Rating:
Average user rating 4.2
87

Angel’s Last Mission: Love: Episodes 13-14

The clock is ticking on our angel’s important mission, but with each day on Earth, he finds himself becoming more and more distracted. Now that his ice princess has warmed up to him, he genuinely enjoys staying by her side — so much so that he’s beginning to wonder if being her guardian angel is enough anymore.

 
EPISODES 13-14 RECAP

We rewind a bit, back to when Dan had asked Yeon-seo if she could give up dancing for Fantasia for her own sake. From afar, Kang-woo was hiding amongst the shadows and listening to every word. When Kang-woo heard Yeon-seo admit that she hates that Dan doesn’t like her, he clenched his fist.

Dan gets Yeon-seo back home, only admitting that he likes her now that she’s asleep. Afterwards, he goes out again, walking along a bridge, where Kang-woo has been waiting. Kang-woo pushes Dan against the railing and demands to know what his true intentions are.

The two struggle until they go over the railing and into the water. As Kang-woo falls unconscious, Dan finds himself wondering why humans love so foolishly when it only hurts their hearts. Even in a human body, he doesn’t understand.

Dan tries to push Kang-woo up to the surface, but he doesn’t have enough strength to save himself. He sinks deeper, seeing memories of his younger self also falling into water.

He then jerks awake to see that he’s out of the river, being cared for by an ambulance crew. He tells them that another man had been drowning, but when he looks back to the riverside, he sees Kang-woo walking away — perfectly fine.

Dan is taken to the hospital to get a bad gash on his arm treated. There, he wonders if Kang-woo overheard his conversation with Yeon-seo. But would that really justify how roughly Kang-woo had confronted him?

“Of course it does.” Kang-woo reveals himself and states that telling a dancer to quit is like taking their life away. After all, Yeon-seo had tried to kill herself after she lost her eyesight.

Kang-woo warns Dan to resign as Yeon-seo’s secretary and disappear, otherwise Kang-woo will make him disappear. Kang-woo walks away, but Dan catches him outside to say that he can’t leave Yeon-seo now.

Kang-woo scoffs and asks if he actually has feelings now, and Dan replies, “That’s right. I like Lee Yeon-seo. I like her so much more than I thought.” He tells Kang-woo to keep his promise of making Yeon-seo’s happiness the top priority — only then will he disappear. But if Kang-woo makes her suffer in any way, Dan won’t stand still.

Dan heads back inside, looking up and praying in a grumpy tone that he knows his place so he won’t act on his feelings for Yeon-seo. Then seeing that his wound has already healed, he decides to go home, despite the doctor’s protests. The doctor — Hoo, of course — watches him leave, concerned.

Kang-woo broods at home, watching videos of his lover Seol-hee. He tells Seol-hee that he’s so close to finishing his mission but that Dan is really getting on his nerves.

He sees Seol-hee’s smile onscreen disappear as she asks, “Is it really that guy that’s making you waver? Or is it your heart?” Kang-woo blinks and shuts the TV off, thinking he must be crazy.

The next morning, Nina asks her mom about her old ballet instructor Elena. Director Choi reminds her that Elena was kicked out of Fantasia and that she was a crazy woman who even dunked Nina in water to make her envision the ocean. Nina sighs, letting the conversation drop.

Dan goes into the practice room to watch Yeon-seo dance, worried about all the stress she must be under. Chief Jung then bursts in, having received Yeon-seo’s blood test from the disastrous Fantasia Night. She tells Yeon-seo to use it as a bluff when she goes into the company today, rather than resign like Director Choi wants.

They get a call and, speak of the devil, it’s Director Choi. She tells Yeon-seo to hurry up and announce her resignation to the sponsors.

Watch the video

Dancing in doubt

 

Yeon-seo has Dan drive her and, on the way to Fantasia, she asks him why he’s being so quiet. At that, Dan surprises her by making a screeching U-turn. (Whoa there, partner; you just got your license!) He takes her to the bridge where she once jumped and surprises her further by climbing up onto the railing.

She cries out and grabs his arm, asking what he’s doing. But he just asks her how she felt when she fell into the water that day — was she scared and lonely? He jumps down, and she yells at him for nearly giving her a heart attack.

“It’s too bad,” he says. “If I’d known you back then, I would’ve grabbed your hand as you did for me just now.” He tells her that when she was drunk that he’d suggested she give up dancing. But after watching her practice this morning, he sees how happy it makes her. Whatever she decides, he hopes that she knows she’s not alone anymore. Still rattled by his actions, she merely says that they’re late for her meeting.

Yeon-seo stands before Director Choi, Kang-woo, and all their major sponsors. She looks to Dan for reassurance before bowing and apologizing for her behavior on Fantasia Night. Choi encourages her to resign from her position, but she cuts in that she has no intention of doing that. She wants another chance to prove herself.

One sponsor named Chairman Lee says that one small apology isn’t enough for them to spend their precious money; he’d rather see her kneel down and beg. So Yeon-seo walks over to Lee, worrying Kang-woo. But instead of begging, she asks, “Do you even like ballet?”

She knows that snobby sponsors like them are always falling asleep in the theater. But she intends to change that — with her “Giselle” performance, she is going to make them love ballet. And that, she concludes, is worth their money. They’ll decide who will resign — her or Choi — after the show.

Watch the video

I’ll make you love ballet

 

Yeon-seo walks out of the room with Dan, and she finally lets herself breathe. Dan pats her on the shoulder, but Kang-woo comes out and one-ups him by giving her a hug and telling her she did well. Pfft, Dan’s reaction.

They don’t have time to celebrate, though, because Director Choi appears and demands to talk to Yeon-seo alone. She takes Yeon-seo to the theater to chew her out, but Yeon-seo just wants to know how things got to be so bad between them. Was it really all because of greed?

Choi warns Yeon-seo not to patronize her with that word. If it was for greed, she would’ve sold Fantasia by now. The reason why she’s doing all this is because she’s the one who raised Fantasia after Yeon-seo’s parents died. And she refuses to hand it over after all that hard work.

Yeon-seo steps forward, asking when all this started — when Choi and her husband had nothing and Yeon-seo’s father had to take them in? Her voice quivers with anger as she then asks if Choi ever felt any pity when she lost her eyesight. If Choi had only acted differently, Yeon-seo would’ve given up Fantasia years ago. Yeon-seo starts to walk away, reiterating that she’ll prove her worth, and Choi coldly wishes her luck succeeding without the corps de ballet.

Outside the theater, Kang-woo and Dan are having a tense (but kind of funny) conversation of “See, she didn’t need you” and “Well, she didn’t need you either.” Yeon-seo finds them and asks Kang-woo about the dancers, knowing they’re on strike. Kang-woo receives a call just then, and it’s Jung-eun, the dancer he kicked out for wanting to leave early. She’s with the other dancers, Nina included, and she speaks for everyone by demanding Yeon-seo out, as well as Kang-woo’s harsh directing style.

