Rating:
Average user rating 4.7
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Chocolate: Episode 1

What a promising start to what could be a beautiful drama. JTBC’s newest romantic melo Chocolate comes from the mind of a hit writer with acting talent that’s been missing from our screens for far too long. Top that with rich characters, poignant storytelling, and evocative music, and we’ve got ourselves a sweet dish.

 
EPISODE 1 RECAP

In Greece, a man races through the streets on his bicycle, determined to reach his destination. The man, who we’ll come to know as our hero LEE KANG (Yoon Kye-sang), narrates that he’s been running for a long time to get to someone.

“At times, I wanted to stop,” he continues. “At times, I wanted to flop down and collapse. At times, I got lost, but because of you, I could come this far.” He arrives at an abandoned building by the water, where a woman waits.

He smiles as the woman turns, revealing herself to be our heroine MOON CHA-YOUNG (Ha Ji-won). This, his narration concludes, is where their story begins.

We jump back to 1992, on Wando Island. The young Kang and his mother, who owns a seafood restaurant, meet with their supplier early in the morning. When Mom turns to leave, supplier HA DONG-GYU (Jang Deok-ju) sneaks Kang some Godiva chocolate.

As Dong-gyu watches Mom walk away, Kang teases that he should hurry up and confess his love. Flustered, Dong-gyu snaps that Kang’s father would rise from the grave and kill him if he so much as tried, lol.

At the restaurant, Mom gets ready for the breakfast crowd, with Kang helping. He heads out to the porch to grab some dried vegetables and catches a young girl munching on them. Seeing how hungry she looks, he takes her to a table and sets her up with a proper meal.

The girl sadly admits that she doesn’t have any money, and Kang simply responds with, “I didn’t ask for money.” He rejoins Mom to take care of the customers, prompting the girl to dig into her food.

Later, after the girl’s devoured everything, Kang finds her crying. She tells him that it’s because the food was so delicious, making him smile. He hands her some tissues and then urges her to come back during lunch time for his special homemade chocolate truffles.

He tells her that she’s welcome to a free meal anytime and runs back inside. Before the girl can react, her brother appears — calling her Cha-young — to say that the family’s been looking for her. He gasps at the sight of her empty bowls and warns her that their mom’s going to be so mad.

Cut to: the mom weighing Cha-young in their hotel room, horrified to see that she’s gained two pounds when she has an audition soon. The dad comes in smiling, having made some fried chicken, and the mom immediately shoves it to the floor. Mom snaps that their vacation is over and that they’re going back to Seoul. In the car, Cha-young begs them to stop so she can get her chocolate truffles.

Meanwhile, Kang is busy being a cute little chef as he prepares the chocolate. He accidentally knocks over a boiling pot, burning his arm, but he just wraps the wound up and continues his work. Afterwards, he waits outside with the chocolate, disappointed when Cha-young doesn’t show. Instead, a wealthy-looking woman shows up, along with her family. Kang’s mom sees her, tensing up, and bows in respect.

This woman is HAN YONG-SEOL (Kang Bu-ja), mother to Kang’s late father. In tow are her eldest son LEE SEUNG-HOON (Lee Jae-ryong), daughter-in-law YOON HYE-MI (Kim Sun-kyung), and young grandson LEE JOON.

Apparently, Kang’s dad was supposed to inherit Geosung Hospital, but he left to elope with a housekeeper’s daughter (Kang’s mom). His brother Seung-hoon was, in Grandma Yong-seol’s words, “acting like Geosung was all his.” But after learning that her youngest son had a child, Grandma developed a new plan.

“Is [Kang] the type of person who could win against their son Joon?” Grandma asks. Mom swallows and asks for Kang to be left out of the family’s affairs, for the both of them to live a quiet life, but Grandma cuts in to say that she doesn’t care about her wishes. Eesh…

Outside, Kang sees Joon kicking his dog San’s dog house and making her whine. (Oh hell no — I already dislike this kid.) Kang pushes Joon to the ground to make him stop, making Joon retaliate. He tells Kang to live with the stupid dog, then, instead of ruining his life.

Kang gets ready to throw a punch, only to get up and tell Joon to leave. Kang goes over to San to comfort her, which is when Joon picks up a rock and heaves it at Kang’s head. The boys get into another heated fight until they accidentally fall into the water below.

The boys are rushed to the hospital, with a whole group of doctors looking over a whining Joon while only one looks at an unconscious Kang.

