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Dating Agency Cyrano: Episode 15

We’ve got a bit more action than we’re used to as the final plot gets underway and lives are put on the line. It’s not just our kidnapping victim who suffers but also her two heroes, who have to confront some old demons in order to rise to the occasion and help her out. So inasmuch as I hate the damsel in distress routine, at least it serves a purpose here and sets us up for the big resolution. I guess. Grumble grumble.

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EPISODE 15 RECAP

Min-young wakes up in a strange room to find her hands and feet tied with rope. The walls are lined will photos and notes of the Cyrano members, all serial-killer-like. Aw man, so the kidnapping was straight-up and real? I was hoping for a twist, since, blah.

Given that it’s real, it makes sense for the Hawaiian shirt man to be behind it, and he chats on the phone about preparations for “showtime.” He sees that Min-young is awake, and she asks why he’s doing this. All he says if for her to ask Byung-hoon, and gags her mouth.

Then the photo text message gets sent to Byung-hoon, with the message “Are you looking for Gong Min-young?” and a photo of her in hostage mode. Just gonna say, if you wanna look scary, maybe you don’t decorate your threatening texts with cutesy bopping skulls?

Then comes a call from the kidnapper, whose voice is garbled electronically to sound gruff and unrecognizable. Through a few chuckles and taunts, he issues Byung-hoon directions on how to locate a bus seat, under which his next message will be taped. Hello, goose chase.

Byung-hoon growls that he’d better not touch a hair on her head, but Kidnapper Batman warns him to do as he says, and also to move solo. The boys are to remain put at the theater.

Byung-hoon thinks fast and issues instructions on leads for them to follow. But he doesn’t have a lot of time, and has to get moving asap to catch that bus in time.

This requires him to take the wheel, which is no easy feat. His hand shakes and he reels in the driver’s seat—no go. He gives up and opts for a taxi instead, managing to catch up to the bus just as it pulls in to the stop.

He jumps onboard, scrambles around and gets mistaken for a pervert, and finally pulls a bulky package from under a seat. Everyone freaks out, asking if it’s a bomb, and he assures them that it’s not. And as he gets off with the package, an obscured face takes note of his actions and puts in a phone call. Hye-ri?

It’s just a huge stack of photos—of Min-young, of himself, of the agency. In the follow-up call, he barks that there’s no info here on where to find her, and Hawaiian Shirt laughs that he was dumber than he gave him credit for. Also: “After interfering with other people’s lives so much, you should pay the price.” He instructs Byung-hoon to head back to the theater to figure out the clue.

The three boys pore over CCTV footage of Min-young getting into an unregistered car, as well as the stack of photos, which include snapshots taken during missions. It’s curious; how did he get access to their surveillance van, for instance? Byung-hoon figures that Min-young is safe, because she’s not the target—they are.

Since Hawaiian Shirt specified the bus by route and license number, those must be clues. They get to work narrowing down their former targets and clients, but the numbers don’t turn up. So the kidnapper isn’t a client or target, but has been watching them consistently.

An address search using those numbers turns up a certain vault, though, of the kind housing ashes and urns. The man housed there was a former racecar-driver client, and while he left behind no relatives, there’s a curious echo of the word “friends” that gives Byung-hoon the tip-off that Hawaiian Shirt is their culprit.

Byung-hoon thinks back to his last confrontation with Min-young, when she’d agreed to disappear from his life. Now he mutters his hopes to himself that she’ll remain safe—a scene that Hawaiian Shirt gets to witness in real time because of the tiny camera he slipped into the agency during his last visit. Time for the next phase, he decides.

And then they’re joined by a third person, whose arrival has Min-young gaping in shock. It’s a woman, and although we don’t see her face, we all know who this is, right? I do wish the show was handling this reveal quicker, since it’s not really much of a secret.

Arang drops by the restaurant to see if Hawaiian Shirt is here today, and asks the loan sharks for their help (since, as debt collectors, they’re pretty good at tracking down people who are trying to hide). He tells them of Min-young’s kidnapping, and Seung-pyo orders him to relay the story, details and all.

Moo-jin reviews old tapes of their ex-client, one which was shot at a hospital, presumably in his last days. The client cuts the video short to avoid his little sister seeing, and the camera catches her face: Hye-ri.

So it’s Hye-ri who joins Min-young now, explaining that she won’t be harmed. This is all to show the Cyrano members what they’d done: She promised her dying brother to get payback on the people responsible for making his last days lonely.