Kang-woo tells Jung-eun that he won’t be accepting any of their demands. And if they don’t show up to the studio tomorrow by 10 a.m., then he’ll be hiring other dancers who would be dying to take their roles. When he hangs up, Yeon-seo insists that she doesn’t want to work with people who were forced to be there. She plans to get the corps de ballet back her own way.

She leaves with Dan, who suggests they call Nina since she’d probably be nice enough to help. They get her on the line, and Yeon-seo reminds her that she wanted this competition to be fair and square, so she could at least mention where they are.

As it turns out, the dancers are doing charity work at a nursing home while they’re off work. Yeon-seo shows up, all smiles, claiming that she wants to volunteer with them. The dancers want her to leave, but Nina urges them to let her be for now. They give in, figuring she’ll be running out after an hour.

Yeon-seo and Dan end up staying all day, and while it does surprise the dancers, they still want nothing to do with her. The two return home late at night, tired and defeated.

The next day, Kang-woo waits in the practice room until 10 a.m., but no one shows up. Meanwhile, Yeon-seo and Dan go to the nursing home for another day of volunteering. All seems to be going well until an old blind woman comes out hysterical and crying for her husband.

Yeon-seo tries to calm her, but the woman keeps screaming that she can’t live without her husband. The husband finally appears, and the woman runs over to him, knocking down a candle in the process. The candle falls into a trashcan and starts a fire, and all of the elders and volunteers hurry to evacuate.

Outside, Yeon-seo takes the blame for dropping the candle, infuriating the dancers. They tell her to leave before she causes any more trouble, and she softly apologizes, saying, “I just wanted to show you my sincerity.” However, they don’t see her sincerity; all they see is a spoiled lead wanting her backup dancers back.

That night, Yeon-seo and Dan sit out in the courtyard, and Dan asks why she covered for the old woman. She explains that she didn’t want the poor woman to get kicked out, and he notes that she’s gotten a lot nicer these days.

Dan assures her that the dancers will come around eventually; they, more than anyone, understand her desire to get up on stage as a lead. “A lead?” she repeats, thoughtful. He smiles, and his hand inches toward hers, only to pull away.

The next day, the dancers head into the nursing home and find Yeon-seo and Dan talking to the old married couple from yesterday. Yeon-seo is showing the grandma how to use a voice-activated app, and the way the grandma’s face lights up when the app calls her hubby is adorable.

The grandpa thanks Yeon-seo, feeling guilty for having her take the blame for his wife’s mistake. The dancers overhear this and call out to Yeon-seo, who, upon seeing them, tells them that she has Kang-woo waiting for them inside.

Once Yeon-seo has Kang-woo and the others all together, she announces that she wants to hold auditions for the “Giselle” show, meaning anyone could get the lead. And if Yeon-seo has to start over as a part of the corps de ballet, then so be it.

Kang-woo takes her and Dan outside, saying that she’s the only Giselle for him. But Yeon-seo wants to do everything fair and square, and she’d appreciate his support. She holds out her hand, but he doesn’t take it.

Dan tries to ease the tension by doing a group cheer, which is when Kang-woo notices Dan’s arm — the arm that miraculously healed. Oh crap…

Elsewhere, Nina finds her old instructor Elena again and begs for her help; she wants to get rid of her nice character and become a new ballerina. As Nina explains that she’s determined to beat Yeon-seo, Elena seems to see a spark in her.

That night, Kang-woo follows Dan as he goes into a grocery store. Inside, Dan runs into Hoo (disguised as an ajumma), who sees that he must be shopping to cook for Yeon-seo. He tells Dan that he shouldn’t be wasting time; he only has two months left to complete his mission.

Dan knows that, but he insists that Yeon-seo’s happiness is vital in her progress to find love, so he’s focusing on that first. He stalks off, leaving Hoo frustrated. And it’s only then that Hoo realizes someone was watching them.

Later, Kang-woo reluctantly approaches the church, remembering all the odd things Dan has ever said. He goes inside and sits down for a confession, and on the other side of the viewing window is Hoo as the priest.

Watch the video

Do angels exist?

 

Kang-woo ignores Hoo’s blessings and asks what would happen to an angel if a human were to discover their identity — surely, there would be grave repercussions. Hoo orders him to leave if he isn’t here for a confession.

Hoo sighs in relief to hear Kang-woo exit the confessional, but when he opens his door, Kang-woo is standing right there. And Kang-woo smirks, recognizing Hoo as the monk from the Buddhist temple. His smirk drops as he turns and walks away.

At Yeon-seo’s estate, she walks in on Dan attempting to cook her dinner. She offers to help, but since she can’t cook either, they both end up making a mess. When Dan accidentally drops a pot of boiling food, he picks Yeon-seo up and places her on the counter so she won’t hurt her feet.

He then leans very close, making her flustered, and asks in a low voice, “Agasshi, do you want to eat ramen?” LOL, Yeon-seo narrows her eyes because Do you want to eat ramen? is pretty much the equivalent to Do you want to Netflix and chill? But, of course, the naive Dan meant actual ramen.

Yeon-seo goes to bed smiling at the thought of Dan, while in Dan’s room, he’s dreaming of his younger self meeting Yeon-seo. She’d seen him standing on top of a cliff (about to jump?) and saved him before he went over. She later introduced herself as Yeon-seo, but before he could say his own name, Dan wakes up.

Dan immediately runs over to the church and asks Hoo what this dream could mean — could it be that he subconsciously longs to become human? Hoo’s expression darkens, and he orders Dan to follow him. Now daylight, Hoo takes him to the nursing home, to see the old married couple. And the grandpa shakes with fear the moment he sees Hoo.

The couple run off to a field, but Hoo catches them and tells the grandpa — referring to him as Angel Noel — that he must face his punishment for refusing to send his wife to Heaven.

Dan looks on with shock as the defeated Angel Noel asks for one last goodbye with his wife. Hoo nods, and the couple then cling on to each other, the grandma crying for her love not to go.

“I was with you for a long time,” Noel says, on the verge of tears himself. “I’m so glad I met you. I won’t forget you, my Mi-ok.” Hoo steps toward them, but Dan snaps out of his daze and begs Hoo to give them more time. Hoo forces Dan out of his way, and Dan helplessly watches as his sunbae makes Noel disappear from the grandma’s arms.

Hoo gives Dan one last warning to wake up before teleporting out of there, but Dan isn’t listening. He watches the grandma sob her heart out, reaching for empty air, and then imagines the woman as Yeon-seo.

Dan takes the grandma to the hospital, noticing that she’s clutching Noel’s handkerchief, the feather now black.

Shaken up, Dan runs all the way back to the estate and into the kitchen, where Yeon-seo has made them both breakfast. Before she can get a word in, he says that he has something to tell her: He wants to quit being her secretary and move out.

   
COMMENTS

Okay, we’re back on track! As expected, this show does best when it focuses on our Tragic Trio (with a little bit of Nina, since she’s a cool cookie too). We had the right amount of everything I wanted — some powerful moments for Yeon-seo, some enlightening moments for Dan, and some, er, complicated moments for Kang-woo. Our second male lead is showing serious signs of a mental breakdown, as he can’t seem to figure out what’s what anymore. Or, who’s who, more like it.

