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I’ll Find You on a Beautiful Day: Episode 2

Things start to come together this hour as we’re given more insight into our heroine as she begins to reintegrate herself into the town she left long ago. While our lead still struggles to express himself around his long-time crush, circumstances bring them a bit closer and give them a chance to get to know each other better. Additionally, our heroine meets a welcoming group of potential friends which may be just what she needs right now.

 
EPISODE 2: Is It Past Perfect?

Hae-won draws a tattoo on the back of her hand but stops to glance out the window towards the bookshop where Eun-seob is currently wallowing in his embarrassment. Hae-won goes over to ask him a question, resulting in the awkward conversation and door slamming incident we ended on last episode.

In a flashback, we see a teenage Hae-won standing at Hyecheon Station with a suitcase. She makes her way to Hyecheon High School with her aunt. Hae-won doesn’t look thrilled to be there, but her classmates are excited to have a new transfer from Seoul.

Back in the present, Eun-seob opens the door to ask what she’d wanted to say. She’d been hoping to borrow “The Wind in the Willows,” the book they’d discussed earlier. He tells her to take it and busies himself.

She asks which copy of the book is his favorite, but he responds he likes them all. Way to kill the conversation, dude. Hae-won sees he’s not in a talking mood and leaves. As she walks up the street, a light shines from behind her. She turns back to see Eun-seob lighting her way with a flashlight. “It’s dark,” he explains.

She feels bad he’s walking her back when it’s just up the street, but he doesn’t want her to walk alone in the dark this late. He brings up his confession and hopes it doesn’t bother her. She assures him she’s fine. Eun-seob wishes he’d have thought to make someone up instead, but she responds it’s all in the past anyway, right? He doesn’t say anything.

Eun-seob notices she changed the henna tattoo on her hand—it’s willow leaves now. Hae-won drew it since she couldn’t fall asleep. He takes a closer look and asks how long it’ll last. He smiles that it’s pretty. They lock eyes and get awkward.

As they continue walking, he asks if it hurts to do. Wait, does he think she’s up in her room tattooing herself with a needle? Heh, she messes with him and says of course it hurts; it’s branded on the skin with a hot iron. He realizes she’s teasing him, and she laughs.

The following day, Hae-won visits her grandmother’s grave with Myung-yeo who complains to her mom that Hae-won quit her job. Hae-won fires back that Myung-yeo smokes, leaves the house a mess, and closed the guesthouse. And she weirdly wears sunglasses all the time (Myung-yeo: “It’s called fashion.”). Hae-won starts to say something else and pauses.

She gets emotional and thinks back to when she was little and curled up on her grandmother’s lap. Hae-won had mischievously tickled her nose, making her grandmother accidentally hit her on the forehead. Hae-won had started crying while her grandmother laughed and comforted her. Hae-won tears up as she says, “Grandma, I really miss you.” She abruptly walks off, leaving Myung-yeo to sigh alone by the grave.

Hae-won stops by a pharmacy and is surprised when the pharmacist recognizes her. It seems everyone knows her grandmother and the guesthouse. Hae-won spots a rocking horse and comments that a kid must hang out there. The woman sighs that the kid is no longer with them. Hae-won looks upset until the woman clarifies that the kid is long gone and left a surly teenager in her wake. Ha!

The pharmacist asks concernedly if her aunt has seen a doctor for her headaches yet. Hae-won is thrown as the woman continues that with headaches that severe, it’s critical her aunt get it checked out. Hae-won goes out and calls home from a payphone. Why the heck she’s using a payphone rather than her cell is beyond me.

Jang-woo happens to be passing by and treats her to vending machine coffee at his workplace, Hyecheon City Hall. When he brings up an old classmate Kim Bo-yeong, Hae-won has an odd reaction. Although she affirms they were close, there’s a hesitancy there.

Jang-woo says Bo-yeong was sad she couldn’t make the reunion and wants to see Hae-won. He suggests another get-together since everyone’s still in Hyecheon—very few went to Seoul like her. She counters that he went to Seoul National University, but he replies he was proud to return and work for Hyecheon. He asks what’s she’s doing that evening. When she says she doesn’t have plans, he invites her to go “somewhere fun” with him.

