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Mr. Sunshine: Episode 24 (Final)

Guns, glory, sad ending — here we come! Our finale doesn’t disappoint in maximizing the potential of our cast and the remaining story. It’s incredible and quite overwhelming. The Joseon people suffer immeasurable losses in family, pride, and history, but they still persevere in their fight, believing that they will see a free Joseon. The Righteous Army invests in the future of resistance and continues to fight until the very end because history ought to and will remember their names.

 
EPISODE 24 RECAP

The traitor ministers line up in front of the throne for a photo taken by Hee-sung, who considers it an honor to document these ministers in history. They proudly display their badges as Hee-sung’s smile turns into a fierce glare at these unashamed traitors. He snaps photos of the ministers, each shutter release sounding like a gunshot.

A real gunshot rings, and Eugene collects the hitlist from Duk-moon’s dead body. Dong-mae enters the room, and Eugene offers to return Hwawollu, which he just reclaimed from dead Duk-moon. Then, they hear gunshots caused by the Japanese soldiers’ onslaught on Ae-shin’s servants, which Ae-shin witnesses from above in shock. When the soldiers find an empty carriage, they quickly retreat to report this news.

Suffering fatal bullet wounds, Ae-shin’s maid reaches for the servant. She can’t reach him but promises that she’ll join him soon. The soldiers report the empty carriage to their commander, who orders them to return to the scene to salvage any evidence.

When the villagers come out of hiding, they recognize Ae-shin’s servants and try to keep the maid conscious. Ae-shin rushes to hold her maid, who greets her and reveals her identity to the surrounding villagers. The maid says that she came to save Ae-shin and the Righteous Army, that she lived for the joys of watching Ae-shin grow up and will die for her as well. Then she takes her last breath.

Ae-shin wails in mourning as the Japanese forces return to the site of their murder. Dong-mae and Eugene arrive too, and the villagers hide Ae-shin under their garments and line up as a human wall against the Japanese. Commander Hasegawa orders the Joseon people to move, but they link arms and stand resolute in defense of Ae-shin and their fallen people. Dong-mae and Eugene (and I as well) stand frozen behind the crowd, moved by the sight.

As Eugene remembers the written accounts about the Joseon people, he tells Joseph that the Joseon people have not changed. He reads the record of the Joseon people persevering against the American forces: “The enemies are still desperately fighting back, even in the face of crushing defeat. Despite being on the verge of losing, there has not been a single deserter. Even while being cornered by the overwhelming military power of our forces, the enemies keep getting back up time and time again under the battle flag of their general.”

Eugene watches them with tears welling in his eyes, as he remembers Ae-shin’s conviction to save the undercover Righteous Army geisha. She had told him that she needed to save her comrade because one day, that woman could be her. As the prophecy is fulfilled before Eugene’s eyes, he thinks, “The Joseon that the woman risked her life to protect is now protecting her.” Commander Hasegawa looks flabbergasted by the resolute Joseon people and the American teacher standing in solidarity. He lowers his gun and orders his troops to retreat, as these people will be crushed by the Japanese anyway.

As Commander Hasegawa rides away on his horse with his ensemble of troops, Eugene tells Dong-mae that he’ll need a horse, a privilege only granted to Japanese soldiers. They approach two soldiers on horseback and each claim a soldier to fight. Dong-mae kills his target first by throwing a knife at the soldier’s chest, and Eugene claims to have drawn his gun faster but restrained from shooting to avoid attention. Ha, I missed these two being petty.

Eugene offers to escort Ae-shin back to the hideout, but she refuses to put Eugene in danger. She didn’t expect the death of her servants in her resistance journey, and she wants Eugene to remain safe as an American. Eugene warns her to prepare for anyone’s death, since this is a war. He assures her that her servants will be buried with the help of the other villagers and urges her to head to the meeting spot.

At the new Righteous Army basecamp, comrades distribute handfuls of raw barley to eat, as smoke from fire will reveal their location. A jaded comrade complains that their suffering won’t make an immediate impact, and the younger rickshaw runner insists that they can remain persistent. Another comrade points to the children playing in the water as a reminder that they’re living, not just enduring.

They hear a sound of horse hooves and see that Ae-shin has returned. She reports the successful completion of her mission as well as the death of her comrades, whose mission to protect their fellow comrades’ escape was also a success. Eun-san comforts Ae-shin with the reminder that their sacrifice protected the young children, and it’s now their duty to protect them.

Eugene burns the servant’s and maid’s belongings, wishing them to a good place. He also throws his mother’s wooden hair ornament and asks them to deliver it to his mother if they meet her there. Dong-mae sits in his hideout smoking opium, counting down the days until he meets Ae-shin: D-5.

Hee-sung prints the news of the assassination of innocent Joseon people and the relentless attacks by the Japanese. In the newspaper, he encourages the Joseon people to face these fears as they continue into the storm. Hee-sung’s worker (Ae-shin’s language school friend), Reporter Yoon, worries about the distribution of their paper, since the Japanese are becoming stricter with their newspaper policy, even threatening to deport an English reporter.

Hee-sung embraces these threats as consequences of telling the truth and assures Reporter Yoon that he purposely left his newspaper nameless so that he couldn’t be traced. He commends his own foresight, and his reporter laments Hee-sung’s optimism at a time like this. She assures him that she’ll take care of the newspaper distribution, and Hee-sung says that he picked a great worker while the worker jokes that she picked the wrong job.

As Hee-sung packs up his printing press, Eugene enters the pawnshop, to Hee-sung’s delight. He’s come to retrieve the item that he left with Hee-sung — the Joseon flag that the emperor gifted him — and Hee-sung jokes that he couldn’t sell his country because of that flag. Eugene asks about the pawnshop duo, and Hee-sung explains that they’re away because of their aid in blowing up the hotel.

As payment for the camera that Eugene sent to Hee-sung, Eugene hands over the list of Righteous Army members, as it could be a hitlist in the hands of the Japanese but a record in the hands of Hee-sung. Eugene warns Hee-sung that this hitlist is worth a lot of money, and Hee-sung offers to buy drinks for trusting him with this invaluable record. They laugh that Hee-sung is finally buying drinks.

At the bar, Hee-sung notices a familiar figure and excitedly greets Dong-mae with flowery words. He orders drinks as his treat, but Dong-mae and Eugene can’t quite believe him. Hee-sung raises his glass as a toast among friends, and Eugene and Dong-mae gladly clink their glasses with Hee-sung’s glass.

Hee-sung looks surprised that they didn’t take out their gun and sword at the mention of “friends,” and he raises a toast one more time as confirmation. They all clink their glasses and happily drink as friends. As we watch the three friends drinking together, Eugene narrates: “The first words that Ae-shin learned were: gun, glory, sad ending. Although we were walking our own paths, we were all heading toward the same destination.”

Hee-sung’s newspaper extra is distributed throughout the streets, and as they watch the newspapers fall from the sky, Eugene continues, “Our paths resembled us: a newspaper written in place of a will, a broken body burning through its remaining life like opium, and a foreigner who carries the Joseon flag. Between glory and sad ending, where will our destination lie? Perhaps we didn’t know how to stop, didn’t have a reason to stop, or maybe it was patriotism because the hot summer night allowed a previously nonexistent friendship to blossom.”

Resident General Ito Hirobumi angrily throws the newspaper in his office and seethes that one line in the newspaper can move the Joseon people more than a hundred words from him. Commander Hasegawa explains that the nameless newspaper could not be tracked down. Minister Lee Wan-yong then suggests that they fight agitation with agitation by providing a large bounty for the wanted Righteous Army members, and General Hirobumi likes this idea.

The significant bounty tempts the villagers to seek out the comrades, and Eugene and Gwan-soo overhear the conversations. Gwan-soo informs Eugene that Soomi, Domi’s older sister, is in the palace after delivering a message to the emperor from Hina but wishes to join the Righteous Army. Though Eugene knows that the palace is safer, he offers to help her escape.

Dong-mae throws a bag of money to the baker for the candies and tells the baker to keep the change. He doesn’t need money anymore and hopes that the baker will continue to make good business. As he walks away, Dong-mae coughs up blood and collapses onto the street.

When Dong-mae wakes up, he’s in his hideout with Eugene taking care of him. Eugene says that he redressed Dong-mae’s wound and notes all the blood Dong-mae coughed up. Dong-mae asks him to turn a blind eye and says that he can’t die today even if he wanted to because it’s mid-month — time to meet Ae-shin. Eugene tells him to take care of his body, and Dong-mae sincerely wishes Eugene the same. Eugene knows that he should hate Dong-mae but admits that Dong-mae has grown on him.

As Eugene enters Hwawollu, he’s stopped by journalist Frederick Arthur McKenzie (a real historical correspondent) from the Daily Mail newspaper asking for help to find the Righteous Army. He’s hoping to cover their story in his newspaper, and he was directed to Eugene. Initially Eugene reacts defensively, but Frederick says he was told to ask, “How’s the picnic, Eugene?” It’s from Kyle, of course, and Eugene complies with the request.

Eugene leads Frederick to the Righteous Army’s hideout, and they’re immediately surrounded by comrades. A few lower their guns once they recognize Eugene, but others remain suspicious of his guest and motivations. Eugene explains that Joseon’s struggle remains unknown and hidden to other countries as Japan continues to cover up their atrocities. He insists that sharing their story to the world will be meaningful.

A comrade finds this storytelling meaningless and tells Eugene to fight with a gun instead, but Ae-shin takes Eugene’s side by claiming that she called for them. Even though other nations may refuse to listen, she urges her comrades to attempt to share their story about the weight of their fearless fight for Joseon’s sovereignty.

The mechanic offers to be interviewed, and he shares that the Righteous Army has incredible courage but lacks necessary supplies. Their guns are old, and they’re almost out of bullets. He knows that he’ll probably die fighting, but he’d rather die free than live as a slave. A comrade asks Frederick to procure guns for the Righteous Army, but as a journalist, he can’t help either side. Instead, he offers to take a photo of the Righteous Army, and they agree to be recorded in a photo.

