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Red Moon, Blue Sun: Episodes 19-20

Trying to catch a killer is difficult enough, but trying to catch that killer when there’s little evidence they exist, while also secretly wishing Red Cry would seek vengeance once more before being caught, puts our detectives in a moral quandary. When all other systems fail, is it so wrong to look to a deadly vigilante to fix what’s broken?

 
EPISODES 19-20 RECAP

With urging from the mysterious Red Cry’s messages, Ha-jung throws herself off the bridge, much to everyone’s shock. Later, Ji-heon asks why Woo-kyung didn’t try to stop Ha-jung. Woo-kyung explains that she thought Ha-jung had just gone to use the restroom. She then grew concerned because Ha-jung said she’d been to that coffee shop multiple times before, and if that’s the case, then she would know where the restroom was.

Belatedly, Woo-kyung realizes that it was a signal from Ha-jung, a way to give Woo-kyung a chance to intervene, so that Ha-jung wouldn’t have to die. But Woo-kyung — whether knowingly or not — just let her go to her death.

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She wanted me to hold on to her

 

Chan-wook has figured out who the sender of Red Cry’s phone is. Well, he’s at least deduced that it’s the man who never faces the post office camera, his face hidden by a large hat, so they don’t really have much to go by. The phone didn’t leave any clues, either, so they still don’t have any leads.

The quirky coroner reveals that Ha-jung died due to the fall, thanks to fractures and internal bleeding. There was no sign of drugs or other interference. Ji-heon wishes they could see what messages Ha-jung received right before she fell, since the secret chat app was open on her phone, but of course the messages had disappeared before the detectives could read them.

Even though all the facts makes it clear Ha-jung took her own life, Ji-heon still isn’t so sure, and goes back to his evidence board to add in Ha-jung’s death to the list of others.

Meanwhile, Woo-kyung goes to pick up Bit-na, gently reassuring the now motherless teenager that if she doesn’t want to leave with Woo-kyung, she can find a family member to stay with the girl. Bit-na begins to cry as she says she never really wanted her mother to die.

Woo-kyung takes the girl to visit her psychiatrist friend, and after the consultation, he tells Woo-kyung that Bit-na feels responsible for her mother’s death, but he’s confident that with further counseling, Bit-na will be able to get over her grief and false sense of responsibility. Woo-kyung still can’t believe that Ha-jung would continue to make her daughter’s life so difficult, but the doctor is more concerned about Woo-kyung.

He asks if she’s still having hallucinations, and she dismisses it as something she dealt with due to stress. She then suspiciously asks if Min-seok wanted him to talk to her so he can turn-around and tattle to Min-seok. The doctor reminds Woo-kyung that even if Min-seok is his friend, he’s first and foremost a professional and keeps his patient’s information private. Sighing, Woo-kyung simply says that she’s fine.

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I didn’t want Mom to die

 

Chan-wook and Ji-heon think it’s odd that the first website Ha-jung looked at as soon as she got home after being released from police questioning was the horror film site. Looking through her internet history, they determine that her first log-in to the site was fifteen days before Ji-hye died.

Ji-heon goes to the children’s center to ask Bit-na what she knows about the horror site, and Bit-na admits she saw her mother on it a few times. She never asked about it, though, because she didn’t want to engage with her mother more than was necessary.

Bit-na continues to feel guilty that all this happened because she accused her mother of child abuse, but Ji-heon reassures her that her mother didn’t die because of anything Bit-na did.

As he leaves the children’s center, he’s startled to be stopped by Ha-na, who runs up to give him a hug. Her smile is huge, revealing the growth she’s experienced, but Ji-heon looks like a deer in headlights when she hugs him tightly. Cautiously, he gently hugs her back.

He notices Eun-ho sweeping away snow from the path, and asks if he knows Bit-na. Eun-ho says he doesn’t, and as Ji-heon continues to press the issue, Eun-ho insists that he’s never seen the girl before, irritably adding that he doesn’t spend all day spying on everyone.

Ji-heon returns to the police station, where there’s a court order for him to release Ha-na’s DNA results to her father. Ji-heon’s furious and asks Captain Hong to help him find a way to not give out that information, but Captain Hong points out that Ha-na’s father is perfectly in his right to ask for the DNA results, so Ji-heon should release them.

But Ji-heon knows that releasing Ha-na to her father would be the worst possible thing for her, except he doesn’t have any proof. Captain Hong reminds him that they can’t do anything without hard evidence that Ha-na would be abused if she’s returned to her father.

Ji-heon calls Woo-kyung, asking for her help to figure out how to protect Ha-na from her father. Woo-kyung’s annoyed that Ji-heon hasn’t followed through on his promise to find a way to arrest the girl’s father and send him away for life. Until he takes care of the father, she won’t be able to help him with saving Ha-na.

Outside, Ha-na happily plays with other children on the playground. Eun-ho takes his lunch break on a bench nearby, watching them play. Woo-kyung finds him there, and he cheerfully says that it’s wonderful to see how Ha-na has warmed up to the other kids. But his smile fades when Woo-kyung reveals that Ha-na’s deadbeat dad wants her back.

Shrieks from the playground get their attention, but it’s just a dead bird. Ha-na slowly advances and carefully picks the bird up in her hands, then solemnly buries it in the ground. This is not the first time she’s buried a dead body.

During their counseling session, Woo-kyung asks her how she knows what to do with a dead creature, and Ha-na simply says she just knows. When Woo-kyung brings up Ha-na’s father, Ha-na stops playing and tells Woo-kyung that she doesn’t have a father. That reminds Woo-kyung of the way Ha-na echoed the threat that if she said anything, her neck would be wrung.

Meanwhile, Ha-na’s father has cleaned himself up and also made his property more presentable to the child protective services representatives, who are there to confirm that Ha-na will have a decent home life. He proudly shows off the room he’s decorated and filled with cute furniture and toys.

Reassured, they leave with confidence that Ha-na’s father seems to be prepared to have Ha-na live with him. But his pleasant smile fades as their car drives away.

The detectives are still baffled by Ha-jung’s interest in the horror site, and despite the fact that there’s no history of interaction with anyone on the site, Ji-heon’s convinced Ha-jung used it to communicate with Red Cry.

Digging through the evidence boxes, he pulls out Doctor Park’s laptop for Chan-wook to look through. They discover Doctor Park was a member of the horror site, which confirms that the site must mean something.

Ha-na’s father calls Ji-heon to brag that he’s hired a fancy lawyer to take care of his legal rights to Ha-na, and that Ha-na will be living with him soon. He gleefully asks how he can thank Ji-heon for proving so clearly beyond a doubt that Ha-na is his daughter.

Furious, Ji-heon throws things around in the command center, much to Chan-wook and Soo-young’s shock. Ji-heon wonders where Red Cry is — not to catch him, but why Red Cry isn’t stepping in to take down Ha-na’s father. He orders his team to get a search-and-seizure warrant for the horror website sysadmin, while he goes to meet with Woo-kyung to see what he can do for Ha-na.

Sadly, Woo-kyung reveals that she believes Ha-na’s father is acting like this — like he’s the perfect parent, delighted to be reunited with his daughter — because he wants to make sure Ha-na doesn’t reveal a terrible secret. If they can delay Ha-na’s return, they might be able to figure out what that secret is and save Ha-na.

