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[Community] DramaFever was here


Solomon’s Perjury

By OhSoEnthusiastic

This might be sacrilege to the name of Dramabeans, but up until October of last year, the DramaFever community was my main drama community. For those not in the know, DramaFever was an OG in terms of legal streaming sites. I was on the site from the beginning, and in the early days, it was free with ads for everyone. DramaFever quickly became my drama site of choice. I was thrilled that I could watch dramas with good quality subs and significantly better-quality audio and video compared to what you would find on the illegal streaming sites. (No shade to MySoju, my first love.)

It wasn’t until I was deep into using DramaFever that I decided to become a site volunteer. I hadn’t really been involved in any drama communities at that point, and because I had no one I could talk to about dramas in real life, I was desperate for a good community to get plugged in to. The DramaFever volunteer community looked like such a fun, wholesome, exciting place that I wanted in. Not to mention there were some nice perks like getting a free subscription to the site so that you could watch all of the dramas they uploaded–without ads.


Age of Youth

I started off in the Video Drama Club, meeting once a week with a group of other volunteers and guided by an employee of DramaFever who was in charge of recording the sessions. We talked about most of the currently airing dramas on the DramaFever site then the video was uploaded weekly to their YouTube channel (of which there’s no way of getting backups now). Regardless of whether I was talking about my favorite shows or talking about dramas I wasn’t actually watching, I was always having fun.

Despite my intense hatred for early mornings, I found I was willing to wake up at 7 a.m. on Video Drama Club days just to take part. Unfortunately, I eventually found myself in a profound drama slump (which I have yet to shake 100%), and I chose to step away from the volunteer community for a while. Even though I wasn’t as motivated to watch dramas, I still wanted to talk about them. A few months later, I was drawn back to the world of Asian dramas and the volunteer community.

Sadly, the Video Drama Club ended maybe about a year after I came back, but unwilling to leave the community again so soon, I quickly transitioned to taking part in Written Drama Clubs. I took part in clubs for dramas such as My Ajusshi, Revolutionary Love, Andante, and My ID Is Gangnam Beauty, among others. It wasn’t quite the same for me as being part of the Video Drama Club. There’s something about talking about dramas “in person” so to speak, that’s just special. But I kept going–out of loyalty to the site, loyalty to the other volunteers; loyalty to Asian dramas. If I’d known how soon it all would be over, maybe I would have been a little more appreciative of what I’d had.

One awful day in October 2018, viewers who pulled up their web browsers and typed in DramaFever were met with a complete and total surprise–a short note saying the site was no more.


My Ajusshi

Here is where I talk about the demise of DramaFever. Before the website’s demise, a couple of other niche streaming services had already been shut down by the corporate powers that be, one based around classic films and another based around horror films. Those shutdowns hadn’t garnered much media coverage, and DramaFever appeared to be a successful company with a loyal userbase, so the volunteer community had no reason to anticipate anything of that nature happening to DramaFever.

In all fairness, DramaFever’s employees suffered the most out of all of us. But let me tell you, the volunteer community and the DramaFever userbase as a whole were GUTTED. People were in the middle of dramas. People had just paid for another year of subscriptions. DramaFever had been actively acquiring licenses. I was in the middle of a Drama Club with a group of girls that will now never be finished.

But the thing I’m probably the saddest about (excluding the fact that the entire site is gone) is the expungement of the YouTube channel, and with it, the Video Drama Club. The Written Drama Clubs were nice to be a part of, and I miss all the comments and reviews I’d written on the site, but there was something special about the Video Drama Club. It had already come to an end by the time the site shut down, but it always made me feel good knowing those videos were still going to be available on YouTube to go back and revisit.

Members had cycled in and out, but a few of us had been a consistent part of the group. We’d developed a rapport with each other over time and friendships outside of DramaFever. Going to the DramaFever and finding nothing there anymore was like a punch to the gut, but going to YouTube and finding all of the videos gone was a punch to the heart.

I get emotional thinking about how an entire part of my life just…doesn’t exist anymore. That some corporate entity can look at all of that work and the relationships that were built up around it and say “Nah. Don’t care.”