I wish we could get a scene of the first time Kang-woo actually saw Yeon-seo after losing Seol-hee. That way, I could get a better understanding of where his head is at. I can imagine his first sighting of her being extremely emotional, especially when he had to pull back and realize that they were different people. But since he’s spending so much time with Yeon-seo, the line between Yeon-seo and Seol-hee is starting to blur. Whether he’s aware of it or not, he’s developing feelings for Yeon-seo. Unhealthy feelings stemmed from lost love. The intensity of all this is concerning, to say the least. So now the very unstable Kang-woo knows of Dan’s secret. What he plans to do with that secret, I have no idea. He seems to know a lot more about this angel business than Dan does, so he’s got the advantage now.

Having rewatched episodes 11-12, I’m nervous about how the writer is dealing with theology. Whenever we get too heavy into angel histories or regulations, it’s hard for me to piece things together. This could just be me, since I’m not the most religious person, but even so, it’s this writer’s job to make it easier to digest. Maybe everything will come together later, but as of now, there’s way too much confusion. First of all… *clears throat* WTF WAS WITH HOO SUNBAE?! His character has been more cryptic than Kang-woo lately, and that’s really saying something. I can’t figure out how much he knows about Dan and how much he actually cares. I mean, did he really have to teach Dan a lesson by separating that poor couple? Sheesh, crush Dan’s heart and throw it in my face, why don’t you.

I have to believe that Hoo isn’t as ruthless as the black and white angels who punished Kang-woo. He obviously cares about Dan as a hoobae and as a friend, so I’m sure he doesn’t want to see Dan disappear. That said, I wonder if Hoo had a similar relationship with this angel Noel. Perhaps he had similar relationships with several angels like Noel, like Dan, and he’s tired of watching them throw their lives away. There’s something there that we’re not getting, and I really, really hope that the writing doesn’t fail us once we do get it.

The bottom line is that Hoo’s demonstration successfully jolted Dan out of his happy dream with Yeon-seo. He was already hesitant around her, but now that he’s seen what their future could look like, I guess he thinks that just being around her is risky. However, seeing their future didn’t and won’t change the way he feels about her — if anything, it only made him realize how important she is to him. And as he’s said throughout the past few episodes, her happiness comes first. So where does that leave him? Where does that leave his mission? Will he continue the mission while keeping his distance or will he abandon the mission completely?

On a lighter note, I loved watching Yeon-seo put her stubbornness to good use. Her social skills are lacking, due to her upbringing and past trauma, but she settled the issues with the corps de ballet wonderfully. It was great to have our ice princess actually get her hands dirty and do some hard work, but it was even better to have her consider the dancers’ feelings. Things are rough between them now, but I’m sure that Yeon-seo will develop a strong bond with her crew in no time. We’ve had a lot of build-up for this “Giselle” performance, and now that Nina has taken it upon herself to get a personal coach, I’m pumped. I can’t wait to see more beautiful ballet scenes. And while we’re at it, Writer-nim, more cutesy ramen scenes. You can’t just giveth and taketh away.

RELATED POSTS

 

Tags: , , , ,

87

Required fields are marked *

I want to think that the confusion is attributable to "God works in mysterious ways." That the whole thing is supposed to actually benefit all of our three main characters in some, as yet, inscrutable way. I just can make myself believe that Heaven punishes love like that.

2
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

@sychotic1 Athena, I've come to the conclusion that writer does not really know or care about the Christian concept of heaven although he bothers to quote (sometimes badly) Scripture and use so many Christian symbols. He has obviously chosen a warped interpretation of god (which I will differentiate from 'God') that will suit his plot.

No, that is not the way anyone gets punished by God, especially if they do things out of love. There is, however, the issue of disobedience, but that's another thing.

However if we buy into Writer's interpretation of angels, and how flawed Sunbae Hu's attitude is, or how he can be a priest and angel at the same time ... then we have to close 1 or 2 eyes and accept for this show, his concept of god who's a meanie.

That's what I'm doing while my eyes roll away ...

11
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree that the writer has mixed up Christian and spiritual concepts. We are now seeing too many angels in the story line to make me wonder if we are being misled by the premise of the series. When do angels control time, space and transmutation of objects? If Dan died as a young boy, why would take the form of an adult angel? Why would present YS have the same body and dreams of KW's deceased lover from 15 years prior?

It seems that lost and unloved souls are being tested and judged by arrogant and semi-benevolent spirits. The characters may be in a state of purgatory.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree that the writer is playing very loosely with the idea of God. Although some of his ideas of angels are drawn from Roman Catholic tradition the God being portrayed is a more Old Testament God with even some Buddhist/Traditional religious hints as well. We saw the reverse happen in GOBLIN: There the religious background was distinctly Buddhist plus traditional religion but at times God was shown in a more Judeo-Christian fashion.

In our Christian tradition God is a more active participant in our lives- this is why angels exist in the first place. But angels are not machines, they are beings in their own right. And, according to Milton and others, the greatest of them all was Lucifer, who took umbrage at the creation of man and literally rebelled against God because he hated mankind.

However awkwardly the writer is trying to explore this side of angels and how it in turn that effects their interactions with the world- and with God. And of course with people.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I have seen these things where people choose to malign religions without understanding how they hurt people. For example there is now a trend in media especially with Netflix to malign Hinduism. Each and every content are very anti Hindu to the point it makes me feel very difficult to watch Netflix. I totally understand how you must be feeling to view. It is extremely triggering to watch what we love what our parents and ancestors love to be maligned and distorted on media

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I am someone who was excited to watch this drama mainly because of the female lead but by the time I got around to being able to I had read enough reviews to know that the writer had twisted and perverted God and Christianity to make it no longer watchable for me. But I am curious if someone could please explain how what this writer is doing by completely insulting true Christians with their distortion of God and angels is any different then the accusations and vilification Man Who Dies to Live received from a huge majority of people yet no one is asking that this drama be cancelled? Is it really ok to offend and give a false view of Christianity but not ok if the religion is Muslim and if so then why the hypocrisy? Please note I am not asking for a boycott such as the people did with the other drama but am curious as to how this can be viewed as being any different and would love to hear from someone who could explain the double standard.

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Frankly, that is a double standard that exists in the world today, perhaps because Christianity is perceived to be a majority religion that is fair game for attack, or perhaps because here in the US conservative Christians have gotten involved in politics which has bred resentment, or perhaps because Christians are taught to be tolerant and love their enemies, or -- maybe most likely -- because there is no one who will demand accountability for messing with Christianity. Whereas different Muslim religious leaders have actually called for the death of writers whom they believe have insulted their faith.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I completely hear you but to be fair, there is a multitude of TV series and even K dramas that give a really distorted depiction of Islam as well, often to serve the purpose of the story without any regards for the religion in itself. So if it makes you feel any better, it seems like the ignorance is widely spread and equally distributed. Doesn't make it ok, but at least, you're not alone in feeling it. <3

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yeon Seo is changing 🥰♥️😭Thank you Dan for influencing her! Two wrongs don’t make a right and this is how Kang Woo works - his team rebelling on him, he wants to punish them by creating a new team. But nope, Yeon Seo, here, became the bigger person and wanted to fix the broken relationship...First day wasn’t easy, but she didn’t give up👏👏 Dan has showed him so much kindness, now she’s paying it forward!