We cut to a teenager whining to her mother CHOI SOO-JUNG (Lee Seon-hee) about her missing socks as Soo-jung rushes out the door. At the pharmacy, surly teenager KWON HYUN-JI (Chu Ye-jin) swipes some hot packs and runs out before her mom can catch her. At a nearby LED store, BAE GEUN-SANG (Lee Tae-hyung) gives a passionate sales pitch but ushers his customers out when he notices the time.

JUNG SEUNG-HO (Han Chang-min) excitedly hurries his grandfather JUNG GIL-BOK (Lee Young-seok), saying they’ll be talking about winter tonight, so he read “Winter Sun.” Oh, are they all headed to a book club? Hwi barrels down the street on her bike, rushing into Goodnight Bookshop as Jang-woo introduces Hae-won as a new member.

Those who don’t know her yet introduce themselves to Hae-won. It seems like a close, comfortable group with all types of people of all ages. Jang-woo didn’t tell Hae-won what the group is ahead of time, so she’s only now finding out it’s a book club. The fact that his fun surprise is a book club makes him ten times more endearing to me.

Soo-jung starts off by reading a poem titled “A Drink” by Jung Ho-seung from the collection “The Person I Love.”

Life has never bought me a drink.
On many winter nights,
At a snack stall in a dead-end alley,
I emptied out my pockets to buy life a drink.
But life has never bought me a single drink.
Whether it was a snowy day,
Or a day when a stone lotus flower silently bloomed and fell.

As she reads, Hae-won recalls being alone in Seoul, feeling pressured to work harder and make her classes more “fun” per her boss. Hwi wants to go next, but Jang-woo wants to hear from Hae-won. The theme is winter, so anything that comes to mind on the topic is fine.

Eun-seob jumps in to say she hasn’t had time to prepare, but before he can finish, she begins to recite a passage about painful memories of a lost love. It’s from “An Empty Field of Grass,” a novel written by her aunt who is revealed to have been a best-selling author. Everyone loves it and is amazed Hae-won committed it to memory.

They munch on some roasted tangerines (You can roast tangerines?!) as they chat and laugh together. Messing with Jang-woo, in particular, seems to be everyone’s favorite pastime. And aw, Hyun-ji stole the hot packs for Gil-bok. Hae-won watches everyone goofing around and looks genuinely happy and relaxed.

Geun-sang walks Hwi and Hyun-ji home and asks what Hyun-ji’s dream is. She wants to be a rapper who’s famous but not a celebrity and writes lyrics everyone can relate to but aren’t common. Pfft. Hwi calls it nonsense, and she and Hyun-ji bicker the rest of the way.

Hae-won stays behind at Goodnight Bookshop. She tells Eun-seob she hasn’t read in a while. Her life was hard enough without worrying about the problems of characters in stories. But today made her curious, especially the poem collection “The Person I Love.” Eun-seob smiles.

Hae-won’s friend Ji-yeon (mother of the disappearing baby) finds it odd that, despite living next door, Hae-won and Eun-seob weren’t close. But Hae-won does have memories of him from high school, even if they’re vague. What about him?

That night, Eun-seob recalls Hae-won saying she has memories of him and opens his journal he’s had since high school. He thinks back to his fleeting encounters with her back then and one memorable day in music class. The teacher had wanted her to play cello for them, but since she didn’t have her cello with her, she played piano instead. Eun-seob was mesmerized. In the present, Eun-seob falls asleep to that same piano piece.

Over breakfast, Hae-won checks with Myung-yeo about the headaches the pharmacist mentioned. Myung-yeo downplays it and claims the hospital told her nothing is wrong. She changes the subject to Hae-won’s unemployment and is displeased with Hae-won’s plan to give music lessons part-time in town rather than going back to Seoul.

When Hae-won sees a flyer announcing Goodnight Bookshop is hiring, she marches right over to Eun-seob’s. She holds up the flyer and points at herself, smiling. But she’s dismayed to realize he was looking for someone who could ice skate, which she can’t do. Uh, what does an ice rink have to do with the bookshop?

As she leaves, he calls after her that she can work in the bookshop, then. He’ll work at the rink since he knows how to skate. Pfft. Did he just give her his job ’cause he likes her?

In the bookshop, he tells her there’s not much to do since they rarely get customers. Most of the shop’s money comes from online sales. All she has to do is look after the shop while he’s gone. And with that, he heads to the rink. That’s the extent of her training?

