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A New Leaf: Episode 11

If there’s one thing Seok-ju knows better than anyone, it’s that we create our own demons. Knowing that, Seok-ju goes through one hell of a fight trying to destroy and fix the inhumane consequences planned by his alter ego. Once again, he experiences the overwhelming disappointment and regret of discovering who he really used to be. But by making necessary amends, he finally gets a well-deserved break from being an amnesiac stuck in the ruthless corporate world.

 
EPISODE 11 RECAP

As Seok-ju feared, Jung-seon is not going to get by with her plan. The judge mandates her arrest, and she looks frightened as she’s dragged away in handcuffs. Seok-ju promises to find a way to get her out.

Seok-ju follows Chairman Gwon outside the courthouse and tells him that this case won’t end with Jung-seon as the sole person taking responsibility. Her uncle argues that Jung-seon was the director of funds and Chairman Gwon takes his advice lightly. They’re trying their best, so Seok-ju should stay out of it.

Upon returning home, Seok-ju makes a phone call to his stock trader to ask about his financial history. Apparently, Seok-ju hadn’t made any stock deals prior to this one, making this particular deal even more suspicious.

In jail, Jung-seon meets with her lawyer, who reassures her about the case. Her arrest was an expected obstacle, and she should be released soon after the case concludes. Unlike in court, Jung-seon looks unfazed and passive. He also tells her that Seok-ju is busy with a prosecution against his unreported overseas funds. She nods and walks out.

Seok-ju is back at the prosecutor’s office, but this time with Sang-tae as his lawyer. The examination goes quite smoothly with Sang-tae, who jumps in during Seok-ju’s pauses to fill in the gaps, mostly boasting about their firm’s reputation and ability to invest millions at a time.

The prosecutor asks about the suspiciously large investment in Japan a few years back, and Sang-tae says that a few of the firm’s lawyers invested in a Fukushima golf course. But the nuclear disaster that followed resulted in a great loss for the investors. The prosecutor comments that for such great lawyers, they suck at stocks.

Sang-tae then hilariously asks if his client is being examined for sucking at stocks. Seok-ju chokes down a laugh while the prosecutor tries to cover up his embarrassment. The prosecutor is briefly called out of the examination room, and Seok-ju and Sang-tae take a moment to chuckle.

The all-powerful Yeong-woo has pulled some strings with the prosecutor’s office to ensure Seok-ju’s release. As a result, Sleazy Prosecutor is called into his boss’s office, where he’s told to step down from Seok-ju’s case. Yeong-woo sure knows how to manipulate his power and money.

Now that he’s off the hook, Seok-ju is looking to help Jung-seon. He knows that Yoorim has put all their best lawyers on the case, but the problem is that they’re representing Yoorim, not Jung-seon. He spends his night at the firm trying to trace any significant evidence regarding Yoorim’s overseas affairs.

The next day, Seok-ju visits Jung-seon to warn her about the gravity of her situation. The prosecution is pushing for a tougher sentence, and Jung-seon’s defense – selling Yoorim Energy – will not be enough. Jung-seon tells him that she made a deal with her grandfather, and she’s prepared to spend a couple years locked up.

But Seok-ju pulls out some suspicious evidence about Yoorim’s supposed investment in a Filipino bank. The website is in Korean, and it’s unlikely that it’s for the Korean immigrants there. The bank was probably established so that Yoorim could pocket some of their overseas funds.

This is news to Jung-seon, but that doesn’t change her attitude. She’s still willing to be the sacrificial lamb for her family, even if that means a much longer sentence. But in her jail cell, Jung-seon sits in the corner, noticeably nervous. She rubs her empty ring finger and thinks back to Seok-ju’s warning that she could be stuck in jail for at least ten years.

News of Yoorim Energy catches Ji-yoon’s attention the next morning at the firm, and she asks Sang-tae whether the firm would represent victims of Yoorim’s investment fiasco. Sang-tae clarifies that the firm’s legal fees are too high and that they can’t represent both parties; the firm is defending Yoorim at the moment.