Woo-kyung goes to her boss, requesting that he make a statement that Ha-na was abused and should not be sent back to her father. But her boss is more concerned about the center making money than actually taking care of kids. Slyly, Woo-kyung points out that Shi-wan told her that his counseling, which was court-ordered as a disciplinary action, was finished early because his father — who has donated a lot of money to the center — specifically requested it of the director.

Shifting uneasily in his seat, Woo-kyung’s boss asks if she’s trying to threaten him. Woo-kyung simply says that she’s willing to make an official complaint if anything happens to Ha-na. She flips over her phone, revealing she’s been recording their conversation.

If Ha-na is harmed, Woo-kyung will testify that it was the director’s fault because he didn’t listen to her professional opinion. That kind of scandal would further destroy the center’s reputation, so he gives in and officially agrees that Ha-na was a victim of child abuse and shouldn’t be returned to her father.

That decision infuriates Ha-na’s father, who accuses his high-priced lawyer of not being able to fix the problem. But the lawyer says it’ll take at least a month to file an injunction to convince the courts otherwise. That’s not what Ha-na’s father wants to hear, and he goes to the center’s director himself to make his case.

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I’m blackmailing you for your own good

 

The center director points out that they’re just looking out for the child’s best interest, even when Ha-na’s father dangles the offer of money. The director maintains his “we’re doing this for the children” demeanor, despite his obvious greed, and reaches a compromise. Ha-na can go home with her father, but she has to attend regular consultations with Dr. Yoon, Woo-kyung’s psychologist friend.

The detectives arrive at the horror site sysadmin’s dump of an apartment and confiscate the server. But after investigating it, Chan-wook doesn’t find anything particularly strange about the website — it doesn’t look like it was even hacked. However, a joke gift starts Ji-heon thinking, and he realizes that a container can disguise the true contents, and orders his team to look deeper into the website for something unexpected.

Ha-na meets with Dr. Yoon, and when she shows interest in a music box, he turns it on and plays it for her. She stares at the ballerina, mesmerized as it slowly spins around while the music plays.

After the counseling session, Woo-kyung meets with him to get his opinion. He believes that Ha-na is a difficult case, and that she must have been put under a strong hypnotic suggestion. Woo-kyung’s determined to have Dr. Yoon help her find out what Ha-na’s father did to Ha-na, but Dr. Yoon reminds Woo-kyung that their first concern is for Ha-na’s emotional well-being.

Dr. Yoon gently tells Woo-kyung that her determination to get Ha-na to talk about what happened is not beneficial, and suggests that Woo-kyung is too close to this case, especially now that Ha-na is no longer her patient.

Captain Hong gives Ji-heon a GPS-enabled wristwatch for Ha-na, where at the push of the button alarms will go off and the police will be immediately dispatched to wherever she is. Ji-heon argues that the watch isn’t enough to save her, but Captain Hong points out that just because they’re police officers, doesn’t mean they’re heroes. They can’t save everyone — they can only provide tools so that there might be fewer crimes.

In her last session with Ha-na, Woo-kyung makes sure the girl memorizes her phone number in case she needs to call Woo-kyung in an emergency. Ji-heon waits outside, watching Ha-na’s father arrive to pick up his daughter. Eun-ho, signing off some documents in the maintenance room, notices the men via the security cameras.

Ha-na’s father is annoyed to hear that police will be making random checks on him and Ha-na, and that Ji-heon will also be following up with his own phone calls to make sure Ha-na is okay. But there’s still nothing to prevent Ha-na from being delivered to her father. Ji-heon gives her the watch, telling her press the button if she’s ever scared, worried, or just wants to talk, and he’ll come running.

Neither Woo-kyung or Ji-heon look pleased to see Ha-na being escorted away by her father, but there’s nothing they can do about it. Eun-ho suddenly runs out of the building and gives Ha-na a lollipop as a going away present. The three of them watch helplessly as Ha-na, no longer smiling, being driven away in her father’s truck.

On the drive home, Ha-na’s father reminds her that he was the one who threatened to wring her neck if she said a word. He’s pleased by her curt, terrified answer, since it means that she hasn’t told the police anything.

Woo-kyung goes to pick up Eun-seo from Mom’s, and Mom asks if she hates the fact that Min-seok took Eun-seo away on a trip. Woo-kyung admits she wants Eun-seo to hate her father and his new girlfriend, but she’s accepted the fact that Eun-seo enjoys being with them.

Cautiously, Woo-kyung tells Mom that she looked into her birth mother’s family, discovering that her grandmother died years ago and that there’s no one left to ask about her childhood. Mom is at first irritated that Woo-kyung is doing this all because of her hallucinations, but is relieved when Woo-kyung says that she’s giving up her search for answers about the little girl in the green dress. Woo-kyung says that she’ll focus on Eun-seo now, so there’s no reason to tell Min-seok anything that would make him worry.

In her room, Ha-na is stiff as a board, pretending to sleep in her new bed as her father comes in to turn off the light. Her drunken father also rips off her watch, telling her she shouldn’t wear it at night, then puts it in his pocket and leaves. Quietly, Ha-na gets out of bed and locks the door.

She crouches next to it, reciting Woo-kyung’s phone number over and over. She eventually falls asleep, curled up against the door, but the sound of a ruckus outside and a dog barking wakes her up.

Meanwhile, Woo-kyung sits with her sleeping daughter, and notices the little girl in the green dress standing across the room, staring plaintively at her. Woo-kyung tells the little girl that it’s pointless — she’s not going to see the little girl anymore.

Her phone buzzes with a message, inviting her to join a website, courtesy of Ha-jung.

Chan-wook discovers some funky code in the horror film website, and realizes that at a set time, a hacking code takes over. You can log-in at that time, but you need the correct code. Woo-kyung clicks on the link to the website, which brings up the same screen that Chan-wook has found on the horror film site.

But she’s distracted from going further with the site when she suddenly gets a call from Ha-na, tearfully repeating Woo-kyung’s name. But the call is cut off when a mysterious hooded person grabs the phone from Ha-na and unplugs it.

Worried, Woo-kyung gets into her car and heads to Ha-na, calling Ji-heon on the way. The detectives also race to the dog farm. Ji-heon also gets a notification that Ha-na’s pressed the alert button on her watch — or at least someone has pressed the alert button.

Woo-kyung arrives at the dog farm first, but there’s no sign of anyone in the house. She heads to the barn, where Ha-na’s father does his butchering. Shining her flashlight around, she sees flesh blood dripping from tools on the table. She starts to scream for Ha-na, but someone grabs her from behind, covering her mouth with chloroform-soaked rag.

The mysterious hooded man drags the unconscious Woo-kyung out of the barn, flipping on the light switch as he does so. With the lights on, it’s revealed that a body is tied above the butcher’s table — not Ha-na’s, thankfully — but her father’s. Carved in his back are lines of poetry: “Everybody consumes crimes, but feigns innocence. Living like a dog. Save a person.”