Ae-shin thanks Eugene and says that she’s once again indebted to him. Eugene says that her smile already repaid that debt and adds that he’s even risked his life to return her lost shoe. He’s referring to the time that Ae-shin ran after him to say goodbye, and she asks if that was the moment he fell for her. She comments that he was late and heads off to rejoin her comrades.

Ae-shin turns around and remembers the moment she fell for him, when they first met on the rooftop holding each other at gunpoint. She shows Eugene her ring hanging around her neck, and Eugene lifts his hand to show his ring. They smile sweetly at each other, and Ae-shin continues on her way.

Dong-mae waits for Ae-shin at the tea shop, remembering his intimate moments with her at the book shop and in Tokyo. Night falls, and the tea shop owner approaches Dong-mae not for closing but for a guest. The guest offers a coin on the table, and Dong-mae looks up to find Ae-shin. He didn’t expect her to come, since she didn’t show up on their promised mid-month schedule, and he expresses relief that he could see her on his last day.

Dong-mae tells Ae-shin that she’s completed her repayment and doesn’t need to see him anymore. Ae-shin asks if he’s leaving and offers to help, and Dong-mae asks if she’s offering her carriage to save him again. He declines her help this time, as his end was predetermined the moment he joined the Musin Society. He knows that riding the carriage will put Ae-shin in danger, so he insists that he will endure the threat alone. He tells Ae-shin to fly as she did and walks away.

Before Dong-mae leaves, Ae-shin admits that his scathing insult of her as a noblewoman spoiled in luxuries haunted her. Dong-mae seems to resonate with that sentiment, and he continues on his way without turning back.

Joon-young trains the Righteous Army comrades to shoot guns, and the tailor asks why they have two people to one gun. Joon-young explains that they don’t have enough guns, so the second person must pick up the gun and continue to fight if the first person dies. The tailor freezes at the harsh reality of their fight.

The pawnshop duo delivers funds and a letter to Eun-san as the jaded comrade sneakily watches the exchange. That night, the jaded comrade carefully steals the letter from sleeping Eun-san and runs away to read its contents. The letter reads: “In the name of 20 million compatriots, we must punish the traitor.” The jaded comrade has been caught red-handed by the pawnshop duo, and Choon-shik kills him with a slice of a sword.

The sound of horse hooves approaches from behind, and the pawnshop duo quickly hides from the Japanese forces, who discover the traitor’s dead body. Choon-shik suggests that they run away, but Il-shik says that a gunshot must alarm the Righteous Army to escape. Choon-shik points out that gunshots will ring even if they run away. Point well taken, Il-shik and Choon-shik grab the attention of the Japanese soldiers and run for their lives in the opposite direction of the Righteous Army hideout. The gunshots wake the Righteous Army, and they quickly prepare their escape.

Eun-san meets with Eugene and informs him that the Righteous Army has moved their hideout again. The bounty and increasing pressure has forced Eun-san to request a favor. He hands Eugene a bundle of funds gathered from comrades around the country — notably Hina and Hee-sung’s mother — and asks him to buy twelve train tickets to Pyeongyang, since he’ll attract less attention as an American. He explains that these tickets are for those who must carry on the future of Joseon: children, women, youth, and Ae-shin.

Dong-mae waits at the port with his swords prepared in both hands. As expected, the Musin warriors arrive and appreciate Dong-mae’s convenient greeting. Dong-mae comments that they were one day late and wonders if it was the heavens or maybe Yang-hwa (Hina) that helped delay the ships. Dong-mae prepares to accept his death, but the Musin warriors have a surprise for him. They drag the limp body of Yujo and taunt Dong-mae about how his right-hand man was searching for him in Japan.

Dong-mae’s eyes sharpen as he reminds himself that he can still cut anyone. With that, he runs into an outnumbered battle, skillfully killing his enemies but also suffering fatal piercings. Covered in blood and out of breath, Dong-mae fights to kill one more warrior, and then, a sword cuts through his chest. As he coughs up blood, Dong-mae falls to the ground and looks up at the sky.

Dong-mae smiles as he remembers Ae-shin and her confession that his insult haunted her. He says, “Alas, I am a bad guy. I hoped she forgot those harsh words, but when she admitted that those words hurt her, I was content that I possessed one moment in Ae-shin’s life.” Then, Dong-mae closes his eyes and concludes his battle.

The Musin warriors drag Dong-mae by his wrists and head off to destroy Joseon. As they drag Dong-mae’s dead body, we see the reflection of Dong-mae and his gang walking into the opposite direction. Dong-mae’s gang fades away, and the phantom Dong-mae gives his dead counterpart one last look before disappearing.

On a rainy night, Eun-san shares his new plan with the Righteous Army to reach Manchuria, where comrades Minister Lee Jung-moon and Song Young have gathered supplies. Due to Japan’s control of the railroads, they can no longer deliver the arms to Joseon and must travel to Manchuria instead.

Eun-san divides the fighting comrades into three platoons, with Ae-shin leading the platoon that will take the train to Pyeongyang and then travel to Manchuria. Eun-san orders Joon-young and the rickshaw runner to steal Japanese uniforms to facilitate the safe boarding onto the train. The remaining platoons will meet any scattered comrades and travel to Pyeongyang by land.

The children with the Righteous Army cry from hunger, so Ae-shin provides her portion of barley. The mothers gratefully accept the food, and Ae-shin plays the music box, which provides a sense of solace and sorrow for Ae-shin and the rest of the Righteous Army. Ae-shin cries to the sorrowful tune, and suddenly, Eugene appears with a gift for Eun-san. He hands over his Joseon flag, and Eun-san jokes that their fourth platoon leader is a foreigner. Eugene announces his one-man platoon and gives Ae-shin a nod.

The next morning, the comrades unfold the Joseon flag and admire its beauty. A young boy trips and leaves muddy handprints on the flag, and the older comrades tease the boy for his seal of patriotism. That gives them an idea, and a woman offers the juice from flower petals for their handprints on the flag. One by one, the comrades leave their stamp on the flag, and the faint blood color of the petals coincidentally makes the handprints look more meaningful.

Ae-shin lifts her hand to look at her flower-stained pinky fingernail. Eugene joins her, and Ae-shin laughs that she’s never seen a man stain his fingernail. Eugene jokes that he saw another man (disguised Ae-shin) do this, so he followed suit. Ae-shin says that she’ll be a woman tomorrow and warns him not to fall for her too hard.

The next day, Ae-shin prepares to board the train with her disguised platoon. Disguised in a Japanese uniform, Joon-young urges her to board quickly, and Ae-shin says that she’s taking one last look at Joseon, as she may not return.

Gwan-soo provides Soomi with a disguise, and he repeats the words of one blue-eyed American soldier to assure her that God is always with the Joseon people. He places the gat on her head and says that it will protect her. “God (gat) bless you,” he says. Aw, that’s a sweet use of a pun.

The post office manager brings records of newspaper type acquired in Hee-sung’s name to the police chief, and they suspect that Hee-sung is the nameless newspaper culprit. They seize this opportunity to regain the favor of Minister Lee Wan-yong.

Meanwhile, Hee-sung develops his photos in the dark room, his collection ranging from the photo of the traitor ministers to Hina’s staff to fighting Joseon soldiers to the sketch of Ae-shin. He pauses to admire the comrades who’ve fought and died for Joseon, and he says that it’s been an honor to know them and bring meaning to his life. He wraps the photos and looks at the sketch of Ae-shin one more time before packing his records.

Hee-sung’s reporter arrives at the pawnshop as he’s burying the chest of records and photos, and he gives her his camera. He says that someone gave him the camera to root for him, and he’s paying it forward to her. He tells her to leave and stay away from the pawnshop, since she could be in danger. He gives her smile and confirms that he’s firing her.

Realizing the impending threat, Reporter Yoon takes the shovel and tells Hee-sung to quickly cover up the spot. She makes him promise to return for the chest, and Hee-sung jokingly promises to come back for the shovel. Just as Hee-sung finishes covering up his treasures, the police chief arrives to arrest him, and Hee-sung willingly surrenders.

Eun-san leads his unit of comrades through the hills to find Japanese soldiers lining up their scattered comrades for murder. It seems like their escape plan leaked, which puts Ae-shin’s platoon in danger, but they’ll be too late to save the comrades on the train. Eun-san must rely on the remaining platoons to protect those on the train and leads his unit to save their comrades in front of them. Before the Japanese soldiers release fire on the captured comrades, the Righteous Army fighters shoot at them, and their scrappy guerilla warfare makes a dent in the Japanese forces.

As Eugene arrives at the train station to meet Soomi and Gwan-soo, he overhears the Japanese forces command to delay the train’s departure and wait for supplemental soldiers for a thorough search of the train. Eugene realizes that the Righteous Army’s escape has been compromised and tells Soomi that they need to take a detour.

Eugene tells Gwan-soo to take Soomi to Stella with his bag and check on her frequently. Then, he spells out Gwan-soo’s name in his hand in Korean, causing Gwan-soo to burst into tears. Gwan-soo hugs Eugene, imploring him to return to Joseon, and he takes Soomi to safety. Eugene keeps a close eye on the Japanese forces at the train entrance and checks for his gun under his jacket.

In the train, the two disguised comrades check Ae-shin’s ticket and inform her they’ve been discovered. Ae-shin knows that the Japanese forces are delaying the train departure to wait for supplemental troops and stresses that the train must depart now. Joon-young says that they’re missing two comrades, and Ae-shin knows which two: Eugene and Soomi. Regardless, she must continue with the plan and orders a comrade to follow her to force this train’s departure.

Eugene’s suspicious loitering catches the eye of a Japanese soldier, but the soldiers are distracted by a Japanese baron that they salute to. The Japanese baron complains about all the ruckus in Joseon, and Eugene casually joins his conversation. Eugene pretends to know the Japanese baron and namedrops Takashi Mori as his connection. The Japanese baron regrets to inform Eugene that Takashi died three years ago, and Eugene pretends that he had no idea.