Sang-tae notices Seok-ju in his office hard at work, and as if on cue, Ji-yoon gets a message from her aunt about getting legal aid for her investment: “Your firm’s probably too expensive, right?”

Ji-yoon sits with her aunt at another law office, where the lawyer says that after all the legal fees, she may be able to get half of her initial investment back. Her aunt is disappointed, but Ji-yoon saw this coming. It’s not worth the time and money to sue for an investment refund.

Seok-ju tells Sang-tae to go home, but he sticks around to help, saying that he’s got no wife or children to go home to. Why go home when you can be bromantic? Sang-tae notices that the CPs were sold for pretty cheap, and Seok-ju reasons that the low cost was intended because investors would be less willing to sue if the return would be only a fraction of their original investment. Like Ji-yoon’s aunt.

After some thorough research, Seok-ju can see Yoorim’s plan of action. By making one person responsible, they can somehow regain their subsidiaries. Sang-tae brings up the fact that Yoorim’s bankruptcy will force the company to undergo a significant reduction in capital, but Seok-ju thinks that Yoorim will somehow avoid that obstacle. He doesn’t remember if he put the mechanism in place, but he can see it happening.

Jung-seon is delivered today’s newspaper in her cell, and her jail mates comment that she must be a chaebol’s daughter, seeing that she gets special privileges. She sees the news of Yoorim Energy and thinks back to Seok-ju’s daunting prediction.

Seok-ju visits Chairman Gwon to update him on his findings. Seok-ju predicts that someone will come forward to Chairman Gwon and propose that they avoid the capital reduction with overseas funds, a source yet unknown to both Seok-ju and Chairman Gwon. That person will be the culprit who illegally pocketed funds. He’s telling Chairman Gwon his findings because he believes that he wouldn’t want his granddaughter stuck in prison for ten years.

After Seok-ju heads out, Chairman Gwon holds a meeting with Cha Yeong Woo Firm’s vice president and the uncles. One of the uncles starts the meeting with the option of receiving funds and even an acquisition proposal from Taiwan. Aha, he’s the culprit.

But Chairman Gwon and his team all seem to be on the same page, as they’ve been planning this together the whole time. Chairman Gwon tells them about how much Seok-ju has figured out, and the vice president ensures him that he shouldn’t need to worry about Seok-ju. Ugh, they’re ALL culprits.

Seok-ju visits the Yoorim CP trials, where he hears the plight of the victims. Many were fooled into investing large sums of money and are struggling to support themselves. Outside the courtroom, Seok-ju runs into Ji-yoon’s aunt, and they sit down to talk about the unfortunate situation.

Sang-tae meets Seok-ju at the courthouse and notices a bunch of people writing petitions. They find it curious, as they are victims of different companies within Yoorim. Ji-yoon’s aunt explains that all the CP investment victims are petitioning to save Yoorim Cement because the Yoorim Cement investment victims have a chance of being repaid if that subsidiary is saved. It’s a last attempt to save those who can be saved.

Originally, Yoorim Cement would undergo reduction in capital and stock value as a punishment for incompetent business. But, they’re petitioning to save Yoorim Cement from the capital reduction punishment that would naturally result from bankruptcy. This is the mechanism that pre-amnesia Seok-ju had planned for. The company’s victims are saving their own enemy. Ingenious.

On his way out, Seok-ju runs into the Yoorim uncles, who thank him for his plan that worked out perfectly. They didn’t need to do a thing, and the victims saved their company for them. Seok-ju doesn’t look pleased, but he’s already working on his next plan. Yoorim obviously prioritizes the money over Jung-seon, so it’s up to Seok-ju to get her out.

Ji-yoon’s aunt comes to her house with her hands full of groceries and tells her about her day at the courthouse. She tells Ji-yoon about how thoughtful Sang-tae and Seok-ju were, but Ji-yoon cuts her off. “Seok-ju is Yoorim’s future son-in-law. Why do you think he was there?”