And she got her reward! Dan telling her she’s a nice person 😍

6
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

And I’m glad Dan took back his words on asking Yeon Seo to give up if things get too hard. He saw that even when she was struggling, she was happy. I’m glad he asked her to do whatever she wanted instead cuz that is happiness too.

5
reply

Required fields are marked *

@13infamyss I like how both YS and Dan are growing. I think Ni Na is as well: at least she initiated the challenge to try out fairly and she looked for Teacher Elena on her own. She's no longer just sitting and crying over her sad fate. I only hope she does not go the opposite way ie while YS becomes nicer Ni Na becomes more selfish.

I heartily applauded YS for standing up to the sponsors on her own like she did without compromising her stance, and for coming up with the auditions to eradicate
favouritism, and for knowing that she had to regain the trust and regard of the corps by true grit, sincerity and hard work.

We have a few more episodes to see if Dan leaving YS so suddenly is going to take away her niceness temporarily or not. Actually, I guess she always was OK on the inside, but circumstances, her losses and traumas and finding that her nearest relatives did not care about her, made her cynical and cold.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Agree! More ballet scenes and ramen scenes! Less of the weird angel shenanigans and company politics.

12
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@blnmom I've begun to expect "weird angel shenanigans" and to be entertained by them, while eye-rolling. It's like: 'now let's see what other weird angel or god logic this writer will come up with, and how far will my eyes roll' sort of thing.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

If “Love is not Jealous” & “God is Love”; then surely God is not Jealous?

The first time I saw this episode I was angry. But then I remembered I was also angry when someone I loved died. How could Heaven be cruel?!

1
12
reply

Required fields are marked *

The writer can make her drama's god be cruel, scary, and inconsistent. She can imagine her god any way she wants to get the story to go the way she wants. I personally think her concept of her god changes from episode to episode depending on what she envisions happening. So instead of there being a consistent, well-thought-out creator and creation, the grand scheme behind this dramaverse changes on the fly. And although it's all cloaked in Christian trappings, this god really isn't Christian, so it's useless to expect him to behave as if he is.

10
11
reply

Required fields are marked *

"Gods always come in handy, they justify almost anything." (now also including bad writing)

7
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I wouldn't say this is bad writing. If it was then we wouldn't be watching and loving it.
Instead it is lazy writing and confused sense of who and what a god is to each one of us.
Let's hope at some point all of this (or even some) will make some sense at the end.

2
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

On the contrary I watch lots of things with bad writing because I like to pull them appart.
Also how are bad writing and lazy writing any different ... if you're a lazy writer you're not writing well, and if you're not writing well are you not writing badly?

1

Let me try this:

A lazy writer is a bad writer. Maybe he can write well but he's too lazy.

A bad writer is not always a lazy writer. I can imagine a hardworking talentless writer who just can't write well. No?

0

I think that lazy writing is just going for all the stereotypes and cliches.

Bad writing can be lazy writing, but it can also be trying to do something different and it not working at all.

1

What I meant by lazy writing was not taking the time (or so it seems to me) to really figure out what you are trying to say with this particular story line as in the theological questions.
To me lazy writing is adding a character or subplot and then not doing anything with it.

Angel's last mission seems to have a clear story line - at least as far as we can tell - about finding what love it. But they threw in the part about killing angels with guns?

Maybe the writer got distracted with that part of the story and punishing angels et al, a story, then changed their mind.

Honestly I don't know. Being a lazy writer to me is the ability to write a good script, but ignoring parts of the story because it gets too complicated and too late to take it out. So they just ignore it and hope the audience will ignore it too.

Bad writing is Abyss or BOF...

1

for me; Hu & Dan are Aliens. 😂 & xAngel Kang Woo is from a Rival but Related Planet coz daaaang they use “Angelic Guns” instead of regular hands to vaporize someone.

Wasnt there an old anime of humanoid aliens with wings? Yeap Im going to believe they’re that. 😂✌🏼

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

What if the writer didn't want God to exist as an actual character in the show? What if he exists as a way to give us insight into the psychology of the characters? And he as a character, or the idea of him, changes when the other characters evolve? We see him as how the characters in the show see him.

I still think it's too soon to say there isn't much rhyme or reason to the grand scheme of the show. I want to believe there is a purpose for each little detail and that it'll all come together by the end. I'm hopeful

2
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

@llamapoet @le-ssy @lindag @charlieblue17
While I'm beginning to think like @lindag, I also remain hopeful like @llamapoet. I'm not sure if there is a clear logic somewhere in this writer's concept of merging the earthly world with the transcendent, however I am looking at the themes he has introduced and would like to see if they hang together and can draw the story out coherently.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

oops, I should have read your post @llamapoet before I responded above. What you wrote makes so much more sense then what I said - and much better than me.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

That's ok, what you wrote was still well put!

1

This was one of the shows I was enjoying the most until this week but I am really unhappy with the clumsy and heavy handed execution this week. It really dampened my enthusiasm for the show.

The story of the old lady and angel Noel shows me that this kind of stuff happened lot more often then I initially thought. This is the third incident we are shown. But what I disliked in the whole episode was the cruelty of Hoo in the way he handled it. What happened to compassion that is supposed to be underlying all religions? That whole disappearing scene didn’t sit well with me. It was very effective in scaring the bejesus out of Dan but was not done well at all. Those people must have their own story but they were literally used to make a point for Dan.

I didn’t like the way Kang Woo discovered Dan and Hoo’s identity either. Seemed to make a mockery out of how mighty these heavenly beings were supposed to be.

I didn’t find what’s going on with the ballet troupe at all realistic (another thing failed in the execution) but more on that in the next episode.

In terms of comedy I was getting such a kick out of Goo’s disguises and that lady in the grocery store was the best so far. But Goo is not my favorite person now.

The only thing that resonated with me this episode was Dan’s growing feelings and his fear of hurting Yeon Seo sadly juxtaposed with Yeon Seo’s own excitement and reactions to him.

7
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

@moonbean
I was thinking that if Hu could just up and locate Angel Noel to demo to Dan what happens to disobedient angels, then Hu must have had Angel Noel on the back-burner for ages, waiting for a chance to use him. It felt so wrong and despicable of him.

If that was the punishment indeed, then there should have been a proper time and notice given for Noel to attend his 'execution'. That sudden appearance of wrathful angel bent on destruction was just over dramatic and felt way off.

4
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think any deviant angels know that their time will come for punishment eventually. They all anticipate it at one time or another. It may be days, weeks, years, but they know it will come because, I'm sure they all got the same warning Dan received.