A Japanese soldier stops the baron from boarding the train because of intel about the Righteous Army rebels escaping on this train, and the baron orders the soldiers to find them quickly before they ruin his business. Eugene continues to walk with the baron, who shares that he has a coal mine business in Pyeongyang and has an important business deal that day. The baron asks why Eugene is headed to Pyeongyang, and Eugene honestly responds that his lover is headed that way. They continue their conversation, and Eugene easily slips in with the baron.

Ae-shin and her comrade barge into the cab and demand the train’s departure, holding the conductor at gunpoint. Ae-shin orders her comrade to keep the train moving and to lock the door to the cab. The Japanese soldiers run after the departing train, and Eugene grabs the businessman to chase the train, just barely boarding as the train takes off.

On the train, the baron tries to thank Eugene with whiskey, but Eugene politely declines and heads to general class. When he enters the general passenger car, he’s met by Joon-young, who quietly greets his instructor. Eugene tells him to save their greetings and gives him the rundown: About six more Japanese soldiers boarded the train, and there’s a useful item in first class. He orders Joon-young to make it to Pyeongyang dead or alive, protecting his comrades, and reminds Joon-young that he’s a lion (a reference to the proverb from his last lesson).

Then, Eugene takes the time to exchange greetings. He tells Joon-young that he’s proud of him. Holding Joon-young’s hand, Eugene says that he missed him and takes his ticket to head to his seat. Joon-young takes a moment to collect his emotions and continues with his mission.

As the Japanese soldiers search the passengers with the sketch of Ae-shin, the young boy with the Righteous Army points to them and calls them Japs. The disguised tailor scolds the boy in Japanese, and the disguised nurse quickly covers up the slip to avoid further suspicion. The Japanese soldiers don’t think twice and continue their search.

Ae-shin reaches into her bag for her gun when someone suddenly sits next to her. She turns to find Eugene, who commends her excellent execution of the mission. She says that it’s because she’s the wife of an excellent American. Eugene smiles at the compliment and proceeds to check his gun. He only has one bullet to use for his mission in first class, and Ae-shin holds his hand to stop him. Eugene assures her that as always, he’ll just need to use his one bullet well. He squeezes her hand, and we see that they both have their rings on.

After successfully fighting off the Japanese soldiers, Eun-san orders the remaining Righteous Army fighters to gather the injured comrades and to scavenge any weapons. Then, they hear the echoes of marching soldiers and horses approaching, and Eun-san looks at the regrettable sight of Japanese forces lined up on the hills. A comrade fearfully asks if they’ll be able to fend off these forces, and Eun-san responds that they can’t turn back now.

Eun-san tells the fighters. “It’s not only the magnificent days that make history. Although we know that we will lose and barely endure with our crude weapons, we must fight and make it known that we were here, that we were afraid but fought to the end.” The comrades agree that they only die once and seem determined to take a few of the Japanese soldiers with them. They run into the battle with the Joseon flag waving with the promising handprints of Joseon’s future.

Eugene enters the first class passenger car to meet with the baron, who once again offers whiskey. Eugene declines once again and says that he needs to save his lover. Then, he asks who killed Takashi, and the businessman infers that it was the deed of a Righteous Army rebel, like their train inconvenience today. Drawing his gun, Eugene corrects him and reveals that the culprit was an American who escaped Joseon.

A Japanese soldier brutally beats Hee-sung and demands to know where his photos are. The soldier notes the detail and bias in his newspapers, and he demands the list of Righteous Army rebels, as he knows that Hee-sung is on the side of rebels Eun-san and Ae-shin. Bruised and bloody from the beating, Hee-sung looks up with a smile and says that those are beautiful names. That earns him another beating, but Hee-sung continues, “I only like beautiful and useless things: the moon, stars, flowers, smiles, jokes. If I am linked with the rebels for this reason, then I am honored.”

The soldier yells at Hee-sung to speak in Japanese and continues to beat him. Hee-sung suffers a fatal blow to the head, and he falls to the ground. He slowly loses consciousness and closes his eyes to the sound of the ticking pocket watch.

The Japanese soldiers continue to search the train passengers, and Joon-young lingers in front of Ae-shin with the sketch in his hand. A soldier approaches Joon-young and asks what troop he’s from, since he’s never seen him before. When Joon-young fails to answer, Ae-shin stands up and reveals her identity. Then, she takes out her gun and shoots at the enemy soldiers.

At the sound of the gunshots, the Japanese soldiers gather to attack Ae-shin and Joon-young. They’re outnumbered and look desperate in their fight against the enemy soldiers. Then, a voice orders the soldiers to seize fire. It’s the baron, and he’s held captive by Eugene, who orders the Japanese soldiers to retreat.

Eugene walks toward the soldiers with the baron hostage, and Ae-shin follows him with her gun pointed at the soldiers. The soldiers continue to backpedal into the next train car, and Ae-shin admits that her gun is empty. She asks what his plan is, and Eugene says that he’s walking the path to delay Joseon’s ruin. He asks her to endure a little longer until the tunnel and asks her not to cry. He says, “This is my history and my love story. That’s why I’m going. I pray for your success.”

As they near the tunnel, Eugene hold back his tears and turns around to Ae-shin. He tells her, “Continue to go forward as I take a step back.” He gives her one last smile and yells at the soldiers to move forward. Once they enter the next train car, Eugene points his gun at the coupler of the two train cars. Realizing what he’s doing, Ae-shin runs to the end of the train, but Eugene has already decoupled the trains with his last bullet.

Ae-shin cries for Eugene as he falls victim to the gunshots of the Japanese soldiers behind him. As the train continues to separate from Eugene’s car, she screams, “Choi Yoo-jin!” The train exits the tunnel, and she crumbles at the edge of the train. Eventually, Eugene’s train car reaches the end of the tunnel, and he’s covered in blood from the gunshots. He looks to the sky as he once did in his youth and falls, blood dripping down his ring-bearing hand.

Resident General Ito Hirobumi orders Commander Hasegawa to bury the names of the deceased Righteous Army rebels and ensure that their existence is never documented. But the names of the deceased fighters don’t die, as Gwan-soo repeats the names of the Righteous Army fighters to Emperor Gojong. Gwan-soo sobs through his report to the emperor, who also cries silently in mourning.

At the language school, Soomi opens Eugene’s bag to find his mother’s ornament and the photo of Eugene and Ae-shin from the Japan studio. She cries when she sees the photo, and we hear the voiceover of Gwan-soo’s letter to Kyle, who tearfully reads the letter: “I deeply regret to inform you of Eugene Choi’s death. Born in Joseon, Eugene lived as an American and a foreigner until he died, and he wished to be buried in a country that never accepted him. So I ask of you to request that Eugene be buried in the foreigner’s burial site.”

Il-shik and Choon-shik return to their pawnshop, and they find a note from Hee-sung asking them to accept his pocket watch as payment for rent. Villagers enter the pawnshop with remnants from a destroyed Joseon, including the medicine cabinet and Dong-mae’s sword. Hee-sung’s pocket watch, Dong-mae’s sword, Eun-san’s pottery, and the shoes of an unknown Righteous Army comrade are displayed almost as memorabilia.

Il-shik finds Eugene’s matryoshka doll in one of the medicine cabinets, which used to be Ae-shin and Eugene’s secret correspondence vehicle. It seems that Eugene wrote a letter to Ae-shin in the doll before he left for Japan with her. He writes, “Our trip to Japan will likely be our farewell. Wherever you went, I always wanted to be with you. I didn’t know you would make me say goodbye.”

When Eugene returned to Japan after completing his time in prison, he visited the photo studio to retrieve the photo of him and Ae-shin. He smiled and cried at the photo, and we hear him continue to narrate his letter: “Every step I took with you fulfilled my life. Every moment with you felt like a picnic. Oh, by the way, picnic starts with a P.”

Back when Eugene and Ae-shin went fishing, they had returned to the medicine shop to cook the fish they caught. Eugene boasted that he was good at everything on a boat, and Ae-shin didn’t know, insisting that she doesn’t know much other than paintings — her usual excuse of being an innocent noblewoman. She asked what fish was in English and assumed that the word started with a P based on the pronunciation. Eugene corrected her that it was F, and she pouted about him spoiling her mood.

Continuing with his letter, Eugene asks, “Are you still saving Joseon? Please do so. Go Ae-shin had a burning passion, and I loved that Go Ae-shin very much. Now, I say goodbye.” Two years later in Manchuria, Ae-shin teaches her comrades under the waving Joseon flag. She tells her comrades that once they shoot, they’re location is revealed, and she asks what to do next. Soomi (yay, she joined!) wonders if they shoot again, but Ae-shin corrects her: They run fast.

With that, Ae-shin orders her comrades to run up the hill, and they all race to the top. Ae-shin smiles at her running comrades, “These were brilliant days. We were all flames, blooming and wilting passionately. Now we burn our flames once more with the embers left by comrades. Since my English hasn’t improved, I kept my farewell short: Goodbye, comrades. In our freed nation, see you again.”

In the year 1919 at the foreigner’s burial site in Gyeongseong, we see a Joseon soldier honoring the Eugene, whose grave reads: “The Greatest & Noble one, still on a picnic here in Joseon.” The soldier remembers his youth, when Eugene told him that this was his fight — it’s Domi (cameo by Kim Min-jae)! Grown Domi says that he won’t stop in their fight and salutes to Eugene with his comrades.

The closing message reads: “Goodbye Mr. Sunshine. In a freed nation, see you again.”