She just revealed everything to the enemy, but Ji-yoon’s aunt wonders why Seok-ju and Sang-tae were against the petition-writing. The petitions would have helped Yoorim. Maybe these lawyers can help her. Ji-yoon calls her aunt naïve and sits down to give her aunt a dose of reality: these lawyers won’t be helping the victims.

Parents tell their kids to study hard, get a good job, and enjoy the privileges of being rich. Even Ji-yoon’s aunt told her a version of that: study hard, get a good job, marry well, and live luxuriously. Hardly any parents tell their kids to go to school to help the uneducated fight unfair treatment, so why should we expect them to help us? True, but it sounds extra cynical coming out of Ji-yoon.

Next door, Seok-ju feeds snacks to Khan, who is thoroughly enjoying his time. Seok-ju comments on how simple happiness is and decides to take Khan on a walk. He runs into Ji-yoon as he comes out and mentions her aunt buying CP from Yoorim.

She turns around and asks about his emphasis on finding the truth: Does that truth change in different situations? Does it change for his fiancée? She leaves him with that question and heads inside.

In the morning paper, Seok-ju sees the news of Yoorim’s acquisition by a Taiwanese company. He immediately calls Chairman Gwon, but he’s been hospitalized and is unavailable. But it seems to be more of a calculated move, as the vice president reports to Yeong-woo that Chairman Gwon seems to be avoiding publicity, given his situation.

He also reports that Seok-ju has caught up on the Yoorim situation and wants Jung-seon to be released. The problem is that they’re representing Yoorim and Chairman Gwon, not Jung-seon, but Seok-ju’s interference could negatively affect Yoorim’s case. The vice president asks about Seok-ju’s uncharacteristic behavior lately, and Yeong-woo spills the beans. He’s lost his memory.

Yeong-woo finds it impressive that Seok-ju caught up, even with his memory loss and such little information on the Yoorim case. He fears that Seok-ju will decide to represent the group of victims, as he’s been trying to make amends recently. Any other lawyer would fail, but Seok-ju could sustain a case against Yoorim. But even with memory loss, Seok-ju is Seok-ju, and Yeong-woo thinks that he hasn’t revealed all his cards.

Seok-ju visits Jung-seon again with more information. Her grandfather, Chairman Gwon, has been hospitalized but probably intentionally. Yoorim Energy has been sold but for an insignificant amount of money that will not cover the massive debt. Seok-ju is hopeful that the prosecution will find something suspicious, but if they don’t, Jung-seon will be prosecuted as the scapegoat for all this mess.

He shows her the news of the Taiwanese company Tayu that plans to acquire Yoorim at a fraction of its original worth. When the transaction is complete, all of Yoorim’s stocks will transfer over to Tayu, and it will become the major shareholder. But Tayu is probably owned by one of Jung-seon’s uncles.

Jung-seon remembers that her second uncle’s wife is from Taiwan, and everything makes sense. Seok-ju tries to convince Jung-seon to get herself out of this situation, but she still seems hesitant. He advises her to tell the truth in court, and he says that he’ll try to change her uncles’ testimonies to save both her and the company.

Seok-ju is once again disappointed at the terrible person he used to be. Before he walks out of the visiting room, Jung-seon apologizes to him, but that seems to do little to pacify his disappointment.

Guests are visiting Seok-ju’s father to ask about his health and future plans for his office. Unfortunately, he’ll be closing his office and giving up work because of his health. Seok-ju walks in and joins the conversation.

The guests are planning to prosecute against a bank for fraud, and that bank happens to be represented by Seok-ju’s firm. Before the guests leave, Seok-ju asks to check their prosecutor and smiles when he sees that it’s Prosecutor Lee Sun-hee. He ensures them that they’ll be in good hands.