Hae-won lazes in the shop, listening to the sounds of the kids having fun at the rink. Looking out the window, she sees Eun-seob’s mom YOON YEO-JUNG (Nam Ki-ae) doting on him. Soon after, Hwi and their dad IM JONG-PIL (Kang Shin-il) join them. Hae-won’s smile as she watches the happy family is tinged with sadness.

Hae-won is reading when Eun-seob gets back that evening. There weren’t any customers that day, which Eun-seob says is the case most days. Jang-woo comes in with a case of beer as she’s leaving. They end up chasing the beer cans around the floor as the case inexplicably bursts. Jang-woo comments these things always happen to him. Ha, I feel you on that one.

Over drinks, Jang-woo rants about his mom trying to marry him off when he’s not even 30 yet. Hae-won heard that people here tend to marry young, which Jang-woo thinks is exactly the problem. Eun-seob’s mom, on the other hand, adores him and wants him to stay unmarried for a while yet.

Jang-woo brings the conversation around to high school and wonders who Hae-won found most annoying. For him, it was Eun-seob with his aloofness. Eun-seob scoffs when Jang-woo complains about the amount of effort he put into his achievements and pleasing people. Jang-woo puts him in a headlock.

Jang-woo brings up Bo-yeong again, saying she wants to clear up some “misunderstanding” between her and Hae-won. Hae-won goes cold and says she hates that term. Just admit if you did something wrong—don’t pass it off as a “misunderstanding.” It puts the responsibility on the wronged party by implying it was their mistake.

Jang-woo awkwardly agrees and whispers to Eun-seob that she’s really blunt. Hae-won continues that Bo-yeong was in the wrong and never apologized. They go silent and jump when a horn honks outside. Jang-woo springs up and announces his taxi is here to get him out of this awkward situation, for which he is deeply grateful. HA!

On his way out, Jang-woo says in a rush that he kind of gave Bo-yeong the phone number for Hodu House. She might call Hae-won. He leaves with a big smile and wave as Hae-won yells after him.

Eun-seob asks if she has anything else she’d like to say. We flash back to when Hae-won met Bo-yeong for the first time. She was excited to learn Hae-won lived at the popular guesthouse with her aunt Myung-yeo, the famous novelist. Bo-yeong noted that they were very different, seeing as her family ran a mill. Hae-won didn’t see why that should make a difference, making Bo-yeong smile.

From then on, Bo-yeong made an effort to befriend her. They hung out frequently and became seemingly close. One day, Hae-won overheard three girls gossiping about her. One of the girls dramatically announced that Hae-won came to live with her aunt because her mom killed her dad. Whoa. That’s … a lot to unpack.

The girl swore it was true because she had heard it from Hae-won’s close friend Bo-yeong. Hae-won got up shakily and accidently knocked over a glass container, causing the girls to scream and run out. Hae-won found a spot to hide alone and cry.

Hae-won tells Eun-seob that’s why she can’t accept it as a “misunderstanding.” She looks over to see Eun-seob nodding off. Ha. He’s only had two beers, but he’s clearly drunk, despite insisting he’s not when she goes to leave. She observes that he’s even worse than her when it comes to holding his alcohol.

Eun-seob is completely out by this point. Hae-won bends down to stare intently at his sleeping face and smiles before catching herself. Looks like someone’s developing a crush. She announces she’s leaving and he mutters, “Irene.” She turns as he slurs, “I’m really happy you came, Irene.” Meanwhile, the phone rings at Myung-yeo’s but goes unanswered.

The next morning, Hae-won wakes to the sound of rain and smiles before energetically preparing for the day. She catches sight of herself in the mirror as she heads out the door and runs back upstairs to put on some makeup. When Myung-yeo wonders where she’s going so early, Hae-won happily replies she’s headed to work.

At Goodnight Bookshop, Eun-seob brews coffee and heads outside (while it’s pouring rain) to sit under the awning and read. When Hae-won gets there, he gives her his coffee. She teases him for falling asleep after a couple sips of beer, and he comments that he can’t remember what happened after that. Eun-seob jokes that maybe he should keep drinking to help his insomnia.

Hae-won is extra smiley and mentions that he said something the previous night. She quotes what he said to “Irene.” He slams his book closed at that. Clearly enjoying this, she repeats it for him and comments on how affectionate his tone was, adding to his embarrassment. Her laugh is cut short when a voice interrupts, “How have you been, Hae-won?” And, of course, it’s KIM BO-YEONG (Im Se-mi) ruining the moment.