 
COMMENTS

Ohhhhhh, Red Cry is getting more bold. Or maybe we’re just getting closer to Red Cry’s orbit. At least we can be reassured that Red Cry has taken care of Ha-na’s truly awful father when the legal and justice system weren’t able to do anything about it. Which continues to give credence to this vigilante — even Ji-heon at one point wanted Red Cry to step in and save Ha-na. While we might not agree on the methods, Red Cry is providing a service for kids whose lives would be irreparably ruined by their abusive parents. Except… murder can’t be the only answer, can it? But what else can you do when the system allows parents to abuse their children without punishment?

I’m assuming Red Cry is our mysterious hooded man — since that was also the figure that set the fire in the car, and was at the other end of the horror site chat room when Ha-jung was desperate to make sure nothing would happen to her (little did she know how the tables would turn). From the glimpses we get of the hooded figure, I’m still convinced it has to be Eun-ho — the build seems to fit his height and weight. Plus, he knows so much! He knew that Ha-na was going to her father’s, and he could have overheard Ji-heon explain about the watch (since I’m assuming he was the one who pressed the alarm button after unplugging the phone, alerting the police to come to save Ha-na — but only after he finished his body carving). Despite what he told Ji-heon, Eun-ho knew Woo-kyung took Bit-na to the counseling center. Knowing how lax the director is with his master key log-in, Eun-ho could have seen Woo-kyung’s notes about Bit-na’s injuries. Everything continues to point to Eun-ho — the sweet, quiet boy who just wants to see children’s smiles return — being Red Cry. So why am I still somewhat reluctant to believe it?

As infuriating as it must be to realize the limitations of your job, I’m pleased that Ji-heon doesn’t give up. I can’t fault Captain Hong for essentially shrugging his shoulders and being like, “We’ve done all we could.” You can’t save everyone. It sucks, but it’s true. It does make me a little nervous that not of all our main cast will make it to the end. Even though Woo-kyung keeps saying that she refuses to engage with the little girl in the green dress, I can’t believe that she’ll ignore the little girl forever. Woo-kyung’s obsessions may mean she neglects her family, but she’s also been saving other children’s lives because of it. Although I’m not so sure that’s a trade Red Cry would approve of — what would he say if he knew that Eun-seo was being neglected by her mother, even if other children were benefiting from it? Is there a cost-analysis Red Cry goes through to determine if someone’s neglect is worthy of fatal punishment or can escape with a slap on a wrist, or is it totally black-and-white?

And what if that person has been abused themselves? Because I feel like the small hints we keep getting about Woo-kyung’s mysterious childhood — especially the fact that everyone seems hellbent on making sure she doesn’t find out what happened — means that she’s gone through some serious trauma. Was her mother’s death an accident? Or was she a perpetrator who became a victim due to someone not approving of how she treated her children? Has Red Cry always been around, in some form or another, like a secret society, or did he spring up only recently? Ji-hye might have been the most visible perpetrator of child abuse, but she certainly wasn’t the first (even if she was the first for our story). Now I can’t help but wonder how long Red Cry has been quietly acting behind the scenes, curating secret chat rooms and convincing terrified and/or abused mothers that the only solution to their problems is to kill — or be killed.

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Who has soft-spot for the medical examiner? LoL.. He's just so cool....

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I've always liked him especially as he coached JH on some of the methods of killing self. I like their businesslike repartee over every corpse. Pity he does not get out of the mortuary to help with the investigation. ;-)

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IKR... He's just different from any other medical examiners in Dramaland - even Dr. Han & his Scooby Doo team. He has his own perspective, and that makes a lot of senses. I love how he describes how someone dies.. It chills, but it might be true.

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The medical examiner, like the investigative team Chan-wook, brings a bit of light to the show. But the difference is he seems to have seen a lot of ugliness in his profession but he doesn't let it affect him, like how he explains the cause of death in a rather nonchalant (I mean he seems pretty chill about explaining how the victim died), and like when he understands why Bit-na's mother might have attempted suicide joking that his own life is boring.

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The moment I watched that last scene, I immediately regretted my wistful thinking earlier for Red Cry to take care of Ha-na's horrible father. That man is awful, but that's not the fate I wanted for anyone. I realized that what I truly wanted is a just punishment and for the police to make sure Ha-na would never need to meet him ever again. In a way Red Cry did make it came true, but now I don't feel conflicted anymore about the need for the detectives to catch Red Cry because no one is entitled to make that kind of judgment against others.

As for Ji-heon, apparently he didn't got out from his bad childhood as unscathed as I thought. The way he froze up whenever Ha-na showed affection and trust to him spoke of his deep conviction that he couldn't be a good enough man to deserve such thing. It almost like he didn't deem himself worthy to be loved by those children. I wonder if this was the real reason he looked dismayed when his ex-girlfriend told him she was pregnant. Not because of the sudden and unwanted burden of raising a child, but because he didn't trust himself to be a good father since he didn't really have a decent role model for guidance. In that case, I just hope that Ha-na's open love will convince him otherwise.

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Honestly, initially I wasn't very invested in RC getting caught (well, beyond 'JH wants to catch him so I'll root him on' lol), but I am now fully convinced he needs to be stopped, ASAP.

Like, there's a saying in my home country that basically translates to 'sometimes one bad person gets rid of other bad people before justice comes', and that was the way I felt about RC. Like, were his murders right? No. But were they still getting rid of bad people? Yes. So I was like, he should get caught eventually but his presence is still useful in the meantime because hey, it's like a hurricane pulling out bad weeds.

And then Bit Na's mother happened. That, out of all the RC killings, was the most tragic and unnecessary. BN's mother was remorseful, she was likely mentally unhinged, and she was going to prison if not also counselling. BN could've ended up reconnecting with her mother after they spent some time apart, healing and reforming respectively. But now, not only will she never have that chance, she'll spend her whole life feeling guilty over her mother's death, wondering if she had done the right thing just because she tried to protect herself. All because RC had to impose his judgement onto the situation.

Like, that is the moment where I realised that everything RC does isn't purely to 'save the children'. His main motivation is to 'avenge the children'. And there is a big, big difference between what people will do with those different goals in mind.

Then we have what happened to Ha-Na's dad. I personally don't mind that he died (bad weeds in a hurricane), but the way he went really freaked me out. Another saying in my home-country: justice and cruelty cannot live under one roof. I'm not gonna write spoilers for the details we got in the next episode out of consideration for other beanies here, but what happened with HN's dad made me genuinely frightened of how far RC is willing to go for his justice.

The fact that WK and HN were actually there at the time makes me feel sick. Sure, RC didn't do anything to them, and I doubt he'd ever do anything to a kid, but what if WK had seen his face? Would he still have just knocked her unconscious and nothing else? Or would he have rationalised killing her as a 'necessary evil' just like all the others?

In the words of Terry Pratchett: if you did it for a good reason, you'd do it for a bad one. And that, more than anything, is why I think RC needs to be caught and stopped immediately, because for the first time I'm very, very concerned about his idea of collateral damage.

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I got too side-tracked on my perspective on RC to mention this lol, but I agree with you about JH as well. The look on his face when HN hugged him absolutely killed me. He actually looked scared that he might break her when he hugged her back, and that just completely broke my heart.