So let this post mark my contribution to the DramaFever site and community, a sort of graffiti in memorium on the wall of the internet: “DramaFever was here. OhSoEnthusiastic was here. This community was here. And it mattered.”

For those of you reading this article, cherish the communities you have, and keep a record of them because you don’t know when you’ll no longer have them.

 
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So, so, so, sad. I had no idea about all the volunteers and the YouTube channel. Thank you for archiving your memories so, at the very least, we who are just now getting into kdramas can appreciate those that went before us, and the road you all forged for us.

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The circumstances behind DF's collapse were understandable, but there is really no replacement. Where can I watch my TvN (legally, in a language I can understand more than 75%) ? And I can't even find most of the classics I like (City Hunter, Rooftop Prince, Fugitive Plan B, etc.) without doing something (that feels) illegal.

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I don't know whether Netflix acquired DF's back catalogue, but most of those - City Hunter, Rooftop Prince - are available on Netflix (at least in my jurisdiction).

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This was a really great write-up, @ohsoenthusiastic! While I was not a big DramaFever user (I also used MySoju as a kid who loves dramas before), I really loved the content on their YouTube channel and it was really sad that it was gone forever. Thank you for sharing your experiences on the DramaFever community. I hope you will feel at home here at DB community!

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Oh,I was soooo sad when MySoju said goodbye,i loved it and back then was my main source...
I apreciated DF for providing us with more C-dramas in content and even if i was not a big user as well(i prefered a more accurate translation to the original and as i understood it irked me)i admired their hard work and dedication for each drama...It was actually a shock when i enetred one day and saw that big announcement...

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I miss the MySoju days more and more. The longer I'm a drama lover, the more I think it was a better time to be a drama viewer. There's just so much...red tape and corporate money involved now. All I want is to watch dramas.

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thank you for sharing >.< the belief i have about programmes/platforms that have formed communities is this: that sometimes, for whatever reason or circumstance, it will come to an end. the programme may end or the platform may close down. but, if the friendships and connections made there are worth maintaining, then those are the most important and should be kept for as long as possible ♥ i hope you still keep in touch with the DF members you have a good connection or friendship with!

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You're right. Everything comes to an end, and I think if things hadn't gone down the way they did, it would still be bittersweet but not so heartbreaking. The way things happened though, it was like getting run over by a truck and then walking around dazzed for a few days. It didn't feel real.

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>.< i'm sorry to hear that. yes - the way that DF bowed out was rather uncalled for and also something that loyal followers like yourself did not deserve. so it's understandable that you'd feel... betrayed even?

at least you're here 🙆🏻‍♀ or whether it's any other K-drama community that you may identify more with, for the support and friendship!

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Wow @ohsoenthusiastic, I knew some people were really upset about the death of DramaFever but I had no idea of the extent of community built around it. And you're right - all these things can disappear with the wave of an uncaring corporate hand.

I wish I'd known about the Video Drama club - that sounds awesome.

I hope you have found a taste of community here at DB instead.

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Great write up. I'm sorry you lost that community. I only used the site for watching dramas but it really was such a gem to find when I first discovered dramas.

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I was never a part of the Dramafever community but even the thought of putting myself in your place and Dramabeans in place of Dramafever saddens me to no end! *sending you virtual hugs*

I just realized how emotionally dependent we can get on online communities! I am not as active as I used to be 2 years back but DB is that place, the safe haven where I can come and talk about my worries or spout nonsense and I will always find people supporting me in both!

Gah! DB! Please always flourish! 💕

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Aww, to get to hear the story of someone behind the scenes of dramafever, is something I’m so happy you shared. It was a serious big blow to me as a viewer to suddenly login in and see that horrible page. At that time, I was slowly watching things in Viki and watching more in Dramafever, cause it had more dramas I was following. I was really becoming attached to the site. So when that happened, it was so tragic for me and my friends.
But like you said, to suddenly see everything, from their Instagram and YouTube channel just disappear was so sad. So, I’m so glad you shared this post and story. Thank you for sharing! We shall never forget of Dramafever’s contribution to the drama world.
Now I’ve been being more appreciative of Viki, as it is the only legal site as of now, that I can follow most dramas I’m trying to follow.