 
COMMENTS

We got more movement today, thankfully, and I have better idea of where we’re headed now. There were tons of introductions this episode, most of whom were in the book club. It looks like the book club is going to feature prominently, which makes me happy. It has such a warm, inviting atmosphere. They accepted Hae-won without question when Jang-woo brought her along, and it was the first time Hae-won looked so content. I think it could be instrumental towards her opening up and feeling accepted maybe for the first time. Also, I liked how they incorporated what people were reading. I hope they continue to work in poems or novels à la A Poem a Day.

I think Jang-woo is my favorite character at this point. He’s almost childlike with his transparency, like when he outright addressed the awkwardness after Hae-won’s anger. I love that he just says what he thinks and feels. In that way, he and Eun-seob are such opposites. Eun-seob is so guarded and quiet, which is quite a contrast to the rest of his family. He has gotten a little better around Hae-won, as in he can now string sentences together around her. Hopefully, her working at the bookshop will help him become more comfortable with her. I was surprised Hae-won is already showing signs of interest since I thought it’d take longer for her to notice him. She seems to find his awkwardness cute, though. If it were left up to him, there’d probably never be any progress, so it’s a good thing he gave himself away with the “Irene” thing. I don’t have strong feelings about the romance yet, but I’m hoping they don’t rush things and take their time developing it.

That’s an intense backstory for Hae-won. I expected something about her parents, but it definitely wasn’t that. It helps explain her melancholy demeanor and why she tends to stay in the background. I imagine she doesn’t want to draw attention to herself and have people point fingers at her as the daughter of a murderer. Her not defending herself at her job seemed strange considering she has a pretty direct personality, as Jang-woo noted, but it makes a little more sense now. She probably doesn’t want to appear aggressive or cause problems since people could accuse her of being like her mom or some such nonsense.

It’s interesting that even after all these years, Hae-won still has such a strong reaction to Bo-yeong. From the looks of it, she was Hae-won’s first friend there, and it doesn’t seem like Hae-won opens up to people that easily. But something seems off with the situation which makes me think Hae-won doesn’t have the full story regarding Bo-yeong’s “betrayal.” Did Hae-won even confirm that Bo-yeong was the one who told? I’m sure we’ll find out more soon since Bo-yeong is eager to clear things up.

I knew something was up with Myung-yeo’s health. Now we know about the headaches, and I don’t believe her statement that the doctor said there’s nothing wrong. I kind of doubt she even went to the doctor. Either way, she’s so stubborn I doubt she’ll tell Hae-won the truth about whatever’s going on. But then again, Hae-won is stubborn too, so maybe she’ll force it out of her. Why is it drama families can never just be honest about their health?

 
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I’m trying to decide whether I like this drama or not. Definitely slower fare, but I don’t know if I feel the drama is trying too hard to be artsy or take itself seriously. But then again, I’ve never been a melo watcher. I can already tell I will love the little moments with the book club. Pseudo families will always be my favorite, and those small glimpses of how they care for each other is already so appealing. The punk teenager is still a punk but one with a heart of gold.

For the cell vs. pay phone dilemma, I actually had to stop and think about it for a moment. But I’m going to give the drama the benefit of the doubt and guess that the rural area is SO out there that the cell service is too spotty to use. The guest house and the bookstore both have been using landlines. My issue was that Hae Won didn’t seem more bothered by her aunts splitting migraines. Seems like a pretty serious problem, especially if she’s been wearing sunglasses 24/7. Plus, we have the benefit of knowing that in dramaland, that’s never a good sign.

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Oh, this one was RIGHT up my alley. Completely. And I had exactly the same reaction about the cell service - sometimes when you're out in the woods it truly isn't reliable.

I love the mood, the quiet, the contemplation. I love that the boys elected to stay there. I love that there's value in being a villager/townie, which is something a lot of us don't realize until we've lived in the city for decades (yes, there's value in city living too, but sometimes I see a friend who stayed home and realize there was quite a lot more available on that other path than I understood).

I am very much looking forward to Hae Won easing into village life. I thought her energetic explosion painting the house was a good parallel - she's so Seoul-paced (go, do, achieve!) despite the fact that she doesn't seem temperamentally suited to that speed, I'm looking forward to her learning to just read the weather and settle into a broader community.

Honestly, this show is 100% what I needed right now.

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The pace of this episode was better than the first one's. This episode makes me very curious about every characters!

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For Uh, what does an ice rink have to do with the bookshop? Isn't his mother who manages it? I guess he helps his both parents when they need.

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Bo-young seems like a sweet friend from the flashbacks, so I am hoping that if she is indeed the sweet girl I believe her to be, she and Hae-won clear things up ASAP because Hae-won clearly needs a friend (who isn't really a romantic interest).

The book club looks so fun and having a bookstore in the countryside sounds cool, but does Eun-seob really earn anything from selling books online?

And Jang-woo is the cutest thing in this show. Thank goodness Lee Jae-wook isn't a murderous son-in-law or a fiance with anger management here because he gets to act in a different role again.

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Hm. About Bo-young, I've met "sweet girls" like her before. Mean girls are always good at appearing nice. I was betrayed by someone I thought was a friend - and endured some pretty heavy-duty bullying as a result - back when I was 13. I really wouldn't want to be friends with those girls now over 40 years later, much less only 10 years after it happened. Maybe the show won't go there - it seems to be a feel-good story about creating your own family and community - and will offer retribution for Bo-young, but that would definitely be the rarity in real life.

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I'm so sorry such thing happened to you in the past and I hope you are friends with genuine people now. I forgot to mention that since the show has the feel-good vibe, I get the feeling that Bo-young was indeed genuine back then, but something went wrong so she was eager to clear things with Hae-won. But I know the "sweet girls" you've mentioned do exist in real life and I've had too much of those kind in both dramas and in the real world (reaaaally tiring), so I would appreciate it if the show offers us something refreshing, such as a likeable second female lead. Of course, Bo-young needs to redeem herself whether she was a good or bad person, because what happened definitely took a toll on Hae-won.

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I'm with you on Boyoung. I've been friends with people who belonged to different social strata, & I never gave two thoughts about it because to me were normal friends.
But she had a complex she'd voice out sometimes, & it was only later that I found out she was making up stories about me & passing them off as plausible due to my background, or simply taking things I'd told in confidence & letting them out covertly in conversations & later behaving like it wasn't intentional & that it was all a misunderstanding.

I've seen too many people with a nice face that stab you in the back.

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Augh, frenemies. I had them, and now my tween daughter has them, and I think one reason they're in so many Kdramas is that ALL of us need a cathartic release for all the beautiful, evil women we ever met.

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I'm loving it. I don't care about the slow path, because I'm loving it.

I also think the book club will be important in the story and a way for HaeWon to open up. It was not only her who looked relaxed and happy, but also everyone else. Even EunSeob, who cannot react whenever she's around, was smiling and relaxed all time. And yes, my favorite in this club is JangWoo, who addresses to everyone (young or old) as an equal and keeps repeating that the club is fun.

I loved the scene where HaeWon watches EunSeon and his family from the bookstore window. EunSeob's family is so united, you can see how they tease each other, and you can see how mum pampers him, as he were a baby boy, and everyone's laughing. HaeWon gets a glimpse of what a happy family is and that may be one of the things that attracts her about EunSeob: a normal guy, with a normal life, a normal family.

I also thought about the pay phone, I was so shocked, but then I like the explanation about the rural area and how complicated it can be to use your cell phone. Well, I don't live in rural Korea, but in rural Spain something similar happens (my dad has to get out of the house to call me because inside there's no phone coverage).

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I loved the window peak.

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I teared up a little at the book club scene. over the last few years- friends moving away, having a baby and then working from home exclusively have isolated me a lot. To the extent that even though I’m a self proclaimed hermit, I’m craving a warm group like this. I hope they become hae wons friends

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You can roast tangerines, I'm doing it right now and it's so fun when it becomes dry and bursts when you eat it. Thanks for the recap :)

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🤤

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ove the music in here. Anybody knows the composer of the piano piece? My memory is terrible and I remember when it came to me for the first time - musical books for babies. I offered everytime one of those to my son when we went shopping together ( he has a good collection 😉 but I have to change batteries to find it ) and there was one with this mesmerising piece.

Does Hae-won have a cellphone? Didn't see her with one. On another note somebody was explaining in another show how it's a horrifying life sentence to be a child of a murderer in South Korea. It stains your life forever and you have to put it on your CV as well because they like to know your family situation. Nobody asks why the murder occurred, women killing even in self defense by abusing husband can get a really bad sentence but when the situation is reversed man can get only a probation if drunk. That's why I can see HW's fear of any personal attachment.

I think HW had found interesting Eun-seob back in school. She has memories of him and it'd caught her by surprise that she could have been someone's crush even with her circumstances. I like it that they're unfolding little by little their past. It's like looking for the right puzzle piece to get an unknown image together.

Oh, how I love his family! Their bickering love is so sweet... I love the book club and all those members and a grandad who can roast anything but his favourite ones are roasted tangerines.

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HW does have a cell phone. Remember when she was arriving to the inn, she received a phone call from "director" that she ignored.

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Shame on me! I like that she is not addicted to her cellphone like most of us are.

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@oldawyer has a nice post in the comments section for the first episode explaining the choice of the piano piece here (Erik Satie's Gymnopedie #1).

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Thank you.

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Eun-seob surrounded by all those words in his bookstore yet he can't manage to find the right ones for Hae-won, although he was a bit better when speaking with her this episode.

Regarding Bo-yeong, I'm actually wondering what it is that Hae-won actually shared with her back when they were in school. Did Hae-won share the truth about her parents with her or, when Hae-won overheard the girls, was this the first time she found out the painful truth? Certainly many questions regarding this whole situation.

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Eun Seob escorting Hae Won with that ginormous torch on a moonlit night down an amply-lit path because "it's dark" was just hilarious.

I think the two girls - Hwi and Hyun-ji - will have a friendship that is supposed to mirror that of Hae Won and Bo Yeong.

My theory/expectation about episodes being named after book titles has been disproven in round 2 itself.

I'm trying to figure out what the literary reference, if any, to Irene might be.

That said, I like that this show has its main characters shown as introverts. So much TV drama is about extroverts and characters putting themselves out there. It's nice to have quietude given centerstage too.

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"Goodnight Irene" is the name of an American folksong- and it is about the singer's regrets and memories of his first love. It is also the inspiration for the name of the bookstore.

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Ah thank you for the song reference. I didn't know about this. Just heard Eric Clapton's version. Nice, although kind of sad. I hope this story turns out better!

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I laughed about the flashlight escort scene, too - there is a full moon out, streetlights are regular intervals, and the lights from houses all around, yet he must escort her because it is 'too dark out' - LOL - he is so unsubtle, I love it.

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It was unquestionably one of the most endearing scenes in some time. It was very funny and yet endearing- and you could see that Hae-won understood what it really meant. You are right that the two leads are introverts and that is wonderful because they will have to find their way to each other by a different path- but will also be so very happy when they do.

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I think Haewon is actually not that remorse. I can see she is actually hold in her own feeling a lot. I like episode 2 more than eps 1. I love how smitten Eunseob about Haewon. I wanna see them together more often. And i hope its not going to melodrama route *finger cross*

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First of all I really like its title "I Will Find You on a Beautiful Day"/"I Will Go To You When the Weather is Nice". We're just 2 episodes in but Im glad to have come across this sentimental heartfelt relaxing slice of life romantic healing drama. Not only the rural setting is a nice breath of change but also watching two characters who are both the quiet type get together. Usually it's the opposites attract in most dramas I've seen. Hae-won who is used to holding back her feelings to avoid getting hurt needs a good listener like Eun-seob around her. Eun-seob though is obviously hiding a deep loneliness within him as well. Does he sleep in the book store instead of their house or is the bookstore connected to their house?
I love Jang-woo. I commend his dedication to get close to people like Eun-seob who is always in his own world during their high school years. The only person who attracted Eun-seob's attention back then is Hae-won who seems to share the same loneliness as him as she expressed when she played the piano.
I found it strange that there are no single and similar in age to Eun-seob (potential girlfriend) in their town and then Jang-woo said that people there married early (or maybe some moved to the city to work). That means there's no love triangle Im relieved haha.

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I was hate-watching Forest, and the FL lead was driving me nuts with her screechy inability to shut up for even two seconds. When the ML told her he never wanted to see her again, I was with him all the way. So it was a massive relief to switch over to this drama. Finally, some peace and quiet!

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Thank you @quirkycase for the recap!

I've always worked in fast-paced environments so I envy Hae-won for having my dream job(..well, one of them anyway): working at a small bookstore in a small town, in the middle of nowhere.

I'm enjoying this drama, and I'm interested in seeing them unpack a little more of the characters' stories. The pace doesn't bother me as I feel it matches the tone of the drama well.

He has gotten a little better around Hae-won, as in he can now string sentences together around her. Hopefully, her working at the bookshop will help him become more comfortable with her.

I hope he'll still fumble from time to time. He's so endearing when he does.

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I don't know if it will end well, but I want to roast tangerines now. I've never heard of that.

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If I didn’t know the leads, I would think I was watching a jdrama .

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It does have a bit of that vibe.

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I am liking this show.

Major pieces came together in this episode- We got real back story. The aunt may be suffering from a terrible disease but is not lacking in money- she may not be writing anymore but must have made a decent pile when she was a famous novelist- she has no need to keep the guest house open. The situation with Hae-won's friend may soon be resolved.

I like that the love story is unfolding slowly and naturally. Like others I also love the book club. The calm pacing of this show is such a treat. This is a show where you just relax and enjoy the story. We could use more shows like that.

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The book club is definitely a nice aspect, a gathering of the rural community. Let's hope we can continue to relax and enjoy the story; history has a way of keeping me on edge (if only subconsciously) for any drama.

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The book club is great. They looked happy and close. Nice to see a variety of ages too. I already teared up a bit when Hyun Ji gave Gil Bok the hot packs.

The poems were bittersweet; I loved them. This part reminded me of A Poem A Day too and just made me want to curl up with a book and chill.

I'm not familiar with any classical music, but I'm curious thanks to this drama.

Eun Seob naturally smiling and talking with Hae Won is a lovely sight.

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Yes, just got caught up on this drama and I have discovered the charms of Mr. Kang Seo Joon. He plays the dorky bookstore owner who doesn’t have the courage to tell Park Min Young that he likes her. Not all bookish guys look like him though, which is a tragedy.

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Sorry it’s Seo Kang Joon. 🤭

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He is adorkable!

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I want to participate in that Book Club!! Hearing everyone readin a poem just makes me so warm and comfortable and want to tuck under blanket.

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I love this show so much and we're only 2 episodes in. This is my first time watching a show as it airs, and I'm really glad I am because I can enjoy the pace without being tempted to skip ahead. I can just make a cup of tea, relax, and enjoy an hour of beautiful television.
The main leads are both delightful in their own ways. As an introvert, I enjoy seeing two introverts being awkward around each other. Eun-seob guiding Hae-Won home with his flashlight when the path was well lit on it's on was absolutely adorable.
The book club might be my favorite part of the show so far. It was just so warm and inviting, where people of all ages come together to read and enjoy each other's company. I loved how Jang-woo lead Hae-won there with the promise of "something fun".
This show reminds me of Because this is my First Life in a way because of the slower pace and philosophical musing, as well as a more introverted couple. I'm super excited to see where the show goes and to enjoy each episode.

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Now that you mention Because This is My First Life, this show needs a cat.

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Hmm. This drama reminds me of the times when I was at a crossroads. My brain was in a fog, I felt detached but also strangely drawn to small things. Like, after I quit my job of 10 years, I would have that surreal feeling of being (innerly) thrown by a tornado of thoughts but (outwardly) be comforted by the smell of a stew simmering on the stove. I just wish there were more hints of that internal chaos.

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Oh the drama gave me the same feelings. I however did feel an internal chaos, as if every surreal moment had something underlying it. Usually some cute scenes in dramas are just that cute and romantic but here those and other moments have some resistance which I also get from both the actors.

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Thanks @quirkycase. This show is a pleasant change.
My thoughts on the possible themes ... which I posted elsewhere and have pasted here:
Searching (and Finding)
I watched the first 2 episodes and tried to see if there was more to the script than just mood. The title: I’ll Find You on a Beautiful Day got me thinking that there’d be a theme of searching for something lost or something never had.

Hae Won had lost her immediate family, trust in friends, and her job, and returns to the one place she had friends and a family of sorts, with her grandma. We know she can certainly do with friends now.

Eun Seop has family and a settled life, but is alone and unable to admit to liking Hae Won since high school, worse he continually stymies himself and is his own worst enemy in the department of dating Hae Won.

