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Oh My Baby: Episode 1

The rom-com queen, Jang Nara, is back to reclaim the throne with Oh My Baby, a story about a modern working woman with a simple dream to be a mother. Of course, the dream is everything but simple for our heroine, who faces the pressures to demonstrate the traditional experiences of motherhood and marriage at her age. Love, marriage, and children in that order are a steep ask for a woman gradually aging out of child-bearing age, and we’re introduced to these challenges and potential solutions (read: targets) alongside our heroine. This first episode leans toward the comedy in the rom-com spectrum, so get ready for plenty of laughs.

  
EPISODE 1: “If you ask why I can’t marry”

We first meet our heroine, JANG HA-RI (Jang Nara), at the hospital as she’s rushed into the delivery room. After a successful birth, Ha-ri eagerly goes to the hospital nursery, where her mother is fawning over the baby. But when her mother turns around, she’s holding an adorable puppy, and Ha-ri’s anticipation shifts to anger. Obviously, this is all a dream, and Ha-ri wakes up on the bus on her way to a doctor’s appointment as the radio features her submission.

The radio host reads Ha-ri’s submission, and we learn about 39-year-old unmarried Ha-ri and her hope in the miracle of love. The relatable submission wins her a box of snacks, and Ha-ri celebrates the small miracle.

At the appointment, Ha-ri shares that she’s been having severe period cramps to the point of hospitalization, but she was too busy with work to have it checked out. She’s quickly dropping by today for painkillers and an AMH test to test her fertility. With no plans to marry but a desire for children, Ha-ri plans on freezing her eggs until she meets her match.

On her way out of the clinic, Ha-ri walks by a handsome gentleman and looks hopeful for an interaction. The man asks Ha-ri where the nearest pharmacy is, and when she turns around, the pervert drops his pants. Ha-ri immediately reports this and slides a nearby shovel toward the hopping man. The man steps on the shovel, which catapults the other end to his sensitive parts (serves him right!), and other passersby help get the pervert off the streets.

Childcare magazine journalist Ha-ri meets up with her chief reporter, Park Yeon-ho, to pick out a microphone prop for their next interview with Pororo at Jambi Studio. After the interview, Jambi Studio photographer Kim Sang-hee scrolls through social media and discovers that photographer HAN YI-SANG (Go Joon) has returned to Korea. She immediately reports this to the studio manager, Nam Soo-chul.

The studio pair scroll through Yi-sang’s posts, which start out looking like idyllic scenes of a photographer capturing falling snow. Then, they see that he’s been picking up a random selection of hobbies that he’s never tried before. Soo-chul tells Sang-hee to not mention Yi-sang’s return to Ha-ri. Hmm, curious.

Yi-sang is in high demand, and he already has people requesting his collaboration. A close management representative even helps him move in to convince Yi-sang to sign under his company, but Yi-sang has the luxury to decline because he wants to rest longer. He receives notifications from his social media, and they’re all from Soo-chul angrily commenting that Yi-sang has time for all these hobbies but not for him.

Before her aerobics class Ha-ri’s mother receives a call from YOON JAE-YOUNG (Park Byung-eun) and grants permission for him to move in with Ha-ri. Jae-young is hesitant because he’s scared of Ha-ri, but he reluctantly agrees to move in. Mom comments that it’s a great day for an accident, and I think she’s implying a one-night stand? With Mom’s permission, we see Jae-young with his adorable baby daughter checking out their new home.

Ha-ri greets their baby model and mother at the studio, and she’s completely enamored by the baby. The mother shares that her baby’s routine — play, eat, sleep in that order — is keeping her up, and Ha-ri correctly deduces that the baby falls asleep while the mother is nursing. She recommends listing out the current patterns to identify how to adjust the routine, and the mother responds that Ha-ri should get married soon with all this baby knowledge.

When Ha-ri and Yeon-ho return to the office, new team member CHOI KANG-EU-TTEUM (Jung Geon-joo) calls out to Ha-ri from afar by calling her “Aunt.” She’s mortified by the title, which drunk Ha-ri approved during a company outing because she’s the same age as his youngest aunt. She hopes that he’ll be sensible enough to drop the title that accentuates their age difference.