So they live in fear most of the time, waiting for that fateful moment. Or they could repent and return to their true mission. I think that's why a grace period was given, perhaps so that these angels (like Dan) could reflect and eventually choose the right thing to do.

1
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I fully agree that there is a grace period, and probably, in this dramaverse, the punishment is justified, however the way it was executed was off.

It appeared as if Hu only chose that time to mete out punishment, in order to prove a point. The way it was done, with loved one clinging, left a bad taste in the mouth.

I recall other shows that had the person leave one realm to enter another before getting their punishment. Or in this case, he could have been brought to the church or somewhere more private. The 'execution' was summarily carried out in the most shocking way. Thus, I felt it was over-dramatic.

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

For Angel Noel, there was a grace period of years, but for JKW not even an hour, or so it seemed.

1

@lindag Yes, Angel Noel had one year to obey the deity.

You saw the link below to what Bitches caught about Noel's relationship with the lady.
http://www.dramabeans.com/2019/06/angels-last-mission-love-episodes-13-14/#comment-3475958

I didn't quite catch it in the subs, but it seems that he pretended to be the lady's husband for 1 year instead of bringing her to heaven. More on the punishment below...

0

I was enjoying this show immensely up until this week, SIGH. This is just silly.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm glad this episode went back to focusing more on the characters and less on the corporate shenanigans. I like the way they're portraying Yeon-seo's growth. A lot of the time, when a character becomes nicer or more empathetic, it seems like they're almost a different person. Here, I don't feel like that at all. Yeon-seo is still Yeon-seo, she's just a becoming a more empathetic version of herself. It's also nice to see her just having fun and smiling.

As for the questionable theological portrayal of late, while I get how it could bother some people, it hasn't bothered me so far. Yes, some of it is ridiculous, but I've never thought it was trying to be an accurate representation of any religion. From the first episode, I've viewed it as a fake religion inspired by Christianity. It's using the trappings of Christianity but making up its own theology (albeit not a particularly well-thought out theology...). I can definitely see how this could be problematic to some people, but I think it's so fantasy-esque that it's not in danger of being taken seriously. Of course, as a non-religious person, I understand that it might bug me less than it does some others.
That being said, I do hope they elaborate on the theology, since it would be nice to better understand the workings of the spiritual realm in this show. It's so ambiguous right now, and I can't tell if that's because the writer doesn't know or information is just being doled out slowly.

10
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

The whole theological aspect doesn't bother me either. I walked into this thinking it was a fantasy show that would loosely draw upon religions for direction, and I still think this. As someone who comes from a religious background, I don't see this as some kind of portrayal of real world religion. To me, they're just telling a fictional story. It's probably because I don't see this as some kind of propaganda for or against real religions. It just exists in the backdrop of the story.
I think the ambiguity is helping to keep the plot from getting too messy and convoluted (for example: W Two Worlds). I just hope they keep the story clean as they delve more into the theology of the drama.

P.S. You're completely right about Yeon-seo, and darn it, I need to see more scenes like the one with her and Dan attempting to cook

8
reply

Required fields are marked *

So Angel Noel was with his lady a long time... and they were married? So that can happen, you're just not meant to rebel against God by not giving people up to death or giving up your hanky? I mean, seems like there could be a loophole here, though Angel Dan isn't likely to surrender his lady to death, but if we can put off dusting a few decades that's worth knowing...

Thank the Lord for fewer corporate shenanigans. I remain DELIGHTED by what a tsundere she is, and what a candy he is. His fond approval of her, plus her sneaking looks at him being Ebullient and Pure!

It remains hilarious that she just barely manages to tolerate Kang Woo. 'He means well,' she visibly thinks as a tall handsome man lovingly embraces her. 'He supports my career. He's tiresomely blocking my shoulder patting action, but endure. stay calm and think of your funny lil secretary. secretarysecretarysecretarySECRETARY.' She would have been so down for ramyun and chill. She will be mystified when she learns she was being set up with Kang Woo this whole time. Meanwhile Kang Woo is going off the deep end (when isn't he, sometimes literally) envisioning his dead love with eyeliner, talking to him...

The characters are so fun, and the actors killing it, but I do have concerns about defining the theology and the stakes. I hope things will snap into place... like the angels, I try to have faith, even when sparkly guns shake my faith...

13
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

So true about Kang-woo and Yeon-seo😂. It cracks me up how completely oblivious she is to his attentions, since she's so focused on Dan. She clearly sees Kang-woo as a professional connection and keeps their relationship in that realm. So I love how every time Kang-woo gets carried away acting like they're all close, Yeon-seo has this look like, "what is this guy doing?" 😕.

12
reply

Required fields are marked *

"I remain DELIGHTED by what a tsundere she is, and what a candy he is. His fond approval of her, plus her sneaking looks at him being Ebullient and Pure!"

This! I started out loving the role reversal too where the female is the tsundere and the male is the candy. (Lately I have been getting so jaded by the female candy, which, don't get me wrong, was what I used to love). I love this dynamic and it's worked really well in their relationship.

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

"stay calm and think of your funny lil secretary."
that would be the PERFECT "keep calm and......" saying. Imagine this as a meme ahaha

4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really appreciate that this writer gave us Kim Dan and YS. They're (mostly) so good for each other, and really fabulous roles for L and SHS. Almost all their moments together have been either hilarious, poignant, or heart-fluttering.

As for everything else, it would have helped if the writer thought beyond what she wanted to happen in each scene. She needed Dan to be scared away from YS, so she had Hoo "disappear" Angel Noel. Writer, nooooo. Did Angel Noel deserve it? Maybe he did, for deciding on his own that he would do better to make this lonely woman happy on earth than to take her soul to heaven. But did the woman deserve it? Did Dan? Did we? If you were going to do such a thing, you didn't set it up in a way that we could all accept it. Who wants to invest in a world where the god seems heartless?

8
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I don't think God is heartless, but I do think not everyone gets what they deserve. That's why we have unfair hardship and difficulty in the world - stuff happens for reasons we cannot see or fathom, because God has a greater plan in action. That seems to be the message this drama has been most consistent with, since no other theological principles have aligned so far.

Angel Noel was wrong to keep the woman alive and live with her instead of guide her to Heaven. As an angel, who's sole purpose to carry out the deity's command, I don't think his punishment was uncalled for. It's an interesting concept though because if angels are supposed to be such one-note servants of God, why did God allow them the ability to fall in love in the first place?

My thoughts are that everything in this drama's world is at the mercy of its god and the fate he dictates. Hoo doesn't know any better than Dan does about god's plan - his only role is to carry out his command, and as a sunbae, ensure that Dan is on track as well (at least I HOPE that's it, because if Hoo develops some godly autonomy of his own, I'm going to be disappointed in the writer) There's always a grander scheme in action

2
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

@brownieoholic Dopedramacongratz
You echo some of my thoughts too. Show might go for the bigger plan of god somewhere to justify a whole bunch of stuff, but it's not been made all that obvious, therefore I'm iffy about it.