Moo-jin hides the Hye-ri connection for the time being, and then the three guys get simultaneous text messages. It’s a riddle of sorts, containing veiled directional clues and also famous quotes. The clues shake out to: library, cul-de-sac, Cyrano. All references to their prior cases.

Another call comes in, and based on his comments they realize he’s watching them. He gives them an hour to come find Min-young: “And don’t forget, what I want is the truth.”

Wearing his grim face, Seung-pyo decides to go “there,” which is enough to get his two goons crying that he can’t, not there. Uh-oh. Is he revisiting his shadowy past?

Sure enough, he turns up at a den of gangsters, making his way to the head boss. He asks for his help finding someone, and while the boss isn’t all that inclined to help, he is curious enough to go with it. What could make Seung-pyo come back for the first time in two years?

To their shark, one of the gangsters recognizes Hawaiian Shirt immediately—it’s Detective Jung. Or rather, just Jung now, and “a total psycho.”

The boss isn’t about to let a golden opportunity pass him by, and before he gives up any info, he offers up a trade: He’ll talk, if Seung-pyo comes to work for him again.

The agency guys split up to get to work on meeting their targets, as indicated by the clues. On his way out, Moo-jin runs into Hye-ri outside the restaurant, who feigns ignorance of everything and pretends it’s a normal day at work. He approaches with a stone face and tells her he has someplace to take her.

Arang races to the alleyway where they’d staged the teenage idol romance, and to his surprise the girl arrives too—she’d been called here by fake Arang. A text arrives to inform Arang what he is to do: Admit that they’d contrived the whole situation.

Moo-jin takes Hye-ri with him to the library, where he gets the same text. She’s still pretending to go along with it, but he asks her outright, “Do you have to go this far? Do you want to ruin things for everyone we’ve helped together?”

Hye-ri nervously tries to leave and act confused, and he guesses, “So you’re just going to pretend you don’t know.” So he catches her the other way: By pointing out that she can’t know the librarian’s name or case, because it happened before she started working at the restaurant.

Seung-pyo tells his ex-boss that he made a promise not to return to this life (to his hyung, perhaps?), and doesn’t want to break it. The boss sneers, but Seung-pyo kneels before him and asks again for the favor.

Idol girlfriend slaps Arang when she hears his confession. He explains that it wasn’t all fake; the idol boy’s feelings and words were all real, and they just helped him express them. She isn’t exactly comforted by that, since it means idol boy deceived her.

Byung-hoon’s clue takes him to Yi-seol’s workshop… where he admits to his very first Cyrano gig. Omo wut. Was he playing Cupid for his best friend all those years ago, then? Byung-hoon admits to regretting it later, not having fully understood his feelings for her at the time he agreed to help Do-il.

But Yi-seol hardly seems shocked, and asks if he really thinks she fell in love with Do-il because of some letter: “I knew you were the one who wrote that letter.” Ah, so his first mission really was Cyrano de Bergerac, down to the (sorry) letter.

Turns out Do-il told her years ago. He was always open and honest with her, and that’s probably why she fell for him. She wonders what prompted him to come here today, and urges him to stop running away. Instead, think about the person who forced him to confront his feelings—a scene that Min-young watches with shiny eyes from her hostage lair.

Mob Boss offers up the perp’s home address, which Seung-pyo accepts gratefully. Only, it doesn’t come free, the boss reminds him. He burns the photo of Min-young, and then as he starts to burn the address, he tells Seung-pyo, “There’s no such thing as an unbreakable promise.” Gulp.

Back to Moo-jin, who guesses that Hye-ri’s motivation was her brother. She finally admits to it, then accuses him of making her dying brother lonely in his last days—didn’t they know that the target already had a boyfriend? Or did they not care because he was dying?

Moo-jin tells her she’s the one who has it backwards: “Your brother was the client.” He requested that the agency set up his girlfriend with his colleague.

She calls him a liar, but he has video proof. He hands over his phone, and she watches as her brother pleads with Byung-hoon to take the case, not wanting to leave his girlfriend behind alone. Furthermore, the couple knew that her brother was the one pushing them together.

She struggles with denial, but Moo-jin tells her, “I don’t lie to the person I like.” He holds her as she starts to break down, realizing, “If you’re telling the truth, then everything I’ve been doing…” He assures her that it’s okay, and that she can still reverse things.

Hawaiian Shirt watches on his screen, not entirely pleased with the way things are shaking out but laughing in his creepy serial killer way nonetheless. He sympathizes with Min-young for being another of the agency’s victims, even though she defends their work as helping people show their honest emotions. So she hazards a guess: Is the agency working on a case involving a woman he’s in love with?