As Joon is being led to surgery, Kang’s mom rushes over and begs that they take her son first, as he’s in more critical condition. Joon’s parents push her aside and tell her to get lost.

Mom watches them go, helpless, until Grandma’s words ring in her head. “Wait!” she calls out. “My Kang is also a part of the Geosung family.” She bursts into tears, while everyone else stares incredulously.

Spring 1993. Cha-young returns to the island and walks all the way to the restaurant (checking her reflection first, which aww). She’s confused, however, to find the restaurant completely abandoned.

Dong-gyu appears, puppers San by his side, and informs her that the owners moved to Seoul. Cha-young nearly cries from the news. She can eat whatever she wants now that she’s done with auditions, and she was really looking forward to the chocolate truffles.

Dong-gyu reassures her that Kang had looked forward to her too, so much so that he burned his arm while cooking. She lights up at that, but long after Dong-gyu’s gone, she’s still sitting outside the restaurant.

Summer 2012. Kang is now all grown up and getting dressed for his mom’s death anniversary. His lawyer friend KWON MIN-SUNG (Yoo Teo) keeps him company as he gives his respects.

Staring at his mom’s photograph, Kang remembers the day she told him they were moving. He’d whined that his dream, like hers, was to become a chef at their restaurant and make people happy with food.

Sighing, Mom had replied that his maternal grandmother died as his paternal grandmother’s housekeeper. So right then, her dream was to be that grandmother’s daughter-in-law.

“How pitiful you are, Mom,” Kang now says to her photograph. “You couldn’t achieve your dream.”

At Geosung Hospital, we see the grown Joon, now a neurosurgeon (and now played by Jang Seung-jo), approach a patient hiding under her bed. He gets annoyed when she doesn’t respond to him and urges the nurse to send her to a psychiatrist. Still heartless, I see.

An older nurse who knows the patient comes by and notes that she seems much better this year. The patient finally looks up, and we see that it’s the grown Cha-young. She lies back in bed and tells the nurse that all the staff here are nice except for Joon. At that, the nurse reveals that Joon lost his family in the same accident she had — perhaps that’s why he’s irritable around her. Surprised, Cha-young looks past the nurse and over at Joon.

Downstairs, Kang overhears a couple fighting as he waits for the elevator. As the girlfriend demands to know who her boyfriend is cheating with, Kang notices that she’s looking awfully pale.

Kang catches the girlfriend just as she passes out and carries her out of there, kicking her cheater boyfriend away in the process. Through another CT scan, she’s shown to have rebleeding from the area she had surgery.

Her doctor, who happens to be Joon, demands to know who brought her in, and he’s not happy to hear who it was. He tracks down Kang and asks if he’s following him around trying to catch his mistakes.

Kang steps forward, smirking, and says that if this is Joon’s way of thanking him, he’d prefer to be treated to dinner. He turns to see his uncle Seung-hoon and bows before stalking off.

Cha-young returns home, still haunted by the memory of her accident. We see that back then, she and her family had been in a building that collapsed. The last words she’d heard from her mom were, “You have to get out of here alive.”

Recalling what the nurse said about Joon, she decides to prepare some food for him. And once she’s baking, remembering her childhood wish to become a chef, she has a big smile on her face.

At the same time, Kang is operating on Joon’s former patient, remembering Min-sung say that he should return to his dream of cooking. Once the surgery is over, Kang leaves exhausted.

Kang: Mom once said that if I get something that doesn’t belong to me, I should return it to its original owner. The pain, wounds, and anger that I can never get used to don’t belong to me, so I’m going to return them. I’m going to return every single one of them and get out of this hell.

The next day, Cha-young leaves Joon’s food in his office anonymously. He catches up to her to give it back, but she denies it’s from her. Sighing, he moves to throw the food away, saying it could be poisoned or something.

Cha-young panics and snatches the food, saying she’ll test if her — er, whoever’s food is really poisoned. She takes a bite, saying it’s perfectly delicious, only to double over in pain a second later.

Meanwhile, Kang has a patient die on his table and takes it pretty hard, even getting nauseous. He’s able to smile, though, when Min-sung shows up with lunch. They go outside to eat and joke around.

Sometime later, Cha-young takes a stroll outside the hospital, balancing her drip on her head. (She’d needed an appendectomy.) She passes the bench Kang and Min-sung were using earlier and finds their leftover food. Oh boy, the excitement on her face.