However, the thing about Hu not knowing any better is a thought that has come to me more than once. He may have been misinformed or he misunderstood. All he knows for sure is what he has been ordered to do and his powers include teleporting, disguising himself and causing an angel to dissipate.

So as a mentor he has to ensure that Dan does not end up dissipating too. However, as I noted in the other episode, Hu has been very remiss in his teaching. He knows Dan is a total newbie when it comes to human beings, but he has not given him proper advice or detailed instructions. What he told Dan his mission was, was just a Word, and not even a broad command. Poor Dan has been left to figure it out by himself along the way.

3
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

"Poor Dan has been left to figure it out by himself along the way."
But isn't that the way it is for all of us? We spend our lives figuring out what it all means. We learn from the mistakes of others, but in the end we make choices on our own. Hu could have explained everything in detail to Dan, but in the end he is the one who makes his own choices. Maybe that is because he was once a human as the show has laid out the story - but maybe not all angels were once human?
Then here we go back into the theological discussion...
Hu pointed the way to go but Dan has to get there on his own like all us human beings have to do.

2
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes, even as I was posting comments like the one above, the same thought occurred to me.

However I feel the Hu either does not know or is deliberately withholding info, or is misguided himself, because Dan only had 100 days to get the mission done, and he knew too little to begin with. He has been floundering and worried and running to sunbae for help, but he never felt that sunbae told him much or what he needed to know. I feel that he did not even really point Dan in the right direction, he just threw him out to continue as he had come, or he scared him.

More of this in the next episode, actually.

So far we viewers have felt that Dan has gone offtrack, thinking only about romantic love for YS. In this, sunbae encourages him with talk of the Rib. But both of them could be wrong. I just don't find sunbae very confidence building.

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Angels are supposed to be lesser beings than mankind- who are capable of many kinds of love- which is why people are important to God. If you read Milton's PARADISE LOST you will discover that jealousy of this fact was what drove Lucifer to rebel against God.

But Dan was not originally an angel. He was a boy. So he partakes of the nature of both angel and man. This may be why Hoo has been so cryptic- perhaps it is God's plan to re-awaken the man in Dan. We shall see.

4

I am agree with your comment as this message aligns with any religious scriptures (e.g. Quran, Bible, etc.), which probably what this writer try to emphasize in this story.

"If angels are supposed to be such one-note servants of God, why did God allow them the ability to fall in love in the first place?" Love comes in many forms, however deities only allows angels to have agape love in which to love deities ONLY as they were heavenly creatures to carry deities' command and also to mirror deities' selfless love for mankind and the universe deities creates.
(I refer to deities as the translation mostly write deities than God)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think the reason some people are starting to get disappointed at the recent episodes is that they expect this to be a melo but forget that this is actually a fantasy drama, which means the fantasy element may not make sense and can be used purely to serve the purpose of the story.

Sure, logic often times go out the window, but it propels the story forward and serves the purpose. I liked the impact of Hoo vanishing Angel Noel to scare the crap out of Dan. How else could he get Dan to understand the gravity of his actions? He's tried countless times to warn him, but apparently it hasn't worked. This does not automatically equal to "God is merciless". If that is the case, then Angel Noel would have been punished from Day 1 (or 2 or 3), not a year later.

I do not see the theology as hindering the story but instead I regard it as a fantasy religion (pulled from various religious beliefs). I still love the growth of our characters and the emotional punch they pack in every episode. That scene of Yeon Soo sobbing her heart out in the field. 😭

6
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Up to now, I always took the 'angels turn to dust' to mean that they became mortal. Ashes to Ashes, Dust to Dust. Made perfect sense that for an immortal creature like Hoo, this would be interpreted as a punishment.

But this was quite an immediate dustification (I know that's not a word) and now I'm not sure about my interpretation anymore.

5
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

That's a good one, 'dustification', LOL.

I'm more inclined to think that what Hu states as punishment, where Dan is concerned, will be closer to your interpretation of 'turn to dust'. It is and yet it isn't really a punishment, since mortal life brings much joy and leads to (we trust) an immortal life ... and currently we mortals do not take being alive now as something we are being punished for!!!

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Also, I thought that Yeon-Seo's dream in the next episode, of them getting older together, showed another reward of mortal life which Hoo would see as a complete draw-back & punishment.

You've assured me that I can stick with my interpretation :-)

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

As someone who was never imvested in the ballet company politics or how the angel world works, I'm still thoroughly enjoying this drama. I'm here for Kim Dan and Yeon Soo and they have yet to let me down. Their scenes together are filled with more magic than even the angels could conjour up.

7
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Lol @sailorjumun
What thou sayest hath settled into mine inner voice that speaketh to me in Shakespearean lisps. 🤣 What dost thou thinketh of this?

Fortunately before I read you, I had already written in 'normal' English. Heh!

There's a repeated theme of getting wet or getting drowned. As children YS shielded Dan from a big wave splash and from falling into the water. It was raining and she threw off her umbrella to save Dan. As adults, at various times they end up on the bridge over the river, sometimes together. While the first time on the bridge together, Dan gave YS the 'breath of life' when she thought of dying, this time she holds his hand to keep him from falling. However when we have Kang Woo on the bridge, he attacks Dan and both end up in the water.

YS and Dan are more in sync with each other, focusing more on the other, on positive things like giving and happiness. KW remains intent on carrying out his own personal mission and is mainly concerned that no one spoils things for him.

Dan ended up running away each time it rained because of his wing malfunction, and never actually shielded YS with an umbrella after all, I think? It was KW who held an umbrella for her twice. However Dan shielded YS from falling glass with his wings. Methinks big angel wings would make a good shield against rain and wind, and might keep a person warm too!!

It's been a long time since we've seen those wings. I kind of miss them. 😝

6
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm a... decently religious person (not Christian, tho) and I'm trying hard to close one eye and watch it unfold as the writers put out without judging too harshly.

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Same, but the Viki comment section is a mess.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Dan picturing YS crying at the end was powerful indeed. Angel Hoo seems oddly cold the last little while. I’d be surprised if Hoo Sunbae wasn’t one of the angels that did what they did to Kang. Seems weird they’d hide their faces if it wasn’t going to be someone we’re already aware of.

2
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

No, those two characters accosting KW with celestial gun did not include Hu. He seems to not know about this gun business. 😝

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

that scene hit me hard

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Wondering how many angels disguised as human in the serial... After Dan, Kangwoo (initially he was), and Noel, we might meet others along the episodes progressing.... :)

2
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Some of us were suggesting that Butler Jung is a possible angel too.

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I like that idea about Butler Jung - and it would certainly fit with the story and her protective attitude.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

"Your mission, should you choose to accept it... is to be the perfect wingman for a certain ballerina..."

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think all the punishment part of the angels is very cruel. They always did it when there was their lover beside them. The women couldn't see or hear, they just knew that something awful was happening. And I'm curious that celest thing can kill a human like that. They could just erase her memories of Kang Woo but killing instead of him, it's so weird.
Heaven seems to be a weird place...

