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Reach of Sincerity: Episode 6

Our main couple take on a difficult case this week, with twists and turns that they will have to figure out if they’re going to be able to help their client. Our undercover Hallyu star Yoon-seo continues to throw herself into the legal work — and it’s beginning to look like that’s not just because she wants to impress her boss, Jung-rok. Jung-rok is impressed though, and who can blame him? The lovely Yoon-seo is just a delight, with more layers and warmth being revealed the longer he knows her. No wonder he’s a goner.

  
EPISODE 6 RECAP

Yoon-seo tells Jung-rok that she will tell him of her feeling sometime. Confused, Jung-rok wonders why she couldn’t tell him now, but his attention is diverted when he spots a pork belly restaurant.

Jung-rok asks, “Do you like (pork)?”

Yoon-seo’s mind being firmly on her almost-confession, misunderstands and assumes he’s asking if she likes him. Flustered, she stammers that she thinks she might. Jung-rok casually says that most people do (like pork).

A touch acerbically, Yoon-seo admits that she didn’t know (he) was that popular, and is absolutely baffled by Jung-rok’s response (still talking about pork, lol) that, “It’s an easy choice, and fairly cheap.”

Yoon-seo finally realizes what Jung-rok is actually talking about, and covers up the confusion with another white lie. Lucky for her, Jung-rok is clueless.

Inside the restaurant and comfortable that her secret is safe, Yoon-seo narrows her eyes at Jung-rok and guesses that he’s never dated anyone before since he’s so bad at reading women.

Yoon-seo brags that she knows a lot about dating since she hosted a dating show. She starts, “I even had a nickname–”

“Single-since-birth,” Jung-rok interrupts, grinning as he reads aloud an article about her utter lack of dating experience. Ha. Jung-rok continues to tease a huffy Yoon-seo, even after she stuffs his mouth with food.

At the end of dinner, Yoon-seo gets more serious, as she encourages Jung-rok to do well in the trial. Her enthusiasm even rubs off on Jung-rok, who smiles and does a tiny “hwaiting” fist-bump.

The next day, Attorney Yeon calls Jung-rok in to tell him not to feel pressured about winning the case — he only has the eyes of the nation, and Attorney Yeon’s hopes pinned on him. Exasperated, Jung-rok nevertheless assures Attorney Yeon that he will win — because ‘someone’ said that he would.

Hard at work later that evening, Jung-rok encourages Yoon-seo to go home, despite her protests. But he seems less than pleased when Yoon-seo answers a call from her ‘oppa’ Hyuk-joon. He even cuts his work short to leave with her in the elevator…

Which comes to a juddering halt. Jung-rok rolls his eyes when a dismayed Yoon-seo rings her ‘oppa’ again. It’s definitely why he doesn’t comfort her, and instead crisply lists out the number of accidents that have occurred in elevators.

But when the lights go out, and Yoon-seo begins to really panic, Jung-rok rushes to her side. He gently touches her shoulder, and they stand staring at each other caught in the moment, even when the lights come back on. They only break apart when a guard opens the door.

It’s manager Hyuk-joon, waiting in the lobby, who really ruins the last of the atmosphere though. He takes the chance to berate Jung-rok for making Yoon-seo work too hard. Jung-rok takes note of how close Hyuk-joon and Yoon-seo are, and from the look on his face, I fear he has just jumped to the wrong conclusion.

Outside, Yoon-seo yells at Hyuk-joon for making Jung-rok uncomfortable. Hyuk-joon yells back that he was afraid Jung-rok would take advantage in the elevator since all the men in Korea want to be with her — and Yoon-seo stops his rant short by agreeing. Ha.

When Hyuk-joon accuses Yoon-seo of working too hard, and suspiciously asks if she’s really thinking of changing career, Yoon-seo quickly lies that she’s just working hard because of the acting job. Yoon-seo must be better at acting than she thinks, because Hyuk-joon actually believes her.

Back at home, Jung-rok broods over Yoon-seo’s ‘oppa’ Hyuk-joon. Meanwhile, in a totally different mood, Yoon-seo swoons over the moment they had in the elevator — and wonders at how conveniently movie-esque it was.

The next day, Jung-rok crankily refuses Yoon-seo’s offer of coffee and says, “Don’t you remember that I was accused of overworking you…by your boyfriend?”

Jung-rok shoots Yoon-seo a look, and she hurriedly denies that Hyuk-joon is her boyfriend. Jung-rok flashes the cutest little smile – and decides he does want that coffee, actually.

In the break room, Yoon-seo walks into Attorney Yeon and Ms. Yang gossiping about the couple caught almost kissing in the elevator after it broke down last night. The guard remembers them exactly: A tall guy with round eyes and a woman as pretty as an actress.

Sure they’re onto her, Yoon-seo tries to sneak out, and then trips over her words denying that it was her and Jung-rok. Attorney Yeon and Ms. Yang stare at her… and burst out laughing that of course they know it wasn’t them. Good thing everyone knows Jung-rok and Yoon-seo ‘hate’ each other.

Oh, boy. The elevator breaks down again, this time with Attorney Dan and Choi stuck inside and they do not take it well. Attorney Choi warns Attorney Dan not to fall in love with him, falls on top of her when the elevator jerks, which makes Dan push him to the floor. Haha, these two.

Meanwhile, Se-won and Prosecutor Kim work together on their case. Kim takes the chance to make a dig about Yoo-reum’s harsh treatment of Jung-rok – but it doesn’t go as planned when Se-won sharply tells her it’s none of her business.

Leaving to get coffee, Se-won spots Yoo-reum. He places a piece of cake in front of her and tells her to take care of her health. Frosty, Yoo-reum asks what that has to do with him, and Se-won smiles back, “If you don’t feel good, I don’t either.”

But Yoo-reum doesn’t soften, and abruptly leaves, leaving behind a saddened Se-won.

When the autopsy comes back in favor of the prosecution, Jung-rok decides to check out his client, Im Yoon-hee’s, house for more evidence. He balks at bringing Yoon-seo to the scene of the crime, but she persuades him since she’s already put so much hard work into the case.

Despite her claim that she played a detective once, the reality that this is a murder scene hits Yoon-seo when they arrive. Jung-rok notes that since Yoon-hee’s husband was standing when he was killed, the prosecution will argue this proves it wasn’t an accidental stabbing.

