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My Absolute Boyfriend: Episodes 7-8

Our robotic boyfriend’s one-week trial ends soon, which means that his creator will be coming to get him soon. Da-da is just beginning to like having him around when it’s time to let him go, though she does for his sake. But of course this is a drama, so things don’t go as planned, leaving Da-da with an important decision to make.

 
EPISODES 7-8 RECAP

Bored and lonely, Wang-joon shows up at Da-da’s studio and finds Young-gu there, calling Da-da his girlfriend. Wang-joon asks Da-da who this guy is to her, and she tells him, “He’s my boyfriend.” She asks Wang-joon why he even cares, since they aren’t dating anymore.

She wants to know why Wang-joon is here, and he’s obviously lying when he says he came to get something, then can’t think of anything. He grabs a random pot from the yard, saying that it’s a valuable prop from one of his dramas, ha.

He gives up the ruse and asks Da-da if she really doesn’t know why he’s here. When she doesn’t answer and Young-gu just stares at him, Wang-joon says again that he came for the prop, so Da-da takes pity on his pathetic flailing and tells him to take it and go.

Young-gu follows Da-da inside and asks if she’s okay. She tells him to stop calling her “Girlfriend” and goes upstairs to cry.

When Wang-joon gets home, he cringes at what an idiot he made of himself in front of Da-da. He tries to cheer himself up by telling himself that there’s no way that guy at her house is really her boyfriend.

Soon, it’s the last day of filming for Wang-joon’s drama. Kyu-ri whines dramatically that she’ll miss Wang-joon, while admitting that she was “cheating” on him with Kang Daniel, hee. Da-da goes out for fresh air and runs into Yeo-woong, who wordlessly gives her the coffee she was supposed to be bringing to Wang-joon.

Wang-joon had asked Yeo-woong to look into Young-gu, who he’d assumed was an actor based on the hanbok he was wearing, but Yeo-woong says there were no sageuks filming nearby that day. Wang-joon is watching the CCTV video of Young-gu defending Da-da when fellow actor Hwa-ni got aggressive with her, and he only now realizes that the guy in hanbok, and the guy she said is her boyfriend, are the same person.

Yeo-woong snaps that Wang-joon is acting like nobody else can have Da-da, even though he doesn’t want her anymore. She calls him petty, and he grumbles that he’ll show them petty if they want to see petty. He makes Da-da do his makeup, then complains that he wants something different and makes her do it all over again, multiple times, until filming is running late.

They take a break, and Yoo-jin asks Da-da if she did something to make Wang-joon angry. Kyu-ri worriedly tells Da-da that the fake heart she made for the surgery scene is missing, and Da-da realizes with dismay that she left it at her studio. Kyu-ri fusses that she never makes mistakes like this.

There’s not enough time to go get it, so Da-da tells Kyu-ri and Yoo-jin to set up the rest of the scene and sends a courier to the studio. She calls Young-gu, who finds the heart and gives it to the courier. But Young-gu hears the courier telling Da-da that he can’t get the heart to the set in only thirty minutes, so he borrows the courier’s motorcycle and uses his superior reflexes to race to the set.

The director is more than ready to yell at Da-da again for being unprepared, but Young-gu arrives just in time, looking sexy as hell in the process. While the women (and some of the men, ha) swoon, Young-gu gives Da-da the dummy heart, saving the shoot and her reputation.

Da-da gratefully thanks him for getting there on time, and instead of calling her “Girlfriend,” Young-gu calls Da-da by name for the first time. Awww. He’d knocked his shoulder on a truck in his hurry, and it makes a high-pitched whine, but he tells Da-da it’s nothing.

She invites him to stay so they can ride home together, and tells him that when they’re alone, he can call her whatever he wants. Double awww.

Filming of the final scene goes well, ending with the dramatic shut-down of Wang-joon’s android character. While the cast and crew celebrate, Wang-joon looks around for Da-da, who’s already packing up her things to leave. Kyu-ri asks her about Young-gu, and Da-da fibs that he’s her cousin from Luxembourg, ha.

She’s not interested in going to the wrap party, and goes out to meet up with Young-gu instead. He offers to carry her equipment and tells her proudly that she did well today, and Da-da admits that that’s nice to hear.

Wang-joon catches Da-da just as she’s leaving with Young-gu and asks her to talk. Young-gu asks what he wants, but Wang-joon snarls at him to mind his own business. Da-da sends Young-gu ahead and says she’ll catch up, so he goes, but not without a worried glance at Wang-joon.