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@kurama Your thoughts are precisely why I deplore the way this writer is putting anything from anywhere, willy-nilly under the umbrella of 'heaven' which is couched as a Christian heaven, which it is not. If this kind of vengeful punishment were true, there'd be hardly anyone or any angels to populate heaven!

If we understand it as the writer's 'strange' (read 'flawed') concept of heaven, then we just have to accept that this is his story and he is telling it the way he wants, and it is a subjective view of heaven, so beware!

3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Even if I knew that a love story between an angel and a human is not biblical (many people are assuming that it is, based on Genesis 6:2, but the verse is not about angels marrying women,but about faithful children of God marrying unfaithful women) , I am very dissapointed... and I know I am not the only one. God punishes, but not like we would do. He is love, but He is righteous, too. Altough many are putting emphasis on just one trait, there is a perfect balance between them. And even in the Bible, we can find this balance ( God is not a God of Wrath in the Old Testament and Love just in the New Testament. This is a superficial reading of the Bible. Jesus was full of Wrath when he kicked out the merchants from the Temple and God was full of Love saving and forgiving his people over and over again)

"Though God is strict to mark iniquity and to punish transgression, He takes no delight in vengeance. The work of destruction is a “strange work” to Him who is infinite in love. "
( "The Story of Patriarchs and Prophets" pp. 116-117)

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I wish the PD stopped with his over-reliance on those diagonal angle shots. It's driving me nuts.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

@cloggie I've been told (again by Bitches, who has a wealth of knowledge) that those slanted angle shots are called Dutch angles, and they are used to tell us that something is not right with the person or whatever in the scene. His thinking or attitude is askew and this is reflected in the Dutch angles. You must have noticed it used several times ... this I believe accounts for why so many of us felt uncomfortable with KW from the beginning, even before he manifested his obsession.

1
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I didn't know that was the name for it... which is kind of ironic... I can see what Bitches is getting at, but he doesn't just use it for KW, he uses it ALL THE TIME. Unless the PD is trying to tell us that there's something wrong with every character...

I'm now going to pay attention to see when exactly he's using them instead of just being annoyed with it lol

3
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Heh! Yes, I should be doing that too, but I get distracted by 'L' LOL.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

@sychotic1 @kurama @bdxpelik @cloggie @stpauligurl @brownieoholic @lindag @ash27 @kafiyah-bello @moonbean @le_ssy @charlieblue17 @blnmom @13infamyss

Once again, 'Bitches' has done a great job in straightening out the confusing mess of things 'not Christian' that has been meshed into this drama and been wrongly put under a Christian or Catholic umbrella. This is a bit long but explains so many misleading aspects touched on or included into this show that are just not Catholic.

http://bitchesoverdramas.com/2019/06/15/angels-last-mission-love-on-angels-and-old-ladies/#comment-9106

2
9
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for sharing the link. The Christianity-ish religion portrayed here is clearly derived from the Catholic tradition, so it was helpful to read a piece from that perspective. As someone who grew up in a devout Evangelical Christian home, I'm unfamiliar with some of the nuances of Catholicism, particularly surrounding concepts like saints, angels etc that don't really play into the Protestant tradition much if at all.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yes, it's very well done. Two things:

1. The explanation of angels that she is giving is not just a Catholic understanding but also Eastern Orthodox.

2. Just to be clear, the Old Lady is just a character in the hands of the writer. She could be written *as* someone who doesn't understand the joy that awaits her in heaven, or she could be written *by* someone who doesn't understand. I tend to think it's the latter.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Good point... I'm tending to agree with you.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh I understand that most of this is non-Catholic but as Bitches said, the writer seems to be mocking Christianity/Catholicism and I am simply not a fan of that. Thanks for the link, I learned some things about Catholicism that I didn't know.

2
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Do you think the intent is mocking? For me, I feel the writer is more misinformed than mocking. It seems like the work of someone who liked the imagery and concept of Catholicism, but has a shallow view and doesn't understand the basic tenets of the religion. But I never got the feeling that the writer is disparaging the religion on purpose. I think he just doesn't get it, and it's coming off wrong. Based on some comments I've seen, I guess that's not how others are taking it?

3
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Well for me misinformed is similar to mocking. If it is as you say, that means the writer didn't take the time to look into the religion and simply used his/her shallow understanding to write a TV show. That means the writer doesn't care how any negative inferences caused by his/her writing could affect someone who doesn't know about Catholicism/Christianity. TV/Dramas have influence on people, how people, objects, religions are portrayed on visual mediums have affects on how people see those things especially if the people watching are not familiar with those things.

So I understand where you are coming from, but from a personal perspective I understand how TV shows can affect perception of things people don't know about. If you plan on using a subject, approach it with respect. If you don't know, research. Even if you do know, research, because you never know how it can affect others.

That was a bit long, but I hope my meaning was clear.

2
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

That makes sense. So it seems you meant unintentional mocking, whereas I took mocking to mean intentional derision. And I agree that whenever someone writes about anything they are not personally familiar with--culture, religion, even a profession--they should do their research to not spread misinformation. But of course, that usually doesn't happen in TV even for things that are familiar. Just look at most hospital or courtroom scenes or the way mental illness is portrayed. TV sensationalizes for drama; realism is less exciting. It's an unfortunate norm.

3

from a personal perspective I understand how TV shows can affect perception of things people don't know about. If you plan on using a subject, approach it with respect. If you don't know, research. Even if you do know, research, because you never know how it can affect others.

👏👏👏👏👏👏👏
I know I'm so late, but I HAD to appreciate the mindset. This is exactly what I wish too, word to word.

2

Since different denominations have different beliefs about angels I see this more as the writer using religion for a plot point. Not necessarily purposefully mocking religion but not putting a lot of effort into trying to accurately portray it since that's not the main point of the drama. Though considering that an ANGEL is the main lead you'd think the writer would have wanted to establish some more concrete theology even if just made up for this show. However, maybe the writer had a bad experience with religion and this affected the writing? I'm a Christian and I'm not particularly bothered by this portrayal, but then I realized that some people may be influenced by this show. Hopefully any who are have someone they could speak to about any concerns.
In the end I still think that all of this is more for convenience sake.

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

@ash27 @lindag @kafiyah-bello
I'm thinking about the difference in the punishment.
The logic of the punishment is bafflling. Say we accept that angels are sent to mete out punishment upon other angels for their disobedience.

Between Angel Raporas/Kang Woo and Angel Noel, the culpability was, I felt, greater with Kang Woo. It was shown as if he was the one to abandon his mission first, and he choose to hook up with a mortal creature instead of remaining faithful to the deity. He set himself a new mission.

Noel was soft-hearted (like Dan!!!) and could not bring himself to lead the lady to heaven. She enticed him to pretend to be her husband of 30 years and to give up his mission. In this case, the lady seems to be more culpable and Noel was weak because he was kind and soft-hearted.

So the celestial gun should more rightly (I feel) have been aimed at the lady, who was due to die go to heaven anyway, and the punishment of dissipation into nothing should more rightly have been aimed at Kang Woo who let her be led astray. But it was the other way around.