I've always thought he was just terrified of being a father because he was afraid of turning into his own abusive parent(/s), but you bring up a really good point about him feeling like he isn't worthy of having a child's love. I've started wondering if he doesn't feel worthy of having anybody's love. He beat himself up so much in this episode that it reminded me of a person with self-esteem issues, who would make a mistake and then spent hours and hours saying that they were pathetic and useless.

I really hope we get to see more of Ha-Na even now that her case is over, like honestly we need her to brighten up these poor characters' lives.

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I thought that he reacted that way out of guilt, because he can't save her from her father, he don't deserve such affection from her?

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I'm interested in the idea that Red Cry (and/or the secret message board for vigilante justice against child abusers) has been around for longer than the cases that we've seen! I'm really on the edge of my seat as each tiny new detail comes to light and mostly I have no idea where this will all lead but damn if I don't enjoy the ride.

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I was content with Ha-Na's father's death. He was awful and deserved all the bad things. Who didn't deserve her death, was Ha-Na's mother. She ran away to protect Ha-Na and just didn't know how to take care of her. She must have been a little mentally disabled. So for that alone I want Red Cry caught and punished. The way he killed her was awful. He doesn't seem to discriminate between parents.

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Ha Na's mother didn't deserve it bit she was an accomplice to her husband's atrocities.
Red Cry does need to be caught because he thinks he has the power to judge over people like the group.

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She was his victim not accomplice.

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She didn't report her husband on murdering the baby. She was probably mentally disabled and scared to death but in Red Cry's eye she was an accomplice in crime.

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That's not how domestic abuse work. It's not only physical violence, and it's not as simple for the victim to report abuser's crime.

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That is the point i'm trying to raise with Ha Na's mother. Fine she must have been under some sort of psychological abuse but Red Cry will not see that. All he sees is the child's point of view. Her divorce should have given her sense of freedom but the abuse had gone bone deep.

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Dr Park wasn't an abuser either, was he? But he was killed too. Actually I have been thinking about this. WHY was dr Park killed?

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More emphasis should be put on HaNa's mother, but like in life, in death too she mostly overlooked and forgotten.

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Agreed, she was as much a victim as her child.

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Excuse me, children.

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I think i said something about this episode making me happy. For once i was happy a serial killer actually killed someone.
Watching this episode made my heart ache for Ha Na and children like her. Everyone one knew she was going to a slaughter house but they couldn't do anything because it was not against the law but Red Cry did.
The girl is smart and put in the right environment would definitely flourish. That and years worth of therapy.
Also i respect the writer and director for being able to evoke the same emotions in me as the characters. I even respect and understand Red Cry to an extent. And i don't know the guy or girl!

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This was seriously such a stressful episode. Aside from Ha-Na, I felt the most sorry for Ji-Heon. He was clearly so agonised over not being able to protect Ha-Na despite everything he said to Woo-Kyung, and the startled reaction he had when Ha-Na hugged him spoke volumes.

I'm starting to wonder if JH's ex was a little right about him ('You always desperately ask for love, but have you ever loved anyone?'), and that maybe whatever happened in his own childhood (I'm still waiting on that backstory, show!) stopped him from fully loving other people?

Maybe that's why it used to be so easy for him to be an impartial, by-the-book cop, and why in the face of other people's rage against criminals, he could still calmly insist that every life is a life-- even if it also happens to be a lowlife.

Now, on the other hand, --and I suspect this is primarily because of his interactions with WK and HN in particular-- JH can't keep himself as emotionally distant. He's getting more attached, and less cool-headed, and it's leading to a lot of emotionally-explosive behaviour.

Like, that scene in the office. It was so spine-chilling to see JH, who's always been such a rational defender of the law, spitting and hissing that Red Cry should go and commit murder. Like, he has truly reached the end of his 'a life is still a life' rope, and I wonder if he'll ever go back. He's still as set on arresting RC as he's ever been, but I wonder if that's just how it looks on the surface, and he's not more conflicted than he shows.

I also adored the way they contrasted those two scenes, how they started with Ji-Heon being so wound-up that even his co-workers looked a little scared of him, and then had his angrily storming out of the office cut to him softly sitting in front of Woo-Kyung, all calm and rational again. There are so many nuances in the writing and director of this show, it's delightful.

Speaking of JH and WK though, I almost snorted when, in response to WK angrily demanding why he was telling her about HN's dad now, he stuttered that he was preoccupied and didn't know it'd progress so quickly. We viewers have been with JH the whole time, and we know perfectly well that what he was really doing was frantically trying to solve everything on his own. Well, I say on his own, but what I mean is 'ask everyone from ahjumma cop to team captain for help but absolutely do not tell Woo-Kyung he messed up until it's too late'.

It was a really, really stupid way to behave, because if WK had just been involved from the start, they might even have managed to avoid this final outcome. They at least could've thought of a lot more precautions to take in the worst case scenario. It was ridiculous for JH to put off telling WK until there was nothing else they could do, and she was right to get pissed at him. I can't hold it against JH though, because he clearly knows it was stupid and regrets it more than...

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...and regrets it more than anything.

Again, I feel like this is another example of more emotionally-fuelled behaviour that's coming from JH being more invested in his attachments than before. It's not easy to admit we've let someone down, and JH looked so agonised when talking with WK on the phone, saying he already knew he was incompetent and pathetic, that I really felt for how much he was beating himself up about not being able to do what he all but promised her he would.

I feel like JH's developing character arc is about him becoming more emotional and less impartial, and the struggles of reconciling that with his job. I mean, there's already a lot of conflict there. Soo-Young has called him out on being biased in WK's favour several times, and this episode he just outright wished that RC would commit murder. Now I just wonder how -or even if- he's going to address it.

(And honestly, show, give this boy more hugs. He needs them!)

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I'm glad that at least Ha-na is there to give him warm hugs.

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Ha-Na's loving presence on this show is a gift, and I hope it just keeps on giving lol.

That said, my shipper heart would certainly not object to a hug coming from Woo-Kyung either. Let Ji-Heon have all the hugs!

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Still hoping for these 3 to be warm hug-loving family πŸ’–

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@fishnchips I was wishing that Soo Young would lighten up and warm up and be the one Ji Heon could turn to as well as WK. WK I see as his big sister. Soo Young is his partner at work but could be even a partner in his lonely social life.

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@growingbeautifully Lol, we're getting totally opposite vibes here! πŸ˜‚

Tbh, I've always felt like JH treats SY like he's her big brother- or maybe like a very grumpy military captain treats his latest recruit, lol. I actually tend to ship partners, so I totally see where you're coming from, but I think maybe that's the problem for me. I've never felt any romantic potential between them, but more than that, I've never really seen them as having a proper work partnership either. There's just too much of a power imbalance, imo.

Like, JH is always in the position of authority, be it as a sunbae or as the team leader. He makes all the final calls. He holds SY to very high policing standards, and whenever he feels like she's fallen short, he's absolutely venomous. She may call him out every now and then, but she does it ala with-all-due-respect-sir, whereas he goes into full I'm-disappointed-in-you lecture mode. Even while investigating, JH frequently uses his authority to go on lone-wolf investigations. And whenever SY objects to this or to him withholding information from her or to anything he does, he immediately pulls rank with her. And SY may be quietly mutinous, but she still respects their different positions. From the beginning, her attitude towards JH has always felt like that of a hoobae who is desperately trying their best to do a good job so that their sunbae will acknowledge them, rather than that of someone who's trying to build genuine partnership.