Wang-joon asks Da-da if she’s really dating Young-gu, but she refuses to answer. He stops her from leaving with a wrist-grab and says she can’t leave without taking off his makeup, but she says that he hired someone else for that. Wang-joon says she should finish what she started, calling her irresponsible.

Steeling herself, Da-da reminds Wang-joon that shooting has ended, which means she no longer works for him. “So don’t expect me to be responsible,” she says, in a wavering but determined voice. “And we never have to see each other again. It’s really over now.”

She leaves, and Wang-joon goes back to his dressing room, defeated. Among the fan gifts, there’s another black box adorned with dead flowers, and inside is a note that says “break up,” written with what looks like blood.

At home, Young-gu’s shoulder acts up again, and before he can do anything about it, he slowly powers down. Da-da finds him unresponsive, and his shoulder is hot to the touch. She calls Bo-won, but he’s thrown out his phone, so she turns to the user manual he left her.

The tablet tells her that a physical impact can cause overheating, and to use the treatment kit to run the automatic restoration system. Da-da is worried, since she always breaks machinery, but she finds the small syringe and injects it into Young-gu’s neck. The syringe turns red, indicating that she got the wrong spot, so she puts on a glove and tries again, and this time the syringe turns a hopeful blue.

In moments, Young-gu is awake again, and he thanks Da-da for fixing him. He takes Da-da on a walk a dark street that she says people avoid because the street lamps are broken, but the lamps suddenly blaze to life. Young-gu says he fixed them so it wouldn’t be dangerous, then they continue on, to the top of the hill behind her studio.

Da-da complains that she can’t see the stars even from here. But Young-gu points down, to the city spread out below them, and says that if stars shine in the night, then there are a lot of stars. He even brought beer, and when Da-da feels how cold it is, she asks excitedly if he has a cooling mode.

HA, Young-gu says he just kept it in the freezer until she got home: “You’ve seen too many movies, Girlfriend.” Feeling grateful to have him around today, Da-da pulls one of the A++ meat grade stickers from her pocket that she took from the store, and sticks it on Young-gu’s sleeve.

It makes Young-gu’s entire day to be acknowledged as an A++ boyfriend. He says he has something for Da-da, too, and holds out the couple ring she threw across the house when Wang-joon broke up with her.

Taking the ring, she says sadly, “It’s only natural for love to become dull when it grows old. I thought I’d be able to calmly accept that when the time came. I must have been looking forward to something childish, like the eternal love that’s in fairy tales.”

Young-gu says that’s not childish, because when you give someone your heart, it’s natural to keep looking for that person. “That is love,” he tells Da-da, but she says he’s programmed to think that way, and that people change. But she thanks him for cheering her up today, and for taking her to see the “stars.”

Young-gu tells her to come see them without him sometimes, too, and Da-da realizes that Young-gu is leaving tomorrow. She pretends to be glad he’s leaving so that her life can go back to normal, and sets off for home. She puts a foot down wrong and twists her ankle, and when Young-gu grabs her to steady her, she’s stunned for a moment before pulling away.

After a sleepless night for both of them, Young-gu makes Da-da breakfast. She gets a call from Bo-won on his burner phone, reminding her that he’s picking up Young-gu today. Young-gu doesn’t seem bothered about it, but Da-da is distracted as she eats.

Before going to Da-da’s studio, Bo-won calls someone and says in English that he needs to speak to them urgently, in person. He shows up to get Young-gu as arranged, and Young-gu places his A++ sticker over his heart, appearing unhappy to be leaving.

Da-da asks Bo-won where Young-gu will be sent next. Bo-won complains about the dumb name she gave his robot, ha, then says that he can’t tell her where Young-gu is going. Young-gu joins them, and he stops to say goodbye to Da-da before following him out, calling her “Girlfriend” one last time.

In the car, Bo-won notices Young-gu staring at his sticker, and he tells Young-gu that first love is supposed to hurt. He says that Young-gu will be reset at midnight when the trial is over, and Young-gu nods.

But Bo-won barely makes it to the end of the street before Young-gu stops him, then yanks the entire AC screen out to reveal a location tracker. Augh — it was Bo-won’s so-called “friend,” In-hyuk, who had his car bugged while they were together, then sold out to Director Go. Bo-won immediately figures it out, so he and Young-gu get out and run, with In-hyuk and Director Go hot on their heels.