 
COMMENTS

Goodbye, indeed. Woo, we made it! In true tvN fashion, we were gifted/cursed with a loooong monster of a finale, but I’ll admit that the show made a grand and memorable exit. This episode was bursting with emotion and nose tingling feels that signal the floodgates to open, and I would have been a mess if I had watched this in one go. Fortunately, recapping required lots of pausing and excuses for me to take breathers when a scene got too overwhelming, which happened quite frequently. Starting from the moment we entered the episode, I was captured by Hee-sung’s duality in photographing the traitor ministers and the symbolism of the camera shutter gunshots. He knew that that they were standing on the wrong side of history and understood the importance of documenting the names and faces of the oppressors. This is the duality I needed from Hee-sung ten episodes ago because Byun Yo-han is so damn capable of carrying this character, as we saw in his final moments as Hee-sung. At least Hee-sung died in glory, honoring and protecting the history of the oppressed.

Though Dong-mae was possibly my favorite character, I was ready for him to die. Even he was counting down the days until his death. Regardless, I appreciate that we got to see him until the end because close-ups of Dong-mae drenched in emotion were just the best. Also, his last interaction with Ae-shin was so important to closing his character arc. He had always regretted saying those piercing words to her, but he also took pride in affecting Ae-shin so deeply. Ae-shin’s confession clarified the impact of that insult, which I believe motivated both Ae-shin and Dong-mae to their respective places in the resistance.

As with the appearance of An Chang-ho in a previous episode, I love when shows pay homage to historical figures because it adds another fascinating dimension of realism to the events on screen. I live for these moments in historical fiction, especially when they’re done with a subtle touch as this finale did with Frederick Arthur McKenzie, a real-life correspondent who gave a voice to the Righteous Army. The photo that he took in the scene really resembles the real-life photo taken by the real journalist, and I appreciate how this small detail adds to the pathos of the show.

These last few episodes really brought me back to the initial hype of this show and reminded me of the epic drama I was promised. For a blockbuster show with great ratings and an aesthetically beautiful production, I wasn’t impressed with a good middle chunk of the show, which was disappointingly devoid of any necessary action. I’m glad someone turned on the switch for the last couple of episodes, making it an action-packed, tear-jerking ride until the end with a sprinkle of whiplash. Ultimately, as promised, there were guns, glory, and a sad ending, though I would consider those last few minutes more hopeful than sad. I’m interested to revisit my thoughts on this show in a few weeks to reflect in retrospect and consider this show in a more objective light because this finale shook me to my core.

Peace out, Mr. Sunshine. (Maybe probably not) See you (and your Paris Baguette PPL) again!

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Thank you for getting this posted so quickly. I suspect that many of us will have comments to share while the memories of the last two episodes are fresh in our minds.

I wasn't always satisfied with the pacing and the story arc of the series. But the characters and the numerous small but powerful moments will stay with me for a long time.

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For this last episodes, I was shaken to the core, with the goosebumps and all tears, knowing fully well that this story has greatly moved me into showing more sides of me that I never thought I had in me, i'm happy for this story of change, hope, history and sunshine.

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WOW! just wow. I think I need the sweetest cake and a range of cheesy romance with definite happy endings to get over the heartbreak I am feeling now. Hat's off to the entire cast and crew. They were just marvelous. I thought I saw a brilliant movie in each episodes. They were beautiful.

What a drama! I loved every bit of it. I liked the fact that the romance was old-fashioned and slow-burn. It was sweet and passionate. I knew Lee Byung-hun was a good actor, but the last scene was just too awesome.

I loved the portrayal of female. All of them, Go Ae-shin, Kudo Hina and all the mothers were just powerful women and I feel so proud of them and their passion for their own choices.

Byun Yo-han as Kim Hee-sung was just too good. I loved that he became a reporter. With his wit and intellect, Hee-sung actively took part in the freedom fight and took records which was essential and hopefully went down in history. I never knew Byun Yo-han was such a great actor!!

Yoo Yeon-seok as Goo Dong-mae gave powerful performance. I was literally uncomfortable with the character at first but warmed to it in the later episodes.

As an Indian, I have learned about our own freedom fighters and their sacrifices for their country's independence. I take this opportunity to provide my gratitude and respect to them. It is because of them , we, the 21st century youths can call ourselves free and we can think for ourselves.

Salute to our freedom fighters and to all the freedom fights all over the world who gave their lives for their countries. Thank you.

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Love it and thank you @dramallama for the grand finale recap.

The last two episodes were full of suspense, blood and tears. The ending broke my heart into thousand pieces but I'm happy that the trio of Ae-Shin's fan club managed to grab their last drink together. And that Ae Shin moved on and turned into a good trainer just like her Master.

Im glad i managed to follow the series till the end. What an amazing journey (because last night i finished a whole box of tissues 😂😂😭)

Good bye and see you again.

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The most sad death in ep 24 to me was Hee Sung after being tortured by the Japanese. He held his ground until the end. Dongmae's death was sad but i did not really like in his final thoughts it was still AeShin in his mind. I was not emotionally connected to Aeshin or Eugene, so i did not feel much about them together or alone.

Disclaimer: i only watched from ep18-24. Thus i'm not really emotionally connected to a lot of characters except for Hina and Heesung. They were my fave characters for their bravery, strong will, selflessness and dedication to the end cause. I like YYS so i naturally i kinda liked Dongmae but i was not a fan of his obsession towards Aeshin.

Will i watch this from the beginning? I'm not sure. But i kinda liked the 6 episodes i watched. Their fight for their land, the unity of the people was amazing and touching to watch.

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I thought Hee Sung will be the only one alive while the other 4 main characters die .. 😭😭😭

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I was so sure he was going to be alive at the end with his seamstress wife, that his death shocked me. I understand it--I don't think it was a "mistake in the writing." But dang--it was unexpected. (And the fact that the police chief traitor lived. Upsetting.)

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Ikr.. i replayed his death scene twice because i didnt expect his character will die too 😣

Btw the first few early episodes are very slow in character development .. i dont think it will change anything if you miss them.

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I knew he would die. Remember we said early on that Ae Shin is Joseon, so she'll live, but the three men in her life would die. The men loved her until the end, because she is Joseon, the motherland.

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I'll be okay if Ae Shin die too *sigh*
I have no hope anyway

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The fact that all the traitors still lived to enjoy their jolly good life upset me even more.

But I guess we need a whole new drama to see them get their comeuppance.

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Oh yes the traitors they deserve to be executed by beheading (the common type of execution the Japanese used to carry during their occupation in my country), revive, beheaded again and repeat the cycles ten times more! Traitors and their descendants dont deserve to live in peace and rich.

https://www.quora.com/What-had-happen-to-the-descendant-whose-their-ancestor-are-Pro-Japanese-collaborators-after-Korea-pass-the-special-law-and-confiscate-their-property

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@ryunami, Thanks for sharing this.

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ever since i watch Mr Sunshine, i keep tab on what happened to the descendants of these traitors. Because i just cant fathom the idea of betraying your own motherland and people; these traitors were rich people with high level positions in the kingdom

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinilpa

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Same. I wasn't expecting Hee Sung to die, especially the way it played out. It was so cold and brutal.

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You're not alone: I do that a lot - watch from the middle of a series and then maybe go back to the first half.

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I’d recommend episodes 8-12 too. :D

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Just tears...

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Thank you Dramallama for the recap. Been waiting for the recap, as this is gonna my last stop, before I am waving Mr Sunshine a goodbye.

I remember, while watching this episode, I cried all the way till the end. A night before that I lurked around twitter to read spoiler, hoping that whatever outcome showing, it would lessen the pain when I watched the episode next day. We knew that it was gonna be a sad ending, so I figured knowing beforehand would help me cope with the pain. I couldn't be more wrong. All I did was prolonging the pain longer, and because of that I am having hard time to move on.

But, when I finally moved past the grieving phase, I realised something. I was not satisfied with the ending. More specifically, I didn't like the fact that Eugene had to die. I got it, as an EuShin shipper, that moment when he was shot on that train, and the way Aeshin cried his name, I was bawling so hard. If the writer decided to break our heart into pieces with that scene, she had definitely succeeded. I am still tearing up everytime I am thinking about that scene.

But as time passed and I gain my rational mind again, I became furious with the way he died. Eugene was a smart soldier, a strategist, and we've seen many times how he handled things under pressure. He managed to lessen the casualty with his calculative mind, so when he died protecting Aeshin by blocking the door, I felt cheated especially on how much I cried watching that scene. He could have asked the soldiers to throw away the weapons outside, and when he deemed safe he jumped towards Aeshin and shoot the hook while pointing his guns towards the other cabin where the soldiers were trapped. They didn't know he had one bullet, so he could pretend like he would shoot. And they continue their journey and the end.

Alas, we got THE ending, not even a child of theirs, which I am also furious about. I wasn't even asking for a kiss, so I was a little bit let down with their love story, despite how much I invested on them emotionally.

Again, when my anger had dissipated, I was starting to feel sorry to Aeshin. She survived, but she survived alone, carrying a big burden, and not even a husband by her side. So yeah, all these characters are so pitiful. Despite my rant above this drama will remain in my heart for a very long time because one thing the drama did so well is the way it makes me care with each characters, their story, their history, and their love story.

Definitely will rewatch this drama again, but not so soon. I need to pick up all pieces of my heart, attach them and heal them first. Until then, see you. See you again.

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Alas, we got THE ending, not even a child of theirs🖊 Fan Corner Re-Write🖊 It wouldn’t have killed them to show a little Yu-jin with his RIghtous Army momma. All the charcters had these noble ideas about lkve, but no one was getting any ! 🤔😟

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Imagining little Yujin with his Righteous Army momma makes me seething with anger. The could have been. Sighs....I guess, the only love that is stronger at the end is Aeshin's love towards her country...

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u spoke my mind... i also thought why did he have to die he could have remain on the other side with the chinese guy and detach the train!? Or jump out!??... I cried a lot for them and repeat that scene 1000times tourchering myself..... BUt i guess the writter wanted a sad ending and sacrifice to make the story really poignant and everlasting painfully
Still best drama ever

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That scene definitely breaks my heart everytime I watch it 💔

It is a poignant, achingly beautiful drama. Now I have a drama that I can watch whenever I need a cry.

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😂.... Lol.... Yeah when we need a gud cry indeed.....