Yoon-seo and Jung-rok are both so intent on their work that neither of them notices when someone sneaks up behind them – and bashes Jung-rok in the head, knocking him to the ground.

The assailant runs off, with Jung-rok in pursuit. Jung-rok manages to catch up, and tackle him down, until the police arrive to arrest the man.

Distraught, Yoon-seo runs up to Jung-rok, who hurries her away from the gathering crowd to a secluded spot. Although Jung-rok tells her not to worry, Yoon-seo can’t stop crying at the sight of his bleeding head, and tries to mop up the blood with her handkerchief.

After Yoon-seo calms down, Jung-rok tucks her into a taxi, and heads to the police station to give his statement. The assailant, a local man named Park Soo-myeong, was a part of the neighborhood watch, and thought that Jung-rok was a thief.

When Jung-rok asks to speak to him, he realizes that Soo-myeong has a learning disability. Jung-rok softly asks if Soo-myeong was ever in Yoon-hee’s house before.

Jung-rok’s gaze sharpens when Soo-myeong answers, “Noona told me never to talk about it.” But before he can learn any more, Yeo-reum interrupts (she’d hurried there after hearing about Jung-rok’s assault). Jung-rok decides not to press charges and outside, both Jung-rok and Yeo-reum order background checks into Soo-myeong.

Jung-rok gets another surprise, when he sees Yoon-seo waiting for him beside his car. Yoon-seo explains she was so worried about him that she had to come see him, and urges Jung-rok to go to the hospital. Jung-rok looks touched by her concern, and lets her shepherd him to get treated.

Afterwards, Jung-rok insists on driving Yoon-seo home. Downcast, Yoon-seo admits that she felt terrible leaving Jung-rok alone earlier with his injury. In return, Jung-rok tells her that he felt bad sending her off by herself.

Awww, then Yoon-seo and Jung-rok take it in turns to tell each other they need to take care of themselves. Yoon-seo even makes Jung-rok pinkie-promise, and they linger over the touch, reluctant to break apart.

Back at his apartment, Se-won (who is hoovering, ha) thinks that Jung-rok is late because of the case, and asks him not to go up against Yeo-reum again. Jung-rok tartly agrees that he’ll only go against Se-won in the future, and tells him it’s nothing when Se-won sees the bandage on his neck.

The next day, Attorney Yeon agrees that Park Soo-myeong sounds suspicious, and warns him to be careful in the future. Yoon-seo adamantly agrees, saying that Jung-rok could have died. Piqued, Jung-rok declares that he can take care of himself, while Attorney Yeon joins in and calls him weak.

Haha, Attorney Yeon spins a yarn about the time he took on 17 drug dealers single-handedly. But when Jung-rok looms over him, Attorney Yeon wastes no time in raising his hands in submission and asking Jung-rok to talk it out. Jung-rok rolls his eyes and leaves. So awkward, I love it.

Mr. Lee goes on a recon mission, and finds out from one of Soo-myeong’s neighbors that he was in love with Yoon-hee – and what’s more, Soo-myeong was at her house the night her husband was killed. Yoon-seo gasps that Soo-myeong might be a witness to the murder, protecting Yoon-hee. Jung-rok, meanwhile, suspects something else…

Having done her due diligence, Yeo-reum calls in Soo-myeong to question him, but he doesn’t answer any of her questions. Outside, Yeo-reum muses that might be for the best anyway, since Soo-myeong could harm their case if he testified to seeing Yoon-hee’s husband beating her.

But Jung-rok won’t give up so easily, as he prepares to go meet Yoon-hee. Yoon-seo makes sure that he eats before he leaves, and frowns, “You’re weaker than you seem.”

Jung-rok really can’t let it go this time, and argues that he was hit so hard that any normal man would have been unconscious for hours. Yoon-seo isn’t impressed, even when he points out that he caught the culprit. Jung-rok brashly says that he could sue her for slander, but quickly takes it back when Yoon-seo calls his bluff.

At the prison, Jung-rok asks Yoon-hee how she could kill someone much larger than her so easily, and without any of the injuries on her hand that would commonly occur in such incidents. Yoon-hee nervously admits to knowing Soo-myeong, but vehemently denies being close to him. So that’s a dead end.

The mood is tense at Always Law the day of the trial, and Jung-rok is disappointed to hear from Mr. Lee that Soo-myeong is stubbornly refusing to go to court. Yoon-seo steps in and asks if she can try.

Before Yoon-seo leaves with Mr. Lee, Jung-rok tells her that there will be many more reporters at court, so it would be best if she didn’t attend. Yoon-seo agrees, and sweetly wishes him luck.

Yoon-seo finds a distressed Soo-myeong, and sits down to speak with him. She quietly explains that she was angry at first because the man Soo-myeong hit was the person she likes. Yoon-seo tells Soo-myeong that he must have felt bad seeing Yoon-hee being hurt – and gently tells him that if Soo-myeong doesn’t come forward, Yoon-hee might get even more hurt.

In court, Jung-rok confirms with the forensic scientist that they didn’t find any of the expected blood spatters on Yoon-hee’s clothes. Intent, he asks if that means there is a possibility that Yoon-hee is, in fact, innocent. Yeo-reum looks perturbed at the turn of events, especially when she sees Soo-myeong being ushered into the room.

Jung-rok asks for Soo-myeong to be added as a witness. When Soo-myeong takes the stand, Jung-rok gets him to write his name, and asks whether he is right-handed. Soo-myeong confirms, and goes on to confirm that in his job, he doesn’t have to handle knives.

Which is when Jung-rok asks why he has a knife injury on his thumb then, with the medical records to prove it. Jung-rok explains to the jury that many people receive these when trying to penetrate the bones and organs of a person with a knife.

Jung-rok says that the prosecution just accepted Yoon-hee’s confession to quickly wrap up the case. Blunt, he states, “They were indifferent to revealing the actual truth.”

Seeing the case slipping away from her, Yeo-reum objects that none of Soo-myeong’s DNA was found at the scene of the crime. But Jung-rok has an answer for that too – very little investigation was undertaken by the prosecution. And they ignored the fact that Yoon-hee was an injured woman who couldn’t possibly have the strength to force the knife in.

Jung-rok presses Soo-myeong again, and demands to know who really killed Yoon-hee’s husband. When Yoon-hee tries to silence Soo-myeong, the guard holds her back, which agitates Soo-myeong even more.