So I think it's because of that power imbalance, as well as the way he treats her so roughly, that I've always categorised them as having a dongsaeng-hyung kinda relationship. Like, the way JH won't hesitate to grab her by the collar to stop her getting violent with their perp and then shove her aside to make a point, but how he will still pick her up from jail and treat her to food all while grumbling 'you did nothing right' bwahaha. I honestly love their dynamic tbh, but again, I see a power imbalance in it that suits that of a big brother and their kid sibling, or a mentor and a trainee.

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@growingbeautifully And now, as for the subject of Ji-Heon and Woo-Kyung (btw, I'm sorry this is so long lol, my problem is I always get so verbose when I want to talk about something I love, and I'm in love with this show haha):

I've always felt a very explicit vibe of there-could-be-something-more here between Woo-Kyung and Ji-Heon, and one of the most explicit examples of this is possibly the earliest, in that scene after they'd both found out the affair, and he'd put his hand on hers while gently trying to calm her down. The cinematography of that scene was brilliant, and the way that they focused on the shots showing his hand over hers immediately raised my shipper feelers, lol.

But what really gets to me is how Ji-Heon's whole demeanour is different when he's with Woo-Kyung. He's gentler, for one. I think the camera work I mentioned in this ep was actually a very good example of that, in the way he stormed out of the office bristling with fury, but when he was sitting in front of her he'd calmed down and settled. He's almost unnecessarily considerate to her and attentive to her feelings, doing stuff like asking if she's uncomfortable talking about a subject, or pretending they just arrived and he totally hasn't been waiting for her to wake up. He frequently hesitates about what to say to her, or how to put it, so he ends up running out into the rain to ask her something or sitting back down on the coach even though he'd just gotten up. He smiles at her more often than I've seen him smile at anyone on the show besides Ha-Na, maybe. Even when he's angry with her, he tends to be more quietly-disappointed rather than explosively furious. The one time he got into a shouting match wit her, he immediately deflated, something he never does in front of others, and tried to explain himself to her.

He's just so incredibly biased towards her lol, something that's made him defensive to the point of irrationality during this whole investigation. One of the most fascinating things to observe about Ji-Heon in this show is actually how he's been struggling to deal with his bias towards WK after being called out on it by SY, and how even though there was a period where he tried to be more impartial, he utterly and completely failed at it. I've written a longer post about that I want to share when the recap of episodes 21-22 come out, so I don't wanna CP it all here lol, but the moments when he does -and doesn't- call her 'Woo-Kyung-ssi' instead of 'Cha Woo-Kyung-ssi' are very telling.

Despite his struggles with being biased, I love how out of everyone on this show, JH is the most open with WK. Like, he's not just open about what he's thinking or doing (or confidential information, like honestly the number of times I have snorted when JH told WK something she absolutely did not have the clearance to know), he's open towards her thoughts and experiences as well. He's constantly asking her how she's feeling, what...

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@growingbeautifully, part 2 sorry lol

...he's constantly asking her how she's feeling, what she's thinking, and when she expresses herself, he is all ears. Even if he doesn't always agree, he always understands.

What touches me even more is how much WK clearly needs that, clearly needs her interactions with him, because she's become so much more stable after confiding to JH and having him support her. And the beautiful thing is how she's come to trust him, so she's just as open with him as well. She doesn't censor her thoughts with him, even if she's saying something that she knows he wouldn't approve of as a policeman. The only times she's ever kept information from him (which resulted in my previously mentioned quietly-hurt/disappointed reactions) have been when the stories weren't hers to tell, never anything she was afraid of confiding in him.

More than anything else, it is that mutual trust --that vibe of something soft in nature but strong and not easily broken between them-- that makes me love their interactions, and really hope for something to come to fruition.

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@fishnchips
It's great that you've been making note of all WK's and JH's interactions. It's true that he's gentler and more considerate of WK than any other person, but I felt that her predicament at that first meeting roused the protective part of him that he never was able to put away. I don't get any romantic vibes at all, though romance can always blossom from consideration.

The one time I recall WK keeping something from JH was when she did not disillusion him about her 2nd child, that she had not delivered a living child.

I don't feel the show needs any romance, perhaps it will be better that there isn't. However if there had to be one, I actually prefer the cliche of the bickering couple who come to trust each other and become friends and proper partners.

So I'd be quite pleased if in the process of mentoring and heckling Soo Young, JH recognises her worth and starts to give her some respect, while she becomes more comfortable and less robotic around him.

However either coupling will not really bother me. I just want to work through the mystery with JH, I want to know his backstory too and I want to find out with WK what she has been brainwashed into forgetting that keeps raising the delusion of phantom girl.

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@growingbeautifully Aw, thank you for appreciating my obsessive note-taking lol. I keep track of JH’s interactions with everyone tbh, because it gives me more material to work with when analysing him. Alas, this is how I show my love towards my favourite characters- by keeping bullet-pointed lists and writing long, emotional comments on DB πŸ˜‚.

There are some other scenes where I felt some potentially-shippy vibes for the WK and JH (ep 6 is full of some of my faves, esp the scenes when it was raining), but since my main goal was always trying to decipher what the author is trying to imply, I also gave a lot of meaning to the way other characters took their interactions: from HN's dad specifically making comments about WK's body to piss JH off, to SY flat-out saying 'Aren't you the one letting your personal feelings cloud your judgement?'. I can't help but feel little details like that are the writer's way of leaving breadcrumbs.

But of course, to each their own interpretations! I admire you for being fine either way the story goes tbh, because I'm a much more stubborn kind of viewer lol. I think I'm like Ji-Heon in that sense, because if I get firmly convinced of something emotionally, then I will stick to that opinion unless proven irrevocably wrong. So my hopes for WK and JH are everlasting! Lol, though even I don't expect the series to suddenly take a romantic focus. Just a hint or two would be perfectly fine with me.

Honestly, I think the most enjoyable aspect of discussing ships in dramas that aren't focused on romance is the element of uncertainty. In a rom-com, we all know who likes who. But in crime dramas like this, character relationships are left to play out in the background in much more vague and subtle ways, so it's kinda like playing detective as you try and read between the dialogue and the cinematography to try and see just what the writer was trying to express. And I love playing detective. πŸ˜…

Onto little details:

The whole simultaneous affair realisation was WK and JH's second meeting, rather than their first (but it’s certainly the more memorable one lol). The first was when JH went to ask WK about her protesting with Everyone's Child during Ji-Hye's release. There wasn't really an occasion for his protectiveness to set in there, but what I find interesting is that he seems to have been hesitant around her from the start (and I wonder if this was simply because she was a pregnant woman at the time, or if this ties into SY comparing WK to a child and the occasional glimpses we've seen of JH being a little afraid of interacting with children). I mean, WK was super blunt and almost defiant while being questioned, and yet instead of putting on more pressure or being snarky like he did with his other suspects, JH just ended each of his requests with a reluctant '...please.' πŸ˜‚

As for the omitting, the first time WK omitted anything from JH after they’d gotten closer (I define this as their convo...

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why is there no edit button for when you realise you left out smth essential, lol.

@growingbeautifully Annnd I didn't realise my earlier comment got cut off lol. To finish:

As for WK's omitting stuff from JH after they’d gotten closer (I define this as their convo where he told her she wasn't crazy), the first time was when she sent the message to Red Cry (technically, I don't think WK meant to hide it at all since she went straight to him with the reply, but I'm including it on this list bc JH's reaction to it was the most upset/hurt, partially bc he assumed she must've been hiding even more things from him. She wasn't, of course, but the damage was done).

The second time was when she refused to admit to her and Bit Na's mother falling out because she accused her of child abuse (JH's reaction to this was more quietly disappointed/frustrated).

The third time was her not telling him in the second to last ep that she knew what happened to Eun Ho's face (we don't know JH's reaction to this, and it's possible he's yet to find out she even hid it).

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I'm loving all these analysis on Ji Heon. I don't need to add a single word.

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Aww, thank you! It's so nice to see other people who have similar takes on him, and I'm just dying to learn more about his past so we can understand him more like gaahhhh

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Dear fishnchips,

Excellent analysis of JH!

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Thank you so much! I really hope I can do justice to his character in my interpretation of him :D

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Been anxiously waiting for this recap. Thank you, @odilettante!

I was totally not prepared for that gruesome cliffhanger. I was disgusted by Ha Na's father and wanted him away from his daughter, but not like that. The public does not know of his true nature. We've been led to believe he has done something criminal and terrible to Ha Na or someone else, but there's no hard evidence. After his murder, the public will view him as another victim until more information/the truth is revealed.

I think Eun Ho has to be involved with Red Cry somehow, but he's not the main man.

Did anyone think the joke gift, the underwear in a can, was a PPL? Maybe because I was thinking about PPL recently especially after reading this article so I thought that scene was a PPL and smiled about it, but the brand name wasn't actually shown. It would have been an example of a PPL done well. Heh

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I'm glad you mentioned the joke gift, I was so afraid it was going to be PPL and was readying my self to cringe I was very tense, the show so far didn't have any obvious PPL scenes and I hope they never do.

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@loveblossom
I think I only had a moment when I thought it might be PPL, but the second it became a tool that pointed Ji Heon to think of the false fronted website, I did not consider it PPL at all.

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Oh yes, I saw that article. It made me keep an unnecessary eye out for them in every drama I watch from then on, lol.

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I'm a little suspicious of the children's center director.
Is he really that computer-illiterate?
Could he possibly have given his admin password to everyone to give himself plausible deniability if anyone ever figured out that the center's computer records were being used as a serial killer's targeting system? Or to make it easier for his accomplices to research things for him??

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Also, since the GGD showed up and bothered WK even though Ha-Na was in absolutely no danger that night, I'm glad we can finally say that the GGD really is just a reflection of WK's own anxiety (and some repressed memories) rather than some child-shaped bat-signal, lol.

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I was thinking the same...
probably the girl looks like someone important from WK's past (I thought WK had a little sister that died somehow and that the sister in the locked-up state was Omma's biological daughter, but I think I was wrong), but she simply embodies WK's anxiety or something like a sixth sense...

Oh, @fishnchips, the post above about WK-JH is so beautifully written and acute! I wanted to reply but didn't manage to.
About that, I remember that scene after WK slept in the car, when JH seemed not to want part from her...

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Honestly, the identity of the GGD is as up in the air as ever lol. I wouldn't be so quick to think you're wrong about thinking Se-Kyung is stepmum's biological daughter though. I'm still fairly convinced that GGD is WK's full sister, and Se-Kyung is a half-sister around the same age that resulted from an affair. We can only wait and see if I'm not speaking utter nonsense though lol.

And thank you so much, that's so kind! I actually felt really bad because I typed it out in a rush since I was going to grab the groceries, and this ship deserves better, but I'm so glad to hear a fellow shipper approved :D

And YES, that scene was absolutely heart-melting. I wonder if you melted at the same moment I did- you know when JH followed WK to ask her about the GGD, and then he told her she wasn't crazy and offered to make a montage of the girl. And then the conversation kinda ended, but he was still just looking at her (to this day, I will always compare that look to the way that a cat looks at the only human it likes lol), until she had to prompt him and say 'you should go'. And he walked away from her so slowly. I just ughhhhhhh these two ;-;

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Yep, this fellow shipper approved! :D

And yes, THAT was the scene I was thinking of and that the moment I melted.
Can't wait to read your comment to episodes 21-22!

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While I joked about wanting RC to kill Sung Hwang I also wanted for our heroes to find a legal way to help Ha Na and yes they couldn't do that but they also didn't leave her defenceless so to speak with the bracelet, memorizing WK's number and even letting SH know that they are watching him and who knows maybe HN would've talked about what happened to her with the help of therapy.
From all of the children involved in these cases HN is the one we spent the most time with her and we knew what kind of person SH is and maybe because of that I wanted for SH to be held responsible for what he's done but RC made him a victim and to me a victim is someone I should sympathize with and I'm not comfortable with that, I honestly dont know how to feel. This episode has really affected me and I'll need to think about it more.

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I think this episode did a good job showcasing the difference between a superhero that acts for the good of the people by ASSISTING the law and just a criminal vigilante that tries to BECOME the law. Red Cry thinks he's some kind of hero for children, but his actions this time prove he's a mere psycho criminal. The police did not completely abandon Ha Na. Even though they knew they wouldn't be able to completely protect her, they were prepared to help in whatever capacity they could until they found a new solution. Red Cry's mistake was in not even giving the law a chance in this. Although slim, there's a small chance they could have found a legal way to save her and then used SH as a precedent for similar cases with other children in the future, but Red Cry destroyed that possibility. He took matters into his own hands when Ha Na wasn't home so much as 12 hours, her father hadn't done anything bad to her yet, and the police didn't have a chance to see if their threats of "having an eye on him" were in anyway helpful.

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@odilettante Thanks!
So much to feel in this episode. If I can list the flow of emotions that came and went ... frustration, anger, helplessness, murderousness, fear, suspense, horror, relief but short-lived satisfaction.

I continue to be full of praise for Team Ji Heon with Soo Young and Chan Wook. I really enjoy the way the procedural and investigation aspect has been portrayed. It's so clear what they are doing and why, and we feel along with them their great desire to save, protect and apprehend the villain. And best of all, they are so smart and hard working, their teamwork warms my heart.

We are now certain that Red Cry is a man (therefore not WK) and so we start now to list and eliminate our suspects:
Eun Ho
WK's therapist
Director of Hanuel
WK's ex-husband

Are there any other men in the show who'd make the suspects' list?

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I don't like the methods of Red Cry. If he knew that there was a another child, he could give the information to the police. It's true that he frees the children but the violence of it is not good for them. He's not a good judge either. He trusted the mum who was abusing her child, he killed one who was abused herself and didn't deserve this kind of death...

I think Red Cry could be the other psy, he knows all the cases of Woo Kyung and he talked to Ha-na. Red Cry could have accomplices like Eun Ho.