Assuming the leftovers are trash, she crouches down and happily stuffs her face. “Doesn’t the hospital give you food?” a voice asks, making her choke. She stands and faces Kang, gesturing for his water bottle. Pfffft.

Kang packs up his food and starts to leave, when Cha-young notices his nametag. She recognizes his name but can’t quite place it. She bangs her head, trying to remember, and makes Kang glance back at her, confused.

Then it hits her, and she gasps. Back in her hospital room, she’s joined by her brother MOON TAE-HYUN (now played by Min Jin-woong), who laughs at her story. He can’t believe she met her first love looking like a slob.

Cha-young gushes that Kang grew to be even more handsome, and Tae-hyun scoffs, saying it ain’t gonna happen. She may not even have the right guy.

That doesn’t stop her — the next day, she stalks Kang all over the hospital to see if he’s really the Lee Kang she knew. She trudges back to her room, thinking she must be crazy, and drops her drip.

Someone picks it up for her and she screams to see that it’s Kang. She tries to run away, inadvertently pulling on her IV (ouch). Kang takes her inside and switches out the IV, with her staring at him the whole time.

Her eyes land on his arm, where there’s a distinctive burn mark. And that gives her all the confirmation she needs. He catches her staring and coolly states that he’s too busy to date, so she shouldn’t waste her time. With that, he wishes her a fast recovery and leaves.

That evening at the Geosung household, the family, along with Kang’s aunt LEE SEON-HOON (Yoon Ye-hee), have dinner. Joon is getting on Grandma’s good side by talking about baseball, when Kang walks in and joins them. And to Joon’s annoyance, Kang cuts in to drop even more knowledge on Grandma’s favorite team. Damn, shut down.

Sensing his son’s discomfort, Seung-hoon announces that they’ll be sending Kang to their station in Libya. However, this is the first time Kang is hearing about this. Before he can speak up, Seung-hoon and his wife quickly state that it’s his moral obligation. Aunt Seon-hoon, clearly fond of Kang, asks why Joon doesn’t go too, and Joon’s parents state he’s needed home. Kang clenches his jaw, unable to argue with Grandma right there.

2013. We see Cha-young working in a calm, clean kitchen, juxtaposed with Kang working in chaos in Libya. He looks near tears when he comes across an injured woman and her son. Later, after it quiets down, he finds the son good as new and playing with some friends in the dirt. He smiles, only to frown when one of the kids pulls something out of the ground — a landmine. He yells a warning, but it explodes and sends him flying back.

Kang lies on the ground, covered in blood and completely stunned. As we zoom into his face, we see his eyes glaze over.

And meanwhile, all the way in Korea, a tear inexplicably falls from Cha-young’s face and splashes onto the chocolate dish she’s preparing. She looks up, seemingly surprised by her sudden emotions.

  
COMMENTS

Imma be real — I did not think I would enjoy this drama that much. While I’m a fan of writer Lee Kyung-hee and actors Yoon Kye-sang and Ha Ji-won, the thought of a medical melodrama had me wary. I usually stay away from the medical genre and I wasn’t particularly in the mood for something heavy, but… here we are. I like it. Everything seems to be working so far, with every aspect of a first episode doing what it needs to be doing. I know our characters, I like them (for the most part), and I like the way their stories are handled, the way they intertwine.

Mostly, I’m just grateful that the actual melo isn’t the hit-you-over-the-head kind of melo. There’s a subtleness to our characters and their pain, like a slight breeze; I can feel it, but it’s not overwhelming me. There’s so much loss there, whether it’s losing a first love, losing parents, or losing a dream. With Cha-young’s loss, she came out appreciating life and wanting to live hers to the fullest. She came out with a new dream and ended up fulfilling it. Then with Kang, he’s still drowning in loss. He’s trapped in a family he doesn’t feel welcome in and a career he doesn’t feel happy in. It’s hard to watch, actually, because he makes it look like it’s physically painful to be doing and seeing what he does every day. Props to Yoon Kye-sang for pretty much conveying all of that through his eyes alone.