They decide to split up, and In-hyuk and Director Go go after Young-gu, but they can’t match his robotic stamina and wind up gasping for air and staggering to a halt. In-hyuk thinks he finds Young-gu, but it’s just Bo-won wearing Young-gu’s jacket. We see that before they ran, they’d switched clothes, and Bo-won had given Young-gu a pair of boat tickets and told him to wait for him at Incheon Harbor.

Bo-won feels betrayed by In-hyuk, but In-hyuk says he has to earn a living somehow. He asks where Bo-won sent Young-gu, and Director Go grabs him and says he’s going to ruin his life over a robot. He reminds Bo-won that their job is done once they hand the product over to the buyer, but Bo-won insists that since they made Young-gu, they should take responsibility for him.

He says that he refuses to send Young-gu to that horrible Diana, and lose him like last time. Director Go promises to talk to the head office for him, so Bo-won says that he promised to meet Young-gu right where they are. Relieved, Director Go and In-hyuk sit to wait — but Bo-won jumps up and bolts, stealing a little girl’s bike and careening downhill at top speed. At the bottom of the hill, he ditches the bike, and runs right into the path of a van.

Back at Kronos Heaven, In-hyuk tells Director Go that he can’t find Bo-won anywhere. They find a receipt for the boat tickets in Bo-won’s car, which gives them a clue of where to find Young-gu. Meanwhile, Young-gu waits at the port like Bo-won told him to do, but Bo-won never shows up.

Da-da goes to the broadcasting station to return some props, and unfortunately, Wang-joon and Yeo-woong just happen to be there at the same time. The lady in the props department complains about the fake blood on the masks, and Da-da tries to explain that she’s only doing this as a favor to the actual props team, who went on vacation right after wrapping the show.

She stays to clean the masks, so she’s nearby when a reporter asks Wang-joon if the “stalker” found in his house was actually a secret girlfriend. Wang-joon says he doesn’t have a girlfriend, because dating is too suffocating, and a girlfriend would be an obstacle to his success. Da-da tries to hold in her tears, but it’s not easy.

A homeless man objects to Young-gu going through a dumpster in “his” territory. Young-gu ignores him until he finds an umbrella, which he gives the homeless man, saying he’ll need it, then he leaves with a cardboard box to protect himself from the elements.

It starts to pour, and Da-da runs home from the broadcasting station, getting soaking wet. The house is dark and empty, but there are reminders of Young-gu all over the place. Da-da smiles, thinking of him, then tells herself to stop it because he’s gone.

She puts on her glove to use her phone, where she sees a message from Bo-won that Young-gu is at Incheon Harbor alone, and asking her to take care of him for a few more days. He’s still sitting and waiting for Bo-won, and when the rain loosens his A++ sticker and it falls off his shirt, he drops his cardboard box to save it.

A hand holds an umbrella over his head, and he looks up to see Da-da. Aww, she came to get him! Bo-won’s message worried her, and she asks if something happened, but Young-gu assures her that he’s fine. He shows her his soggy sticker and she fusses at him for caring so much about it, but he says very seriously that it’s precious to him because it’s a sign of her approval.

Relieved that nothing bad happened to him, Da-da sighs that she wasted her time and that she’s going home. Young-gu tells her that the one-week trial ends in five minutes, and he’ll be reset, which means his memory will be wiped of her.

He asks what she wants him to do — allow the reset, or stop it. Da-da says she’s sorry, and Young-gu looks disappointed for a moment, then nods and turns away. But Da-da keeps talking, saying that she’s in no position to take care of him, or to think of someone else right now, and that she wants him to find someone better than her.

She tries to tell him to allow the reset, but her voice falters, then the wind whips away her umbrella. Young-gu shields her with his, which puts him very close to Da-da again. Impulsively, she blurts out, “Don’t do it.”

 
COMMENTS

Aw yay, she wants him to stay and remember her! I’m really loving Da-da as a heroine, because she’s just so real. She’s messy in such a relatable way, both emotionally and physically — her clothes fit oddly and her makeup is often smudged, and her house is a realistic reflection of herself and her priorities (and boy, can I relate to housework being low on the priority list!). But despite being a physical disaster, she’s very strongly herself, and she knows what she wants even when she’s heartbroken.