As they enter the building, Ha-ri folds over in pain from her menstrual cramps. Kang-eu-tteum isn’t embarrassed by the topic (“My mom had me run period-related errands since I was young,” he explains.), and he helps Ha-ri get to the elevator. It’s a sweet gesture until he announces to the whole crowd that Ha-ri is suffering from menstrual cramps in order to get priority elevator access. Thanks to the announcement, Ha-ri gets on the elevator, but she shrivels in embarrassment and runs out when she arrives at their floor. Haha, he is completely imperceptive!

Ha-ri reviews the magazine copy and asks her staff writer, Choi Hyo-joo (Lizzy) about the traditional medicine endorsement piece that claims a cure for subfertility. Hyo-joo says that the advertisement team requested this addition, and Ha-ri confronts the advertisement department manager Kim Chul-joong about this misleading claim. She refuses to include a misleading advertisement credited to their writer, who would be responsible for any lawsuits on these unproven claims.

Determined to remove this advertisement, Ha-ri follows Manager Kim into Vice President Joo Seung-tae’s office to contest this addition. Ha-ri lies down on the couch to make the point that she’s doing whatever she wants in his office since they’re doing whatever they want despite her editor privileges. Point taken, Vice President Joo agrees to the removal of the advertisement, and Ha-ri agrees to compensate for the losses with the editing department’s funds.

Jambi studio manager Soo-chul has a drink with Yi-sang and tries to woo him over to share their studio space. Yi-sang rejects the proposal and notes that Soo-chul works with Ha-ri. He seems to have a negative association with her.

Ha-ri’s editing team works late into the night, and they eagerly accept Ha-ri’s snack offering for their break. They ask why Ha-ri isn’t married yet, and Yeon-ho teases her for falling in love easily, like with that one guy outside the studio. Ha-ri recalls that the man was crying.

Flashbacking back to that moment, we see Ha-ri marveling at the snow and Yi-sang looking up to use his eye drops. When he turns to look at her, it looks like he’s crying. Ha-ri admits that this was the first time she saw a man crying and that made her feel some type of way.

Yi-sang remembers this moment with Ha-ri tells Soo-chul that he was spooked by the look in her eyes. He isn’t fond of forward women. We don’t know what happened after they met, but Ha-ri also isn’t fond of Yi-sang and tells her coworkers that the crying man was a crazy person.

Ha-ri has tried all the dating and marriage services, and she sighs that she’s at the age where remarriage websites are targeting her. Yeon-ho asks their coworkers to introduce Ha-ri to a handsome rich guy, but Hyo-joo says that handsome rich guys would never marry an older woman. Ha-ri doesn’t take offense and says that at 39, any decent guy is already taken or dead.

With no other options, maknae reporter Lee So-yoon suggests that Ha-ri give up on marriage and just live alone. Yeon-ho teases Ha-ri that her insistence on marriage is highlighting the generational gap, and Ha-ri glares at her friend. Before she walks away, Ha-ri offers a scary prediction that she’s their future. The younger reporters spit out the drinks in alarm.

Ha-ri returns to work and scrolls through the comments that criticize the new acting editor (Ha-ri) for lacking the personal experience, namely marriage and bearing children. She received the same comment from the baby model’s mother and Vice President Joo.

After resolving the advertisement issue, President Joo asked Ha-ri to stay behind to discuss her options for advancement. He suggested that once Chief Editor Nam returns from maternity leave, Ha-ri move to another magazine under the parent media company, since she can’t advance at “the baby” magazine as a single childless woman.

Yi-sang drops by his neighborhood restaurant with a menu that only features the chef’s choice, and the owner assures him that the saury gratin special isn’t too fishy. The rest of the customers, including Ha-ri, disagree with that claim and try to warn Yi-sang not to order. Yi-sang doesn’t catch the signs and suffers the consequences. He also doesn’t catch Ha-ri leaving the restaurant. Turns out, they both live in the same neighborhood now.

The next morning, Ha-ri hears movement from downstairs and cautiously investigates the intruder. It’s her childhood friend Jae-young moving in with Ha-ri’s mom’s permission but without Ha-ri’s consent. Jae-young tries to normalize the move-in, but Ha-ri won’t agree to it. Jae-young says that he has nowhere to go and still seems distraught from his divorce, but Ha-ri isn’t sympathetic to her friend, who cut ties for the past 5 years because his ex-wife didn’t like her.