Compared to Cha-young, I’d say that Kang is surviving rather than living, with the only brightness in his life being his friend Min-sung. The feud with Joon’s side of the family seems like something he’s gotten used to, something he just has to deal with. His heart’s obviously not in “winning” the inheritance, so I do wonder why he’s sticking it out. Maybe he’s been in his situation for so long that he has no idea how to get out of it. All I know is, Joon is completely delusional to his cousin’s true feelings. Or anyone’s feelings other than his own. I really, really hope that Joon gets major character development because I can see a glimpse of humanity. It’s based around a severe inferiority complex, sure, but Joon is trapped within his family, too. Once he sees that, maybe I can work up to forgiving him for kicking the poor puppers. (Hell yes, I’m holding that against him.)

The flashbacks were placed extremely well in this episode, so I look forward to seeing more as we fill in the missing points of the timeline. How else are our heroes’ pasts linked? How has the meaning of chocolate changed for them? Then, of course, I look forward to the future, when we inevitably reach 2019. The ending scene has me worried for what’s to come, but the opening leaves some reassurance that it’ll all be worth it. I saw heart eyes, y’all, so I better get my heart eyes and lots of it. For now, the intense sad eyes will have to do.

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I honestly can't remember the last time I sat through two consecutive episodes of a drama in one sitting, not to mention one that is so emotionally fraught. There are aspects of this one, especially [redacted spoiler for episode two] that hit a bit close to home, but I think I'm kind of looking forward to next week.

Ha Ji-won and Yoon Kye-sang are both managing to convey their melancholy without tipping into the over-melodramatic. Visually, the seaside locations are making me want to chuck my life and just go sit by the ocean. And finally, the food looks fantastic.

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I know right? The food really looks fantastic, and the ocean and the... awwww you can just smell the scent of the sea.

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Were you reading my mind, @mmmmm? I could have sworn I got a whiff of bracing sea breeze (and I don't mean mudflats at low tide!). ;-)

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Hmmmmmm, I watched the first two eps too, but I don't know about this drama. We shall see.

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Loved your review. I am crossing my fingers for this series as I hope it doesn’t cheat us of all the sweetness and heart eyes that it seems to offer.
Make up on the lady and the second lead in some scenes are things I didn’t like. I also felt the episode was a tad bit slow. Maybe it is asking me to slow down :)
I am wondering if I should watch episode 2 now or wait for a couple of episodes to be released... such that it is a long ride and sweet ride with the sweet pain of some heartache instead of agonizingly long waits.

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They packed a lot of drama into this first ep. I'm a bit worried about what is about to come, just that it could start to be too angsty. But overall I liked it. I think the 3 main actors did a wonderful job, and I thought the show, even for some heavy themes, showed some charm even a bit of whimsy.
Now onto ep two with fingers crossed.

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i loved it and couldnt wait to go to the next one....at the moment both the main actors and characters are knocking it out of the park for me....and the wonderful music...a good OST can just elevate any story.....love it...

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Thanks for the recap sailorjumun. I too was surprised by my pleasant reaction to this drama. I tipped my toe in the water for Ha Ji Won, and ended up fully wading in, finishing the first two episodes back to back. Can't wait for the next wave.

I already love our two leads - Cha Young with her cute charm and Lee Kang's bleeding heart. Kang's best friend is a treasure. The cinematography is fantastic and the meals look so beautiful. I am crossing all fingers that the first two hours are not just a fluke. I have had too much disappointments lately.

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I finished both episodes in one sitting, as well, and overall I'm quite liking this drama so far. I didn't find it slow unlike the other beanies in the What We're Watching thread. It's melo but not overly sad or dramatic for my taste, calm but not boring. It reminds me of Encounter in some way. And I found the cinematography to be very pretty. The food shots are a plus, as well. Ha!

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Another drama I didn't expect to like but seems interesting. I have never experienced anything quite like it before so it's definitely a new one for me. The music set the mood which feels a little sad. So much was packed into one episode that it didn't feel slow to me. Just finished watching it last night. It kind of feels like a movie and I wondered if I could sit through more than one episode without a break to absorb the episode. But the ending scene made me curious enough to want to watch the next episode right then but I had to go sleep. Definitely going to watch it today.

The Greece scenes are so beautiful. I can't even. One thing I didn't like was that the food preparation scenes being shown one after the other and side by side with the medical scenes and it made me feel sick made worse by the fact that I was actually eating. Still some of the food was pretty to look at.

So many tropes were fit into one episode and yet the plot is interesting to watch. But it's just the first episode and there are fifteen more to go. I also found myself shouting at the screen at the characters, reactions ranging from don't, stop, he didn't, ugh serves him right (the cheater boyfriend when Kang pushed him), how dare he or they, etc, heh. Still I liked the episode overall.