In particular, I love the way Da-da set some firm boundaries with Wang-joon. He’s been acting very strange, breaking up then getting possessive, and I loved how Da-da shut that right down. It would be so tempting to see Wang-joon’s confusing behavior as a sign that he wants to get back together, but rather than get her hopes up, Da-da tells him to stay behind the wall he threw up between them when he broke up with her. She didn’t beg him to change his mind, but instead was the one to remind him that he ended it, so it’s over.

I have a feeling that we’ve already met the person that’s sending Wang-joon the threatening “gifts,” and like many of you, my suspicion is firmly on Eun-dong right now. He’s not supposed to know about Wang-joon and Da-da, but then he says or does something that seems too on-the-nose for him not to know. What I have no idea about is why he would send the threats, because if it’s Eun-dong and he’s trying to preserve his business investment, it seems a lot easier to just… talk to Wang-joon about it? But then, he’d be up against a seven-year-long exclusive relationship in which both parties truly loved each other, so maybe scary threats seem more likely to succeed. And it may not be Eun-dong at all, but right now, he’s my top suspect.

I have a hard time getting a read on Young-gu as a character, though I think that at this point, he’s supposed to be this blank slate, generically perfect man. He’s mostly acting according to his programming, which is exactly what he should do, but at times you can see that he does seem to have emotional reactions. When he was alone just before leaving Da-da’s house, then again when it looked like Da-da would say to allow the reset, Young-gu seemed to be feeling sad, though in front of Da-da and Bo-won he acted exactly like a robot who wouldn’t have feelings one way or another regarding the situation.

But I do think he feels something, or at least, he’s beginning to. I think we’ll see Young-gu’s emotions (or whatever versions of emotions he has) emerge the more time he spends with Da-da, and as she becomes less Girlfriend and more Da-da to him. Until now he’s done the things he was programmed that a perfect boyfriend would do, like make breakfast or bring his girlfriend an umbrella on a rainy day. But as he gets to know Da-da herself, and as she models what it means to be human, I hope to see Young-gu evolve and learn, and become more of an individual. We’ve seen glimpses of it, but I want to see him really break from his programming and start making autonomous decisions. In the meantime, I’m worried about Bo-won and why he never showed up at the harbor, but was able to leave Da-da a message. Was it really Bo-won, or is something else going on?

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I am still enjoying this drama. You are right, I like that Da da doesn't brook much in the way of crap. She is a little negative, but who wouldn't be after such a wishy washy ending to a seven year relationship?

If you get death threats and are in a relationship, you discuss it. You let the other person make an informed decision about the situation. The worst that happens is a far more amicable break up. Also, threats or no threats, the whole stalker incident was beyond the pale. She has been rather decent about it, a far better sport that I would have been in a similar situation.

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Wang Joon is so childish: his fears, his self-absorption, his tantrums, his boredom as soon as the other players are gone...it is obvious that Da-da has always been the adult in the room, and I really applaud her for being able to turn away from that, to stop being the mom and gently force him to live with the consequences of his actions. The temptation is always there to be the saver, the fixer, the one who will redeem the guy and make everything right and rosy...and she has not only accepted but is going ahead with her life, realizing Wang Joon has somehow got to fix himself. Kudos!

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For me, he is not only childish and boring, but he is also soooooooo unlikeable. I have not find any single reason why to like him as a person or an actor or a work colleague or anything, let alone as a man.
I really don't know how they will develope this version of the serie, but if he is not second but first lead, I am not sure I want to watch this drama.

Not that I would promote a girl falling in love with a robot (as perfect as he might be) because I understand it is unsustainable in long term, but I would rather have her with a robot than with such a stupid, selfish and boring guy like wang joon.

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Guess there's lots of room for a redemption arc for the human. Or not. If HJH is the 2nd lead, that's an iffy proposition. However, I don't want any more girls-falling-in-love-with-robots tropes either, so I might wait til the end of the drama to see how this all pans out. If the human changes from a stupid, selfish and boring guy to a somewhat wise, selfless and interesting person then I might pick it back up.

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To me, this show is doing so many things right. Our heroine is likeable, the cinematography is pretty and there are wonderful emotional beats in each episode.
However, I find it hard to get invested in the romance between Da-da and the Young-gu. All their moments ring hollow to me. The great thing in a blossoming relationship is, that someone WANTS to be thoughtful and go through trouble for you. They have come to like you for who you are. But Young-gu just does whatever his software makes him do regardless of who is on the receiving end. That kinda destroys the foundation of it all.
I reall want to love this show and I know I can get invested in a robot-human-relationship, because I did so in Are You Human, Too?. But I need them to convince me that there is more to Da-da and Young-gu than Ones and Zeros.