It’s close enough to get him in a rage, and he orders her to shut up.

Moo-jin calls Byung-hoon to let him know where the hostage lair is, but by the time they arrive, it’s empty. Hawaiian Shirt is making his getaway in a car when he calls again, this time with a demand to set up a meeting with a woman named So-yeon: “You guys messed around with my woman.”

Byung-hoon demands to talk to Min-young, and tells her he’ll come get her soon. With that, Hawaiian Shirt sets the time and place for their next meeting, two hours hence. He hums to himself cheerily about getting them good. And from the backseat, Min-young’s eyes widen to read something—a clue about what’s next, which we don’t get to see.

Seung-pyo and his two goons make it to the hostage lair, thanks to the boss’s address (oh no, he took the deal?), and find the serial killer wall of photos. They rifle through his notes, and among his papers is a letter written to Yi-seol, from Do-il. Seung-pyo furrows his brow—why is that part of this case? He connects the dots: Then did Byung-hoon play matchmaker for his brother?

A note scrawled on a page identifies the the plan’s last stage: Cyrano Theater. And then on the wall, the goons find plans for a familiar-looking “final stage” scenario. The diagrams include a theater stage, and a bomb.

Then Minion Two opens up a cabinet, which explodes in his face and sends him flying with a bloody arm. Eeeek. The boys urge Seung-pyo to hurry to the agency asap and put a stop to the crazy man.

Byung-hoon arrives at the address indicated, but hears from the woman living there that the person in question has been living abroad for over a year. That’s strange, and Byung-hoon deduces the rest: The crazy man sent him on a wild goose chase to get him away from the theater. (Note: Byung-hoon’s deduction is correct, but the logical is totally nonexistent. But this is drama climax. Who cares about logic. Let’s get to the boom.)

So everyone’s arriving at the conclusion at about the same time, and Seung-pyo calls Byung-hoon to warn him. Byung-hoon makes a desperate request of the lady to use her car. Ready to confront our fears, are we?

Hawaiian Shirt takes Min-young back to the theater and tells her to take a good look around since it’ll be its last day. “You know why I’m doing this to you and not Seo Byung-hoon?” he asks her. “Because they have to feel for themselves what it’s like to lose everything. Somebody who toys with other people should’ve been prepared for this.”

Min-young makes an attempt to knock him aside and make a run for it, but he grabs her and shoves her head-first into a metal locker. Yeeeouch. She goes out cold.

Byung-hoon struggles behind the wheel, but manages to get it turned on. He chants to himself to think of Min-young, and powers through.

 
COMMENTS

I have a giant pile of MEH for this episode, although I recognize that it’s not quite a mess. It’s not a slapdash collection of makjang twists, and it’s not random or last-minute. The plot feels like it was planned in advance, and it brings together overarching themes in a nicely roundabout way, and as an added bonus, the characters’ emotions rise and fall with the dramatic events.

It’s just that I can’t be moved to really care about it. Maybe because it feels maneuvered, like the contents of one of Cyrano Agency’s missions—everyone says and does the right things, but it’s lacking that last 2 percent to make it feel whole.

On a purely intellectual level, I think it works just fine. Let’s look at it from a narrative-building perspective. Byung-hoon’s trajectory of personal growth has been leading to this point, where he’s been pushed out of his emotional comfort zone all series long, and now the reason for that growth is also the one thing to spur him into action. He’s gonna face his stubbornness and fears and Just Do It to save her life, because he can’t be the coward when something this important is on the line.

That dovetails nicely with Seung-pyo’s arc as well, because he’s carved out a slice of comfort for himself with the shady past firmly behind him, and thinks of just moving forward with his new career and new love interest. And then the past rears its ugly head, and it’s love of the girl that pushes him to action. (Although I have to admit I was dismayed at the idea of his hard work taking a big step back if he were forced to work for the boss again, especially since we know that Min-young’s gonna get saved without his help. But he doesn’t know that, and I suppose that’s why the sacrifice hurts.)

Hye-ri’s misunderstanding and the Crazy Kidnapper’s plot aren’t terrible in the scope of things. I like that they challenge the agency on their fundamental principles, and point out the downside to their work, albeit one seen through a twisted and incomplete lens. But since the question of manipulating emotions is a valid one, good on the show for bringing it up itself, rather than ignoring it in favor of the fantasy.