Also I didn't even recognize the actor who played Jerome in Vagabond as the same one who is playing Kang's friend, his role is so different here. I have only seen Ha Ji Won in 'Hospital ship', though.

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It reminded me of a movie too. It is the way it is paced and show time, like vignettes, that you dont often see in tv. Probably as a way to fit a lot in to a movies limited time and so am curious how the show will continue, especially as we approach the present.

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Yes it's totally different from the usual kdramas. I am kind of surprised I liked it.

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Yup! The way it's shot made it seem more like a movie than a drama to me, too. I really like how they did it. The music in this drama's very well done, as well. Both add a lot to the viewing experience.

Overall it reminds me of older movies which apparently I'm in the mood for, lol. Given the writer's track record this one's definitely going to be a tearjerker but as of the first 2 eps, I'm surprisingly really enjoying it. Feels like a warm cup of hot chocolate on a cold night.

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Sorry, but Joon is better looking than Kang as the main lead.

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So? Why does the lead of a drama have to be what is considered better looking? Also, Kang is plenty handsome.

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It's just my preference.

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I really think the child actors set up their adult characters so well. (This is the year of great child performances in K-drama land).

I am not a big fan of the first love only love trope but in this situation it may work because Kang still yearns for his simple life with his mother which is a powerful memory with Cha-young.

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I mean, I like the first two episodes much more than I thought I would. I like chocolate, so I can relate well with the female lead when she said she ate chocolate whenever she was anxious. There are many pluses in the show: cinematography, the interesting careers among other things. I don't know much about Kdrama tropes since I don't watch Kdramas that much, but I think there were handled quite well. Though there were times when I didn't really believe the actors, those moments were temporarily and quite short.

Above all, I think I like how these two 'imperfect' people will complement one another in the end (if it ends well ofc.) One has a bleeding heart and yearns for relaxed time and a simple life doing what he loves, and one who couldn't forget her first love, and has always regarded him as somewhat her inspiration as well as her first love. The former is a neurosurgeon and the latter is a chocolatier.

Above all, the food looks yummy. The scenes are nice to look at. The drama goes on in a somewhat slow but relaxed manner, and I guess that that's its charm.

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Well, I kinda rewatched the first episode and have one question: why the nurse at the hospital told Cha-young that doctor Lee Jun lost his family in the same accident as her? Did the nurse lie to Cha-young? Or the nurse misunderstood that it was Lee Jun who lost the family while in fact it was Lee Kang?

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Lee Kang's mother was Lee Jun's aunt, so she is family even if they treated her badly.

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Thanks! Really, I felt so sorry for her for being so mistreated like that, and because of that I truthfully could not make sense of the nurse's words when I heard them at all. I totally forgot that they were indeed family.

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There's likely more to that story and situation, which will probably reveal some guilt and angst later on and make clearer why Lee Jun won't talk about it.

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i went into this feeling a bit antsy and left feeling wonderful. i love yoon hye sang. can't say the same for ha ji won but she is wonderful in this one! it is as others say, serious but a bit whimsical and overall i love it! plus. chocolate is my go to when i am anxious or depressed. it really helps if i stay off the scale!

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I watched the first two episodes last night because I've really been looking forward to this drama. First I love dramas with food themes, and second I've been a fan of Yoon Kye Sang since, "Road No. 1."

I thought the beginning of episode 1 was a little too cheesy, but as it went on things got better in a hurry. I've got an idea that this one, like most Kdramas is going to be a fate-weave of enormous proportions.

It starts out with the usual love triangle, and I think once one side of the triangle dies, another will join, in the form of Lee Jun. Since Kang and Jun hate each other to begin with, this will make for even deeper wounds. Like, "Something Happened in Bali," Ha Ji Won's character will be caught in the middle, and put through the wringer big time.

Like a lot of food Kdrama's the healing power of expertly made food will come to the forefront--in the hospice, and in Kang and Cha Young's lives and relationship.

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I also thought of What Happened in Bali. It was so good and i hurt for Jae Min in What happened in bali. Hope this one has happy ending.

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Only watched the first 10 Minutes and I can tell, the music is a piece of art itself. It delivers the feeling of a whole world enclosed in a snow globe. Also makes me think of another Answer me/reply season..

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When i heard the music, i knew this is a quality drama & has decent budget on the top of experienced actors.

