Rating:
Average user rating 3.9
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Kill It: Series review, episodes 7-12 (Final)

Kill It has come to a close, and while my emotions went in pretty much every direction while watching, one thing I didn’t expect was to have my heart torn out by the ending. After all, action thriller doesn’t exactly shout “You will cry your way through the final credits” — but maybe that’s what made Kill It different.

When we last left our hero, he was entangled in a mess of clients, kill orders, and trying to answer two questions that haunted him. The first was, “Who is my father?” The second was, “Why did the numbered children of Hansol Orphanage have to die?” Kim Soo-hyun not only answered these questions, but uncovered an entire ecosphere of corruption and some the most heinous crimes you can imagine. And what Soo-hyun learned about his own past, and the numbered children, changed everything for him.

I went into this drama knowing I hadn’t been a big fan of OCN productions previously. If I found Kill It a little cold, spare, or even predictable, it wasn’t something that I didn’t see coming. What I often feel like I’m missing in stories like this is the depth of character that we usually get in K-dramas — in Kill It, and dramas like it, there’s no time for that level of character exposition. Most of the plot movement is external, and has our characters reacting to threats, reveals, and the actions of others, rather than the characters themselves pushing the story forward.

Still, the characters that we met in Kill It were enough to keep me invested, and I watched mostly to see where they would land after everything played out. Though I wasn’t without my frustrations over the impenetrable silence of Soo-hyun in the first half of the drama, by the second half I can safely say I fell in love with him just as much as the women around him in the drama did.

Seul-gi, the teen who he saved as a child and protected as a little sister, shared a special bond with him. She was as jealous of his attention as she was fiercely protective of him. And then there’s Hyeon-jin, Soo-hyun’s childhood friend at the orphanage. Their bond as they reconnected, the spark between them, and the inner conflict that Hyeon-jin suffered as she began to realize who Soo-hyun really was: these relationships were the best and richest parts of the drama.

The first half of Kill It made it clear that there was a whole lot of ugly waiting to be unturned, and in the second half, they don’t spare the gruesome details when all is revealed. (TMI, show! I did not need to see inside peeks at bloody operating rooms to understand the heinous extents of the crimes committed.)

We needed the details to be filled in to understand the mystery around the orphanage children, but it wasn’t the details that made me stick around. What I wanted to know was what would happen to our characters when they found out. After all, the audience knew more than each of the characters during the bulk of the drama. We were given the big picture, and multiple storylines, so the tension didn’t lie so much in the reveals to the audience, but the reveals to the characters.

While I wasn’t crazy about the actual ins and outs of the plot, or think the plot was particularly interesting, the strength of this drama was definitely in the directing. It was slick, graceful, and made the most out of the performances from the cast (Jang Ki-yong might be getting all my attention here, but Nana, Jung Hae-kyun, and Jo Han-chul were also great).

The drama was also punctuated with some really strong moments. Many of these were the action sequences, where the camera work made Jang Ki-yong look cooler than you thought possible. But there were also smaller, quiet moments in the drama that added depth and color, like Seul-gi sitting in front of an empty plate waiting for Soo-hyun to turn up. Another example: the still moments between Soo-hyun and Hyeon-jin, where nothing was happening on screen, yet so much was happening under the surface.

When you have a hero that’s notoriously silent, being able to get emotions and conflicts across without words is essential. In this respect, Kill It was lucky to have a leading actor with such a strong screen presence. Instead of wishing for more dialogue and interaction between our characters, I eventually gave up and instead enjoyed the actors’ performances without it.

While the direction was really strong, the drama missed out on utilizing some great plot angles and metaphors it set up early on. The first was the metaphor around animals, and canines in particular. In the very first episode, we learn of young Soo-hyun’s connection to them, and his cover as a veterinarian (however poorly played) soon makes sense on a deeper level.

He and Hyeon-jin have an early exchange about how dogs don’t make memories likes humans do, but rather, they are imprinted. Hyeon-jin mused what it must be like for some dogs to be “imprinted with abandonment,” and the thought is left there. I hoped against hope that the drama would pick it up again, but they didn’t. Still, the plot was ripe for this: Soo-hyun himself was imprinted with abandonment, and the drama is really the story of who that made him become.

Other metaphors were waiting to happen here too — there was his intense loyalty to those in his “pack,” and there was his gorgeous dog Grey. I don’t think it was a coincidence that both Soo-hyun and Grey had bright blue eyes. Those blue eyes are another storytelling layer I wished Kill It had had more time to unpack.

We learned early on that those electric blue eyes belonged to our hero Soo-hyun, and in the flashbacks of him as a boy at Hansol Orphanage, his eyes stood out in the grime and filth of those scenes. We caught a glimpse of Soo-hyun putting in contact lenses to mask his blue eyes in Episode 1, but beyond that they were totally dropped until an off-mention in Episode 11. Here we learned that the “playing with the chromosomes” of the numbered children sometimes yielded blue eyes.

Blue Eyes was the working title of this drama, and by gosh I wish they had kept it. The title Blue Eyes sets up questions around the story’s hero so much more effectively than the awful title Kill It does. For a drama that relies on us caring about an anti-hero with questionable morals, the more sympathy and understanding built for that character, the better.

Beyond my disappointment that they didn’t make better use of these story elements that were ready and waiting, it was also a bit of a head-scratcher that Soo-hyun’s blue eyes weren’t the first thing people mentioned or remembered about him. But, with its short 12-episode run, Kill It might have just run out of space to add in these nuances and layers. Either way, we’ll have to take the story that we were given.

That story, as we might have guessed, was not made for a happy ending. The more Soo-hyun uncovered about his past and the crimes around the orphanage, the deeper he got — too deep to give up, and too deep to extricate himself. The drama might not have been big on character development, but we did witness enough of a change in Soo-hyun to give his character arc some impact.

When the story opened, Soo-hyun was a killer for hire, weighed down by his own past. At the close of the story, Soo-hyun had become much more. The truth behind his past gave him something to fight for — and so did all of the people around him that he had to protect. “My duty,” he said, “is to make sure there are no more children born to die.” Without even realizing it, Soo-hyun had transformed from a cold-hearted assassin into vigilante with a cause.

In contrast to our vigilante killer, Hyeon-jin acted as the story’s moral compass — she never faltered in her pursuit of justice, nor her beliefs about right, wrong, and just punishment. She warned Soo-hyun that what he thought was revenge was just murder, but the world of Kill It was not so simple. The tension between their world views, mixed with their obvious affection for each other, was one of the strongest tensions in the drama, and certainly one of the more interesting ones.

What Kill It wasn’t able to deliver in terms of character development and originality (so, so many plot devices carried this story along), it was able to deliver with subtle emotional tensions, like the one between Soo-hyun and Hyeon-jin. Between this and the strength of the direction, I’m actually pretty satisfied with the conclusion of this drama.

A story about heartache, abandonment, and bloodshed, can only end with the same, and though the drama dealt justice where it was due, Kill It wasn’t afraid to show us that it wasn’t without its cost.

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I may sound cranky, but I had high hopes for this drama, and I snorted at the notion that this drama was too short to properly develop the story.

I hope all actors came with better projects next time.

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I don't think it was too short to develop a story. Kdrama writers just can't write.
I personally think 12 is a way better number than 16.

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Plus as one beanie noticed, we got melodrama instead of sleek thriller, but that again writer who can't write.

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"Melodrama instead of a thriller..." I noticed that in the first couple of episodes so I stopped watching. What kind of a thriller is so slow paced?

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Maybe it's just me, but I find the trope of a heroine who thinks she's morally superior to the hero just because she doesn't have dirt on her hands a real tiring aspect in a lot of these movies.

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Kdrama writers can't write? If they can't, who can? American, British, Chinese, Japanese? There is an opinion piece on Soompi about badly written kdramas (which I agree with), but in general kdrama writers have been pioneers in TV. When most of the world's TV producers concentrated on episodic sitcoms and crime dramas, or, unending soap operas, kdrama developed the most engrossing format, a format congruent with written novels, the most popular of all forms of writing. Kill It is a tightly-written example of the conversion of an anti-hero into a true hero. That was the objective, beginning to end, no fluff.

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Lol.
I agree with you actually, at least about kdramas having developed the one of if not the best format for tv. I wouldn't still be watching kdramas if I didn't.

However- Kill It "tightly" written? Mmmm debatable. Sure I enjoyed it, and sure it had enough good points that it kept me interested, but I wouldn't call it tightly written. Otherwise, at least by my definition of tightly written, it would have been clean start to finish and would've made sense the entire time too. Which it didn't.

I was summarizing here, and yes, being quite hyperbolic and harsh on purpose by saying kdrama writers can't write- because a) @shach here probably already read my 2000 word post on this show yesterday and b) I have written thousands of words of many many shows, and I always reach the same conclusion and same realization.
These people do not have a good grasp on the logistics of story telling.
There's a difference in being able to write and being able to write well. Erotica writers "can" write. Trashy YAF writers "can" write. That doesn't mean what they're writing is good, and it doesn't mean what they're writing always makes sense, or holds out when you break it down as a story.
This show does not hold up when you break it down. It has potential yes, but everything has potential. It did some things well, and other things horribly.
Kdrama having developed the best format for storytelling in television is not the same as every writer being able use that format well, or them personally knowing how storytelling works.
My criticism is harsh, and not entirely true yes, because SOME kdrama writers CAN write, or again, I wouldn't be here, but most of them, just like most modern fiction writers, and most writers of large blockbuster movies, do not sit down to think about HOW their story works and WHY it works. They don't. They think about profit and reaction.
The ending of this show proves that. That wasn't written as a conclusion to Soo Hyun's story, that was written for shock factor and shock factor alone.

The essay: https://docs.google.com/document/d/19vMUpzH9LAAOtJ-Kwa2exivuGuujDMf3EeOqlVbUzFs/edit

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Having just watched Episode 3 of Game of Thrones, I came to the same(ish) conclusion; GRR Martin can write, David Benioff and D. B. Weiss are not as capable. Actually, the writing and script began going downhill in Episode 6, when they had no more of GRR Martin's original writing to guide the plot with. GRRM's dialogues/script had more depth and artistry, compared to the short one-two liners the show is churning out these days. fans of the tv show are going to flog me for this, heh heh.

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Oh don't worry @lumiere, I wouldn't worry about you getting flogged by the GOT fans, when I'm here and I like none of it, not even the books or Martin's writing...

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It was not "tightly written." The 12 episode format may lend to that illusion, but eliminating the usual dragging out of plot points that the 16 episode format produces does not equal "tightly written."

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Well. I remember back when there were 20 episode dramas that had 3 times the content of most 16 episode dramas nowadays. Those were the best, because they lasted long enough and also had enough content in each episode that one hour provided enough to think about 'till the next day.

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I've watched some 30-50 episode dramas that were very well plotted/paced, and some 16 episode ones that just.dragged.on.and.on. So yeah episode count does not mean "tightly written" imo

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Read your final post on this drama, haven't found time to continue (but camping here...heheheh)
totally agreed about 12 eps format. I actually glad that this is only 12eps tbh, I thought to Kill It follows the standard 16 eps~ fuh~ we are spare from (further) plot hole and filler episodes

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The parts I thought were done the best are the quiet scenes between our 3 main characters.

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100%. Episode 10 is my favourite episode for this reason. It balanced these so nicely with the rest of the plot.

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I declare that if he didn't shoot him I was about to stop watching K-dramas for a whole year.

That crying scene afterwards though. Very realistic and moving. I couldn't stop laughing, though, because it made me realize that nobody will cry when I'm gone.

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I actually think with this director and writer, any more episodes and we would've all been bored out of our heads waiting for the climax.
Under the hands of someone else, 12 episodes would've been a perfect amount of time to develop everything, and under someone else again they could've done wonders with this concept for 16 episodes. But as it was? Nooo any more and it would've dragged and the last four episodes would've been filler before the ending.

You make a good case about Soo Hyun having to die "A story about heartache, abandonment, and bloodshed, can only end with the same" (ouch. what a message to end a show on)
But I still think it was lazy writing and contradictory of the other themes it had set up. Hence, badly written all round, since it wasn't consistent in its themes, and never developed any of them and only followed through on the depressing ones.

I don't think I can be bothered posting the whole thing in the comments like I usually do with these things, so here are more of my thoughts on the matter: https://docs.google.com/document/d/19vMUpzH9LAAOtJ-Kwa2exivuGuujDMf3EeOqlVbUzFs/edit

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Thanks for your essay and many thoughtful points. Nope, it wasn't LOOKOUT. More's the pity, because it had potential.

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Technically, everything has potential.
Some potentials are just bigger than other potentials is all. :P
Glad you enjoyed the essay.

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The female characters were such stereotypes, and so darn needy or intrusive that i just couldn't watch after a while. And the plot, omg the plot! This is the most careless hitman i've seen in ages. No matter how much you want to protect someone, you do not just let people into your life...and your apartment. It was all just unbelievable.

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Kdramas? Unbelievable? They wouldn't dare...

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I didn’t mind the teenager being needy - she saw the assassination of the adults in her life and was partly raised by/only living family is an international assassin...which she sort of knows. Nana’s character on the other hand ... she was supposed to be a hot shot detective. If she had been written as such, she would have been a much better character.

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One of my favorite scenes was when Seul-gi cried and apologized to her grandfather. The acknowledgement of her actions as a betrayal, but not being able to say anything because she didn't want to be alone. That was real.
And then the show seemed to imply that she didn't actually know he was the one that saved her and the whole crying apology didn't make as much sense.

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One could argue that someone under deep cover would in fact let a few people into their fake life and apartment, to seem sort of normal. What the highly trained and experienced international assassin doesn’t do is leave the door to his secret lair open so that the police detective he let into his life and lives in the same building can just waltz in. That’s just lazy writing.

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LOL! Truth! I just couldn't take it. The guys were all generic evil bad guy. The women! Wow! Poor Little Rich intrusive-but-guard-ballerina-cop. Nut-case clingy mother. Fierce-yet-sensitive, distrustful-pushing-folks-away-yet-tells-everyone's-secret-and-her-own-to-everyone aegyo-over-dosed survivor. Bitter-trusted-aide-avenger. Omo! I have seen all these types so often. Now, if they had flipped the sexes of all the characters, that would've been exciting. I haven't seen a former-ballet-star turned cop male character in a while. Or a clingy damaged dad. Or a pushy-intrusive-survivor.

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ROFLMAO! Thank you, @scifiwriter CaroleMcDonnell. I needed that. The image of black-masked Jang Ki-yong on point in a tutu with a sniper rifle slung across his back will be with me for a long time.

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There’s an interesting fanfic waiting to be written!

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I propose we assemble the writers of the past 100 K-dramas and find the least common denominator, extract him/her and send the rest into a biodome I've created where there are only rude self-centered heiresses, psychopathic rich guys, poor ladies selling whatever on the street and loser gang guys that have been to jail.

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This show was trite and overplayed. At various points, the word 'bathos' came to mind. I think the talents of the main actors were squandered by a writer who really ought to barred from working on a Korean drama ever again. I will continue to follow Jang Ki-yong despite this mess of a show and I hope his upcoming rom-com won't suffer from the same lack of writing talent.

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yep!

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I didn't expect the finale week eps to deliver, but it actually did and more. It still haven't answered most of my questions (like the backstory of Hyun-jin's adoption, Soo-hyun's peculiar blue eyes and his deliberately hidden information as a child, or the mechanism behind the numbered children as organ bank), but it delivers emotionally, which is a feat for a drama that never evoke the intended emotion out of me for the previous 11 eps. And for that, I'm a happy viewer.

I think one of the reason I enjoyed Soo-hyun as an antihero is the fact that this drama didn't try to be contemplative and philosophical and deep. That kind of story telling needs a strong writer, which is clearly not the case here, so thank God for a much shallower characterization. Soo-hyun didn't hesitate or give a damn about killing all those evil people, even until the very end. The only line he had drawn was about killing children and animals, and he was consistent about it since the beginning. I think the only time he felt bad about his job was when he realized that both Seul-gi and Hyun-jin knew about the real him. All these traits somehow made him more interesting than if he was clearly morally conflicted by the various relationships he has built.

Speaking of relationship, I'm glad that he and Hyun-jin never officially became a couple because that would add an unnecessary dramatic to an already dramatic story. I like their dynamic as a reunited childhood friends: close enough to share their stories and visit each other, but not too close that the development felt forced. What I really love though, is Soo-hyun's relationship with Seul-gi. Contrary to many other viewers, I don't find her brattiness annoying or pushy. I think she balanced Soo-hyun's super stoicism nicely with her sassiness. It kinda amazed me that the relationship that started with that big of a lie can turned into a genuine bond and fondness for each other. When Seul-gi matter-of-factly told Soo-hyun that she has forgiven his past deeds, I'm pretty sure it moved him as much as it did me.

Overall, it's an enjoyable yet somewhat boring journey. I don't really regret watching this drama since I have no grand expectation from the start. Though it's still true that they wasted good actors with their sparking chemistry, great cinematography, and earworm OSTs. I hope those actors will have better luck with their next project.

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The blue eyes were explained as defects of preliminary testing in the test tube babies.

(also yes to everything to do with Seul Gi and Soo Hyun. I also liked that)

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“When Seul-gi matter-of-factly told Soo-hyun that she has forgiven his past deeds, I'm pretty sure it moved him as much as it did me.”

That was a beautiful, moving scene. I always thought SH NEEDED the spot of energy and life that is SG to keep him alive and sane.

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The kids supposed to be "designer babies" crafted to specific donor needs but if you try to look at it logically it doesn't really make much sense (like most things in that drama).

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Thank you for this, I really enjoyed your comment and ideas. The show had many flaws but it had an interesting vibe, cool /gorgeous leads and I am not sorry I spent 12 hours watching it.

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It wasn't horrible, in an unwatchable kind of way. It was just "bad" in a typical K-drama kind of way. There's always a point (or many) in a bad drama where there's simply no logical reason that what's occurring on the screen should be happening.

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"in a typical kdrama kind of way" 😂😂😂😂 if that aint the truth

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Oh. I was wondering if this would come out.. I'm probably among those who chose to abandon technical scrutiny to just enjoy the drama. Yes sometimes JKY's silence pained me but it made me realize how good he is in expressing emotions with just his eyes or subtle changes in his face. He's not the best actor out there but he definitely got me invested in this kind of story. And Nana--it's my first drama of her and so far she's better than most actresses out there who can't deliver emotions well. Haha I expected it to have no happy ending but I didn't expect to bawl my eyes out.. This will probably be on my list next to Lookout..

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It had its good moments...maybe 12 episodes of mainly silence was not enough lol.
I knew it would end badly since the premise was just too sad to have a happy ending but I was still hoping that he would make it out alive. sob.
I did not understand the last scene...was that some sort of dream?

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I bet they just showed us that to tease our hearts for what it would've been like if jky and nana had time to be lovers instead of killer-detective. It's likely her dream but it would've been better if we saw that kind of smile from suhyeon more often. 😭

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I was Entertained by this drama. It was ridiculous and I love love that he was a killer until the end. Was it absurd? Yup, ridiculous? Yup. But it did what it was supposed to do and that was entertain. I am content.

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I liked it also. I don't have to have everything explained or it all be perfect. I liked the dynamics between all the protagonists, the killer, the cop, and the teenager. I liked the way he quietly supported seul-gi. I mean, if anyone knew what it was like to have rotten things happen when a kid, he would. It had a bit of a sci-fi element which I liked. The evil guys were pure evil which sometimes gets too much for me, but that was the story--it had the gritty element. I knew he would die because in K-dramaland, there almost always is a price to pay for bad deeds, and he had too many to just go to jail over. For a killer, he was definitely a softie.... And yes, it entertained

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Let's not forget that our killer also loved pets....he was a softie indeed...

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Cool action sequences but other than that? Sorry to disagree but even as a melodrama it doesn't pull emotional punches. I don't know whether it was poorly written or the actors were miscast.

And I'm still perplexed as to why we should understand/connect/relate with Hyeon Jin's & Soo Hyun's relationship. Because they're childhood friends

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A contiunation.

You know in my opinion this is where the Writer-nim should write a delicate female lead not a female version of the male lead serving as his external moral compass (which he kept ignoring like he ignored Pavel's last words).

It's a short series. Do we need an overreaching plot to get the job done?

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This drama had POTENTIAL .... But it was wasted ughhhh.. I'm frustrated and disappointed... I had high expectations for this drama coz not every day you'd be seeing this kind of genre in a typical kdrama since most that are being produced nowadays are rom coms... I seriously can't believe that they wasted this.. I feel bad for the actors efforts here.. The plot is not written well.. The characters are sometimes not sticking to their roles correctly (poor character development)... Sometimes the characters are an annoyance too, i mean seriously, the killer is way too RECKLESS, he was said to be a veteran but is that how a veteran killer supposed to work?? And the detective... Sometimes, she's an annoyance..
Overall, watching this drama was disappointing... The first episode was epic and yet the writer didn't build the story much... I like series that have genres like this and yet they wasted its potential.. This show reminds me of what i felt when i watched VAMPIRE DETECTIVE ...
This show is so sad, frustrating, boring and annoying... Next time, the writers should develop the story and characters more BEFORE making it to a drama..
I like the casting here and i pity them in this show.. I sure hope their other shows are better than this...

Another thing is that if this wasn't much of a thriller, action and serious drama which was another disappointment... It was more of a melodrama.. And their are a lot of scenes which were predictable... If they thought of making this kind of drama, they should've done better... Seriously, the main character is a veteran killer and yet all the scenes they've given are just him staring then doing his job at the animal hospital?? He's a veteran killer!! A PROFESSIONAL!! and yet why did they make his character reckless.. They portrayed him well enough at the first episode and i was expecting that they'll be doing that until the end but damn... Disappointing.. And they could have at least shot some more scenes where he was doing some jobs as a veteran killer coz it wasn't enough...

Furthermore, the blue eyes... Why did they got rid of that premise immediately?? We see the main character putting contacts on the first episode but why didn't they continue it until the end?? It would have been better if they let the main character place contacts on certain episodes then reveal it in the end that he has blue eyes.. That would have been more epic.. Another disappointment and bad writing..

In conclusion, i was mostly downcasted, frustrated and depressed that they didn't put more depth into this series...
Bad writing, poor character and plot development, inconsistency of character personality and many more...
But even if i felt this, i still recommend those who love this kind of genres to watch it... If you can... And will not regret it..

What i only loved about this show was the ending... It was an appropriate ending for me coz it started of tragically and it ended that way...

If i...

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Part 1 of 2

Thanks for your series review and summation for KILL IT, @missvictrix. I agree that various elements that had been introduced early in the show were abandoned instead of further developed, which was a shame. What we ended up with was the mother of all birth secrets, and a shadowy bunch of perpetrators that made Pavel the assassin and his Russian mafia rivals look like a bunch of choir boys.

The imagery and significance of blue eyes was abandoned. What a waste. The old title was so much more evocative than KILL IT. It instantly reminded me of The Who’s original version of “Behind Blue Eyes” from the 1971 LP Who’s Next. In addition to the edge of anger in Roger Daltry’s voice, the vehement cries for help in the song’s bridge, and Pete Townshend’s daebak guitar break that are entirely missing from Limp Bizkit’s cover, the lyrics fit the premise of the drama to a T. They speak of having to live a lie under a false identity, and having to stuff all emotions because of what was done to the speaker by another person.
http://www.dramabeans.com/members/pakalanapikake/activity/777180/

Who’s Next consists of pieces from Pete Townsend’s unfinished second rock opera, intended as a successor to Tommy. I’ve posted the Assembled Multitude’s cover of the “Overture from Tommy” on my fan wall because I needed to cheer up after the finale. It’s still as uplifting as it was when it rose to #16 on the Billboard charts in the summer of 1970. Bonus tracks by related acts from the City of Brotherly Love, TSOP and The Three Degrees.
http://www.dramabeans.com/members/pakalanapikake/activity/777216/

From the start, I feared that Soo-hyun was beyond redemption. That turned out to be not quite the case. However, he took the kamikaze route to ensure that the monsters who created him and the organ-farming and transplantation apparatus were permanently put out of commission. It brings to mind another production involving social carnivores, albeit felines instead of canines: BORN FREE – which he most definitely was not. I cannot imagine Soo-hyun in jail for the rest of his life, nor on death row – both of which would have been a return to his original life as #88. I don't mean that he was trying to avoid paying the piper for his career as a hit man when he finally pulled the trigger on Do Jae-hwan. (As a child, he trained to become an assassin only as a means of survival. He had no other choice as the ward of a professional killer, dang it!) If he could have found a way to live, I’m convinced he would have done so. His conscience was clear. In his mind, he had euthanized rabid animals that had fatally bitten too many victims.

- Continued -

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Part 2 of 2

Soo-hyun wasn’t committing suicide by cop, either. I don't think that ever entered into the equation for him. If anything, he was acting more like a honeybee guarding the entrance to the hive against marauders, or a worker bee ensuring the colony’s collective survival by evacuating vulnerable brood to safety (Seul-gi). Unlike wasps who can sting repeatedly, a honeybee dies when it stings in self-defense. Soo-hyun was laser-focused on ensuring that the evil mastermind would never harm another child – nor create future generations of genetically-engineered clones as throw-away spare-parts donors for the Obscenely Rich & Powerful. He wasn't leaving it up to the corrupt system that had aided and abetted Do Jae-hwan and his ring for many years. If you want the job done right, you do it yourself. The honeybee did it.

I was ready to scream on several occasions in various episodes when our allegedly hotshot Detective Do did dumb things like go to the baddies' remote warehouse without a partner or backup. She's supposed to be an experienced cop, dang it! She got stabbed in the back by Park when he was trying to nail Soo-hyun who was attempting to rescue the numbered kids from the Hospital From Hell. She barely stayed in the hospital, and then was running around – for a short while with her right arm in a, a, a – cast?! WTH! How did she hurt her arm? She'd been stabbed in the back, dadgum it!

Soo-hyun's being caught on a surveillance camera was unbelievably sloppy. Ditto for leaving the entrance to his Secret HQ & Armory wide open. Pavel must have been spinning in his grave at high RPM over such egregious lapses. Shame on you, Writer-nim, for turning uri pet-friendly vigilante and detective into doofuses.

Soo-hyun sent wolfdog Gray to a sanctuary. If that didn’t telegraph that he was on a one-way mission, I don’t know what would have. He left a single bowl of ox bone soup on Seul-gi's table, and later called her from up the street on the new phone in the new car Philip had acquired for him. He said goodbye, and didn't just disappear from her life. I appreciated that he did not abandon her.

Jang Ki-yong did a lovely job of conveying Soo-hyun’s emotional states via his eyes and body language. He was my main reason for watching. I had been impressed by his performance in COME HERE AND HUG ME, in which he played another inexpressive character. Here’s hoping his next project has a happier story line. I’ve had my fill and then some of serial killers, assassins, evil spirits (I’m looking at you, Park Il-do!). On the up side, good triumphed over evil in the end, and for that, I’m grateful.

-30-

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Thanks @pakalanapikake for your thoughts. I just finished KILL IT tonight after I shelved for a time while I traveled. Like you Jang Ki-yong was the main reason I watched. This is the second drama with an anti-hero I caught up on and finished. The other being DOCTOR PRISONER.
I like your use of the term “inexpressive character”. He made up for a light dialogue load with the look (with those eyes) and the action/fight sequences. He looked in great shape.
In some ways he reminded me of his performance in CAHM.
It has been awhile now but if memory serves I think writer-nim snuck in a CAHM reference with Philip saying something about Soo-hyun being like a tree.
I did like the very short dream like epilogue where we got to see Soo-hyun and Young-eun holding hands and smiling.
In his upcoming project I hope to see more of his smiles.

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You're most welcome, @marcusnyc20 bong-soo, and welcome back from the Balkans! I had to let the finale marinate for a while before commenting. Alas, I think I missed the tree remark by Philip, but it would have been as apropos for Soo-hyun as for Namoo in COME HERE AND HUG ME.

Thanks for the reminder about the epilogue. Towards the end of COME HERE AND HUG ME, there was a very touching scene of the leads comforting their inner children in an open park edged with trees. The KILL IT epilogue reminded me of that, with the two numbered kids reconnecting long after leaving the orphanage. It was a good note on which to end the drama. The last image of #88 is of him with his fellow flyer of paper airplanes -- who, along with Seul-gi, will be able to live in peace now that Soo-hyun has stopped the evil mastermind once and for all.

I watched DOCTOR PRISONER, too. Between it and CONFESSION, I was on tenterhooks. They both struck me as stronger, better-written dramas than KILL IT. I've been recovering with a couple of lighter, fluffier shows, although I didn't start watching them until after HAECHI's finale and NOKDU FLOWER had been airing for a couple of weeks. Speaking of antiheroes, THE SECRET LIFE OF MY SECRETARY is a nice antidote to the Jang Do-han-shaped hole LOOKOUT left in my heart. ANGEL'S LAST MISSION: LOVE and MY ABSOLUTE BOYFRIEND are also diverting (though the cranky ballerina is really getting on my nerves). As it was ending, I started HER SECRET LIFE for a much-needed dose of Kim Jae-wook minus Park Il-do. ;-)

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@pakalanapikake, ALM:L was calling my name but felt I could not begin since I am still in catchup mode with 8 episodes of A BEAUTIFUL WORLD to watch not to mention picking up NOKDU FLOWER at episode 13. ARTHDAL CHRONICLES is almost here and I will be watching that when it appears on Netflix. On top of that I somewhat on the spur of the moment subscribed to OnDemandKorea hoping it my carry more current dramas subbed in English. CONFESSION is available there subbed and only saw the first two episodes so I would like to get back to that.

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@marcusnyc20 bong-soo,

CONFESSION was very good. I think you'll like it. ARTHDAL is on my radar, too.

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thanks for the recap, finally watched this show, and i sort of liked it..definitely did not hate it...also it was mine first time watching both lead actors, and would definitely like to watch more of their shows, if any.

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Hi @pcch2345. I am late to the party but I can recommend the two dramas that I have seen Jang Ki-yong in. Both are excellent: COME AND HUG ME and GO BACK SPOUSES. He is a lead in CAHM and supporting in GBS. I think I can say both are/were beanie favorites.

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So much potential squandered T____T and so many unanswered questions. The directing and OST were top notch though. If only the writing had direction.

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