What makes it fall flat, though, is perhaps because the show is so light and feel-good that I don’t believe any of the dire consequences. The kidnapping scenes start feeling laughable rather than menacing, and it’s not the fault of the acting or even the directing—but taken in context of the show as a whole, it’s a jarring contrast and I don’t buy it. But we’re heading into the final stretch now, so thankfully this disbelief need not remain suspended for too much longer.

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I think this is one of the weakest episode which is a shame considering it's 2nd to last but I see that it was there to set up the ending. It's sad that it falls flat.

I just keep saying to myself this is supposed to be a ridiculous drama about a ridiculous dating agency. Being ridiculous is good in small portions but this ep just gave me more than I wanted. kidnapping??... ehhh... could have done without it. still overall a good series.

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This episode was a joke. Everything felt weak and the acting was horrible.

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The acting was good. However they can only act as the script dictates.And the script and flow for this episode was jarring.

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so happy moojin forgave hyeri. he was so calm tooo. perfect line. I don't lie to a girl I like. perfect guy:)

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Like:

-revelations/twists
-Moo-jin

Hate:

-Hye-ri
-the execution of most of what happened. Felt disconnected mostly, so I hope the last episode will be better.

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My single-focused view: I loved how Moo Jin handled his girlfriend’s involvement – he didn’t do the wrist grab, but was sensitive and talked to her. When he moved in to hold her when she came to the painful realization about her brother and said, “It’s okay. You didn’t know,” I totally melted.

Check out 2NE1’s song Falling In Love – Moo Jin is one of the background beach boys 

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OMG! I was watching the video and then I was like "*GASP* Moo Jin, what are you doing there?!" He was smiling and I was thinking he looked so pretty lol. I really like him with his longer hair versus the shorter haircut he had before.

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I kinda saw the whole Hye Ri thing coming especially with those ominous words from the last ep but I think the execution is better than what I expected albeit quite dramatic for the light-hearted fare we've been getting it (like JB said). And while the kidnapping seemed a bit random, I understand that it was a way to force Seo Byung to own up to his feelings and made sense that they team was quick on the uptake like they normally are with their own missions. But gah, I felt so bad for Moo Jin :(. He opened up to her and it was all to get closer to Cyrano. It's pretty similar to what Cyrano does and I like the way the show is discussing the ethical implications of their activities despite having good intentions. Her feelings became sincere and I thought it would be hard for Moo Jin to forget that he was being manipulated to begin with but he seemed very forgiving and sympathetic (he really isn't a robot :).

Also, a small yay for some more Cyrano influences. I had always wondered where Seo Byung got his start with the whole match making thing and I was a little surprised that it was with Do Il and Yi Seul but it makes sense and is in tune with his character. The couple/trio saved themselves by being honest before things got too far which differs from the tragic ending of Cyrano. Is that a life lesson there, Show?

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Grumble grumble is right! Moo-jin's I don't lie to people I like--EEEEK! She's in league (even though she didn't realize how psycho he is) with a killer/bomber/whacko and he STILL is treating her like a girlfriend?

I was so mad when he didn't out her right away. Is Min-Young's life not worth his girlfriend's privacy? Wow. I really was enjoying this drama and now I'm just ticked off.

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Kidnapping... Like in TW dramas. I hate that plot device!
Didn't like that episode either...

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Hahaha! Love your comment. Yeah, when I used to watch TW dramas, I also hated the kidnapping stuff. I guess it's hard to write kidnapping scenarios....even the currently airing Scandal which was built on kidnapping premise had me rolling my eyes but like Cyrano, I'm going along with it to get to the other heftier issues.

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Overall, I didn't think the episode was bad...but I totally agree with you -it just doesn't work because it doesn't fit the 'feel' of the drama.

It probably would have been a more satisfactory episode if it was for a different show.

Oh well! At least not being emotionally invested into a show has its advantages!

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The kidnapping makes it contrived and overstretched. It was unnecessary as he could have regretted and confessed after losing her for real. He could have done it per his own volition and it would be more believable. His admission could have triggered tying up all the loose ends with Hye Ri being the mysterious Snowden LOL

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I'm probably the only one that skipped through the whole kidnapping sequence. You've seen them once and you've seen them all. And guessing off of the character I knew how this would roughly end too.

- -;; Princess in towers in this case often function a lot like fridged women. I'm not thrilled.

Knights in Shining armor also I hate.

I can sum up this episode for you quickly. Everything you think will happen, does happen. The subplot with Hye Ri is moot because it gets lectured out of the script. Bunch of telephone calls. And then crazy guy is in stalker love with Yi Seul and he has a bomb. Done.