Ha-ri can’t believe that Jae-young has the audacity to have a casual face-to-face conversation with her now, so Jae-young turns his back to her to continue the conversation, heh. Knowing Ha-ri’s weakness, Jae-young points to the room with her 8-month old daughter, Do-ha, and Ha-ri immediately finds delight in the adorable child. Checking on Do-ha, Ha-ri immediately nags Jae-young about washing the baby and getting the appropriate bottle size.

Even with the baby in her arms, Ha-ri demands that Jae-young move out in the next day, but Jae-young doesn’t seem to take that seriously, since he has Mom’s blessing. Unwilling to accept this living arrangement, Ha-ri calls her mom to argue against this decision. Mom is more sympathetic to Jae-young’s situation and asks Ha-ri to take care of him. When Ha-ri refuses, Mom orders Ha-ri to also move out of the building with Jae-young, since she owns the building. Mom wins.

At the health and welfare department, Ha-ri presents a new report proposal to follow a couple working through subfertility in their year-long process from the beginning to delivery. It’s received favorably, but the department staff suggests that Ha-ri partake in a pregnancy simulation in exchange so that her pitch is better received by higher-ups.

Ha-ri reluctantly agrees and wears the pregnancy simulation outfit at the studio. After she’s forced into smiling for the camera, she looks longingly at her fake pregnant belly and decides to keep the outfit on even in transit. She claims it’s for the full experience, but she actually likes feeling pregnant.

At the mall, photographer Sang-hee photographs Ha-ri’s pregnant simulation day, and she shares that Soo-chul is looking for someone to share his studio with. She mentions Yi-sang, and Ha-ri shows a knee-jerk reaction to that name. Yeon-ho seems amused by the memory and says that Yi-sang left Ha-ri with a curse that seems to affect her dating life even now.

Flashback to the 2017 New Year’s Day party. Soo-chul offered to introduce Ha-ri to Yi-sang, and she was eager to get the relationship started and on the path to marriage. But Yi-sang had no plans for marriage and told Soo-chul that he’s sticking with his bachelor life. They expressed completely different interests for their future. Ha-ri wanted a family, a friend-like partner, and children. Yi-sang wanted no nagging wife nor children in his future.

Yeon-ho advised Ha-ri to be forward and touch him slightly, citing her experience with her current husband. Meanwhile, Yi-sang complained to Soo-chul that the need to marry and have children seemed too primitive for him. At those comments, Soo-chul gave up on setting the two up.

Unaware of this conversation, Ha-ri practiced her interaction in the bathroom and followed Yi-sang to the balcony. Ha-ri clumsily started a conversation with Yi-sang and went for a stiff touch and rub of Yi-sang’s arm as she complimented his photography skills. Oh dear, she’s so awkward. Her motives are so blatantly obvious that it’s cringey and hilarious.

Yi-sang seems disillusioned by romance and tries to break Ha-ri’s romanticism in her advances. He says that her interest in him is simply lust fueled by her hormones, nothing close to her romantic imagination. Ha-ri stops him and tries to neutralize his claims, saying that he’s not that attractive to trigger desire. Then, Yi-sang offers some unsolicited advice: “If you’re lonely, then raise a dog,” he says. Ohhh, this ties back to the opening scene!

Back at the mall, Ha-ri says that if she ever runs into Yi-sang, she’ll just ignore him. Right after she makes that claim, Yi-sang appears in front of her. Ha-ri’s company quickly flees, and the two make eye contact. At first, Ha-ri hides her fake pregnant belly, but then she decides to flaunt the belly that Yi-sang had disparaged.

As Yi-sang passes by, Ha-ri lifts her hand and almost greets him, but Yi-sang completely ignores her. Mortified, Ha-ri runs away to her friends and says that she ignored him first. Suddenly, Ha-ri leans over in pain from her menstrual cramps and tells her friends to go ahead while she takes care of her cramps.

Ha-ri drops her pill bottle under the lounging chairs, and then two children accidently spill water on her leg. She’s bent over in pain with water all over her bottom half, and this is a misunderstanding just waiting to happen. Two ajummas walk by and make the perfect conclusion that Ha-ri’s water broke and is currently experiencing labor pains. The ajummas are so excited and overly helpful while Ha-ri can barely get words out through her menstrual pains, so the situation escalates quickly.

When the elevators are too slow, the helpful ajummas lead Ha-ri to the escalators, where they push aside an ajusshi in the way. The ajusshi is none other than Yi-sang, who’s offended by that title. Ha-ri does her best to deny the ajummas’ assumptions, but at the sight of Yi-sang, she protrudes her belly to perpetuate the misunderstanding. Haaaa.

In the parking lot, the ajummas chaotically try to find Ha-ri’s car, and Yi-sang watches them frantically search the lot. He decides to intervene and carries Ha-ri to his car to take her to the hospital. The ajummas cheer for Ha-ri’s successful delivery, and Yi-sang speeds out of the lot. This has gone too far for Ha-ri to resolve.

Yi-sang asks where he should drive to, and Ha-ri asks him to just drop her off at a pharmacy. He uses his best judgement and decides to speed to a hospital instead. As Yi-sang carries Ha-ri into the hospital, Ha-ri pulls his hair to manage her pain, but that image makes it seem like she’s actually in labor. When he puts her down, she seethes through her teeth that she didn’t want to come here.

The doctor tries to check on Ha-ri’s contractions, but Ha-ri won’t let her look under her shirt. With Ha-ri not cooperating, the doctor places her stethoscope on Ha-ri’s belly instead. She’s alarmed by the lack of any sound, and she pulls aside Yi-sang to talk privately. While they’re distracted, Ha-ri makes a run for it.

Ha-ri tries to run through her menstrual cramps, but suddenly the pain becomes too strong to handle. She faints, and Yi-sang and the doctors find her on the ground unconscious. When Ha-ri wakes up, she’s out of her pregnancy suit and no longer in pain.

Ha-ri’s doctor suspects that she’s suffering from endometriosis and says that she can get surgery for this. Then, the doctor shares the results of Ha-ri’s AMH test, which shows a low concentration ovarian reserve. The doctor says that it will be difficult to collect a healthy egg from Ha-ri at her current age and regrets that Ha-ri didn’t freeze her eggs earlier.

Deflated by this news, Ha-ri asks if there are any other possibilities, and her doctor shares the shocking reality that Ha-ri’s changes of natural pregnancy is less than 7%. She tells her more discouraging figures about the low chances of pregnancy in your 40s and higher chances of miscarriage. Ha-ri asks if she can have any children in her future, and the doctor states that her chances of pregnancy reduce every month and are even lower with the endometriosis surgery, which requires a year-long drug therapy.

Meanwhile at home, Jae-young searches for a baby cloth in Ha-ri’s room, convinced that she’s brought some from work. He finally finds the drawer with baby items, but his successful scavenger hunt reveals Ha-ri’s earnest desire for a baby. In the drawer, Ha-ri has labeled all the clothes, bottles, and shoes as items addressed to her future baby. Jae-young looks emotional at this realization.

Disheartened and lost, Ha-ri tearfully carries her diagnosis and searches for a pharmacy. In a flashback, we see young Ha-ri deciding on her future aspirations. Mom advised that being smart or rich can’t beat being happy, so Ha-ri wrote down “Mom.” She observed that Mom was always happy when seeing children, and all children like her, so she wanted to be a mom.

Yi-sang finds Ha-ri in her emotional state looking around for the nearest pharmacy. Shaking her head in denial, she tells herself that this can’t be the end. Then, she turns to Yi-sang and asks, “Do you want to marry me?”

  
COMMENTS

This was the perfect introduction to our heroine and this story, balanced with hilarity and plenty of heart. I was happy to find most of the episode leaning more heavily toward comedy, with all three of potential baby daddies. I love how every potentially romantic or sweet moment was paired with an unexpected laugh, like the eyedrops with Yi-sang and the mortifying menstrual cramp announcement from Kang-eu-tteum. If the comedic punches from the first episode are an indication of how the rest of the show will be, my excitement just boosted a couple of levels. The laughs are greatly appreciated.

In addition to the laughs, this first episode did a great job of laying down the groundwork for Ha-ri’s dilemma and motives. It’s interesting that the pressures to be married and have kids comes from Ha-ri’s work life more than her personal life, at least from this introduction. Her career depends on the sharing experiences with women her age who have followed the traditional marriage and motherhood trajectory. Her passions clearly lie in babies and motherhood, and while she’s actively engaged in these passions in her work life, she hasn’t been unable to pursue those in her personal life. Considering these dynamics, the ending packed an emotional punch that felt fitting.

I’m intrigued by Yi-sang’s character and his relentless cynicism. His cockiness doesn’t put me off yet because it’s harmless and serves as a point of contrast for some of the comical scenes. His callousness towards romance and partnership indicate to me that he’s overcompensating for something, so I’m curious to see how his story unfolds. I already feel invested in this character and his relationship with Ha-ri, so I have a feeling that I’m Ha-ri’s going to have a hard time choosing her partner.

Even though Ha-ri feels like a familiar character for Jang Nara, it’s still a delight to watch her in the role. I also can’t think of anyone more perfect for the role. Ha-ri is independent and accomplished but still a sucker for love, and Jang Nara portrays all of that with such ease. I also love all three potential suitors so far, and I’m looking forward to see how Ha-ri charms and gets charmed by all of them. I’m hoping for some stiff competition and plenty more hilarity as Ha-ri establishes her priorities and the order of operations.

 
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Thanks for the recap, @dramallama! 😄
Anyhow, all of her male leads used to be in supporting roles territory so I'm really happy they nabbed this project. And with Jang Nara too! She's been one of my faves for several years now. Go Back Couple remains to be in my top 3 kdramas. Hoping this one would turn out great as well. ☺️

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I really needed something light and fluffy to go with feeling of being down this weekend and I liked it so much I watched it twice. There were some really nice. subtle moments with Yi-sang in the first two episodes that I hope the writers will come back to and explain later that made him seem a little less cold (but because this is recap one, I'll save even the tiniest spoilers).

When Yi-Sang walks past, after clearly noticing Hari, he throws his bags off to the side and promptly sits to stare at sign of a tissue dispenser. Probably reading too much into it... but it definitely seemed like the sort of reaction that show writers hold till the near very end when establishing that the tsundere ML lead actually did care all along. I also would have been much more put off if he had left her in the parking lot with the fussy ahjummas.

So far a fan of the drama as a whole and Yi-Sang's character seems more well done and easily to establish a connection with than typical male leads introduced in similar dramas.

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I have been anticipating this light and fluffy K-drama for weeks, so I can relate!
Yi-Sang definitely has potential for growth and he is not as cold as the teasers want us to believe. That tissue dispenser sign was definitely not random! I actually thought he reacted that way to stiffle his shock at seeing her again. I do not know if he already cares about her, but their first meeting certainly left an impact on both of them.

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The weird tissue dispenser is a nice red herring! I thought he didn't remember her, but he was yelling her full name when she made a dash off the hospital bed, so he must've been faking.

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Jang Nara hits hard. That last scene had me near tears.

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That scene with her OB-Gyne hits me personally. To be told that you’re old and have less chances of conceiving is heartbreaking. 😭😭😭

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Yes. Listening to her go age by age and decreasing chances was so sad.

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Really, even though being so informed about childcare, everytime she was reminded that as she herself is not a mom, she won't be able to understand. The pain we can see right off from the start!!

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This suffers from some classic romcom problems - romcommon sense is the first thing that comes to mind - but it's charming and I love Jang Nara just being an ordinary woman who knows what she wants.

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@frabbycrabsis
"suffers from some classic romcom problems"

Same. Given KDrama is usually so good at openings (it usually suffers from the saggy middle and ends) it's worrying that these are so evident in the first ep.

It makes me nervous for the story going forward.

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Jang Nara is always a delight to watch!

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Hijinks I would have found delightful in 2016 I'm finding a little bit cringy in 2020. Maybe its because Jang did the harrowing 'V.I.P.' just recently, whose story revolved around the central hub of a miscarriage.

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Totally agree even though I really enjoyed the show, Jang Nara's character, and the humor. I still kind of cringed. The fact that they're also still playing into the 39 year old woman with no viable option for motherhood except, as another person mentioned "throwing herself at men" feels very dated. Especially given that there have been so many really great portrayals of strong women in the last few years. This feels a bit like a throwback. A delightful throwback but a throwback nonetheless

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Even the romantic in me hopes this ends with her single. She just needs a child. Not likely though.

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Partly hoping that she would get pregnant first and fall in love after but also seems unlikely.

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Agree with you that the plot sounds dated. However this is still a real issue for a large share of the female population esp in traditionally patriarchal societies. SKorea is going through a birthrate crisis as more and more young people are opting out of marriage and child birth. So this topic is probably culturally relevant to the natives. Ofc our heroine actually wants the traditional trappings or atleast thinks she does , so it'd be interesting to see where her journey leads her. Wonder if they'd touch upon the demanding work culture that is said to force a lot of people to choose to go solo.

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Jang Nara and rom-com is just a match made in heaven! Since go back couple I’ve really become a fan of hers and this show is no less in proving her comedic and melancholic acting ability (died laughing at her smug pregnant belly). I like that all three male leads are flawed and seem to have a sense of goofiness especially the male lead who I expected to be totally cool but it’s so much more funnier that he’s not in some aspects, like freaking out over a horror movie. It feels like a breath of fresh air to finally have some laugh out loud comedy and a lighthearted drama grace my screen as opposed to the dark meloncholic romance dramas lately so bring on the fun!!!

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After watching the first two episodes, this series could have been boiled down to a two part drama special because I immediately thought of a simple solution. The fundamental problem is that there is readily available solution that would negate all the angst, anger and loathing of JN's character's about marriage and her biological clock running out: adoption.

Adoption itself is a sore subject in South Korea. Korea’s reaction to criticism that it had exported orphans to other countries led to it being harder for foreigners to adopt children. Government policies designed to encourage its citizens to adopt domestically has failed to gain traction because it is society taboo to raise a child outside one’s bloodline. Further, government-run institutions often remain a permanent home for Korean orphans because there is an economic incentive of caregivers not to have them adopted. But is still a viable option which could be explored by anyone who wants children.

Granted, there is a stigma to both the orphan and the adopting parents. But is the same with unwed mothers.

That was my frustrating take from the beginning of this show. Hari is a strong, independent, opinionated and tough woman. If she wants a child, her advisors should have immediately given her adoption as a viable option. It would actually be more interesting than her desperately potentially throwing herself at men.

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See, if you apply logic - there is now end to what you end up questioning.

Beautiful post by the way.

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I'm torn because adoption is so important and I'd love for them to explore an unconventional approach that could become the norm. And because some women (and men) just really want to experience, ther bio child and pregnancy.

I mean, she could get a surrogate too. But these aren't options for her at the moment. She still sees a chance for pregnancy and she's going to follow it. Maybe the drama will end 5 years later and she ended up having to adopt. Because as much respect as adoption deserves, some people think of it as an absolute last resort. One Jang Hari doesn't have to settle for yet.

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Or...she may just be childless.

Somehow, I feel that would be such challenge for a SKDrama to show that as a positive outcome (where as J Dramas are going there much more often).

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But from a character perspective that would be a sad ending, given she's bought little first things. She's wanted a child since she was a child.

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I share your frustration. I wished adoption is being presented as one of viable option for Ha-Ri. She doesn't have to take the option, the title is afterall "Oh My Baby". But for the drama not to even mention it at all makes me kinda sad.

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Is this finally my first bean of 2020? I certainly hope so.😀

Eu-Tteum announcing Hari’s menstruation cramps was meant to establish his character, and the embarrassment Hari feels is a sentiment a lot of women would feel if they were in her shoes that moment. I certainly would and that is why I could acknowledge the comedy. However Eu-Tteum actually had a point. It happens every month to half of the world’s population, this should not be treated as something abnormal. Especially not by Hari’s judging and laughing female coworkers, who should know very well how it feels.🤔

Of course I am aware that the scene was more realistic that way, but in a better universe Jang Na-ra would have metaphorically strutted inside that elevator and everyone, both male and female, would have let her pass and offered either help or sympathy the way Eu-Tteum did.🤔

It reminded me of the scene in Go Back Couple when Son Ho-Joon helped Jang Na-Ra deal with her menstruation cramps, which made me swoon more than any other romantic scene I had seen before.😍

So kudos to Eu-Tteum’s mom, you raised your son right!😘

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I agree whole heartedly.

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That was a seriously cute scene, and funny, so I want more of him now!

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The scene was realistic but what he did was totally right. Menstrual pain and time of the month should be normalized. And his reaction would've pretty appropriate in a world where it is normalized.

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You summarized it a lot better than I did! Thank you!

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His reaction to knowing she had menstrual pains was appropriat, what was not appropriate is him shouting it to the whole world, that actually made me a bit mad at him.

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Jang Na-ra is back and she's awesome as always! The first episode didn't convince me as much because I didn't like anyone except Ha-ri. Her doctor was rude as hell. The men were not very promising and the youngest one was just cringe.

I'm sticking to it because Jang Na-ra gives it a lot of thought when she chooses a project so I believe this will sweep my heart away sooner or later.

Thanks for the recap!

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I loved this show. Also totally appreciated how there were women with different beliefs about love and marriage. Jung gun joo had little to no scenes in these 2 episodes but hopefully he gets more stuff going forward. Our male lead even if a tsundere, he isn't half as bad as many terrible tsunderes dramaland has seen. I like how the show didn't just make having a baby Ha ri's desire but her ultimate goal of life. When that shatters then well it is extremely painful. The whole hospital scene was hilarious though. This show has old school rom com vibes which means I think it will have to try hard to maintain the good momentum after some episodes but if keeps on being this funny and entertaining then I'm totally in for a light watch.

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Maybe I didn't read the synopsis properly, I didn't realise Ha-ri was the editor of a baby magazine too. Her whole life is surrounded by babies and even though I knew what was coming, I still wasn't prepared. There is something about Jang Na-ra's acting which makes you cry alongside her character. I felt for her in the doctors office as the doctor explained how much time she has left. The doctor in my opinion, could have shown more compassion, her tone of voice wasn't great.

I don't find anything redeemable about the three male leads and I want ha-ri to run far, far away from all of them. The only person I see could have a loveline is the childhood friend, simply because they live together and have known each other a long time.
My wish is for her to go it alone and be open to finding love in the future instead of trying to conceive/marry in 6 months.

I did find the scene with the ahjumma very funny, especially when I saw yi-sang's deadpan expression carrying Ha-ri in the parking lot. Not sure if I will continue because I was expecting a different take on this topic.

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1/2
First of all, thank you for the recap. You made reading about the episode more fun than I had while watching it.

2ndly, The OB-Gyn scene felt all too familiar in its callous approach. Most doctors, unless you're pregnant or married don't care about you - the apathy towards issues that don't end in successful production of a baby. While I'm sure that the disheartening news hurts, for some the apathetic & callous attitude of their doctors hurts more.

I do wonder though why she'd care about the FL going through a fertilization process which she said was costly but won't be effective for her - since she or her affiliated clinic would be the one profiting off of her desperation.

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I didn't think I'd find anything relatable in this drama,but I liked the educating & normalising of period pain - even though the intern was tone deaf about casual discussion of period problems vs humiliation from having your issues announced publicly. [It's one of my irl pet issues - I've always advocated normalisation of period things. ]

The friend guy finding the baby items was touching.
I understood the pressure from the FL's work life, but what I don't understand is that why would a woman who has always wanted babies wait till she's 39 to think about freezing eggs or artificial insemination.

They didn't bring up surrogacy yet so I wonder if they will in the future? Or is it illegal in SK?

I didn't find the cold photographer guy offensive either, but I didn't feel drawn towards any of the targets either.

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It did feel a little like this drama is kinda reverting to old tropes when there are more winning portrayals of single older women in recent years. But on the other hand I also think it's a realistic portrayal - why is that single independent older women can't also have hopes of wanting love, a family and children? It's just that Ha-ri did seem to be really too desperate here, so much so that she appears to have let these desires overwhelm her a little that she is losing her own self-worth and self-esteem over it.