Hae Won’s Aunt seems to have lost her desire to write, to run the guesthouse, and maybe even to live. She wears dark glasses all the time, hiding her health? and true thoughts (maybe from herself and) from others.

These are people looking for themselves, for a sense of belonging, for courage, for purpose, for warmth and family.

The Wind in the Willows
I looked up what a willow tree symbolises: life, balance, growth, harmony and the ability to bend and adjust, to bend as the wind blows without breaking, and regaining it’s more or less upright position.

The wind and willows motif is repeated in the pattern on curtains of Hae Won’s room that also blew in the wind when she opened the window. She may have copied her curtain pattern onto her hand. (Ep 2)

There is a question/saying: “What wind blew you here?” Might it be too much to read into this that Hae Won has been blown back to her old home, after being blown about and battered in Seoul. She has tried to bend, give way and accept her untenable position in the academy, but is exhausted. However like the willow tree she is still standing.

By contrast, her aunt seems to have given up trying to rebound after whatever strong winds blew at her. (I’m interested to know why Eun Seop calls her by her name, it’s so familiar and impolite for a young man to do so.)

Eun Seop waits for every winter to have Hae Won blow back into his life. He has his leaves blown about chaotically when Hae Won is nearby, but he tries to look disinterested and distant.

Good Night Bookstore
Thanks to @oldawyer for the post about the folk song and the name of the bookstore. Wikipedia says that the song "tell(s) of the singer's troubled past with his love, Irene, and express his sadness and frustration." - which is pretty close to Eun Seop's experience.

There’s also a theme of being able to sleep well at night as a sign of a good life, something he aspires to, and yet, the irony is that Eun Seop has insomnia. He comments each night on the blog of the World’s Oldest Dispersed Nocturnal Organisation/Good Night Club (I think he means an international Insomniac’s group). He...

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... He comments each night on the blog of the World’s Oldest Dispersed Nocturnal Organisation/Good Night Club (I think he means an international Insomniac’s group). He calls his bookstore "Good night", when he generally has a bad night.

It is also ironic that Hae Won remembered his words about how good sleep was, but then wakes up/or can’t sleep, and ends up at his place late at night, more than once.

I think I will continue watching this show to watch for the lifting of the melancholy of the early episodes (the shift in the 2nd episode indicates that this will happen), and to see what the Beautiful Day part of the title refers to. 😃

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Oooh I like everything you said. I want to go check out Hae Won’s curtains. ^^ So there were more than a few references to the willow tree.

I thought I saw a tree outside her house that was a willow tree or at least looked like one.

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I love Eun Seob character here. He is presented to be a gentle and timid persona, Who tends to keep to himself. This is different from his other roles.

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So, when she asked what those marshmallow things out in the field were the first episode are we to now assume she was ironically/nostalgically referencing their first meeting when she moved to town as a teenager? Or did she forget their first meeting and forget what the hay bales were, and simply repeated herself? I prefer to think she was directly referencing their first meeting to let him know she remembered.

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I also think she was referencing their past meeting.

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Though the screenplay is considerably slow moving but I like the editing which takes the story back and forth. Scenes are indeed done very aesthetically. Great direction, editing and screenplay writing but the core of it all, storyline, seems terribly weak. Didn't find anything interesting about it. Intrigue in main character's past is quite forced. Wish the team, cast and crew had better story to work with.

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This is not usually my kind of style. I prefer things to move a bit quicker, but this has come at the right time in my life. It’s just the thing I needed. I’m in love with what’s been shown to us so far.

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Not sure if this gets addressed in later episode recaps, but I feel like it would be great to add the little notes that come up during the end credits! They are Eun-Seob’s journal entries. Like for this episode he explained why he couldn’t tell Hae-Won which version of the book was his favorite (he said bc the books can hear! he’s cute).

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Two episodes in and I’m already in love with the drama (did I just jinx myself for future episodes?) Sometimes a drama, which may not be your cup of tea (or coffee in this case) in normal circumstances, somehow just found you at the right time. I remember the exact moment when this drama stole my heart - the book club scene where everyone looks happy/contented - and I like that - finding joy/friendship/happiness in the little things. And of course the excellent cast just elevate the drama further.

So tell me, dear Drama God, what do I need to sacrifice to ensure I stay in love with this drama? Daily Subway lunch? Dyson vacuum cleaner?

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