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Thanks for that. You put into words what I have been struggling with since this show started. To me Young Gu is doing everything mechanically rendering it meaningless.

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I only enjoy this drama when it's funny, the robot romance is not doing it for me at all. I asked a similar question in another post but I still can't comprehend fully the difference between Are You Human Too and this drama - why did you get invested in that relationship but not this one? At the end of the day, aren't they both robots?

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Robot with a feeling.... I don't know how else to describe. You could tell Nam Shin III was a robot (as opposed to Young Gu who nobody suspects of) but still feel for him and feel that he feels.... sadness, loneliness...

For example, in a hostile house he was the robot who felt an affinity to the robot vacuum and called him chingu. How does that not remind you of the loneliness of the hero of I Am Not a Robot (another robot drama but that's completely coincidental in this case).

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That's even more bewildering - so Nam Shin III was obviously a robot(not sure if it's the way he is written or how Seo Kang Joon played the role) but elicit more affection than Young Gu who is more like human.

I guess it's in the small details of the writing.

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Haha - I read "small details of the WIRING" and thought, ahhh, that's the difference in the robots. :D

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Nam Shin III had spent his entire "life" as a mother's son, receiving and giving love and affection. He was invented by his mother and psuedo father, and not as a sex toy. So he was closer to a "real" boy.

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To me, there are a couple things that Are You Human, Too did better:
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They robot was not programmed to fall in love, therefore was never forced into the romance. The female lead was posing as his bodyguard and when he owed her a dept, he invited her to treat him as a robot slave. They spent a lot of time together and he learned information about her. What he learned, made him categorize her as someone he could trust.

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They found a way to express a robots way of love. At one point, he was reprogrammed to hurt her and something in him rewrote it at the last second. It thought it was a clever way to convey his version of "feelings", that were stronger than his wiring.

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They rolles with his "robotness". In Absolute Boyfriend, there are these "tension filled" moments of physical closeness, that just don't work. In Are You Human, Too the female lead was sometimes affected by touches, but the robot never seemed to be. That made the romance as realistic as a human-robot-lovefest gets. And there are more little things like that. Absolute Boyfriend seems to want to have it both ways. Zero Nine is a robot, but should fall in love like a human. In Are You Human, Too they just let the robot be a robot and valued him for what he could bring to the table.

So those are the main differences.

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Thank you for your take on this. Today I had some time to kill on the treadmill and since I was limited to watching youtube videos, I watched a few clips of AYHT on KBS World.

As several pointed out here, Nam Shin III was clearly a robot(kudos to Seo Kang Joon who managed to portray the two roles differently) which should theoretically make the romance even harder. I guess I can never wrap my head around it.

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Agree 100%. Personally, I am more invested in the scenes between Wang Joon and Da Da. Whether or not they reconcile, their scenes are more compelling, mostly, I think, because they are real.

I know that could change in the future...and the actor who is playing the robot is always so excellent; I can only assume taking on this role wasn't a career mistake for him. I'm looking forward to major character growth...from everyone!

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Agree x 1000. I love Wang Joon’s scenes with or without DaDa...He behaves like a jerk half the time, of course, but you can see that the feelings are genuine. Also, Yeong Goo pouts a bit, but Wang Joon is clearly in so many kinds of pain that I find myself forgiving his more arrogant moments. Again, I have a soft spot for HJH, so I might be just a tiny bit biased, but personally, I just think he’s killing it in this role. I do kind of wish they would stop dressing him like Brian Austin Green in 90210, though. I lived through that the first time, and once was enough!!! 😂

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Honestly, I wish HJH didn't take this role, same for Yeo Jin Gu. I'm not sure if it's me but I find the writing and directing pretty weak. Maybe it's just a simple story and not one which I thought would be a little more thought provoking besides being fun.

HJH may not be the best actor but he always have a knack of making me root for him even when his character shouldn't be the one getting the girl.

I liked Yeo Jin Gu in Circle(my first drama of him) but I think when it comes to romance(not of the college type), he still has a long way to go. Reunited Worlds and the romance in Crowned Clown didn't work for me. I enjoyed him playing the villain in Crowned Clown more than him playing the nice guy. I'd certainly look forward to him take on more challenging roles. He is sweet as we can see in this drama but doesn't excite me.