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I think the writer is progressively showing that Red Cry is unstable. I mean he made Min Ha-jung kill herself because she was afraid of what he would do to her, and the murder of Ha-na's father is way more gruesome than the others.

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You know what... I am not watching this show AT ALL but I'm being cheeky and I want to level up. So people who ARE watching this show- tell me about it! Should I put it on my to watch list? What's it like?

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@sicarius
This show is very compelling and has created good mysteries to confound us, with great characters that we can get behind and really wish to know. It's a crime-detection, suspense-horror-almost thriller and can be chilling.

This writer is great for offering practically every character as either villain or victim or both so we viewers are kept on our toes trying to figure out who's the real baddie. Every main protagonist (there are at least 4) is very interesting. We want to know everyone's backstory and especially what happened to Woo Kyung in the past, who's that phantom child who haunts her and will WK recover from whatever trauma she seems to be suffering.

I highly recommend that it goes on your watchlist... in fact why not marathon it and join us in the next recap!!! :-D

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Unfortunately I can't marathon it cos I got sucked into bingeing a CDrama hahahaha but it sounds like my kind of show, and very much something I'd enjoy when I was in the mood for a thriller.

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It's one of my favourite drama of the week!

The story is very well written and told. They give us some clues but there is a lot of suspens. The characters are interesting not black or white. I really like the investigation from the police.They're competent. They have a good instinct but follow the facts.

But it's a very dark and sad drama. If you are not in the mood maybe it's better to wait :)

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So when I need a dark crime thriller I know where to turn... Thank you~!!!

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I can only say that this is the only drama ever that I have been lured into live-watching after reading a few recaps, and I don't regret it at all.

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Oh you never live watch? Now that's interesting. It must have a dang good hook

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It definitely does.

No I prefer to binge watch a drama while I am in the mood, I won't be able to finish my rom-com when I suddenly shift to craving a thriller. Also, I am a mom and I can easily forget the plot if I wait a week, let alone subtle nuances.

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Why do i feel like red cry is woo kyung's physiatrist friend?

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Why was dr Park killed? Because he prescribed pills for kids? However much I think about it I can't understand why he was killed.

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He comitted suicide, maybe he was suicidal from beginning given that he lost his family and decided to go in the blaze of glory (taking child's abuser with him).

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There was a poem at the crime scene. That makes his suicide very much like Bitna's mother's suicide. So why was he pushed to his death? What was the reason he was judged?

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There was a comment form "Red Cry" praising doctor for his "heroic death" so I take it as indication that his suicide was his choice not punishment.

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@midnight @shach
Yes, I too thought that Dr Park volunteered to commit murder followed by his own suicide. I had the impression that with his family dead, he did not want to continue living anymore, but before he died, he might as well get rid of a known child abuser. After he killed Ji Hye, he accepted his own judgement that he'd committed a crime and killed himself, rather than surrender to the police.

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@growingbeautifully hmm I hadn't thought of it this way at all. Thanks.

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I got the feeling that Dr Park got killed or pushed to kill himself because the police was unto him and so to protect RC or for RC to protect himself (and everyone else), he had to go. That was my understanding.

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First of all, this drama makes me feel cold because the actors are wearing a single parka or coat when it’s minus zero degrees Celsius in South Korea.
Now back to the story, I feel like the murder of Ha-na’s father was hasty, compared to the other killings, probably due to the fact Red Cry personally knew that Ha-na was helplessly walking into danger and his involvement was thus urgent. Moreover, it seemed he was very well aware about the personality and crimes of Ha-na’s father because the corpse was painfully mutilated like he wanted to punish him further, and he didn’t dare to dispose it. It shows that Red Cry was especially riled up for this murder and wanted to use this as a warning about his ruthlessness to kill.

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And they never, ever take that coat off unless to change into pyjamas ;)

I agree with the rest too, and it takes EunHo from my suspects list, he doesn't seem to have that kind of rage in him, we already seen him in confrontation and he is subdued and resigned when faced with unfair circumstances.

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@midnight @shach @sicarius @kurama @sooyi @psycho94 @hobakky @fishnchips @loveblossom @gadis @zitless @kafiyah-bello @lemoncello @witchyromance

I've got a little question, which although is not all that important, just bugs me as to whether there was a forgotten bit of plot. The first time that WK went to Ha Na's father's place (his name is Go), she snooped and found a room with children's things and a book on pregnancy, etc that was evidence that Go had been lying. He had claimed that he never had a child living in that house. WK told JH about this.

How come this evidence of his lies was never used against him? It was not brought up again when it could have been used to prevent Ha Na from being taken by Go? This has been bugging me because in every other way, the little details of the plot have held together so well.

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I was waiting for this to come up too, and when he said that an expensive lawyer can do wonders I thought perhaps the lawyer had advised him to clean the room and pretend it hadn't been there... Or he had cleaned it himself and just urged the lawyer to maintain that WK was lying... I don't know really, it's just that at the mention of a lawyer I thought now they can prove and disprove anything...

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I'm not sure about that detail, but maybe the detectives couldn't use it against him since everything is only circumstantial evidence? There is no other witness who can testify about that since after Ha-na's mom's death. And I don't think there's direct evidence there that showed the history of abuse or neglect.

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It would only prove that he was her father, but that's amount to what? With HaNa's mother dead he could come up with any story to explain the items. Although they knew he was the abuser, they didn't even have HaNa testimony or physical evidence to do that, and once it was confirmed that he is her father, let me say Korean courts rarely separate children from their parents even when there is evidence of abuse.

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The first time WK went to his place, she used a lie to ask him questions and she found those things illegaly. He called the cops, I think she was charged for breaking and entering. WK had his adress because she stole it to the police. So the police was responsible for leaking his personal informations.
I guess it made too complicated to use those informations against him.

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Like @kurama said the way they found these things was not legal but it is weird they never mentioned it again you would think it would come up in conversation.

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I think other than it being circumstantial evidence and obtained in an illegal way, the bigger problem is that they had no evidence proving his abuse or crimes other than Ha Na's testimony, which she refused to give. No matter how creepy and disgusting the guy talks, without solid evidence of a crime having been committed the police can't get a search warrant. That's why WK told JH that the only way to save Ha Na was to figure out the secret he was hiding, since the discovery of the corpse in his backyard would have immediately put him under investigation and lost him his custody.

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As @hobakky @shach and @gadis mentioned, I'm pretty sure it's because nothing she found was hard evidence, and could easily be explained away. Crayon scrawled furniture? Second-hand. Pregnancy book? Left by a friend. Crayons? Friend's kid. Etc. Etc.

I mean, Ji-Heon's captain refused to even consider Ha-Na wetting herself in fright when she saw her father as evidence, so anything else really pales in comparison.

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That also struck me too. Regardless of the room, I feel like a good social workers should have seen a few red flags with Ha-na's father like the fact he likes vulnerable women and didn't recognize he had a child. The man thrives on exercising power over the weak and vulnerable and I thought the woman assessing him would feel that, but all she saw was the nice (and very new) bedroom.

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He also may not have shown them what WK found, he knocked her out and then the screen flashed and she was being arrested. He could have thrown what she found away. She may have forgotten in her fear of being assaulted. Or, you found the single plot hole in this drama, ha.