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and i dont understand the deal about one bullet..there were many japanese soldiers..many of them dead. just take their guns.. or eugene could tell them to throw their weapons..
but then i think maybe the shot to disconnect the cabins could only be taken from the other side.. thats why he went there

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I feel bad for Ae-Shin too. She was one of the first to join the Righteous Army (everyone else joining as a consequence in some way) and in the end, she is the only one alive. :( It must be a terrible burden to bear.

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True. There were many times I felt mad at Aeshin for her questionable decisions, but I couldn't stay mad at her for too long, watching at the end of this drama she survived alone. She chose to fight for her country, even at the expense of her happiness and that's the consequence for her decision.

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me to.. i thought she was being cold towards aeshin but i didnt blame her.. i mean obviously she chose her country over her own self.. and then in ep 24 there was a scene when the soldier tell ae shin that train is delayed and that they were still waiting for eugene and that girl and ae shin said that train has to leave immediately and then it hit me..
ae shin tired again and again to let eugene go. in ep 20 she only came because she had to.. she tried to make him go to america twice.. she wanted him to live as an american .. she told him to leave her again and again because she knew eugene would do something like this..
and honestly what did we expect from a person whose mother held another woman hostage just to buy some time for her son.. can we blame him if he did exactly the same for the person he loves.. and oh wow the feels.. i think i might cry again <3

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They both love each other so much, thats no doubt of it. She wanted him to leave so that he can live, and he wanted to protect her so that she will be safe. It is just that their love is not the conventional usual love story where they live happily ever after. They are separated by death *cries again*

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Totally agree with you on Eugene's death!! Not really a EuShin fan, but I felt his deTb was such a waste. There could be other solutions but he chose to f****** die instead. Maybe because from the start he resigned to death already? But then it felt to soon.

Loved Byung Yo Han as Hee Sung. Loved him in Misaeng, loved him more in Mr. Sunshine

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Love Byung Yo Han in Six Flying Dragons too! His acting and singing! was full of poignancy and pathos in that drama!

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Is Six Flying Dragons worth watching?

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Yes. So worth watching for those who do not mind sageuk. But its pacing is good even for sageuk, and characters are endearing and easy to root for. Yoo Ah In esp was great in it, but my fave char of SFD wud always be, Warrior Moo Hyul (Yoon Kyun Sang).

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Really worth your time. You should check that out. It has many episodes but it doesnt feel like one.

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@waterhyacinth,

SIX FLYING DRAGONS and TREE WITH DEEP ROOTS which follows it chronologically are absolutely worth watching. Epic is the word. ;-)

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Six flying dragons is an amazing drama.

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Six Flying Dragons is worth watching a million times over.

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I think that moment when he realised the shooter is also the woman he fell in love with, he already resigned to protect her, even if it cost him his life *sighs* beautiful...but tragic...

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I totally agree with you. Couldn't' understand that Eugen had to die like that. It seemed so forced. Eugen has known as solider with good strategies. He had a very high-up Japanese nobleman as a hostage and he could order Japanese soldiers to drop their guns and walk to the other section of the train and disengage the other side of the cabin. Why the hell did he go with Japanese soldiers and hostage to the other cabin and die there?!?! I'm pretty upset at the writer.

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True. His death didn't make any sense. All for the so called SAD ENDING 😑

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I am going to miss this show!!!! And kudos to the writer. I never guessed who would actually be alive at the end. Lovely costumes, lovely sets, great acting. (Yeah, some small errors,) but I loved Mr. Sunshine. I know I loved it because I had a predetermined mind set NOT to like the lead actor because of actual events. But I still loved it.

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Thank you @dramallama for the hard work in recapping MS. It has finally ended! The emotional roller coaster was just... by the time it ended, I just realised the length of this ep was way over an hour mark! There were those moments that I grumbled upon (which I can now let go) and those that I appreciated (esp. the final 4 eps which were what I was initially expecting/hoping at the start of my MS journey). My wish is for the production team, actors and actresses to get the recognition they deserve for their amazing job, a top notch quality, efforts and determination in the duration of this production. Kudos!

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Yap thats my wish too.. The director, writter and main leads should get the recognition they deserve
The drama was a big milestone presentational wise... International level quality
This story made a lot of people check on korea history... I finally got my entire family to tune in a korea drama for the first time

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Three deaths of the main characters in one episode, it makes a lot to bear. Even if KES never hides the sad ending part, I still had hopes or vain optimism.

Hee Sung> I think his character could have been more explored but I liked him. I liked the fact it the only one who didn't fight but chose to tell the story and immortalize it.

Dong Mae> After his wound and opium, he left by killing of lot Japaneses. But I hated to see him pulled by a horse like that :(

Eugene Choi> he protected his love until the end :)

The reunion of the 3 was so nice, I loved all their scenes together.

Ae Shin> we didn't see her so much... She was the heart of the rebellion and we couldn't really see her in action. I missed it. I wanted to see more from her. The words of Dong Mae really touched her and I think participated to the making of her personality. She's the only survivor, it must be very lonely.

Otherwise, the pawn's shop duo were survivors! They didn't really become old since Eugene was a kid, they survived all the way without loosing their humor !

It was a great journey. I will miss it!

I love the ost https://youtu.be/eN9tomzuKTg?t=5250 , so many emotions :)

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u forgot hina kudo.. she couldve just stayed apathetic to the whole situation like she was always staying but in the end things became unbearable even for her..
I think these five leads were divided in three grups.. ae shin at the centre.. the trio around her who cared about he and then hina who watched all three from the side lines..
In the end Hina died first.. in ep 23 again on the side lines.. and then the trio died.. together in the same episode.. and Aeshin survived. This story really was a journey and payed equal attention to the character development of all five leads

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I didn't mention her because she was not in the final episode.

Hina was more important than that. She helped directly the King, she was working for the Minister Lee. And she helped the 4 others . I really loved her character :)

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me too.. her character was classy yet lethal

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Dramallama, thanks for the recap. 😢. Poor Hotaru, she doesn’t get a dying moments notice from Dong-mae. Over all I liked the show, they should have spiced it up a bit in the romance department tbh.

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I feel honored to have watched this on tv,my eyes are red from crying .....it deserves lots of awards n a daesang.... best direction ,acting and writing
The four main actors n support cast were beyond amazing.....
The otp chemistry n story was wonderful and their ending heartbreaking but meaningful
I love the last scenes that people kept on fighting especially the cemetery o e... Death isnt the end
The best drama this year hands down
I will miss n remember it for a long time

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I don't believe it - almost everyone died! I expected less casualties than that, to be honest.

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Gotta admit, what a hell of a FINALE!!! Man it was so emotional to see such a bittersweet ending with the Deaths of all 3 main male characters.

It feels as if there's a fuel for a sequel with the ending with adult Domi. But seriously tho, why did the Japanese were so terrible during that time. It took about 2 atoms bombs to make them rethink their ways. Did something happen to them to treat other Asian countries so terrible?

Ps. Who here thought it was gonna be related to Deep Rooted Tree like Six Flying Dragons? I was kinda hoping for it :P

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The mindset of colonialism, I suspect. Many European countries invaded Africa, Asia, Americas and they weren't nice about it either.

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Yes colonizers don’t consider their victims as human beings

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They think they are do them a favor. Modernizing, bringing Christianity ect. So evil.

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Wolf in sheep's clothing.

Or...Evil likes to be well dressed.

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I also got a feeling of a sequel?!! Especially with the last words goodbye comrades /mr sunshine in a freed country see u again?!.. A reunion?!
Never the less am satisfied n appreciate this masterpiece

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They could call it Mr. Moonshine, and have Dong Mae reincarnated and making illegal moonshine for a living, clad in a kimono, of course.

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I cracked up so hard when he accidentally killed the Japanese solider on the horse. Sorry, poor form, opium woes and near death experience.

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What is moonshine? A variety of opium?

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It's basically an old alcohol drink from the west made from absinthe

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I expected the ending words to be Kyle's "poem" but that didn't work out.

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The words on Eugene’s gravestone were by Kyle... maybe these words?

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The Meiji era's power elites were from Samurai class. Japan was not democratic country. They were quite brutal to Japanese who opposed to their policy. There were so many deaths among Japanese as well. I am not saying this to justify their deeds but It was a different era. And the reason why the States bombed the atomic bombs has a more specific reason. That is, they knew that Russian could come down to attack Japan and they feared that Japan would belong to Russia. They had to make sure that Japan would surrender with America before Russian attack would start. What happened both in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were beyond terrible but I personally think it was better than being occupied by Russia. Look at what happened to Germany. Eastern German and other Eastern European nations suffered greatly decades after the World War 2.
As luzitania said, the European colonialism was also appalling. England made fortune with opium both in India and China. Belgian savaged Congo. What about how Spanish razed over South America?
Democracy, as we know, is rather a new recent history when we examine our history and we realize how important to keep the beacon of light for democracy.

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Oh really, then ask any of these countries if they would like to get two atomic bombs to solve their problems...LOL
One of the thinks I liked about this show is that they did not shy away from portraying the Americans as the imperialistic power they were and still are...no different from Japan. So, I don't know where you are from but as someone from Latin America believe me when I say that the US was no more merciful to what they deemed their backyard then Japan was.

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@dramallama thank you so much for your good work recapping this drama. Having jumped aboard the Mr Sunshine train only mid-way, I am glad I watched the drama - the first KES drama I've seen. Cried several times during the last episode (especially when Gwan-soo read out the names of the Righteous Army soldiers who perished). KES is truly a great story-teller.

Thank you to Ms Kim, Director Lee and everyone concerned with the production for making a magnificent drama about a very important subject.

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The ending was heart shattering but with a hint of hope
Kim tae ri has risen to the top of the food chain for women actors with this.... Hina was also amazing..... Definitely this writer best work on female lead characters
ps i love love the last scene ...the grown up DOMi.... Ae shin still fighting ......new generation rightous army..... Eugine letter to ae shin (crying again)
I will forever follow the career of our 4 leads..this writter n director... They have earned my loyalty

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My whole box of klenex was finished during the death scenes of Eugene and Ae shin screaming for him.. i think i was bawling too loud that the whole neighbourhood can hear me 😂😭😭

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Thank you so much for your timely writings, our recappers.