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I sorely miss Dramafever for its ease of use, the quality of playback, and the back catalogue of titles. But I didn't know that such a deep and committed community resided within it. So, as much as I am still angry about the manner it was pulled from users, I am now sad you, @ohsoenthusiastic and your fellow DF volunteers, that you lost such a valuable platform.

I've only been a DB user for a fraction of its life, but I would miss the Beanies if they suddenly vanished. (btw, I miss vanished beanies. Don't anyone else disappear) Your post makes me want to archive all the APAD shenanigans, the BTIOFL and My Ahjussi recap discussions, and so much more. Just in case the overlords decide to pull the plug. (Please don't do that overlords. Mary and the rest of the minions are too delightful to leave so cruelly unemployed.)

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DEFINITELY archive. Archive, archive, archive. If I had known what was coming, I would have been downloading all of the Video Club videos for posterities sake. All of the articles on the site were thankfully not lost forever as some random website/blog had been uploading every single one since Dramafever's origin to their own site/blog (technically illegal, but I'm not gonna complain about it, because it means I now have an archive of all the written drama clubs I took part in), but those videos are gone for eternity. And that makes me madder than a hornet.

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I also have no idea about the community behind Dramafever. But it's the first site I used when I fall to the rabbit hole aka kdrama and it satisfied my new hunger of good quality drama. I was shocked and gutted at the abruptness of the shutdown (I thought it was a glitch on my phone app and i kept uninstalling and reinstalling the app to my own stupidity).

I'm really sorry for your lost community. RIP Dramafever.

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That was such an emotional read. Dramafever being unavailable in my region, never had me checking it out for dramas but I would see the articles or insta. That alone made me realize that they have a dedicated community of commenters but lest I knew there was a lot more to it.

DB has been my only main community that I cherish. Since the beginning DB's model has been to include people and connect them even except for dramas. There is a certain charm in talking to people anonymous to you but unlike myspace or other social media sites, DB is the safe space where as I guess people belonging to diverse cultures and age ranges give me way better advice than my best of friends in times when I need them. I love how people matter here. How people care. Just as egads mentioned, I also miss the people who left and I hope other people don't. Hope you find a good community here too.

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Hugs @ohsoenthusiastic! I hope you find a new community and new friends and could keep in touch with old ones. (Oh I never knew, you could volunteer on Dramafever (it was never available in my region), I knew about it on Viki and the community on Viki is very strong and supportive. )
Thank you for the write up, it shows how inconsiderate people can be when shutting down, at least they could give a prior warning for people to archive their stuff and be prepared for it.

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Awww... *hugs* I haven't commented on DB for a long time but delurked for you. I hope you managed to keep in contact with your online friends.

I empathise with losing the YT channel. I was gutted when we lost videos on viki way back when when things were not licensed. Since I used to be an uploaded.

Online doesn't mean the end of friendships. I know a few group of subbers who became friends. And one group- they meet up since they are in the US and I am not- who sent me my baby showers gifts. And another who visited me halfway across the world.

Friends comes not only from being in physical proximity but shared interests. Besides dramas. Another friend has become my go-to cooking advisor on Korean recipes. It is wonderful that I have friends all over the world because of Kdramas. But someone has to take the first step to get out from behind their username.

Hope you find a community you can hang out with. I cherish the friends I made online and learnt so much from them.

All the best.

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The powers that be screwed everyone over (employees, subscribers alike) when they just shut down without notice. I have friends that cried! Now I mainly watch dramas on VIKI/Rakuten (before I had VIKI AND DramaFever). VIKI still has good content, but DramaFever took away the binge factor and more reliable subs as well. Plus now there is the insecurity in the back of your mind that at any time VIKI could shut down too. Hey, they've already changed their name and subscriber content fees. It's not a leap.

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This is something I'm genuinely concerned about. The streaming landscape is changing very quickly right now, and I fear that Asian media is going to get caught in the cross-hairs. Not only dramas but anime and other things as well.