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@midnight @shach @sicarius @kurama @sooyi @psycho94 @hobakky @fishnchips @loveblossom @gadis @zitless @kafiyah-bello @lemoncello @witchyromance

Thanks so much for giving me your thoughts and take on this 'maybe' plothole. I do sort of agree with you, just was wondering if I missed anything. But the thought did occur to me that with things like DNA testing, when WK first reported the articles to JH, he could have asked to search further or to get a sample of the cloth/clothes stuck in the window, look for hair,... etc to test for DNA with the dead wife. Later on he could have checked this DNA with Ha Na's even. But this never happened although JH's been the most competent and meticulous cop I've seen in a long time. 😉

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@growingbeautifully: I almost forgot about this little detail until you've mentioned it. You're right, instead of finding the pregnancy and book stuffs in the room, what have disturbed me more was the piece of dirty clothes hanging in the window.... If we're aware of that, we had to be suspicious there must be another kid in the house.. :(

But it looks like this is the plot-hole the write forgot to address. I hope she won't forget about Si-wan's case closure.. I'm not happy with Si-wan parents "dragged" him out of the center. To me the reason wasn't clear either.

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As far as I'm aware, even obtaining DNA samples without first having solid evidence that a crime occurred is illegal. Ji Heon couldn't do anything with the DNA test because he obtained it without consent or a warrant, so it doesn't matter if he has proof that Ha Na's father lied about not having a child, the courts would be legally required to ignore the DNA test.

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*takes notes* when watching, see if you can spot plot holes. Got it. Wait I do that anyway...

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[Part 1] I'll try and condense my feelings, which are a little controversial even to me.

I want to agree with comments that are uncomfortable and upset at how far Red Cry went. I normally would agree. But I'm actually not sorry that this happened, purely because I felt sure Ha-Na would die or suffer, and I can only assume that she didn't. I care about the children in this story, first and foremost, which is why I was upset that Bit-Na's mother died (it wasn't what was best for her, and was a terrible thing on Red Cry's part) and it's why I'm not upset that this guy is dead.

Red Cry is a human, yes. So is Ji-Heon. And Soo-Young. And the director of Haneul. And the judges in the courtrooms who can decide on fines, imprisonment and death sentences. These are all people – our world is run by people, including the justice system. People will always be judging each other, because that's the way the world works. And it seems that people in positions of power, who judge others, are also capable of shady or outright terrible things. So what right do they have?

I'm not justifying anything that's happening here. I'm saying the entire system is flawed. For as long as the system is so flawed, little girls will be handed back to their abusers and the good people in the system can only watch and tick boxes and hope.

I don't like what Red Cry is doing, because it's just another part of the flawed system created by flawed humans. But I'm happy that he saved this child. What I hate is how it seemed like the Dog Butcher was tortured – I despise torture, it should never happen. If you want to take matters into your own hands, then kick his ass off the planet and be done with it. If you torture someone, you're a terrible human being, and it's saying a lot more about you than the person you're harming.

Maybe I'm being given a glimpse into Red Cry. Maybe Red Cry was someone who was let down by the system. Did you see DB's back? He had crayon scribbles all over him, underneath the carved words. It's childlike. Either Red Cry is pretending he's Ha-Na dishing out justice, or Red Cry was a tormented child.

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[Part 2] Like Batman used his traumatic experience in the bat cave and turned it outwards, Red Cry could be taking childhood trauma to do the same, with different results of course (not going into motivations, since I think Batman is dubious as a superhero and that's a whole 'nother story).

Red Cry might be a person – or a group of people – who are tired of seeing the system getting tied down to a point where childcare is little more than box-ticking, form-filling and turning a blind-eye. Red Cry might be a person who once wished someone would save them, and decided to become that person when they got older. Red Cry is not a superhero, has no justification behind them, and is extremely flawed in their method. At times they are actively hurting children with their decisions, like with Bit-Na and her mother.

And at times, they might be vindicated. I get the feeling that Ha-Na might hug Red Cry for this like she hugged Ji-Heon after he gave DB a five-finger kiss. The result will always be different depending on people and circumstance.

I think this is a moral thing that runs deeper than just 'he has no right to judge others' or 'I'm happy he did this, thank god someone saved that kid'. There might be no right answer to this. Because no human has the right to judge others, which makes you wonder why the justice system exists, given that it was made, is filled with and is ultimately meted out by humans. Lines do exist for a reason, but at some point those lines became more about protecting people in certain jobs or positions of power than about protecting everyday people and the vulnerable. I'm starting to sound anarchic, so I'll stop there.

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[Part 3] I still have suspicions about Eun-Ho, but I also found the psychiatrist very suspect. His behaviour came across strangely to me. He would also be someone who would have access and understanding of not only the information on their admin system, but he might also be someone children open up to at times. And think about Bit-Na, who said some harsh things about her mother before the reality of her death made her express her true feelings – she didn't want her mother dead.

If Bit-Na had expressed her rage towards her mother during therapy as catharsis, the psychiatrist might not look any deeper than that. Mama was a bad person and she wishes she was dead? Okay then! That does seem to be about the depth that Red Cry needs to act.

But I think Red Cry might be more than one person. A coder to create the chat room, the one who provides information and judgement, and the one who does the leg work. At least two or three people, I'd guess. And if they have different motives and methods, that would also help to skew the investigation.

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I think that there is group of accomplices around Red Cry or even more than one Red Cry, but this one that picking up targets right now doesn't ring me as someone who was the victim of abuse himself, more like helpless witness? Which would made the psychiatrist perfect candidate, EunHo strike me more like a follower than leader and he is more concentrated on children whereas Red Cry main focus are abusers.

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This is a very good point. It reminds me in some ways of Light from Death Note, who had never suffered himself but felt motivated by his hatred of what he observed around him

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@alex8825 he tortured the butcher for information, it was showed that he pulled his teeth, the mystery is how he know there was another child in this household.

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@alex8825 That Red Cry is a 'group' conjecture has many points going for it. There is a Hanuel group already in the Head Director, Director and Eun Ho all being family or like family since before. If Red Cry had existed even before the present time, the old man Head Director might even have played a more active role.

Red Cry seems to know far too much as well ... like how did he/it know where the baby had been buried, so as to leave hints as to where the police should/would dig.

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I think he knew where the baby was buried because he tortured Ha Na's father. The "how he knew there was a dead baby" it's a mystery.

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Ha-Na was tight-lipped, but there's still a good chance that someone like the psychiatrist or even Eun-Ho could have drawn information from her.

Red Cry knew the EXACT location though, so what I think is most likely is if he had to torture the info out of the dog butcher, or if he convinced Ha-Na to show him the grave.

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The way Ha-Na kept repeating WK's telephone number broke my heart...

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Judging from her action, we could see that she's been living in hell for so long...

A part from that.. the child actress Ha-Na is soo good. It's the first time I'm seeing her....

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Yes, she really is a terrific actress! As in that scene with the good-faced man, when she cried like she really was scared to death.

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I have just discovered this show and it's great.

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After this episode I'm even more convinced that whoever Red Cry is (and I no longer think it is Woo-kyung), they're punishing WK for seemingly standing by and impotently letting abuse happen.

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