Any attempts to escape are met with being put down quickly, but she only tries twice. First time was weak, second time was a plot excuse to knock her out for the cliffhanger. And when she was wearing heels and had her legs free, she didn't struggle once and didn't attempt to kick him where the sun don't shine.

The stakes aren't there... where is the gun? The knife? She's not drugged or knocked out during the transfers. Why is she just standing there with him when he isn't holding either up to her? She's willingly walking into the agency? He had to untie her legs. She could have kicked him with her heels. Compliant women in these situations where there is no danger makes me upset.

I would have accepted these twists:
- Min Yeong planned all of this herself.
- Seo Il Rok is kidnapped and pleading for his life and realizes his feelings for Min Yeong. For once he can't talk his way out of it. So it's up to Min Yeong to use what she learned to rescue him while he tries desperately to escape.
- Min Yeong escapes. The guy pretends he still has her while she tries to figure her way back from a remote location.
- The guy has a gun/knife/bat. SOMETHING threatening. You know, anything... even threaten her with the bomb. Seriously.
- Min Yeong gives clues to Seo Il Rok while on the phone about the make and model of the car.

I know I'm spinning wheels, but can't you give the woman a chance to grow as a character?

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All these scenarios would have definitely made the drama ten times more interesting. But yeah, the whole drama was pretty much about quick resolutions to everything....there were never high stakes whether it was through the cases or in this kidnapping scenario.

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So I actually didn't think the episode was that bad; it's just that it felt like it was from some other show than the one I'd been watching up 'til episode 15. Light-hearted comedy? Nope.

I know that the Detective Jung/Go Il Do sinisterness was hinted at when episode 10 ended, but still, this big revenge plot seems a bit pulled out of their *ahem* butt. I would have been better with him being Hye-ri's dad or something. It's all a bit too heavy on the Tables Turned, I'm stalking you, now.

And I must have missed something along the way, but I don't understand why Byung-hoon never drives and has panic attacks behind the wheel. Yes, his best friend died in a car crash, but he wasn't in the car. Are we supposed to believe he is traumatized by the accident he feels he caused, on some level? Hm. Then again, maybe I zoned out somewhere along the way during the previous 14 episodes and it was explained.

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Not all people who experience accidental deaths have PTSD. In BH's case he just has a wad of guilt to pay off in terms of debt on the theater which he feels is his own debt.

But yeah, it seems to have been pulled from no where and manufactured, which is a symptom of a character lacking agency in a writer's eyes.

They could have turned it around halfway through, but didn't edit it or anything.

Usually when a character can't affect the plot, i.e. Min Yeong, the writer tries to compensate by making up plot around them, but the problem is that you have to generate plot harder, which means that the events and conflict look very forced and you use other characters to force the character forward. You can see this with Min Yeong in her actions.

My complaint from episode 1 that she needs some talent within the agency, and the inability to fix that, leads to plot problems like this later down the line. Where you need extra and outside characters to get any movement forward. There were places they could have fixed it, but didn't do it.

You see this several times and even attempts within the script to get her to move on her own and the inability for the writer to do so. For example, "I thought you would go after him..." is a failure to edit line from the writer using a character as a mouthpiece to get another character they can't quite get to move forward.

Also lecture at the character and the reader/viewers who the character is supposed to be in a character write up, but then find that the character isn't doing it. *cough*

=D I say that as someone who has been there. Also when critiquing. Usually, I would say, "Uhh... the things you're saying about the character aren't what they are doing. This may cause you issues later on. Is this intentional?"

So the only fix is to come with a more contrived plot and generate more events around the character plus push other characters to push them forward. i.e. can't get Seo Il Rok to like her through the Master or her confession, doesn't have enough force to do it herself, so maybe put her in the classic Knight in Shining armor situation so here feels stakes. The only trouble with this, is that you undercut the character even more. >.<;; Trying too hard to compensate and doing it in the wrong way.

Sorry for the writer jargon.

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Honestly, when Byung Hoon asked for the car my only reaction was: Take taxi! It will be much faster!
...as how can somebody with such a fear and totally inexperienced (especially in a traffic of a big city) be more efficient than a skilled taxi driver...

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I guess I'm in the minority when I say I quite liked the episode? Well, that's alright with me. I do recognize all the things pointed out in your comments, Javabeans, and was nodding along too. However, I wasn't too put down by them and was watching along, waiting for things to get tied neatly with full closure amongst all characters. Its probably because this show is very light, like you said, and things wrap up really quickly so it doesn't bring that heart-pumping stuff but as a viewer, I don't care either. Everything is building up to a nice, neat ending full of closure.