I am not ready to watch eps 23 and 24 yet.
But this drama really stirred me. When I heard 'in a freed nation, see you again.' I wonder if they indicated the time when Korea was freed from Japan. In a way, they were freed in 1945 but after that, their history is checkered, the country was broken into two countries after the Korean war. In South Korea, almost all past presidents ended up in prison or deaths. Their conglomerates(chaebols) wealth take nearly 3/4 of the national GDP. When do they achieve the true freedom that those freedom fighters dreamed of? Have they already? I am not sure,,,.
The word 'freedom' is so subjective. which country is truly called democratic and free now? Only a few, I am afraid.

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ps. Why I asked myself something like above is that I believe that they dreamed that those three men and two ladies would meet someday under equal status. If they reincarnate and meet now, Ae shin and He-Sung would be Chaebols and Dong mae would be dirt poor being chased for his organs by loan sharks. This thought really made me sad.

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I hope you're planning to write than fanfiction because I would read it immediately!
https://www.fanfiction.net/tv/Mr-Sunshine

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I wondered if they meant when everyone on the entire peninsula was finally free.

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when do they achieve the true freedom that those freedom fighters dreamed of? ...hmm, So are you saying that Koreans haven't achieved the 'true freedom' because there are corrupted politicians and Chaebols in Korea? Your words can be pretty offensive to us Koreans. Anyone doesn't have right or insight to define a nation's degree of freedom so easily. Former president's arrestment clearly shows the freedom of Korea, since it means its people can properly check the political power, in other words, democracy is functioning well.
Yeah, there're some problems still we are working on, as any other countries do, such as concentrated economic powers aka Chaebols. But what I feel very proud of this country is that it got through that many obstacles and agonies you mentioned earlier, yet kept proceeding toward the freedom and prosperity instead of giving up or making a compromise.

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Your point is well taken and I am sorry if my comment offended you. What I mean is that it is hard to have a true freedom( freedom of speech etc etc) for any countries. I do hope that Korean would achieve certain obstacles. We need to have a democratic Korea for so many reasons. I believe every country has gray or dark shades but as far as their countrymen understand the situation and fight, there will be a brighter future.

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I think I was a bit sad that Hee-Sung died alone, there on the cold floor of the interrogation room. The other two male and one female main characters who died were not really alone. True, Dong mae was basically alone, but he and Eugene had been together and acknowledged his impending death. Hee-Sung just died with nothing but his own knowledge of dying at that moment in time. At least there was a certain peace he had in knowing how his life had helped others. I suppose that brought a certain beauty to his death. Still, I wanted others there to witness his death and cry for him and there was no one. (Other than you and me, of course)

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I feel you.
None new the other death.
So sad.

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It's okay we all know

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Girl, that was the killer for me. Watching him get beat to death. That was so Korean of this writer but it was damned brutal. I looked away and I watch horror movies without hiding my eyes. I was hoping Hee sung would not die but like that was sick and brilliant at the same time. His death touched me the most. Just the brutality of it.

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Woooaaah! I'm still quite shaken. Let me gather my thoughts.

Hee-sung, oh my! I love how dedicated he was with documenting everything! Even he was sensible enough after that anti-Japanese issue of his newspaper that things might go south, he preserved the important stuff and made sure the people around him are well. So sad for the seamstress storyline though :(

One question I have now is that, which part and characters of the show were historically true? I'm now interested in Joseon's history!!!

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The last two episodes were a roller coaster of emotions. I loved all of the characters from the very first episode. I enjoyed watching them fight for their country and it was so sad to see them die.

I thought Kim Tae Ri did an amazing job and I hope Mr. Sushine wins tons of awards, especially for cinematography.

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As expected, the finale (and DM's death) broke me. That final dialogue between DM and AS was full circle, such character growth! Each realising what the other needed - AS giving baekjong!DM the dignity to not save him, let him be on his own terms, according to how he saw himself; DM not trying to shelter yangban!AS, not apologising for the insult that ate into her, telling her to fly.

What caught me off guard was the blow (too soon?) of HS' death, it felt like losing a friend. His humour mixed with tenderness and pain has grown on me.

HS, boat lady, and AS' parents' deaths also hit close to home: my great-grandfather was in the local resistance, and sometime during the SEA WWII occupation was arrested and never came home.

MS was my first visceral and high stakes understanding of Japan's atrocities at the time that made my skin crawl, outside of family stories. We've had local dramas about it but (probably censored+sensationalist, and I was much younger then) never sank in.

At the start I was wary of KES, especially after Goblin panned out... But the last 3 episodes rewarded the slow burn. Thanks for the recaps and great Beanie discussions!!

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I agree with your comments. I've watched Bridal Mask but Mr. Sunshine's slow burn and little moments building up to the finale really sank in with me to appreciate the multi-faceted perspectives of this time in SK history (I know, this drama is fiction). One repeating frustration in the drama was that outsiders were not aware of the plight of the Joseon people. This is a great way to get non-Koreans interested in learning more about Korean history. KES, the actors, and the crew definitely accomplished that.

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My thoughts:

1.What happened to Hotaru? They never showed her, and I thought that she would turn up at the end.

2. Why did Yujo have to die?

3. I kind of thought they would end with an older Ae Shin in her fifties laying a windmill on Eugene's grave...but I guess they wanted to emphasize the patriotic part, more than the romance, so they ended it with the boy grown up. Still, it would have been more poignant, showing the human side, as well.

4. I didn't like the Dong Mae ending, where he died, smiling, thinking of how he had impacted Ae Shin's life. It was frustrating, that he died, tninking of her, and not of Hina.

5. Hee Sung died, beaten to death...I knew that he would die, and won't end up with the girl. I kind of was expecting him to die, thinking of Ae Shin and white flowers. Oh, well.

6. Eugene's death was heartbreaking. I loved the last line: "All I have to do, is to take a step forward, and all that you have to do is to take a step back." Just beautiful, and so poignant. Ae Shin's face screaming in muted agony was just amazing. Heartbreaking, it made me cry, even though I haven't felt much for the couple.

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Trying to answer your question:
1. Nobody knows, maybe reads someone's fate here and there to continue her life
2. So DM become more triggered to swaying his sword and die quickly
3. They'd better be shown an older Ae Shin at Eugene's grave. But it doesn't matter because Do Mi as teenager is cute tho
4. I KNOW RIGHT. I kinda frustrated
5. Poor HuiSeong. He'd better marry with cute girl who told AeShin what "LOVE" means. They'll be bickering couple and live happily. Happier than with Ae Shin.
6. You haven't felt much for the couple yet you felt it right? Could you imagine become me who adore this couple since at the rooftop pointing gun at each other. I lost words. Totally.

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Loled at your No. 1 answer. Maybe she lived, or maybe she died. When I saw Yujo dead, I thought she would probably be dead eeas well, since he took care of her after DM left. I even thought Yujo and her got married, but, no, they had to show me Yujo dead.

Poor dee...*pats crying dee* Don't be sad, let's watch Bad Papa and see Jang Hyuk...but he'd probably die, too, with a title like that. *cries*

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I'd like to pay my sin for didn't watch JH oppa properly in WOL but I still not sure about this one. Tell it to me whether Bad Papa good or otherwise I'll become bad girl for him.

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#6

Lee Byeong-hoon was excellent in that scene. Do you remember when his voice broke as he spoke his final words to Ae-shin? :(

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He's a terrific actor. That ending was the saddest thing ever. So quietly moving.

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3)But did she live so old ? For me, she died as a warrior for her cause.

4) I think it's more in his character. He always loved Ae Shin since his childhood she played a role in his life. He cared about Hina and he liked her but it never has been more than that.

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I never thought that she would die, until I read your post. You're right, she never appeared in the end because she had died somewhere, buried in an anonymous grave. That is the reality of the risk of being a freedom fighter.

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It's not written, so we can imagine what we want. If you want to imagine her becoming old, don't let my sad vision stop you :)

For me, all the great fighters died, so she's the last one with experience, so I can imagine her taking bigger risks in the rebellion to protect the others.

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4. Because like Hee Sung and the seamstress, you can't choose who you love.

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I thought that he had feelings for Hina, but he stayed true to Ae Shin to the end, as did Hee Sung; he was saying how he liked useless things, he, too, was thinking of Ae Shin in his final moments.

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Excuse me how did we get to the end of a war romance without one kiss? This is my only complaint. The death scene at the end of the train cars was magnificent. She calls out his Korean name, just as Dong Mae calls out Hina's Korean name. Best death scenes ever.

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There was an almost-kiss, but look on the bright side, if they had kissed, and it turned out to be a dead fish kiss, it would have spoilt the drama. Way better this way.

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you have a point

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Well a Beanie said at the beginning episodes that by the end,Dong-mae's kimono will turn total black instead of random blotches here and there, and it became correct. Now it's a black kimono with white blotches.

On a different note...music. Just music. May not have been as beautiful as the Goblin ones (in my opinion), but still they were soulful and gorgeous.

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This was a rough two episodes, I don't remember ever going into a Korean drama finale so tense. I have so many thoughts and feelings on this drama and its characters, that I don't quite know where to begin.

I am sad that Hee sung, the character who was the most tender and sensitive experienced the most violent death. This was the thoughtful boy who kept a spare suit in his hotel room for Ae-shin laid on a bed of flowers. He loved all things beautiful and had no place in such a brutal world, but regardless he placed everything on the line.

I just can't with Dong-mae, my favourite idgaf but secretly actually gives all the fucks bae. Has a character ever been so poetic? Has anyone ever rocked a tie dyed kimono as hard? Dong-mae had his own odyssey. There's a nice reciprocity in that while Ae-shin re-wired his fate my saving his life, his comment about her being nothing but a noble fool also determined her life as an independence fighter. I'm glad he was able to die knowing the impact he had on Ae-shin's life.