Even if KW's girl, Seol Hee had been shot by mistake, there should have been Dissipation for KW as well or a 2nd shot for him. But the deity unwisely leaves him unscathed, to wreak more havoc in other people's lives like with YS. Most careless of the deity.

In any case, the lady does die, but one wonders now if she gets to heaven or not after she ruined the 'life' of an angel. In the end, did Noel do her a favour or did he also ruin her chance at heaven by being soft-hearted? Maybe that's why the punishment was aimed at him.

Noel's 'death' augers ill for Dan who is soft-hearted and kind, like Noel. However there's a loophole. The missions were different. Noel's was to bring lady to heaven, Dan's is to help YS love and be loved. So we still expect a happy ending.

3
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree that Kang-woo's culpability was greater than Noel's, since he was portrayed as essentially abandoning his mission to appease his own selfish desire, while Noel failed to carry out his mission due to his compassion. But like you mention, I took it as Noel's punishment was due to not only failing his mission but leading the woman into "sin" (deception, selfishness, etc) as well.

I'm also very confused by the decision not to turn Kang-woo to dust. Since he so thoroughly turned away from his faith and abandoned his post, why would he be allowed to continue existing? If an angel is supposed to exist to fulfill their duties on behalf of the deity, which it seems like this show is saying, then why does Kang-woo get to exist when he has denied his purpose? Very strange.

But I see both of these cases as quite different from Dan's. In Dan's case, loving Yeon-seo does not go against his mission as it did in Noel's case. And it is actually causing Yeon-seo to become a better person, so he's clearly not leading her astray either. There's no negative real-world impact as he's following his mission and having a positive influence on those around him. That's why I'm not convinced that he is necessarily going against the deity's wishes. Especially considering Dan was once human and had a connection with Yeon-seo at that time, his situation is unique. It makes more sense that he was sent to her because he can get her to open up and love in a way that others can't. The only way I can see him being in the wrong in this situation is if he rejects the deity and refuses to comply. But as it stands, he is still acting according to his mission.

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think you are correct. Kang Woo's punishment is in fact the strangest. As an Angel he wasn't particularly good, he was impatient, prone to anger, and just generally a bit of an asshole. As an ex-Angel, not quite human, he is still just a bit of an asshole. I think Mathilde tempered him, but she would have eventually left him. That being said I think his punishment is to be immortal, never ever fully realizing that his hubris and arrogance is his punishment, not living without Mathilde.

With Noel, his punishment was not to get to be with his love, so he needed to disappear. We are assuming death, but sometimes it is harder to live than to die.

As for Dan, his loophole is that he was human. So that will probably solve everything. Ahh, childhood connections, SIGH.

The punishments are still disparate and silly. Also excellent analysis

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

What an incredible job by Shin Hye-sun. She gives us two completely different women in Seol-hee and Yeon-seo.

I do not think that the God shown here is simply punishing love- because in fact Angel Noel was permitted to be with his wife for a very long time. In fact, he is finally taken from her at a very normal time in her life when she would usually expect to lose her husband, and at a moment when his loss can serve Heaven’s purpose.

Kangwoo did not turn aware from his angelic duty because he met Seol-hee. We have clearly seen that he had already become disgusted with artists and no longer wanted to carry out his mission when he met her. Instead he had decided to change his mission – which in turn would amount to re-making the world. This is why the heavenly hit squad appeared and tried to take him out- but got it dreadfully wrong and killed Seol-Hee. Ooops- now they have failed their mission and, in effect, left a hole in the world where Seol-hee used to be.

The heavenly assassins tried to do their job and simply bungled it. Noel found that he could not do his mission because he fell in love. Kangwoo is a different critter- he is a loose cannon. His love for Seol-Hee may not have been a healthy one, but rather a substitute for his mission. By being so willful he had the potential of creating havoc.

We all see that Kangwoo’s feelings for Yeon-seo are even more unhealthy - a monomania stemming from trying to reclaim or re-create Seol-hee. It may be that in the end this fallen angel will serve God’s purpose after all precisely through his sickness.

Which leaves us with Dan and Yeon-seo. With the sacrifice of Noel Dan has now been thoroughly warned about the danger of loving Yeon-seo. But there was more to the example of Noel- there is the simple truth that sometimes God does permit love between angel and human, even if Hoo does not get it. Noel was with Mi-ok for a very long time. It served God’s purpose that he be with her- because otherwise Mi-ok (who was supposed to be dead) might have married another man- leaving some other girl without a husband. Leaving Noel with Mi-ok plugged a hole rather than creating one. It seems to me that perhaps in Dan’s case it will be God’s will that he actually stay with her. This angel who was once human will be made human again.

2
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I don't quite get Hoo's deal too. I know he's a sunbae angel but he doesn't seem to be all-knowing.. Like he didn't recognize that Kangwoo was another supernatural being. Maybe he just operates as he's instructed. (maybe he once tried to do something against rules and was punished for it? That's why he's so strict towards Dan?) Anyways, the old lovers' farewell was so heartbreaking I understand how Dan's initial reaction would be to run away.

On the theology aspect, I think writer-nim doesn't plan on sticking to the good aspect of angels. Writer-nim seems to emphasize that angels are merely minions that must do what needs to be done..must love the One only and will vanish into thin air if found to be at fault. Although it's not entirely false..cause it applies to all of Christians who must love God and no other gods.. But it. I hope some things get clarified.
I know the childhood connection explains why Dan ended up meeting Yeonseo again..but everyone seems to be tangled to each other in some way.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

this episode made me so mad

1) it made it seem like the angels had to hunt down kang woo and his girlfriend/wife to break them apart. like he was constantly on the run or something. but from this episode, it made it seem like the sunbae angel knew exactly where the older angel and his wife was. like, there was no sense of urgency to break them apart. rather, he just wanted to break them apart to show dan lol

2) i really dont believe god, angels and heaven would function like this. and be so cruel to break up a couple, or kill someone, or inflict such tragedy upon anyone........the ending had me bawling but i really find it so hard to believe that heaven would punish someone like that

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

To your first point I feel like it shows that Hoo sometimes has sympathy but always carries out his mission in the end. He doesn't particularly like dusting angels (couldn't think of a better term lol) but knows it's his duty to punish or correct them. It seems like he had given the couple time cause he was sympathetic, but was eventually going to do his job in the end. Dan just gave him an extra excuse to do it right then. Still super sad

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Playing catch-up here since i dropped this a few weeks ago. but i like where we're going now. Kim Dan is so sweet, not wanting to hurt Yeonseo like the halmeoni. but i hope he realizes he's already hurting her by leaving.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

They were having some cute moments and in dramas you always know that means trouble ahead. I gotta say the old couple scene was already heartbreaking, but when Dan imagined Yeon Seo in the old ladies places, tears sprang up in my eyes immediately.
I'm keeping hope (faint) that Dan and Yeon Seo will end up together, but I'm more and more afraid it'll end with each of them learning some of kind of lesson and with one of them dying

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *