's hair, as his part-time jobs are rather too related to her.

With Eun Ho in the picture, Sa Ra also gets a new twist to her character. No longer are we given a flat, annoying chaebol style rival, but a nuanced human half-sister with some uncertainties, lots of ability and none of the out-and-out meanness towards underlings. She is ambitious, and full of one-upmanship, but did not actually get round to hurting Do Jae. I'm hoping that even when she does discover Do Jae's weakness, she might not take full advantage of it, or at least not hurt him in the process of trying to take over his place.

I'm wondering about the image of Se Kye as a piece of white pottery. It looked so lonely and cut off in it's glass case on a pedestal. I suppose that could be a good metaphor for Se Kye, before Woo Mi, Eun Ho and now Do Jae came to know her condition, and she appeared to be an unapproachable celebrity, who disappeared when she liked. However I'm a little nervous that that piece of pottery may get knocked over and broken, and piecing it back together will not get it to look the same.

I also wonder what Director Lee really means by how Se Kye has changed, and why he would not befriend her again. Her condition that has caused her to run away has given her tremendous bad publicity. In a sense, that piece of pottery has already been chipped and found wanting by people like Dir Lee. I guess it's good that the show has not simply glossed over her losses in terms of ad contracts, but has also shown us how hard it is for her in the area of acting. In the end, Do Jae will be her saviour in her professional life.

Right now, he's already providing her the glass case for protection, but he might also as easily, accidentally(?) knock over the pedestal and shatter the lovely piece of ceramic. Se Kye is brave indeed to trust Do Jae, but again, she may not have much choice! 😏

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LOL I found Do Jae’s a strange character too. He seems so aware in some occasions but totally detached and lack of common sense in some others. Does he develop such attitude from not trusting people? Or he really is a selfish, snarky and a man with attitude. While Se Kye is more compassionate, but in public eyes she was portrayed the same I guess? - selfush, snarky and an actress with attitude? Alas, despite the puzzling behavior, they suited each other well. He protects her and backs her up, and she could teach him more compassions and common sense LOL.

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“However I'm a little nervous that that piece of pottery may get knocked over and broken, and piecing it back together will not get it to look the same.“

Interesting that you mention this. It reminds me of kintsugi, a Japanese art of repairing broken pottery with gold and thus elevate its values. It gives the idea that even broken pottery has it’s uniqueness, and that the flaws should be displayed with pride.

Not sure how it relates to the drama, but if one day Se Kye would be “shattered”, I hope she would be pieced better and be even more valuable. 😉

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You know...I'm kinda reminded on kintsugi. It's a Japanese technique for repairing broken porcelain where gold is used to hold the pieces together. The effect emphasizes that it is the flaws that make the piece beautiful.

Therefore, I'm not really worried about the vase breaking. Because if Se-kye is a broken Joseon vase, it really is the flaws that I love about her, like her outspokenness. I love that she'll stick her neck out for others and protect the weak. I also love that she'll compensate you for being collateral to her revenge.

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Whoops...ditto. Looks like I was late to the party lol.

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Your last line is exactly why I am willing to forgive her a few follies.
I have never met a drama character who cared to compensate the owner with tangerines after she used their set on an unprofessional ,sexist doctor.It's the little things that count,ya know 😉

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I'm happy that they are finally honest to each other.

I really don't care about the scenes Eun-ho and Sa-ra and for me, they don't bring anything to the story...

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I just adore Seo Hyun Jin in this role. She is such a full character, as for Lee Min Ki's character, he still hasn't fully grown on me. That being said the romance has begun. I will say this for the show, I fully appreciate when a the man likes the woman first and that seems to be happening, so cheers and kudos.

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My two biggest takeaways from this episode (because I'm getting a bit bored to be honest) were: Where can I get that green coat? And that clothing store was smaller than Do-jae's closet, but seeing how he shops, I understand why he needs a closet that seems larger than my home.