I don't understand Eugene's death. Logically I feel like the Japanese troops stationed in Manchuria would probably receive a call or telegram from Joseon that there were wanted suspects on board the train and Ae-shin and co would be rounded up upon arrival. Narratively I don't understand why he had to die, and died neither embraced as an American or Korean. Is this the drama's commentary on immigrants? Was it because Eugene looked up too high as a slave? Or does he just embody a quiet life of service as the adopted son of a Christian missionary? I don't get it.

More than anything though the characters on this show acted with a sense of legacy, dedicating themselves to a bigger cause and sowing seeds for a future and dream they knew they would not be there see. There's value and meaning in living with conviction and quite earnestly Mr. Sunshine has made me re-evaluate my own life.

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I think I saw someone comment last week that they thought Ae Shin to be metaphor for Joeson. So all of the men had to sacrifice themselves for her. I think that's probably accurate since it is a Korean production and they often have what we call in the west "easter eggs" inside the plot. Hidden meanings and stuff like that. Koreans also seem to enjoy plot lines with more philosophical meanings and leanings. I didn't expect Eugene to live but I was at least hoping Hee-sung would. I you look at my post you'll see that was the single most shocking scene in the entire production for me. She went there, but it was brutal.

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I understand that Ae-shin is the symbol of Joseon, (I think the fact that she's permanently swapped out her hanbok and plait for westerns suits or gunner attire with a pony tail signals a new era for Joeson) but it's been re-iterated that Eugene's American. So his death seems to me gratuitous and played out for tragedy's sake. I suppose it adds to the burden and serves as another loss for Ae-shin, but that's just mean.

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I agree, Eugene's ending was so contrived and unnecessarily gratuitous. As it was airing I could think of so many things he should have done. Why didn't he make the soldiers jump off the train? Why didn't he shoot the coupling while on her side? I highly doubt a single bullet would actually de couple heavy metal. Etc.

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Right! He could have used the other guy as a shield, ordered the Japanese to close the door of the other train, and stand on Aeshin's side of the train. But it did lead to a very dramatic and heroic ending for Eugene.

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Titanic all over again!!! There was enough bloody space on that piece of wood to fit DiCaprio and the girl.
Another senseless and infuriating death..

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My thoughts exactly. A bullet from a hand gun would never dent that steel. What a time to run out of bullets. Not like Eugene to not think ahead. But the shot of the wedding rings and the emotion.of Ae sin calling his name...I am grieving

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He definitely planned on sacrificing himself. I think he had intended that for quite awhile. As someone above posted, he was a metaphor for the American soldiers who sacrificed their lives in Korea later.

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Have no idea but if we're talking easter eggs than American sacrificing for Joeson is not outside of history either. Over 35k American men lost their lives in Korea. So perhaps this was a representation for them as well. I didn't find the fact that he died gratuitous. I found the scene with Hee sung graphic, unexpected and yes, gratuitous. Just a difference of perspective I suspect. Wonder what Koreans think?

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I found the scene of Dong mae's body being dragged too graphic and also gratuitous. Or maybe it was a metaphor.

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I thought it gratuitous in the way it played out, thought there could have been a better way to portray his death and sacrifice for her, not that he shouldn't have died. I knew he would.

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Thanks for the quick post. This was a great drama despite all the flaws. The casting was pretty much perfect. I even came to like Lee Byun hun in the last few episodes. I think he needs to always make sure there is some levity in his work. He plays the stoic character so often. He just seems more human when he smiles once in awhile. More believable.

The other boys were perfect. Every woman was meant to fall in love with Dong Mae. He's tall, handsome, hard on the outside and squishy for kids, candy and women on the inside. Plus, Yoo Yeon seok! It's a day later and I can't stand the idea that this writer had them beat my boy to death. I watch horror movies but I had to look away. Whether he was smiling and squeezing his tiny ass inbetween the "Japanese or the American" that wanted to kill him, Byun Yo han always stole the scene. I'm put out. I really don't appreciate him dying so brutally. I'm pissed about it ladies. It kinda sickened me. Props to the writer on this one she went there but it's harsh. Very Korean of her.

What can you say about the ladies that's bad? Nothing. Kim Jung Min and Kim Tae ri were exquisite in their roles. I really think the performances and casting, right down to the side players like my favorite teddy bear, Choi Moo sung that played Captain Jang.

Then there was the huge cast of creepy villains. Starting with deranged sociopathic soldier dude Tsuda and culminating with evil incarnate, Kim Nam hee as Takashi Mori. A villain fit for a Japanese horror movie.

Overall, despite the slow moving middle in this story and the occasionally overdone montage, this was a great, beautifully executed, well acted drama. I'm sorry for it to end.

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Thank you @dramallama for recapping this show! I had looked forward to this drama the most in 2018, and it didn’t dissappoint.
Mr Sunshine packed most of the action and history in the first and final episodes, but I learned to appreciate the slow pace in the middle, knowing that I would be rewarded with bursts of action: Gu Dong-Mae running, Ae-Shin flying over rooftops, Kudo Hina whipping out her fencing sword (which is also hanging in the pawnshop at the end, I believe).

I watched the final episode twice: the first time I followed the story and grumbled at a few unnecessary dramatics (Ae-Shin for goodness sakes don’t show yourself and make your servants’ sacrifice in vain!) But the second time I totally embraced the dramatics and almost cried. Especially for my wonderful Hee Sung, who died in prison without Ae-Shin or her comrades knowing. He died alone, fighting for the truth, and because he still loved her. Ae-Shin is the true-blooded patriot in this show (the ending practically screams that she is the symbol of Korea’s fight and future, as she stands next to the flag). Because of that she came off as cold sometimes, while characters like Hina and Hee-Sung always felt warm to me. Eugene was attracted to the flame and got too close, but he went willingly and I loved that the show kept his conflicted identity to the end. Joseon never accepted him, but he still chose to die there. Gats off, show.

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Lovely synopsis!👏👏👏👏

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Good grief, @wishfultoki, you made me cry again. In the beginning I did not like Hee Sung at all but in the end he was my favorite.

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Oh my! i didn't realize that Hee Sung died alone! :( now I'm gonna cry again! He's one of my favorite characters!! He was the glue that binded Eugene and Dong Mae (other than Ae Shin). The best part of this episode for me is when this bromance drank together and actually clunk their glasses together! The show came on a full circle once again! Those 3 guys felt like that would be the last time they're gonna drink together!

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Hello! I think that scene at the pawnshop showed objects which symbolized RA and each of the five main characters.

RA - pottery
Hee-sung - watch
Dong-mae - sword
Yang-hwa/Hina - fencing sword
Aeshin - shoes
Eugene - matryoshka doll

Overall, this show was beautifully filmed and full of patriotism despite its disappointments and could-have-beens. I applaud all the actors for a job well done.

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Yes! My favorite scene. The most beautiful and meaninful!

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Who is RA?

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RA = Righteous Army.

Potter Hwang Eun-san, local head of the Righteous Army, made the white porcelain that Ae-shin's family possessed -- and which was coveted by the Japanese. Now that I think of it, the way clay is worked and fired repeatedly is a metaphor for what the rebels went through in training and in battle. They literally went from soft and unfocused to physically and mentally strong and battle-hardened.

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Just wanted to voice my opinion on the ending. At first, I was so angry that only the main character lived, but after thinking about it I think the writer did it to symbolize something. I think the reason why she didn't die was that she represented Korea and the lovers who died for her and those that protected her were protecting her, yes, but also protecting Korea in a way. Pretty clever if you think of it like that.

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You cried you lose

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It was obvious a few episodes ago that Eugene would be the one to die, not Ae shin. From the beginning there were many of us who were sure it would be Ae shin, or we were hoping they would both live.
The first clue was when I read an article that LBH had finished filming but KTr had some more scenes to shoot. I though uh-oh. That spells doom for Eugene. So then watching the next several episodes, the clues were all there. Even though I predicted the ending who cannot help but cry tears for everything, not just Eugene, but every one.
However, the ending for him was too contrived. There were so many different things he could have done that would have saved both him and Ae shin.
My hero at the end was definitely Hee sung.
My least favorite lead was Dong mae, he was pathetic to the end.
All in all and in the end, this was a remarkably powerful drama.

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Dong Mae died like he lived... His all life was pretty pathetic. Which was sad, because you can see that he was not so bad as he pretended.

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Beautifully written recap. My eyes were watering just reading it. Then again, that could be a combination of my being sick and the epic music I had playing in the background as I was reading. ;)

I decided to repost my comments from my fan wall:

While I don’t think that Eugene is completely emotionally detached from Joseon’s cause, Ae-shin has been and will always be his raison d’etre. All that he has done and will continue to do will be for her. In many ways, Eugene’s character has functioned in a chiefly supportive—and traditionally feminine—role.

For Ae-shin, on the other hand, the Cause will always take precedence over Eugene. I can’t blame her for this because she is fighting for something bigger than herself. In fact, she is fighting for both her own generation and the generations to follow. Yes, she loves Eugene, but she has to focus on the bigger picture. Ever since her grandfather’s death, she has committed herself to fully living as a freedom fighter; this is no part-time gig for her. I could see the benefit of having no lovers or family ties if one has to live such a life. While she has told Eugene to free himself from her on more than one occasion, the latter, living only for her, cannot make such a choice.

Eugene’s sacrifice at the end made sense for his character. And his actions once again benefited the Righteous Army, even if the chief motivation behind those actions was love for one woman.

I should have known that Eugene would die. Why was I not even thinking about that?

Dong-mae’s death, on the other hand, seemed obvious from the first moment he stepped onto the screen. I felt it coming, even if I was still taken aback by it when it finally happened.

Heesung’s death was another shocker. Interestingly enough, when the promotional material on the other characters started coming out, I remember commenting that both the Dong-mae and Heesung would die…that I was getting that feeling from both characters. And yet, as I watched the drama, I must have forgotten my initial prediction. Heesung’s death shocked and saddened me.