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Bleh,

I'll pile on to the non-like of the episode.

While I didn't hate it, and I sort of understood it in an intellectual way like javabeans, it just felt kind of like another show with the characters imported from DAC....

From an intellectual standpoint, I loved the character growth lines coming to a head and the previous episodes being tied in along with the moral questioning, but from an enjoyment perspective, this really wasn't what I signed up for....

Oh well, I wasn't expecting brilliance, and the ride has been mostly fun.

I hope that episode 16 will go back to the breeziness that was the hallmark of the previous episodes....

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The whole time I was watching this episode I kept thinking: javabeans is going to have fun reviewing this one. Lol
I pretty much agree with everything you said. The whole kidnapping thing happening at the end of the series is just... Meh. Considering how light and fun this show has been it does not fit the theme at all. I couldn't help but rolling my eyes a bit a few times during the episode.
I like how they are trying to address the consequences of the 'setting up' business and manipulating emotions but I wish it could have been carried out differently. The kidnapping is an overkill.

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I really wish they did something different. Kidnapping seems too farfetched. I wish they used something else as the drive to make BH face his feelings head on. Oh and SP breaking his promise seems a cruel fate for his character. I don't know how they'll fix that or if they even will.

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like thw climax of this story... this is getting more interesting and i am sooooo looking forward for the ending.

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"Min-young makes an attempt to knock him aside and make a run for it"

maybe I need to watch the episode again but that's not how I remember it, the way I remember it she knocked him over, stood there staring till he got up then tried to run.

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and then ran not for the door, but further into the studio even though it's home turf... Yeah... really...

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I was watching this show for the fluff and cotton candy, dang it, where did it go?

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I completely agree that this climax makes sense thematically (deliberately manipulating people's affections for money falls in a moral gray area for sure) but the way it has come to a head just seems SO overdramatic for this particular show so I completely understand your feelings of MEH-ness. It almost feels like I'm watching a different show all of a sudden. Even though Master had roots in a darker side of life, it was usually played for laughs (what with his inept goons and his insistence that he had turned his back on that way of life) so now that we suddenly have to deal with a kidnapping plus an attempted bombing/murder, it all just seems a little over the top and hard to stomach. This show used to be light and airy - what happened? I wish they had found a more realistic way of getting us to this point.

It also feels sad that all of the cases that we saw will now be undermined because of Hawaiian Shirt's machinations. I kind of liked the Hyeri/MooJin parts though.

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I think I liked everything about Cyrano and its feel good vibe until this ep... lije, I dont get to think that Crazy Pants actions are valid at all and we dont get to see what happeed to hum fully.. maybe if they did I could feel he has some reasons and might understand him. I feel so bad for Master... I always think twice before I start watching a drama cuz I know ill fall for the second lead and we both will end up heartbroken.. id like a drama with the 2nd lead getting the girl... seriously!

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I rolled my eyes when I saw the kidnapping plot. Though it kinda served its purpose so I'm kinda ok with it but going all the way to the terror side -- the bomb and what not is totally uncalled for.

Will browse episode 16 now to understand where all the terror from the Hawaiian shirt man is coming from.

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I hated this episode. Moo-jin was cool. Everything else...*sigh*

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Just one thing: I'm soooo disappointed that the kidnapping was real and not a setup from the boys (or whoever else). It totally killed the mood...

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I liked the episode....but I agree that they could have cut short the kidnapping thing....

Anyways....looking forward to the last episode....

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OK, still one thing - I was also disappointed how they revealed the Cyrano backstory. The thought that Buyng Hoon was the Cyrano in the past did cross my mind already couple of episodes ago, so I was not surprised now. However, I expected that BH (and YS) would find out the pieces in a more subtle way.... and by themselves... with emotions... and maybe some flashbacks... than by some kidnapper's show with plain talking of 1 minute....

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thanks share ^^ saranghae :)

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The script was awful.....probably the worst episode so far... =( I don't blame the actors though! They did well with what they had. Seriously, it seems like this episode had every possible dramatic thing. Bombs? er.....I knew nothing was gonna blow up.

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They ruined this episode by having the kidnap plot. Come on geez.

OK I decided this episode never happened.

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Does this episode not remind anyone of Sherlock the TV show?

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I don't think the kidnap plot was that bad, it was a so-so episode but it wasn't bad, the characters came a long way.

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