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This is such a beautiful write-up, thank you for sharing it here with us @ohsoenthusiastic. I cannot imagine the world without dramabeans, this community is my online home -- and to suddenly, without warning have it all taken away sounds terrible. Hope you were able to keep in touch with a few of the folks at Dramafever!

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so sad it disappeared without a trace. i loved that site as well as mysoju. thank you for the explanation/heartfelt memories of it. that must have been so hard yet i am grateful for the time i spent on it and the wonderful people behind the scenes like you. still miss it and so glad dramabeans has survived so far. things are fleeting. enjoy them while you have them.

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This is what happens when the big boys realize that the little guys are making money in a niche market that looks profitable. They either shut you down, shut you out or buy you out. I miss Drama Fever. I had subscriptions with both DF and Viki, but I liked that the subs were fast and professional over at DF (but I really appreciate the efforts of the subbers at Viki...thank you subbers!)

I wasn't shocked that it occurred as I felt that it was inevitable, but I was shocked at the suddenness of it all. I am pretty sure I was in the middle of one or more dramas when it happened.

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Us volunteers have speculated (and it's honestly not speculation anymore but just plan true) that AT&T were buying up and shutting down companies like Dramafever so they could 1) own the content on them and then 2) put it on the streaming site they're currently working on and are supposed to launch sometime next year or the year after.

Which I refuse to use. I will pirate before I do that. I will wear the hat and the eye-patch and start carrying around a stuffed parrot before I use a streaming service that is attached to AT&T. They can go stuff themselves.

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I refuse to use it too - anything ATT.

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Blegh. They're a scummy company. I can't refuse to use their cell phone service, unfortunately, but if I don't have to use them for something else, I won't.

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DramaFever was the main platform I used for kdramas when I started watching several years ago, so I was sad when it got shut down. But I had no idea about the community it fostered. Thanks for sharing, @ohsoenthusiastic.

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I'm just glad to have left my 'sort of graffiti in memorium on the wall of the internet: “DramaFever was here. OhSoEnthusiastic was here. This community was here. And it mattered.”'

Cause it did. It really did.

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ohsoenthusiastic, thank you for sharing. i was an sometimey dramafever follower. but you have my props for being a member of the video drama club. you & the other members brought much joy to the youtube world. that's what i miss the most about the demise of dramafever. the dramafever community was a loss to those of us who watch asian dramas.

also, thanks for reminding me of mysoju! i loved that site. they had the best way of tracking dramas. there is no site that really compares to how they listed dramas. they were my 1st love too.

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Man, I miss Dramafever, but I think I might miss MySoju even more. And that's saying a lot. I miss it so much that I kind of wish we could just go back to the days before legal streaming sites when everything was fansubbed and you needed the ad blocker of Jesus to protect your computer, lol. It was such an easier time then. If you could think of a drama, it was probably subbed somewhere. Or there was a subbing team willing to take it on. Man, Those were the days.

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I am not at all over losing DF and miss it all the time. I continue to be upset and heartbroken about it even though I have premium subscriptions to both Viki and Kocowa.

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None of the other sites have really replaced it for me. There was just something about the way the site worked that Worked for me and my drama viewing needs. And it was the first legal site I used for watching dramas, so by the time I learned of places like Viki, I already had my drama home picked out.

I will say that I like the layout and navigation of Kocowa pretty well. I Hate the layout of Viki though, Hate it. It's clunky, cluttered, and ugly. I just don't like it and tend to avoid using it if possible.

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Omg...there goes my broken heart again 😭😭😭 I was soo pissed and heartbroken when it got cancelled. It's like a breakup you didn't see coming. Dramafever is on a different level! DF has shows that you can never find in other legal sites. Viki, Kocawa and Netflix can't still fill the void :(

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Netflix has mostly crap. VIKI is better content (especially all Asian countries, not just Korean), but the subbing takes longer. Ondemandkorea does in a pinch. I only use it for free content though. Sad to say, none of these offer Lakorns except a few on Netflix.

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There was just something about Dramafever that none of the other sites have been able to replicate for me. It just...felt like home.