To the world outside, he might have lived a frivolous, meaningless existence, but little did most people know how much he was actually doing for the cause. Should we get a mini drama that follows the discovery of his buried pictures?

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Me too. I'm tearing down just by reading this recap. And it's morning in my timezone. And it's exactly not a good thing to start my day. I'm feeling so gloomy now... :(

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Dramallama, thanks to you again for committing to the epic task of recapping this show. It was not without its own drama and we are most grateful to you for making the long slog for and with us! It was a show that really required a lot of explanation for me as I found it full of cryptic comments and long glances that I had trouble interpreting. So more than usual, I relied on your recaps to make sense of everything that was hiding in the KES shadows. Kudos to you 💐

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I loved this show so much. It was a masterpiece of visuals, plot, and characters. I knew everyone would die. I resigned myself to that fact before I began this show. But when it happened, I still couldn't accept it. My heart and soul hurt and I am deeply in my feelings.

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i'm still reeling, reading this recap makes my eyes water all over again... it was so good, this drama. i was not bored during the middle episodes at all - i was entranced by the gorgeous cinematography and the beauty of the actors and the fabulous period wardrobes of Joseon and the Western clothing...

i sat watching the last two episodes holding tissue over my nose and pretty much emptied the box in the process... wish i were like those women actresses who "cry prettily". i was totally puffed up and wrecked the yesterday.

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I remember @daydreamer11 did a fantastic custom translation of the temple scene from Episode 12. Could I implore him/her to try to do the same with Dong-mae's final scenes? I have the feeling I'm missing a lot of subtleties by only having access to Netflix subtitles.

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@dramallama Thanks for the recap. I love the recap photo its a nice way to sum up the drama. Aeshin, the Korean flag, and hope for the Joseon people.

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Mr Sunshine is the prequel to Descendants of the Sun where the 2 leads are reincarnated in peaceful Korea.

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...absolutely positively true -- when AeShin and her mother's cousin were saying their goodbyes in Japan, his parting words were that her parents would meet again in their next life, recognize one another and fall in love again (they too happened to show up in DOTS) -- and as an added bonus, AeShin's thorn-in-the-side Cousin, showed up as Dr. "Beauty's" colleague: Dr."Good for Nothing"...

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I'm hoping that Dae-Young and Myung-Ju have a daughter in DOTS2. If she's named Ae-shin, it would be full circle in the next life

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I stopped by in ghost form to haunt you with my final thoughts on Mr. Sunshine. Overall, I did enjoy it. However, I felt the entire last half of the show was bloated, convoluted, confusing, disjointed, and rather poorly-written. There were also numerous continuity errors in props and characters. I believe many of these problems were caused by the fact that the script was still being tinkered with while airing (e.g. the ripple-effect of injecting Jang Dong-yoon and his military cadet buddies), and there wasn't time to tidy up the editing before broadcast. Yes, there were those flashes of KES's brilliant character dialogue that we love, but it wasn't enough to offset all the negatives. I also disliked the many flash-forward time jumps; these tropes served little purpose except to advance the date.

For those interested: my final overall grade for historical accuracy is a "D". The grade had been holding steady at "C" at the mid-way point, but the numerous errors in the last half of the show significantly outweighed the authenticities, leading to a further reduction.

My big takeaways from this show were the outstanding cinematography, OST, and acting. Byun Yo-han, Yoo Yeon-seok. and Kim Tae-ri were the big standouts for me.

I left here abruptly a few months ago, so let me say goodbye. Some exchanges I had here confirmed a growing feeling that my eccentricities were stirring up conflict. That was never my intention for participation, so I rode off into the Texas sunset. The DB admins know the full story, so I won't rehash it.

May you all find happiness - in both real life and in your K-drama adventures. If possible, please remember my time here at Dramabeans like Major Kyle Moore's military tour in Joseon: a guy who came with good intentions, and made some contributions, but who was invariably in over his head.

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Had a sandwich and left.
Veni Vidi Vici

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Thank you for coming back to share your final thoughts! I have missed your historical posts and thoughts. Hope you do stop by for the occasional ghost posting!

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...so no picnics for you any time soon..?

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Tim, you and your contributions have been often mentioned and missed by many. Thank you for joining us for the last episode. I felt quite sick when you disappeared and want to heartily apologize for any part I may have had in it, it was unintentional.
Much happiness to you as well, and thanks for the fun and learning you brought us.

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Hey, it's Tim!!!! We missed you, and I thought of you as I was reading the posts for the final recap.

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Tim, we really missed you!

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After the finale, I was watching some BTS and saw some pictures of the crew. I'm amazed that such a small group of people produced this masterpiece. @dramallama Wouldn't it be interesting to include a picture of the crew (if available) along with each finale recap? I get that sometimes the picture might be incomplete so any finale crew picture would be nice.

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I enjoy seeing the bts shots. Fighting !

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I simply couldn’t breath for the last episode and also frequently hit the ‘pause’ button. Amazing performances from Kim Min Jung and Yoo Yeon-Seok. I’m so blown away and I think they walked off with the show. Another gorgeous success for Kim Eun-sook.

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Yes. Thank you show. That was quite the ride. 😭
I'm glad they still had that three men walk into a bar up until the very end. Alas, just when the members of the Go Ae-shin Fanboys Club finally became real friends they all met their end. 😭
I was ready to quit this show halfway but I'm glad I didn't. 😭😭😭😭😭

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*quickly entering with my eyes covered* I haven't watched the final two episodes yet, and I won't be able to get to them for another couple of weeks. But I wanted to thank @dramallama for recapping this-- I know it was a challenging show to recap. I also wanted to thank my fellow Beanies for their insights, with special thanks to all those who shared historical information. Learning more about the history of this devastating but fascinating time period was one of my favorite parts of the journey.

I ended up dropping out of the comment threads a while back because I got too disheartened by a) a Beanie lashing out at dramallama and telling her to stop recapping, b) Beanie Tim's sudden withdrawal (huhu), and c) too much negativity for me in the comments. I don't usually have a problem with critical comments, but when there's a preponderance of them and my own feelings are mixed, it lessens my enjoyment of the show. (Btw, I'm not referring to the recapper's comments.) This all got me doing a lot of thinking about my own negative comments, and about the tension between wanting to say our piece even if it's negative, and not wanting to rain on the parade of others who are enjoying whatever it is we're criticizing. It strengthened my desire to try to limit negative comments I might have to one or two per recap and to try to avoid being persistently negative (unless it's a show that everyone's making fun of, like Dr. Jin).

I'm sorry I won't be able to participate in the discussion of the show as a whole in this recap (I'll be away for a week), but I look forward to reading everyone's comments later. (And I'm sure I'll need some virtual shoulders to cry on.)

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what happened? did Tim leave because of the comments for this drama? did anyone (or even i) criticize your comments?? this site is amicable, respectful -- or rather, it used to be... is it not anymore?

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Tim left because he did not like how Minister Allen was portrayed ( or may be it was the consul that died). One of them was the opposite of the real man. He was offended and left.
I personally found it funny as American movies and most movies really are full of stereotypes. It was also interesting that he was troubled not by American imperialism portrayed in the first 3 episodes but by the wrong portrayal of a white American man while there were other Americans, Kyle and Eugene that were decent people.
I read mostly and then decided to join the conversation. I can see where @risa could be frustrated at some point but as for Tim, there is nothing there to see.

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goodness, this is sad...

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Tim explained above. I wasn’t around myself so I don’t know what happened, but it is true that beanie opinions can be overwhelming sometimes when you find yourself in a minority. Also, discussion is fun but too much of it kills my enjoyment of a drama. It tends to reveal its flaws rather than virtues, so the whole tone of the thread seems to become negative. Sometimes I step away from DB for a while and just watch on my own, and then lurk to read recaps.

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@wishfultoki
You are like a DB Gandalf...so wise.

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A few things:
- The actor playing older Do Mi did a good job including the way young Do Mi will fondly say Nari to Eugene^_^
- For someone who was deemed cold and stoic, Eugene touched a lot of people from the King and the coldest people of Joseon, to Hee Sung's mother. He was definitely my favorite character and did live up to his name "Great and Noble". I was so upset at the ending I swore not to watch the show again but with some reflexion I realize he indeed became the wind that kept the flame alive. I still don't like it though...(tears). As the letter said, he just wanted to be with Ae Shin and not say goodbye...(ok, I am about to get upset again...sighs...)
-Before showing that she still had the ring he gave her, Ae Shin gave him the same look she gave him when both her and Eugene rode a boat for the first time and she said ".. may be that was romance in itself" and I thought thats why this man was willing to die for her. Look at the way she looks at him!!!
- what a show...wow

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I love Dongmae but I felt his death scene lasted too long. The awkwardly close up scene of his face was too drawn out.
I'd hoped Heesung would survive so to see him tortured and beaten to death was horrible.
Eugene signed his own death warrant by returning to Joseon so I expected his death. He used his last bullet to separate the trains which required some suspension of belief for me, it just doesn't seem realistic that the bullet was strong enough to break the train connection.
I'm glad that we go to see Somi with the Righteous Army and grown up Domi (without his teal).
Overall it was an enjoyable drama that I will recommend to others. The middle was a little slow but the last few episodes were everything I wanted from this show.

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I'll be the first to admit that I could be suffering hallucinations brought on by fangirl fever, but I *swear* that the bloodstains behind Dong-mae's head during his final moments looked like blackbird wings to me.

Also the final moments juxtaposing him and his gang walking on top of the wall from his initial return to Joseon with the Musin samurai dragging him below the wall -- the whole thing gave me chills. Even he said that this kind of violent death was inevitable from the moment he decided to join Musin, but the visual full circle moment really brought it home. Plus those final seconds with him (or his "phantom") standing alone with the gorgeous scenery behind him. I'm amazed that they took a fairly horrific death and made it a thing of beauty.

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