Overwhelmed, Soo-myeong cries out that it was him who stabbed Yoon-hee’s husband and repeatedly babbles, “He was hitting her again. I stabbed him.”

The court erupts. Yoon-hee is mobbed by reporters outside asking why she lied, while Soo-myeong is escorted away in handcuffs.

Meanwhile, the Always Law firm are triumphant at the outcome. Attorney Choi attempts to claim that he always knew there was the possibility of another culprit but Attorney Dan immediately bats him down and says, “If you knew you wouldn’t have been able to keep quiet about it.”

So Jung-rok arrives to good cheer in the office, and Attorney Yeon won’t be defeated in his quest to give Jung-rok a great big hug for the win. But Jung-rok doesn’t look happy, and makes his excuses to avoid a celebration dinner that night.

As Jung-rok leaves that night, Yoon-seo senses his low mood and encourages him to take a rest after all his hard work. Instead, Jung-rok surprises Yoon-seo by asking her to go out for soju with him.

Over soju and food, Yoon-seo points out that Jung-rok seems glum, and astutely asks if it’s because he didn’t like winning against his friend Yeo-reum. Jung-rok admits that’s part of why – but somberly says that it’s really because the whole situation is sad. He understands why Yoon-hee protected Soo-myeong, and why Soo-myeong killed her husband.

Taking a breath, Jung-rok sincerely thanks Yoon-seo for believing in him, and worrying about him when he got hurt. Yoon-seo bashfully smiles, and takes the chance to ask him why he wanted to go out with her when he was too tired for a team dinner. Jung-rok says simply, “I wanted to drink alone with you today.”


Walking home, Yoon-seo chuckles as she recalls trying to put her hands into Jung-rok’s pockets to warm them. Yoon-seo confesses that she was really embarrassed, and says, “I’ve been on too many TV dramas and that interferes with my sense of reality.”

Jung-rok’s face softens, and he slowly takes one of her hands and puts it into his pocket. At the growing look of surprise on Yoon-seo’s face, he explains, “I’m worried too. As much as you worry about me, and console me, I wish to do the same for you.”

  
COMMENTS

First of all, I absolutely love everything to do with our lead couple. But before I move onto what I think this show is doing well (oh yes, there’s still a whole lot to like) I just want to say that I’m not sure how I feel about this case of the week. For one thing, I wasn’t very enthusiastic about their choice to make the character with a learning disability the killer. It was handled as sensitively as I suspect it could have been, but I still think it was a misstep when it is overwhelmingly the case that vulnerable people like Soo-myeong are on the receiving end of violent attacks, not perpetrators of them. Jung-rok obviously felt badly about the way the situation ended up, and his duty ultimately was to Yoon-hee and the firm – but it still felt uncomfortably like a trap when Soo-myeong took the stand. Further, it didn’t even really work narratively for me. It, again, wrapped up the case neatly for our protagonists with the twist telegraphed too strongly to be compelling.

Finally, it feels somewhat of a letdown to end this way, when the groundwork for the confrontation between Jung-rok and Yeo-reum was being laid since the start of the drama. There just wasn’t the emotional connection there that I expected, since we haven’t really explored Yeo-reum as a character enough, and Jung-rok was just doing his job to the best of his ability. To my knowledge, in South Korea, prosecutors have a general duty and powers to investigate the truth of a case (rather than solely the police), which means that Yeo-reum was conducting some shady business by ignoring the potential evidence Soo-myeong could provide. Given that, I don’t imagine she will get much more sympathetic if she tries to pass the blame onto Jung-rok for upending the case, but we shall see where this goes. I am getting slightly more interested in Yeo-reum and Se-won’s backstory the more hints we get (and the cuter Se-won looks doing things like hoovering) so I hope we get more context sooner rather than later about them. There is clearly still a lot of unresolved tension there, but without any forward momentum, it’s at risk of going stale.

Forgetting all that though – which is remarkably easy to do whenever Jung-rok and Yoon-seo come back on our screen – I loved that it drew our main couple closer together. The heightened drama drew out a few lovely shared moments, especially the sweet touch about both of them worrying over each other. After Soo-myeong attacked Jung-rok, Yoon-seo was too focused on him to care about getting spotted — and even in the midst of the chaos, Jung-rok was so hyper-aware of Yoon-seo that he moved them away to a hidden area. Side note: is it now just a running joke that Jung-rok will have to tackle someone each week? I doubt your average defence lawyer gets this much aggravation from cases.

And as has become the norm for Reach, there’s always plenty of comedy, and big-grin moments. This time, it was the hilariously obvious jealous Jung-rok. Who, it turns out, can be just as petty as Yoon-seo when it comes down to it. The tables really turned on her, from Jung-rok’s snippy facts about elevator accidents, to his melodramatic refusal of coffee. I genuinely thought they were going to use the misunderstanding as a roadblock to their budding relationship, so I was delighted when it turned out to just be an opportunity for Lee Dong-wook to throw some serious side-eye. And I think this may have been the first time that Yoon-seo actually admitted liking Jung-rok (to Soo-myeong), though let’s be honest. Girl has not been hiding it. Jung-rok has been inching ever closer to declaring a romantic intention as well – who knew I could get so fluttery over Jung-rok putting Yoon-seo’s hand in his pocket? Or weak-kneed at their moment in the elevator? That’s just the power of Lee Dong-wook and Yoo Inna’s chemistry, I guess. Keep it coming, show.

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As always, I enjoyed this episode ~ this couple really trusts each other, and I honestly can’t wait for the next one.

Since I can only say “I loved when LDW smiled” so many times, for this episode I thought up a different list system:

Times my cynical mother giggled out loud:
~When Lawyers Dan and Choi we’re trapped in the elevator (she frustratingly said, “really, the elevator cliche?” when the lead’s ended up there)
~ When the CEO cowered when he and JR were boasting of who was the better fighter (his yellow socks in the air as he showed what a yellow belly he is)
~ When JR dodged the CEO’s hug after the trial

Memorable times she scoffed (because counting actual scoffs takes too much time):
~At any PPL (the vacuum, ginseng and soju especially)
~When they pinky promised
~When YS wore blue jeans to the office the day of the trial
~At the end when YS started rubbing her hands together with cold, knowing that she was going to put them in his pocket again
~Many, many other times

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I love this running gag they have about the CEO saying something and then immediately either contradicting himself or being proven wrong. I love Oh Jung-Se so much.

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Let me present counterarguments against one of your scoffs -the pinky promise. We all know that pinky promises are metaphorically the converging of their souls at the present and interlocking of greater parts in the future, much like rubbing hands to put them in whoever's pocket, hopefully many many times to come.

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Oh, pinky promises are the ultimate sign of soulmates finding each other through interlocking fingerprints, especially once they stamp it ~

I shall tell my mother your counter argument (like i said, these are her scoffs), but it would be easier to get YS to give up pink then get my mom to think pinky promises are romantic.

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Hahaha I thought by "mother" you were referring to yourself (albeit in 3rd person), much like how @bammsie who has adopted many in Dramaland to be her children! 🤣

Now I want to meet your mom who seems to be a perfect snarky drama buddy!

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😂😂

(Kimbap, love your new name, I must say!

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Haha no ~ this is my mum’s first utterly unrepentant rom com in dramaland. I usually only force her to watch thrillers and sageuks.

She is so snarky! Cynical as can be but she couldn’t hide her giggling in the first episode. I know she loves it, secretly.

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That was a pinku pinku pinky promise.

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Watching KDramas with your mum must be fun!! :D

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It really is 🥰

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LOL I was reading this and realizing your mother and I are the same...except I'm also the girl quietly freaking out over otp moments once I'm done my initial scoffing at cliches

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Are... are you my Mom?

*even in the kdrama forum, birth secrets abound*

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My long lost child! But I cannot say, for you are surely much better off with the chaebol family that took you from me...
*shudders with memory of water thrown in face*

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I always knew there was a reason I loved dramas so much, because, just for a moment, I could be with you in spirit, as we ogled oppas together...

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So touching! I cry. Yes I knew my drama-watching genes would come through. It's in your blood ... embrace it ...

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the problem with the real killer is that he's clearly not getting social protection (another failing of a system obviously! including women still in IPV) etc but when k-dramas have characters who have mental disabilities they so rarely get a person to portray it well either. and that's part of 2 problems: able-minded people probably shouldnt be portraying one (to circumstances) that often and more importantly if they do...........their acting is incredibly poor and distracting as this was. i couldn't stand looking at him or hearing him speak bc i actually find if the acting isn't great it's a effing mockery to people who have these problems. it comes across AWFULLY and is insulting.

that being said everything else was good. and i'm grateful we had stuff explaining how hard it is to get out of these situations and there are more dramas at least trying to wedge in some sort of (possibly poor) moral values that no longer always reflect "treat this girl like garbage and it's ok"

i appreciate whatever is happening w/ yeoreum bc yea she is not doing her job but the presence of competition and her need to survive as a woman? it makes sense and it means a lot more in these contexts when you are THE only female prosecutor etc

ok my lil rant ends there. YS development is perfect. i hope she can like save-save him once. or we get less saving moments (which there have been!) her worry was so beautiful tbh YIN did such a lovely job. whatever characters she plays and no matter how rote they have been or may be in the future it's always a diff type of girl and motivation and flavor i love it.

theyre just too cute together. so i am waiting. and WAITING ! for more ;")

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I actually think the actor did a good job portraying a functioning person on the autism spectrum. He’s not bullied in that neighborhood, has an Ahjusshi and noona that looks after him as well as him mother. I didn’t have any problems with how he was characterized. I think it was pretty realistic and I look at stuff like this all the time. However, I was surprised that they put him on the stand without any coaching whatsoever. A high stress environment like that could have been dangerous for him and others if they didn’t prepare him for it.

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the rest re: characterization i would have no clue about. i'm strictly talking from the standpoint of like how it comes across on screen/his acting (certain tics that are just super stiff but i honestly dont even think they try...ppl just think they can act that way naturally? idk)

and yea that maade no sense but i suspend all disbelief bc whenever i watch korean law shows there's a lot of things that dnt make sense lmao

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oh and my other problem would be the carceral punishment but that's on a bigger level for the show and the world lol

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I also had no problem with the way the show portrayed him. I was shocked though that he was coaxed up there as a witness when Jung Rok and Yeon Seo knew he was a suspect. I’ll wait for @oldawyer or some of the other law beanies to show up and explain. I had the impression that the case was wrapped up too quickly. Shouldn’t Soo-Myeong have a trial too?

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I'm sure he will, but will Jung Rok be representing him too? And will it be part of the show? It takes months to get a trial together, so I don't now. There's that mystical kdrama timeline when time can go really fast or molasses slow. So who knows? Only the kdrama gods.

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Another picky point, if it takes months to get to trial why was the accused still black and blue with unhealed cuts?

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I was confused at JR's behaviour as YoonHee's lawyer...I think I need a beanie to clarify something that bothered me. YoonHee clearly had not wanted to implicate SooMyeong in the case. If JR suspected that she was lying to cover for SooMyeon'g involvement, is it still within his duty as her lawyer to have laid out his argument the way he did in court without giving a second thought to her intentions? I found it odd that JR's case for the defense was essentially a refutation of his own client's words, without even attempting an open discussion with YoonHee first. Yes, JR's role as lawyer is to serve her best interest. But to not consider what *she* thinks is in her best interest and decide *for* her when it appeared that she had already committed to a contradicting decision felt almost like he was doing the work of a prosecutor and simply arguing for a victim, and showed a lack of solidarity between lawyer and client that surprised me.

I just thought the situation posed a larger ethical question for JR than the show seemed to make of it in calling SooMyeong to the stands...The truth should prevail and no innocent should suffer unjustly, but I think glossing over a need for discussion confuzzled me a bit even if this was the necessary outcome!

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I was just praising the actor who played Soo Myeong, I thought it's one of the best portrayal I've come across. It's close to some real life examples I've seen.

On the lack of protection, I totally agree. I was aghast that he was even put on the stand and then they just handcuffed and lock him away.

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As somebody who has worked in special education, and the mother of a daughter with a severe cognitive disability, I thought the acting for Soo-myeong's character was brilliant and absolutely on target. I was so impressed with this actor's characterization. I wondered if the actor actually knows somebody on the spectrum, he did it so well.

I don't really agree with Helcat's regrets over having somebody with this kind of disability- whether is is autism or a cognitive delay portray a killer. Again, as the mother of an adult who has a severe cognitive delay (at 31 she doesn't speak and is in diapers), I appreciate the willingness to treat a character with this kind if disability as a full human. I get so sick of people going all syrupy over my daughter and talking about what a perfect angel she is and the fake sugar sugar stuff- she's a darling, yes, and mostly quite easy going, but she is a human being, and she's knocked down a niece she felt was invading her space, and she's snatched at cookies from a child eating them too near (she's allergic to most cookies), and when she's mad she hits, or yells, and has occasionally pulled my hair- *because* she can't speak, and has little impulse control, she communicates however she can and if she's miffed that I am not getting her breakfast together fast enough, or that we're on a bus and somebody in front of her is eating and she's not.... People with disabilities are individuals, not members of the borg.

(Helcat, I am kind of wincing over calling the character's issues a 'learning disability.' ).
I also think there is nothing wrong with neurologically typical actors portraying characters on the spectrum or with cognitive disabilities. It would generally be far too stressful for most people on the spectrum to this level to act out this part anyway.

All that disagreeable disagreement aside, I was troubled that they could just get him on the stand without consulting his guardian and having protection there for him, but I don't know how things work in Korea so I set that aside as either fictional for the purposes of the episode or reflecting a cultural difference I don't know enough about.
That was really the only sour note for me in Soo-myeong's character and role in the show.

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Thank you for your real world experience. I, too, have worked with and children and adults on the spectrum and, again, I think this was one of the best portrayals I’ve seen on screen.

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Thank you for sharing. I have worked with children on the spectrum and it is not easy.

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Hi DHMRS! Thanks for your input, I was hoping that someone would be able to come in with more experience than I have. I agree with you about Soo-myeong's characterisation, I thought that the actor actually did a very good job. And there was some nuance about the case, given that Jung-rok felt badly (not enough not to put Soo-myeong on the stand though, which I did call out).

I have to stand by my reservations about making Soo-myeong the killer though. I don't hate it, because as you say, people are just people and anyone can do a bad thing. But I've seen this plotline in a few dramas, when in real life, it would be extremely rare to find someone like Soo-myeong being a killer (in self-defence or not). So I thought it was worth pointing out.

On 'learning disability' - I didn't want to diagnose Soo-myeong (even though it seemed pretty clearly autism) since the show didn't address it. I needed a more general term - the UK NHS and other places still officially use learning disability that way, so that's what I used. What would be your preferred term?

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In the U.S. a learning disability is generally invisible outside of specific contexts- in most conversations it would not even be obvious somebody has one. That's why it bothers me as a term for Soo-myeong. Without a specific diagnosis given by the shoe, I would have gone with a wordier definition, so I see your dilemma.
Neurologically a-typical, or just 'a disability of some kind, possibly on the spectrum.' So, again, I see why that would be a problem, I didn't think about the difficulty of describing Soo Myeong without knowing his diagnosis from your perspective.=)

I do understand what you mean about making him the killer- I don't know if you have seen the American movie The Village, but they did the same thing there, and in that case it *seriously* bothered me a lot, and didn't ring true at all, and had all kinds of baggage that I found just offensive, obnoxious and wrongheaded (I felt very strongly about it, as you can see, probably because that character's disability was a lot closer to my daughter's).

So I understand where you're coming from. It just seemed that here they weren't really making his offense about his disability, but the disability was necessary to make us sympathetic to his reasons for attacking the man and then keeping quiet about it, and her reasons for taking the blame for him. If he'd been a neurologically typical fully able-bodied, fully able to function on his own in society male character, it would have been despicable for him to leave the scene or keep his mouth shut about his part for even five minutes.
I wonder who else they could have chosen to be the real killer and maintained our sympathy for the killer and the woman for keeping quiet?

I actually thought for a bit that the real killer was her missing mother who had come back and killed the abusive husband in a brief fit of guilt. That would have been a good reason for the abused wife to take the blame, but we wouldn't have been sympathetic to her mom for letting her risk jail that long.

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So, they just lock up Soo-myeong and throw away the key? Or will they actually try and get him some treatment? I couldn't even enjoy the winning verdict and finding out the truth because I'm imagining him just beating his head against the wall for the entire duration of his sentence or being frantic because he won't be able to see Yoon-hee anymore. I hope they give us an update in a future episode.

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I expect the killer and his noona are both going to be in for a hard time. Him because he stabbed a man and ran, her for giving false statements to the police to cover for him. His diminished capacity and acting to stop a crime would mitigate things somewhat, but probably not a lot considering Korea has (according to this show) never downgraded a murder charge due to spousal abuse.

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I hope JR finds someone competent to take care of Su myeong's case. I hope the domestic violence is taken into consideration. Because I guess no one really liked the way it wrapped up. I don't want it to be forgotten just like that.
Also I know YR was just trying to win the case and be a little more favourable with her peers, but not investigating su myeong just because she would lose her case doesn't make me like her any better.

To the cute stuff- loved that the misunderstanding between the leads was solved quickly, although I loved seeing him get jealous and his little grin when she told him about her cousin made me so giddy!

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I absolutely love that misunderstandings get resolved very quickly in the show, but not this time just because I cannot get enough of JR's petty jealousy!! It wasn't just petty.....it was damn cold that he just threw those elevator accident facts out to a girl who was scared out of her wits. So it served him right to be annoyed by "Oppa" for at least for an entire night!!

And Child, not having to make you coffee in the morning is not a punishment to the object of your affection. 😆

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Ugh, yeah lots of cringes moments in this episode. The ethics of putting a person with disabilities on the stand with no legal counsel. . . And then to throw the blanket of romantic passion over the whole thing. I just can't wrap my head about what the writers are thinking. . .As someone who works with people on the spectrum, "acting" like a person with a clear cognitive disability is just not ok. It feels like minstrelsy.

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There’s a larger conversation here. I remember when Sean Penn played a man with cognitive delay in “I Am Sam” while there where other people of other abilities acting as well. There was a lot of debate on if that was respectful or not, but I think he may he been nominated or won an academy award for that role (which I think he did an amazing job). It showed how those with other abilities could live and care for their children and their loved ones. Michelle Pfeiffer (sp?) played the role of his lawyer. There was a second of romance but ethically, the audience knew it was wrong. South Korean tv does have a long way to go, but it may be a start. And when I saw “intimate” relationship as the translation, I didn’t automatically think it was romantic. I saw it as a sister/brother relationship even as he says “noona” and has a crush on her, we know it is just that. She probably keeps an eye on him to make sure he stays out of trouble in the neighborhood. But he also cares for her and doesn’t want to see her hurt either. Not every relationship between a man and woman is romance. I’m not sure if the show was going there, but the media questions were out of line and I think the writer wanted us to see how rediculous those questions were. I don’t know how to show that storyline without using an actor that could “act” other abled, because as you know, having a person on the spectrum actual do that role would be almost impossible if not impossible.

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I, too was surprised that they could put someone with clear cognitive disabilities on the stand immediately, because it could have been dangerous for him and everyone else around. Felt a little off to me.

However, I didn’t see that the “romantic passion” was emphasized - I saw it more of a person who was just highly, highly upset that one of his favourite people in the world was being hurt, and he lost control of his emotions in that moment. Not so much romantic passion in that sense. (Or maybe I connect “romantic passion” with people murdering their exes/spouses that they catch with someone else).

And on that note, I do think it’s ok to act as somebody with disabilities because it gives an insight into people from all walks of life (if acted respectfully and sensitively). Some people might never have had contact or experience with others suffering from disabilities.

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I can understand these alternative readings but some points of clarification: "romance" does not have to entail sexual attraction. I'm think here about how scholars of romance describe the range of what qualifies as romance including some of the ways people try to distinguish heterosexual desire with other forms of passionate affection. I.e. Bromance is still romance.
Okay, so representing cognitive disability is okay as long as it's done "sensitively" and respectably. I want to know if they talked to disability advocacy groups cause I want to know who approved having the cognitive disabled character also be a murderer. Intersectionality matters.

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i don't think it was romantic at all. she looked out for him. and even if it was idk i guess the point is people can fall in love. but i agree with you it did seem minstrel-y which is about my comment above. kdramas have a tendency to do this and i think their portrayals are super one-note and it ends up looking awful and insulting.

in trap there's a dude who has a stutter and although that is not as severe as this case and is linked to speech and learning it was done REALLY well (i have seen other faked stutters that are horrible) lol it's so rare

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Actors 'act', that's in their job description. They 'act' like geniuses or sociopaths or humble housewives or thugs or chaebol heirs or dumb teenagers or car accident victims. I wonder who did people with a mental impairment more of a disservice, the actor in this (obviously sympathetic) role or the lead in 'Devilish Joy'. Actually, one of the leads in '30 but 17', 'That's Okay Its Love', 'Clean With a Passion for Now' and 'Beauty Inside' all have one sort of significant mental disability.

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i'm not sure if you're agreeing or disagreeing with their assessment ? but most of those are very different. and the IOIL portrayal was abysmal lol

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As the mother of a severely cognitively delayed daughter, it doesn't feel at all like minstrelry to me. It feels like representation when acted well, and this actor did it very well.

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The elevator cliche... totally made my day! I wish someone could make a GIF of it.
Choi: “Getting stuck in an elevator is a well-known opportunity for two people to get closer physically and ignite romance... I am so annoyed to be stuck here with you.”
*crashes headfirst into his unappreciated companion*
Dan: “Don’t you dare fall on me!” *sends him flying to the other side*
Me: 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

He’s gonna fall so badly for her right?

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I cannot wait for this ship to sail.
Ma Ma's boy is soooooo gonna be Dan Dan's boy (toy).

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No, I dont want it to sail yet! I need a lot of unrequited love from Choi first ~ and then Dan gives in begrudgingly and let’s him call her excitedly on the phone all the time. And they try to hide it from the office. Oh gosh, so much potential hereeeeee

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This is not the elevator scene, but @tsutsuloo made an excellent GIF post of the MaMaDanDan couple:
http://www.dramabeans.com/members/tsutsuloo/activity/726064/

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Thank you! I actually thought he leaned in too close in that scene. 🙈 Luckily she didn’t find the closeness sexy at all.

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Bam case solved! I gotta say, I was heartbroken watching Su-myeong. That's one real sad story, and I'm glad that justice prevailed and Yun-hee didn't get punished for something she didn't do but... that was just... heartwrenching. I almost cried.

On Yoon-seo and Jung-rok: Guys, I LIVE for the cliche hand-in-pocket thing. I LOVE it happening in other dramas, and the fact that it happened here makes me wanna squeal. Those last few seconds? My heart wanted to burst. My only gripe is he should have held her hand before putting into his pocket! Argh! Never have I felt like a hand-in-pocket scene was so intimate and sweet!

Symbolically, I like that he turned down the company dinner and instead asked her to drink with him. Firstly, that shows he really needs to recharge his introvert self yet does not mind her company. And secondly, drinking with someone means that you trust them to a certain level. And that's a really sweet symbolism for me.

In other news, jelly Jung-rok is everything. "Woori Yoon-seo?!" And how he looked so ridiculously happy when he found out that manager-oppa wasn't her boyfriend? With his goofy little grin when he asked for a cup of coffee? (These goofy toothy little grins really remind me of Kim Woo-bin aka Grim Reaper).

Note that YS already refers to him as "woori byeon-ho-sa-nim". That's just cute.

Overall though, we're at E6, and if we want to focus a bit more on stalker-ex-story, I'm torn between wanting the fluff to just continue, and wanting to move onto more plotlines.

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I think the main significance of JR turning down company dinner was the fact that even though he technically "won" the case, as that is the legal term, he did not feel like he had won at all nor did he think there was anything to celebrate. But he also didn't want to be alone. That he chose Yoon Seo to share that moment is also very significant.

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I am smitten by how the pocket cliche was brought back to signal the elevation of their intimacy, but not just for the fact the swooning move of he taking her hand. Even though it might just be setting up for that moment, I just love that YS didn't mind recalling her most embarrassing memory with him about the pocket misunderstanding and was able to joke about it with him! 😍

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I was uncomfortable with a person w/a learning disability ultimately being the killer, too. Felt like such a tragic scapegoat that wasn't really necessary...

Other than that solid episode, screamed a lot when he put her hand in his pocket. Such a simple, sweet gesture. LOVE.

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Maybe the writer wanted to show that people with mental disabilities are much more human than others who are considering themselves as superiors of nature. It wasn't handled with as much care as needed but it could be a beautiful movie.

I think a country where people are judged mostly on their looks, Karl Lagerfeld would be happy with it (all the creative respect to him, just he was such pr..k when dealing with beauty and humans but he loved his cat sooooo much), must be opposed strongly to something like people with any disabilities (we saw a reaction in The Third Charm to just a wheelchair handicap person).

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They needed to provide the woman with a credible reason why she would confess to a crime she didn't commit and risk a murder sentence. The solution was to make the actual murderer a pitiable creature on only did it to save her. So either it would have to be that guy or a child or an grandmother.

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Agreed. They needed the battered wife to have a creditable and an admirable reason- if he were a boyfriend, it would't be admirable at all. It needed to be somebody vulnerable.

I also appreciate that they attempted to show some truths about domestic violence- bringing in the psychologist to testify about how violence in relationships can make you more at risk for violence in later domestic relationships.

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At first, I wasn't sure who would win the case - Yeo Reum or Jung Rok. I had wondered if the writer was going to show Jung Rok losing a case at some point. Yoo Reum could use the win too. She was under a lot of pressure at work and was trying to rise above all the gossip and hate. I wondered for a moment if Im Yoon Hee was not innocent after the insurance info was brought up. But the truth was revealed in the end. The actor playing Soo Myeong did a good job. I teared up during his outburst in the courtroom. I understood him and Yoon Hee, but the whole situation was sad.

Their case was wrapped up pretty quickly. So he just happened to be near Yoon Hee's house when he heard Jung Rok & Yoon Seo. Maybe they'd eventually find him after speaking to the residents in the neighborhood, do more investigating, etc. I think the writer wanted to introduce and wrap up some legal cases before the OTP deals with a bigger & personal one involving the stalker CEO. It would be good if they include an update on Soo Myeong's case in the next episode though.

I love the little detail about Yoon Seo where she brings up her past roles that gives her various skills. Surgeon, chef, detective.... ^^

The ending scene was so sweet. I like that the writer came back around with the hand-in-the-pocket cliche. I can't even remember the last drama that had this cliche and had me giggling over it.

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To our girl's credit that she seemed to be determined to learn about every role she had to play......so unlike Yoo In-na, Yoon-seo must have never played an actress in a drama before so she could have a chance to improve her acting skills 😆

I also wonder if the detail about her being the host of a dating show (therefore she is a dating expert) is a meta reference to her character in The Greatest Love.

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In APAD also there was a similar hands in the pocket scene. When boyoung had just started crushing on Dr.ye and she thought he wanted to put her hands in his pocket. It was equally cringey and hilarious.

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Ooooh thanks! I watched this drama, but forgot this part. ^^" Bo Young really had a ton of embarrassing but funny moments.

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Jung-rok definitely reminds me of Dr. Ye in many ways!

Didn't Bo-young have a fantasy with the lettuce wrap during their dinner? Here YS just stuffed it right into JR's mouth to stop him from saying mean things about her being single since birth 😆

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Yes she was fantasising right from dinner time! Boyoung was hilarious and endearing.

I agree about JR and Dr ye. Both are good at their job, reserved and are respectful of their female counterpart( although a bit dense when it comes to their feelings 😀)

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Usually fake-out annoys me, but the "Do you like (pork)?" got me in stitches. Died laughing too at the "There's a strand of hair" deadpan, Oh Jung-se is a delight!
Loved how Yun-seo respects and understands Jung-rok, she was worried as hell about his wound but conceded to him prioritising the case coz she knows that's the kind of person he is. She always wants to help with the case, but never forcing her way in, no wonder Jung-rok finds her comfortable to be with. All this worrying about each other just warmed me all the way to my toes...

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i dont know if its bad acting, writing or directing, but Yoo Yeo Reum character is just...flat. When she gets bullied by her sunbae and she doest react, im guessing shes supposed to be taking the dignified approach and swallowing her anger, but i just dont feel it. she gets mad at her friend for taking a case against her making her look petty and/or incompetent. She doesnt come across as a good friend for sure and really i just cant be bothered by her romance with Se Won.

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I agree. I really don't care about this relationship. Anyone outside of the Always Law Firm is just boring to me.

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I love the main couple and how their relationship is evolving.
I don't particularly like Se-won...he comes over as obnoxious...the way he tells Yeo-reum that she needs to eat, take medicine etc... Ok, he is worried but they are not in a relationship anymore and I really don't like when the ex does not respect the boundaries. Maybe I did not like their first encounter when he told her she looks too thin...as if she was still desperate because he was not there. I prefer women who manage to be on their own instead of those that barely function (or pretend to) while the guy is out of the picture but secretly just hope to have him back.

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I echo everybody's opinion this week's case could've been handled much better than the way they did.
YIN and LDW both continue to be a delightful in their roles, they really have great chemistry.

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Oh and one thing I really hate Jung Rok's bangs, everytime I see him J want to reach across the screen and brush them aside.

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And please wipe out his lipstick too while you are at it!

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WOW our 'nunchi eobneun' lawyer (i.e. one who's slow on the uptake, esp with feelings) finally has some inkling that YS feels something for him. can't wait for next week!!

— Picnic time: Mulhyanggi Arboretum [물향기수목원] (from ep 5) https://koreandramaland.com/listings/mulhyanggi-arboretum/

— Im Yoon-hui's house: House Sangsa Village 8-15 https://koreandramaland.com/listings/house-sangsa-village-8-15/
(and the chase happened around here! https://koreandramaland.com/listings/house-sangsa-village/)

— A piece of pie: Peace Piece [피스피스] https://koreandramaland.com/listings/peace-piece/

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Jung Rok is clueless when it comes to reading women’s emotions but at least he learns. Like catching her the second time she tripped after letting her fall the first time he gets her hand in his pocket the second time around.

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And, he remembered that she said she liked pork backbone soup, so that's what they had when they went to eat and drink. ♥️

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Yes, he turned out to be very attentive and thoughtful.

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I have a theory, that stalker ceo will back and JR will have to defend him or the Always Law firm will be shut down. The prosecutor will be Se Won, coz he looks have interest in the ceo case before. This is the worst scene i imaging that will be final dilemma for both our lead.

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I predict an insurmountable problem with a truly evil villain that, once they're done with the plot, will be easily resolved. Oh, we're not talking about 'Devilish Joy'? ;-)

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But is it just me or I really want to see LDW’s hair pushed back?

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At first Yoo-reum looked very interested in this case and wanted to find out the truth. I thought she would bring all the evidence by herself to make her bullying colleague some kind of ashamed for the usual scenario. I thought she will ask Jung-rok for his opinion and wrap it together, but it just looked like it. Maybe they've changed it in the last minute, because it came flat afterwards. She did exactly what her superior would do - ignoring evidence, not to try her best, just for the pettiness, that her friend who is so much fond of her is changing before her eyes.

But still I think they will be a good help to him or one of them will turn extremely sour, like Yoo-reum is feeling towards Se-won right now - betrayed and hurt.

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@kerouregan—I shared the same expectations regarding Yoo Reum. From Ep. 1, she never jumped on the bandwagon of assumed guilt and, when she received the case, I looked forward to her figuring out what really happened. I was shocked that she ignored her own observations about Soo-myeong.

I don't know enough about Yoo Reum's history know whether this was out of character. I hope she doesn't end up painted as a callous, ambitious prosecutor, determined to win at any cost.

Isn't finding the right perpetrator actually winning? The fallout from this case could be professionally and personally calamitous for YR. For someone taking up all this screen time, her character needs to be as intriguing or delightful as the leads and supporting characters.

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I have a feeling that the professional fallout aspect may be the very reason for the way that this story progressed. Her argument may be that she was swayed by the life insurance policies.

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I don't know, because her father was accused of frauds, so she could do more about it, but it won't be considered as win if it was her who did find the truth.

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First I really love the slowly but steady progress our two leads are doing getting closer 😍

Secondly I do agree that the case could have been handled even better. But consider it is a side story I do think it was handled with respect. Also the fact that Jung rok really got affected by it and admitted that is was a complicated situation show that the writer is aware of what they wanted to tell with the case. I am happy we at least got two episode to dive into the case and the two people involved. It could even been a story of its own because of the complicated situation and ethics that could be raised. But because of the limited time frame in this story I am ok with what we got out of it. Beside I think the cases here is used to let us getting to know more about our leads.

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The chemistry is off the charts! The moment they are on screen together it makes me forget any plot holes or other things haha
This drama is like my weekly does of honey!
The moment he put her hand in his pocket I literally squealed! That is the dream haha
When LDW smiles, he transforms from a the upright lawyer to the kid who just got candy! So adorable! and YIN is just shines! her hair color (which she uses almost always) suits her really well and her fashion sense is super great too! haha I want her to take me shopping

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Manager Oppa seemed especially concerned about Yoon-Seo being on an elevator that stopped working- he stresses the elevator part at least once. I'm curious about what that back-story is and how it will play out later.

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Isn't it interesting that while Jung-rok addresses her "Oh Jin-shim" when they are together but when he does an Internet search on her, he will search her as "Oh Yoon-seo" ? 🤣🤣🤣
I'm beginning to believed that he does so because
1. when they are in public, people's attention won't be drawn by her name even if they can't recognise her
2. Jin-shim is her real name.

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Helcat, you are absolutely right to be upset about the case of the week.

Up until now this how has done a fairly good job of representing both the substance of the law and how it works. That is until Lawyer Kwon stepped up to cross examine the bold stain expert:

“Isn’t it correct that no blood splatters were found on the defendant’s clothing?” Expert; “Yes”. “That means that there is a possibility that Im Yoon Hui is not the culprit, correct?”

At which point Yoo Yeo-reum leaps to her feet and says “I object, that was a leading question”.

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARGH. That was a primal scream rendered on behalf of all ‘Law Beanies’ everywhere. I am so very disappointed. Lawyer Kwon is cross-examining the expert. Leading questions are not only permitted on cross-examination but a smart lawyer tries to use leading questions to the fullest extent possible because open ended questions are dangerous. A real-life counterpart to Yoo Yeo-reum would never, ever had made such a stupid objection. Give the judge credit for maintaining his judicial demeanor as he over-ruled the objection. Note to the writers- check with your legal technical advisors before doing that again. It was dramatically unnecessary and actually detracted from the dramatic impact of the cross-examination.

Of course, the very truncated ‘examination of the ‘actual culprit’ Park Soo Myeong- the disabled man- was far worse. Helcat is right to be disturbed at the way that this case- and in particular Park Soo Myeong- were handled. And what was Yoo Yeo-reum doing? This is where you properly make that objection about leading the witness- because this is Lawyer Kwon's witness on direct examination. But even before that the judge asked him to give a proffer of proof (That means the lawyer describes what he believes what the witness will say). Where was it? We do not seat surprise witnesses on the stand- once the proffer was made Yoo Yeo-reum was supposed to be given another chance to talk to the witness. The trial should have been adjourned so she could do that. The result would likely have been that the charges would have been dismissed. Even better- the Prosecutor’s Office might have chosen not to charge Park Soo Myeong with murder in the light of his diminished mental capacity- and might have come up with a more appropriate resolution for what he had done.

This is still my favorite show, but I hope that there is some dramatic reason for the nonsense in this episode. I am guessing that it could be a part of the story of our Prosecutor Couple. But that is just a guess.

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"I’ve watch too many TV dramas and sometimes that interferes with my sense of reality" lol

I'm curious about Sewon and Yeorum past too, and looking forward to this week ep. Thanks for the great recap 😄

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since the drama trained the viewers so well to enjoy all the cliches they throw at us, why not add another? a cameo. much better if from gong yoo. also better-er if he's from a chicken store!!! he's doing deliveries and lawyer dan suddenly falls for him at first sight when he delivered chicken at Always. YIN is supportive of lawyer Dan chasing him, like she did with 2pm Chansung. LDW, comments that "why him?? he's not that good looking though??"

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Has anyone noticed the police sirens in the background that seem to serve a function to underscore a comedy beat during scenes that take place in the CEO's office? Once I started noticing it, I couldn't stop...

I agree with the review about not liking the fact that they made Soo-myeong the murderer. It doesn't help with the (wrong) stereotype that people (for example) with Down syndrome or on the autism spectrum are somehow a danger to society, when they are indeed far more likely to be victims of violence than perpetrators. The whole trial left me feeling kind of heartbroken.

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This is too cute. I can't handle the cuteness of the couple. Dear lord ❤️😭

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