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I agree, DF was the "to go" place first and foremost. And now most of the quality dramas are cable, correct? And many that Viki doesn't get the license for. Netflix might but I haven't watched too many dramas there. It's like Viki is being squeezed out as well.

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The cable companies have definitely been hit unfairly by this which just adds another one to the list of grievances I have against AT&T.

I believe Netflix has some sort of deal with JTBC for their dramas, but I don't know about any of the other cable channels.

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Even though, I am Viki long time fan. I miss Dramafever due to they have more variety of kdramas and Chinese dramas then Viki and KOCOWA.

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One thing I don't see mentioned here that is really important is that DramaFever was originally owned Independently. It operated for years beautifully that way. Well, at least as far as the viewer could see. Then somewhere around 2016, Warner Bros bought DramaFever and it wasn't long before it went downhill and crashed. Whoever it was that originally owned DramaFever I bow to. Thank you. To Warner Bros, I'm more tempted to give a rough should bump to as I walk away empty handed.

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Oh sorry, that is supposed to be *shoulder bump not "should bump". Sorry to confuse.

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Wiki says SoftBank bought it in October 2014, and they sold it to WB in mid 2016.

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Yes, apparently there is an interesting history behind DramaFever's beginnings and Softbank was one of the early contributors to the start up even before purchasing it in 2014. I was also surprised to see that two of DramaFevers original founders continued to support DramaFever working at Warner Bros after the purchase in 2016. I sure do miss DramaFever and appreciate this article even though I was never a volunteer or contributor in any way. Just a subscriber.

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The fact that they kept supporting it even after it was bought says to me that they really did care about the site and the users. Even if their new overlords did not.

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This is very true, and I hadn't even thought about that when writing this. It's probably good I didn't go too much more in depth though as my original version of this article I sent in was over 1500 words, lol (I HAVE A LOT OF FEELINGS), so they had to cut a good deal out (no shade; I went on too long, lol; I JUST HAVE A LOT OF FEELINGS).

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What a great idea to post about various sources for kdrama consumption. I had no idea of the fan history behind DF.

Hulu was my original gateway into kdramas. I can't remember exactly how I found DF, but once I did, I rarely used Hulu anymore (and this was before Hulu went to subscriptions.) (I want to say some of the shows on Hulu eventually either had DF or Vikki's ad snippet at the beginning, but I'm doubting my memory at the moment.)

I did have some love hate moments with DF when they went to the subscription model because I often could only afford a one month here and there, and would end up binging like a crazy woman. They often didn't cancel on time and my funds then did not have any wiggle room. That led to a few angry complaint emails. XD

The one thing I miss TERRIBLY now that DF is gone, is the subs they had for historicals in the early days (before I started finding other sources for kdramas overall) were amazing. Whomever did them went out of their way to use more casual common English for the lower classes and set a perfect tone for any palace and upper class related dialogue.

When I later found Vikki (before they dropped the other k), I rarely ever watched historicals there because although I was very impressed by the fan subs, they just did not match the quality of tone on DF I'd come to expect. I eventually assumed that DF must get their subs direct from the broadcasting companies because they were just that darn good to me.

Now that I'm learning what a broad volunteer group they had, I wonder if my long held assumption was wrong! If anyone reading this is or knows who used to sub the historicals on DF back in the day: To you--or please pass my words along to them--my heartfelt thanks. Your work was an immense pleasure to experience, and it really helped shaped my love for the genre. I truly miss how much your style enriched watching them.

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I have heard some complaints (I think it was Bitchesoverdramas) that DF didn't use proper words for how Chinese people refer to each other as 2nd uncle, 3rd uncle, 2nd sister, etc., but instead referred to someone as "Mrs" or "Mr". I think it was Love O2O they were complaining about. The c-dramas on Viki do proper titles. Don't know about kdramas.

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Yeah, Dramafever tended to localize the subs a little too much, honestly. But seeing as both Dramafever and Viki are/were getting their subs done within only a few days, there's really no way to avoid issues like that. Really good translations take significantly longer than these sites do them in, unfortunately.

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Hulu had a deal with Dramafever for awhile where some (maybe all?) of Dramafever's dramas were on Hulu as well, so that's probably why you remember there being a Dramafever ad at the beginning of some of the ones you watched there.

As for Dramafever's subs, it depended. Most of them were done in-house by Dramafever employees, but occasionally some were done by the original broadcasting companies and sent along with the episodes (I think this was only for a rare few though). From the little Korean I know, they did get some subs wrong, and I think they probably localized the language a little too much at times, but I was honestly usually pretty happy with the subs.

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I'm not sure what "localized the language" means? Please explain. I'm thinking it might have something to do with idioms, but I also know I could be way off.

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Yeah, that's part of it. A major aspect of translation is making the translation 'make sense' in the language it's being translated to. Some words don't translate, some idioms are bizarre and confusing to an outsider, and some translations would be too off-putting for a foreign audience, so translators employ a variety of tactics to ensure that things flow properly and the audience can follow the story without experiencing confusion.

For example, even though Harry Potter is already written in English, some of the terms used in the books were changed for the US audience (and I assume for other English speaking countries as well), because the terms don't make sense to us/they aren't common here/they already have a different meaning in American English/there's another term in existence in our form of English that means something similar/many, many other reasons. This is why the British version of the first book is titled Philosopher's Stone and the U.S. version is titled Sorcerer's Stone. Philosopher doesn't have any wizardly connotations attached to it in American English, so American readers would probably read that word and think Aristotle or Plato or something along those lines.

When it comes to something that can't be fully translated because there's no true English equivalent, translators will often simply replace the word with something the local audience already understands and that works in the context of the story even if it's not a perfect replacement. An example would be the Danish word hygge, which is a very specific word for a very specific feeling but that has no English equivalent and spending a paragraph explaining it would be far too much to add to the work (thus fundamentally altering it), so the translator would just replace it with the closest thing to it they can find. In this case, something like cosy or peaceful or happy. None of those terms mean exactly what hygge means, but they're as close as you'll get without going into a long explanation. (A number of European languages actually seem to have very specific words for very specific things that have no direct translation in English.)

And then there's things like Idioms which present translators with a myriad of their own problems, lol.

In my opinion, Dramafever tended to localize their subs a little too much. But I don't really think Viki or any of the other sites are inherently better at any of these things either. I think they all suffer from the same problems, mostly because of the quick turn around they have for their subs. The best quality subs take a much longer time to put together, unfortunately, and that would mean no live-viewing, which I would truthfully be loathe to give up at this point.

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Thanks for explaining this so well. One thing I have liked related to this with Viki (and I don't know if they still have this feature) was the comments that showed up at the top of the videos that folks could insert at a given moment. Often, someone would put an explanation of a direct translation of an idiom like "blowing wind". I liked learning the different idioms and what they meant. There were also many occasions where they would explain certain titles/offices/structures as well.

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@lilyleftthevalley I actually really hate that feature and never use it, lol. I hate having all of that stuff on the screen distracting from the subtitles. My brain inherently wants to try and read both, and then I end up not actually watching the drama. I do wish there were another way for things like idioms to be explained to the audience though, cause I like having as much of the original language accurately translated as possible.

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What I've done with dealing with the dual focus is just watch episodes twice. Once for the subs, then the other for the comments looking for explainer bits. =D

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Thanks for writing this. I also miss DF. I think On Demand Korea got a lot of DF video. For some reason, subs don’t seem to come with. Not everything is subbed. Time between Dog and Wolf is there which is cool because I never found it on a legal site before. Also some historicals are there. I don’t know if anyone else noticed, but Viki seems to be dropping much of their old stuff. You always think there is endless time to get to a series, but this doesn’t seem to be the case. Gotta watch them while we can 😁!

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Not dropped. Their licenses have a time limit. I have lost dramas because the license expires. I only know because I get emails from the paid viki staff to the ? Channel manager of that drama.