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After watching the first 2eps, I can safely say that I really like it, this drama.
At first, 2 things attracted me to anticipate this drama: it’s food-related, and it has Yoon Kye Sang :) But then some reviews told how the first week was trope-fest, so I was a bit worried the drama won’t do well. However, I was surprised to like the main characters from the get-go, I found the reason for the female leads first love is believable (I swear some drama play this trope annoyingly, HA), and since her childhood memories is one of the main plots for the drama, then I really need it to be plausible, and I was relieved that I found it that way.

Lee Kyung Hee, the writer, was the one who put me into misery during the 2 dramas: Will It Snow for Christmas (super angsty middle to the end plot), and Wonderful Days (family vs love theme), so of course with this drama I should know what I am going into, but but I like the leads and their story in the beginning of the drama, and the music, ooh it’s beautiful, and I guess the cinematography helps setting the mood too, now I am happy to have Chocolate to look forward too during the rainy days this December, so even if this is going to be heart-wringing and a tearjerker, please let all be worthy for the characters to be healed and happy in the end!

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this drama has captured my attention just like (*snap*) that! Having just finished When the Camellia Blooms, I was worried I'd have withdrawals. But Chocolate launched me right back into K-dramaland as smooth as, well, chocolate!

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I already hate Cha Young's brother and he is gonna bring her unnecessary angst because he is a selfish douchebag.

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ohmy..I love this one! I didn't pay any attention during this drama's promotion and it had popped up many times on youtube or IG. But I got caught up right way by its warmth and dreamy tone. Yoon Kye Sang is so swoony only by his very existence <3
I love Ha Ji Won too, her earthty and classic vibe are lovely. Not to mention the food galore..bring them allll

I found out about the writer and it got me anxious if it'll be overly tearjerking, but I still look forward to its melo, I'm in the mood for it I guess :))

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Thank you for your recap, @sailorjumun. I hadn't planned to watch CHOCOLATE because I've been awaiting ROMANTIC DOCTOR TEACHER KIM 2.0. But for the heck of it I tuned in to the first week's episodes, and noted that the show got off to a better start than HOSPITAL SHIP, which I dropped after a few episodes, despite my love for Ha Ji-won. CHOCOLATE looks more promising. Here's hoping I dodge an acute case of Medical Kdrama Overload Syndrome. I'm not actually a fan of melodramas and selfish tycoon heirs behaving badly, but occasionally end up watching them when the cast is appealing.

I enjoyed Jang Seung-jo's performance in MONEY FLOWER, and wanted to see what he'll have up his antagonistic sleeve in this production. It appears that he's got a serious case of Chaebol Heir Derangement, which explains his anger management issues even as a kid. Considering his battle axe of a grandmother, I can't say that I blame him.

As for our hero, Lee Kang, he's really gotten the shaft from his horrid paternal family, but grew up to be a decent human being because of his early start with his Mom. Thank goodness he has a good friend in lawyer buddy Min-sung. I couldn't even recognize Yoo Teo in modern non-Neantal garb. (Does it make me a bad person to kinda wish he would channel his inner Ragazeu and liberate Lee Kang from the clutches of Geosung Inc.?)

The opening seaside scenes in Greece remind me of both LEGEND OF THE BLUE SEA and THE THIRD CHARM. The cinematography is lovely.

I was a bit taken aback when Jatanpung's "Me to You, You to Me" from the soundtrack of THE CLASSIC (2003) played in a scene from 1992. Maybe the anachronism is actually an audio flashback -- or foreshadowing. Whatever. It's one of my favorite Korean pop songs. Oddly enough, I just rewatched the film a week or two ago. The lyrics and sentiment are right on the money for the scene, as is the whiff of fatedness conjured by the association with the movie.
http://www.dramabeans.com/members/pakalanapikake/activity/940964/

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One more thing: I cannot help but sense that the precious bars of Godiva that Kang wanted to share with Cha-young in 1992 are signalling that we are in for a bitter(sweet) journey with these characters. Fingers crossed that the theobromine alkaloid that gives chocolate its fiery, stimulating effects also delivers enough antidepressant oomph to keep woori leads keepin' on in the face of the adversity that is circling like a famished turkey vulture.

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I had no expectation since i was disappointed by last 2 dramas of Ha Ji Won and also if i have higher expectation, i get easily disappointed. I thought kids part was too short to have first love or whatever. But adult versions was so good, i actually am happy that we got short time on the childhood. 2nd episode was even better than episode 1.

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