When he goes back inside, his father is holding his phone, confused. He can’t remember what he was about to do. He looks at his labeled pills, and Seok-ju asks what he’s doing. He looks up at Seok-ju but can’t remember. Seok-ju asks why he labeled his pills, and his father says that he’s just getting forgetful with old age. His Alzheimer’s secret is safe for now, but I don’t know for how long…

Seok-ju is surprised to hear that his father will be giving up work, but his father justifies his decision with his deteriorating health. You can’t properly do your job in court without good health. His father is also surprised when Seok-ju tells him that he’ll be quitting soon as well. He doesn’t have any plans, but he’s sure he won’t starve.

Then Seok-ju asks his father if he has any regrets. He answers that he’s had none, that he would make the same decisions if he were to go back, but he acknowledges that it wasn’t easy for the people around him. When he was arrested, Seok-ju’s grandmother fainted, and Seok-ju found his relationship with his father to be strained.

Seok-ju’s father asks about Khan, so he gives him the latest. Khan got surgery, and he’s currently getting treatment. He feels sorry for leaving Khan in an empty house all day and presumes that Khan would have been happier at his father’s place. Before Seok-ju leaves, the cleaning ajumma tells him that he took Khan when he fought with his father a few years ago. Of course he doesn’t remember, but when he goes home, he tells Khan that they’ll visit his father together soon.

Negotiations are well underway the next day between the Yoorim uncles and Seok-ju, who proposes that they spend a little more to release Jung-seon. The Yoorim uncles argue that Jung-seon chose to be the scapegoat, but Seok-ju pulls out an official document confirming her as his client. She’s changed her mind about the whole scapegoat thing.

Seok-ju also adds that he’ll be helping with the class action lawsuit against Yoorim. He would be illegally representing both parties, but he’s leaving the Cha Yeong Woo Firm today, so that won’t be a problem.

The Yoorim uncles can’t believe that Seok-ju would go this far, but Seok-ju does have another option for them. He gives them different overseas investment options to cover up their illegal pocketing. As long as they release Jung-seon, they won’t be needing to face Seok-ju any further in court.

Yeong-woo has been watching the negotiations in his room and turns off his surveillance footage as Seok-ju comes into his office. Seok-ju hands him his resignation letter and thanks him for everything. He says that he’ll be taking a break for the time being, and Yeong-woo says he hopes to see Seok-ju again when his memory returns. He also gets confirmation from Yeong-woo that his overseas funds are his personal savings, and with that they share a farewell handshake.

In a series of flashbacks, we see Yeong-woo telling Seok-ju about his potential. Some people aren’t born to enjoy the simple pleasures of life; they must fulfill their potential. And he somewhat did by cleaning up his mess in both the Jung Hye-ryeong case and the Yoorim case. Yeong-woo tells his vice president to follow Seok-ju’s requests, as they cannot fight against someone who’s got nothing to lose.

The other associates and interns are shocked to see Seok-ju leave, and Yeong-woo gives the excuse that Seok-ju has yet to recover from his accident. Ji-yoon follows Seok-ju out and just misses the elevator.

As Seok-ju is exiting the building, we see Ji-won enter. He sees Seok-ju moving out and Ji-yoon following after him. The new ace has arrived.

Slow motion and into the light, Seok-ju exits the building, looking refreshed and free. He takes a deep breath, finally released from his burdens.

 
COMMENTS

Ah, freedom at last. The slow motion walk into the light was a little dramatic, but I get it. He’s finally escaped the hell that he’d created. I don’t suppose that he’s completely escaped from his old disappointing self, but quitting the firm is a pretty good attempt to start fresh. I’m a little surprised that Seok-ju didn’t last longer at the firm because I was expecting to see him struggle and butt heads with Ji-won. But I’m sure it’ll happen at some point. It would be an unforgivable missed opportunity if we don’t put these two against each other and witness the charisma overload. That being said, I would love to see more solo Ji-won at work. Does he have a moral compass? Is he like pre- or post-amnesia Seok-ju? I’m sure we’ll find out soon enough.