I liked how the male lead isn't the typical cold, rude guy. He does have that cynical side of him, so I like this slightly unconventional set-up than a typical cold, rude male lead from the start.

Whilst I agree that women having period pains shouldn't feel like they can't talk about it, I thought Eu-Tteum's manner of handling it was unnecessary. You can be understanding to a lady, telling her it's normal and being helpful and sensitive to her without making her feel embarrassed. But then going on to tell the world... whilst she herself is still feeling embarrassed... is just rendering his original understanding and sensitive actions nugatory. In my view, it should be about making the lady feel comfortable, not about just announcing to the world to make a grand point that this should be normal...

But overall, still kinda enjoyed the feel of the first episode. Shall see how this goes!

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The episode seemed to flash by, and I was laughing all the way until the end. I love how everybody is quirky in this show, even down to the restaurant ajusshi with his fishy gratin and his polite customers!

Fell in love with Ha-ri the moment she managed to served karma to the pervert even when she was flustered. Her peaceful protest about the ad and her comeback quip to the juniors is so enjoyable. So funny that she was so tiny yet she totally manhandled big, broad Yi-sang ><

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I absolutely enjoyed the first two episodes. It has heavy topic but handled in a very light manner. Loads of funny stuff and loads of warm fuzzy stuff as well, Tsundere included.

I feel this one I am going to enjoy. All those adorable babies and adorable, kinda mature men and Jang Nara. She is pretty perfect here.

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Really curious how this is a "heavy topic"?

Sure every one has the right to desire children. Now circumstances/choices have lead HA-RI to the point where that is becoming difficult. This juncture was not outside her agency, it was not brutally imposed upon her.

No one is owed to be a father to her child and if you were a man would this really be an appealing proposition for you (in the current SK society)? There may be just the man out there but her choices have lead to a thin pool of opportunity - with the many men in that pool potentially interested in other options. Now it is up to her social skills, lets hope her years have been spent honing them.

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Thanks @dramallama for the recap, I also got to know certain points which I missed.
Jang Nara is totally queen of acting and her bubbly nature fits her role perfectly. But I was really disappointed with the fact that I'm order to get promoted, she had to get married and have a baby! What kind of nonsense is that? She has worked so hard, and she is already more experienced than any other actual moms.. And her love for children looks so real.
She is also very confident while discussing her miserable love life with the co-colleagues, and I laughed so hard when she mentioned "I am your future" But the last scenes actually made me cry!!
I really didn't like the scenes where Park Byung-Eun was taking care of the child. Really, it was pretty messy!!!
I agree on the menstrual concept and how it shouldn't be an embarrassing thing, but the way he loud speakered everything, that was definitely embarrassing😳
I like Go Joon's character, and I hope both of them end together. Let's see!!!

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The "I am your future" line is GOLD!

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I tried this for Jang Nara, but found myself ff-ing most of it. The menstrual cramps scene was well done, and thank heavens for shows like this trying to normalise it. But honestly, the only thing that stayed with me was Go Joon's voice. He's got a great radio voice! I'd listen to that show.

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Thanks for the wonderful recap @dramallama. I am mainly in it for Na Ra. True to form,she makes the character instantly likeable and had me rooting for her from the get go . The last scene was soo heartfelt. I wasn't ready for tears in EP 1, show!
* The two older male leads are interesting so far and aren't as trope-y as I feared 🤞.
*The only thing the younger one has going for him is that he seems to have an awesome omma.
*I liked that Ha Ri has a good mix of women around her . Her married Hoobae who doesn't want anything to do with a baby, two younger colleagues who are not overtly sweet but do like and respect her, a boss who's out on maternity and could be a potential rival(?) and a mother who's apparently rooting for her and the bff to fall into wedlock.

WTF moments: The ob-gyn doc really needs a crash course in bedside manners.
How is her personal life a factor in whether or not she can be a good editor-in-chief.

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Thank you for the recap. You made it interesting to look at the episode once more and bring with it more fun .#tag http://gospelmusic2021.org/ ( http://thenignesw.com/)

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Thanks for the recap.

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I’ve just been catching up on episode one and I have to say - those are very white pants for someone with problematic periods to be wearing! It would make me nervous 😄

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