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OMG - I was thinking the exact thing about that coat!!! I loved it and the bright shade of green was just right!
But I'm not getting bored yet, a little confused by the dialogue at times, but not bored.

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The way she abandoned herself to the director. Woah.

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this is a little cheesy but still a great watch. i'm really liking the actress.

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I am glad that the "villain" is somebody who is misunderstood. And totally likable. More of that chance encounters, pretty please.

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I totally get it se kye and do jae are a great couple butttt.... i wanna see more of sa ra and eun ho's romance. Can we have a spin off featuring a priest and an heiress who are full of cuteness with no melo no tragedy around? I wud be gappy if there were no story line too! Eun ho and saRa are so cute together! And maybe lil kingkang cud join them too!!

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Thats "happy" by the way. Here I am rectifying my typos and feeling child like while i do it😂😂😂

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My wants after seeing this drama:
1) I wanna see the saeguk she's in. Kdrama producers..this girl has the acting prowess...cast her.
2) I wanna have her wardrobe, makeup and hair stylists. Damn... she looks good.

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All my questions are about what happened to cause the directer to change his opinion about Se-kye.
1. Did they have a good relationship throughout their filming experience? Was the directer fond of her and happy to have worked and influenced her career?
2. What changed his mind? Reports in the news about her disappearing? I can't even imagine how she can accept an acting job knowing that sometime during the filming she will need to take a week off. Is the show implying that she would break contracts and leave filming during her change. In that case it seems like she wouldn't have much of a career at all.
3. Does he have anything to do with the start of the changes?
He keeps saying that she has changed but of course an actor will change as they mature in their acting abilities. They literally take on different personalities to represent. I find his comment so incomplete. What really is he complaining about?
The last thing I want to ask is anyone else see this once a month change for a week to be a metaphor for a women's menstrual cycle? It seems too simple but I can't help but think of this connection.

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@crazyjason
The menstrual cycle was the first thing on everyone's mind when we heard about this show's premise.

I've been asking question 2. and saying that it's crazy for her to continue in this profession when she cannot hold onto her body, let alone her face, all at unexpected times.

I also am dissatisfied by what he is saying in 3. What's his problem actually? Is he saying that she's become unprofessional? She accepts his statement at face value but I don't even know what that is. And what's the issue with having changed - it does not mean that she's become bad or worse, only that she's different.

So I have lots of issues with Dir Lee. He does not look to me to be much of a mentor or one who cares about rookies whom he took under his wing.

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While I also think the conversation between Se Kye and the director is vague and requires more explanation, for now I simply assume that the what the director means by the word “changing” is Se Kye’s attitude. She’s notoriously known as a problematic actress with lack of discipline, and comes across as a airheaded actress who would do what she wants regardless what others say. Maybe that’s what he meant by “change”. But little that he knows that the word means so much more to Se Kye.

Yea, I’m also curious how she survives in the industry given the public perception of her attitude, but like Do Jae said, even with her personality, she sells out almost everything she represents so she must be really popular, for both the right and the wrong reasons.

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I'm not really sure that the drama really earned that director's response to Se-kye. They don't really explain what really warrants such an OTT outright repulsion/refusal from him. His reaction doesn't really measure up to what we've seen of Se-kye's behaviour thus far.

Like I can understand that it's incredibly frustrating to work with her because of what her running off for a week does to any production, but the fact that she has remained a top tier talent and spokes-model means that whatever trouble she brings to a production, her skill/talent means people are still willing to work with her.

Plus, people act like her running away is just part of her mystique or charm/a cost of doing business with her.

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crazyjason,

As soon as I heard that the female lead would metamorphose for one week a month, all I could wonder was how she could ever get along during filming. She would likely hold up shooting every three weeks. Who would sign a contract with her if they knew of such unpredictable "timing issues" in advance?

Writer-nim had better have a good explanation for this because I cannot get my head around it.

I think I understand where Director Lee is coming from -- only to get the feeling that he's not talking about what I think he's talking about. I'm confused as all get out.

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I'm enjoying this show so much. Lee Min-ki is good no matter what role he's in. But I'm getting curious to see how Se-kye's condition will be cured if at all. I like the supernatural twist it brings to the show.

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Yes, I was alao hoping the show would give more focus on her condition. How did it happened, why, how can it be solved, what are the rules of changing etc. Do Jae’s condition is more clear, as while it is uncommon, it’s a real health issue.

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I agree. I hope they go into more detail soon. I'm sure they will, but I hope it's soon.

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Thanks for the recap, but I want to point out that Se Gye only boarded that flight to Paris but then got out of the plane before it took off. She met those Korean tourists in Incheon airport departure terminal, after she got out from the plane. Distance between Seoul and Paris is about 12 hours by plane, so there is no way she can made a round trip back to seoul in a day, let alone having a movie date in a broad daylight with Do Jae if she indeed landed in Paris

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Thanks for your recap, dramallama!

I had a feeling that Do-jae had a logical reason for his sleeping proposition. He's so doggone literal. LOL!

Se-kye's meetings with Director Lee were really painful. My hat is off to her for facing the music and persisting in attempting to mend fences with him, even though she knew he probably would not work with her again. Here's hoping that something comes up and the other actress has to drop out.

*squints heavenward, hoping there is no thunderbolt with my name on it*

Don't tell me that Eun-ho's mother is pushing him into the priesthood. Please don't do that! Look at what happened to Priest Choi in GUEST!!!

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I knew that he wouldn't be literally propositioning her. But it still made me LOL.

If the other actress doesn't drop out, I want the movie to BOMB HAAAARD and for the overall response to be 'If only the director had given the role to Han Se-kye instead...' And then I want Han Se-kye to be given a role where she blows that other film out of the water...like get that Golden Palm or whatever at Cannes, girl...plus an Oscar lol.

But like I said earlier...there's kinda a cognitive dissonance between the director's attitude towards Se-kye and what we've seen of her behaviour thus far, so the drama doesn't feel like it's earned that reaction from the director. So when Se-kye is like...I've wronged people etc...I'm like giiiirl, you take down the creepy pedo businessman to his face. You go! Like, I just find it refreshing to see a female call out poor behaviour around her. Does she go too far? Yeah. Like, maybe don't throw oranges or cop a feel...but yeah.

Eun-ho is hilarious. It's like a grown up version of Song-yi's brother.

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we hope for the power of netizen comments on "the money has been wasted for watching this movie" or "the PD's eyes are blurred in casting actress"

as for commenting on sekye's action: i think given circumstances and subject, she of course will act different. i mean she has soft spot for this director. i accept that she is becoming desperate

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Can anybody enlightened me regarding our three musketeers' relationship aka Sekye-Woomi-Eunho like do they live together? is Woomi her assistant or her director? how Eunho met the girls? if Eunho aspired to be a priest, why he lived(?) in Sekye's house than living in church and trains there?

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They seem to be old friends..not sure if they date all the way back to their pig tails and shorts,but old enough that when she first transformed at 20,she relayed the secret to both of them.They all have individual residences although EunHo's family home and Se Kye s lavish mansion seem to be their usual hang out places. Woo mi is the CEO of the company that likely(only) manages Sekye.
Hope this late reply helps ☺

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thank you for the explanation @ashes2ashes ! it really helps me navigating their relationships

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Finally caught up with this show and feeling a bit underwhelmed.The story is enjoyable so far and SHJ in particular is her usual winning self.But I am not feeling the crack factor that I got from both of their previous works.Adjusting expectation mode.
More curious about Se Kye's character at this point .She strikes me as a younger sister making hella noises to get her aloof older brother to notice her.Not discounting her obvious ambition and underhanded methods here.But I fell that the family dynamics is messed up and informs a lot of the step siblings' behavior.What kind of haraboji plays his grand kids off of each other while dangling the company they both clearly want.🙄

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