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Whether it's because of expired licenses (which could and should be renewed) or any other reason, there are far fewer dramas on Viki now. It's gone from over 1200 down to just over 1000 (still a lot, I know). I just wish they'd do like Hulu used to do and say when a drama will expire. I was in the middle of one that disappeared.
First it was Hulu (where I happened on my first kdrama experience by accident). I had probably 100 dramas on my watch list and suddenly they disappeared. Then it was DF.
I have learned when a drama isn't available to me, oh well, I have enough other stuff to watch. The only real disappointment was Junho's latest and Jung Kyung Ho's Life on Mars.

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@ck1oz @linda-palapala This is probably the main reason why I want to own physical copies of my favorite dramas, other than the fact that I just prefer owning physical copies of things over digital. With a physical copy, you Own it. Completely. Someone would have to come into your home and literally steal it from you in order for you to not own it anymore. If I weren't perpetually broke, I would genuinely pay the upwards of 2-300 dollars it often costs for a high quality, well-subtitled, multi-disk DVD set. And as soon as I Do have the money, I'm going to start doing that.

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I do have some older favorites I would love to own: Heart to Heart, Mawang, c-dramas: NIF2, Oriental Odyssey, Legend of Fuyao. I have Wuxin: Monster Killer and Train to Busan, but that's it.

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I own none at this point, but someday. Someday.

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I hate to point this out. There is literally no well subtitled drama on HD to be had. I would PAY for it. In fact whenever I stopped by Singapore- it is usually my transit point- I have bought legal copies of dramas . I have given them away. Why? Because all the subs suck. They suck so much they are unwatchable.

There is a reason why I sub or learnt to edit. I literally volunteered to edit Kings 2Hearts once just so I could watch the proper subs with all the songs translated. So I am probably one of 3 ppl who has copies of those srt subs. The same reason why I also have Reply 1988 srt subs as well. If you want good quality subs you need to do it yourself.

God. The expired licenses. You think it's bad when it's English. Wait till your mailbox gets messages from non- English rubbers. I just read an email from a Damo rubber. And you guys know how old this show is.

The problem is that even if we can afford to pay for dramas legally, no company comes up to standard. To consider buying the boxed sets. I have given so many sets away.

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Truthfully, I would probably pay for not so great subs too. But I'll also probably buy my DVD sets from somewhere like YesAsia, because I wouldn't trust I was getting a legit version otherwise.

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Immediately after Dramafever shut down, On Demand Korea started doing a promotion kind of hinting like they were going to pick up some of Dramafever's licenses. They had you sign up for a newsletter and everything promising exciting new content to come. But then they never really brought it back up again (and I had signed up for the newsletter, so I was on the lookout for it). After awhile, I just assumed they were using the situation as a chance to market themselves, and as most of their dramas aren't subtitled, I never bothered to check their site to see if maybe they'd grabbed any of Dramafever's old liceses. They might have some, but I honestly wouldn't know, and I don't plan on searching real hard to find out.

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"Thank you for nine great years..." that sentence made me so angry.
A year before DF demise, when I learned ATT&T wanted to buy TW, I told people just wait, if ATT gets to by Time Warner (who owned DF) that will be the end of DF because it doesn't make enough money. So I wasn't a bit surprised.
I feel your pain and thanks for sharing your story. Hopefully the employees have gone on to better things.
For this reason and others, there are certain companies I boycott.

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What makes that line (and the short paragraph that followed) all the more heart-wrenching is I'm pretty sure Dramafever's tech team were the ones who probably had to write it up, which was probably really hard for them to do for many reasons. First, cause a company they'd been apart of for so long was now gone, and second, because they were the only ones who got to keep their jobs and wow must it feel like s*** to know most of your co-workers have been let go while you got to stay. When I read it, I was angry at AT&T and sad for everyone who worked at Dramafever. It just sucked all around.

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Thank you for all of the lovely comments, everyone. I wanted to give a little love back to Dramafever after it showed love to me for so long. I hope I achieved my goal.

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Why screenshots are important
@adieunoire
@christina41218
@ultramafic

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Says Miss "I can just search for it later" ....

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I only have so much memory space allotted to blackmail. 😁

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Oh same same. None of us can ever run for office.

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Oh you tooootally should. I have to get rich quick somehow...

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