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I agree with YJG not being ready for romantic roles. I watched him in Potato Star and his romance line didn't work here either (despite the early kiss that sucked me into the drama), in the end the writers backed themselves into a corner by a love triangle with his brother and ruining that as well.

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@moonbean I've not watched YJG when he was a child actor except for a very brief moment in The Moon That Embraces The Sun. The childhood romance was said to be even better than when the lead characters in adulthood.

Now that I think about it, I don't believe it's purely an age thing. Another actor who I can never get excited about in a romance is Park Bo Gum. It's strange because they are both good actors, handsome and YJG has a very nice built, so I can't even understand why.

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@outofthisworld

To me it's the baby face. I agree about PGM for the same reason. I just can't take them too seriously as a romantic partner.

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In Spanish, we call it"sabor." (flavor) It doesn't necessarily have anything to do with looks. There just isn't any heat there.

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Tall, thin, and tortured...that's the way we like them! :)

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I don't have a bias toward the tall, thin, and tortured, particularly. I watched The King Loves and felt indignant at the crew who thought she should end up with the (OMG SO EMOTIONALLY ABUSIVE) king that I automatically root for HJH indiscriminately now. Which...really doesn't back up my original stance, but I can't help myself. That said, this comment cracked me up. Lol!!!!

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I am happy that 09 ended up with DD again. I hope we will see a nice evolution that breaks from his programming.
I, like other beanies here, really don't like WJ. Even if the break up was caused by the blackmail, I still don't like him as a man/bf. He always put his career first and he just seems way too selfish.

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I feel like I need to defend Wand Joon. Yes, he has made many mistakes, he is less than an ideal boyfriend, the breakup and the way he handled it was cruel and he doesn't have the right to act jealous. But we can't make too many assumptions about their relationship for the last seven years. We have only witnessed the end but Da Da is a no nonsense girl who took him at his word when he mentioned break up so I can't see her sticking up with a total jerk for seven years. He must have some redeeming qualities. We have witnessed some sweet moments in their past, I have hopes that he may learn to deserve Da Da yet.

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I think Wang Joon just has asshole moments but isn’t a real asshole. He’s human. Stardom hasn’t turned him into a womanizer is quite enough for me to believe he loved her a great deal. Tbh, I don’t find men putting career over his girlfriend selfish because I would too. Some people just don’t consider romantic relationships that important.

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If Wang Joon had given no thoughts to his career, I would have found it unrealistic. So I totally understand why he wanted to hide their relationship all these years. His biggest asshole moment was when he let Da Da get arrested for stalking him.

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Am I the only one who is thinking the black boxes are coming from someone more sinister? I am totally expecting the sender to be a crazy fan who will try to harm Da Da thus causing Wang Joon to put his fame on the line for her.

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I think it’s from ppl in his company.

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Thanks @lollypip.
There is a parallel of shutting down between the 2 guys.

Filming of the final scene goes well, ending with the dramatic shut-down of Wang-joon’s android character.

This got me laughing. It's drama (Wang Joon acting) imitating life (Zero Nine who is a real robot) that is in a drama. The human who behaves somewhat like a robot and who plays the character of an android shuts down like a machine, and that's the end of his show. The real robot who behaves more like a human being, and is supposed to shut down at midnight, gets an extended lease of life and the show goes on.

So cute that the person who breaks machines is the one who has to take care of one sophisticated machine. It just occurred to me that that's why her home is filled with so many broken down machines and she did not want to get new stuff because she believed that she'd just break those too.

Young Gu's programming has the wisdom to power himdown when he is damaged. So unlike a human being who wants to carry on even when sick. It's great that she gets to fix Young Gu. With more opportunities to use the machines in her hown( that Young Gu can fix for her) , she'll hopefully gain confidence in herself, that she's not a jinx of machines.

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*It's great that she gets to fix Young Gu. With more opportunities to use the machines in her own home*

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I'm in love with the drama, but i still find the audio awkward. Am I the only one ? Something sounds wrong with the audio, if you compare it to the usual drama. Did anyone else notice it ?

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Ma wang joon is not likable but I'm rooting for him cos i dont understand how a robot is expected to live happily ever after with a human. This is my first ever robot drama.

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Seriously, has it come to this? That we have to go to robots to find true love? Or a guy who isn't an a$$wipe? A sad state of affairs.

That said, and although there were LOTS of problems with it, I would still recommend "Are You Human, too?" The lead actor (I'm sorry, I can never remember the actors' names) had a double role--playing both the replica and the real person. He was truly excellent.

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