Yeong-woo isn’t my favorite character, but I’ve got to admit, he’s pretty intriguing. A lot of what he says and does reveals a twisted version of the truth that seems so realistic at times. His version of “innocent until proven guilty” is not a matter of due process; it’s a matter of making sure there’s no proof of guilt, whether or not the person is actually guilty. But he’s not all about being the bad guy either. He knows when he needs to abandon ship and let the criminals pay their dues. All of his actions, however, are motivated by his quest to preserve and build his empire: the Cha Yeong Woo Firm. I’m not sure if he has a moral gray area or if he’s just a jaded man driven by capitalism. I’ll miss that interesting charged dynamic we see with Yeong-woo and Seok-ju, but I wonder if Ji-won will fill that void.

Seok-ju’s intelligence has always been pretty obvious, but we clearly see the dual quality of his ingenuity in this episode. His skill is a double-edged sword for Yeong-woo and for himself. Yeong-woo definitely fears his skill, and it served him well in getting his (literal) final say at the firm. But for himself, it’s both a blessing and a curse. There’s no doubt that his past self planned some horrible almost cruel scenarios, but there wouldn’t have been any other way to fix them without that same intelligence. He needs the same mechanism he used to create his demons to destroy them. But for what? Peace of mind? The truth? Ji-yoon poses a good question. In what situations does the truth change?

That’s the conflict Seok-ju faces when he’s trying to protect Jung-seon, but I do think he finds a good compromise. I found myself a bit frustrated yet sympathetic to see Jung-seon still hesitant to turn on her family after finding out they tried to frame her. They obviously don’t care about her, but she does because maybe they’re all she’s got. I hope we see more of her story as we go forward because the vulnerability behind her cold apathetic façade is worth some attention.

And how much do I love that Sang-tae is looking out for his amnesiac friend? I wasn’t sure how much help he could be to the infamous Kim Seok-ju, but he was actually helpful and even slightly comical. His impish quality never seems to leave him, even in front of our least favorite prosecutor. Seok-ju may have left the firm and his marriage plans with Jung-seon may be over, but the bromance will go on. Near, far, wherever you are.

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This episode ♥♥♥♥♥

Finally, the epic showdown is in motion!

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"They obviously don’t care about her, but she does because maybe they’re all she’s got". I think that is why she agreed to this farce in the first place, not knowing just how much her "family" was lying to her. I was happy to see that unlike far too many k-dramas that she opted out of the Noble Idiocy clause in her contract :P

I wish our intern got a little more screen time, perhaps in a future episode she will go to work for our Hero + Khan OTP. I suspect that the marriage to his fiancé is pretty much off the table, even if not officially, but they might leave that part open to speculation.

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Forgot to mention that I think that the ONLY reason they brought her back into the family was for use as a pawn or scapegoat. They pretty much cut off all ties with her mother, so I cannot think of any other reason why those sleazebags would invite her back.

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I wonder whether the marriage will happen, but nevertheless the relationship between Seok Ju and Jung Seong was a good thing for both of them. SJ found his loyal and selfless side, whereas JS realized that she doesn't have to sacrifice everything for her "family" - she can find a supportive and sincere man, even if it's not SJ in the end, and she doesn't need to take all the blame (probably including her mom's "mistake" of loving a wrong man). I think she was moved by SJ help and wouldn't give up the feeling of trust and support.

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Seokjoo has better and more important things to do.

At this point, Seokjoo’s fiancée seems a lost cause. To begin with, she was not much of a businesswoman and certainly not a lawyer. Yet, she disagreed with (and acted against) every piece of legal advice or business prognosis Seokjoo offered to her. Even as things proved her wrong and him right on each and every point, she persisted.

Unlike Jiyoon, I don’t think the fiancée will learn from mistakes or benefit from experience. I am not fond of narcissists.

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I have mixed feelings on your take of it. I think that she was lying to herself that she could actually become a part of that "family", and this may have been a wakeup call.

I think the term is cognitive dissonance - where you hear what you want to hear, not what is more factual or real.

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It's possible that Jung-seon will continue to side with her family, but I don't think she's a narcissist. She didn't so much act against Seok-ju's advice as go into the situation with her eyes open, i.e. she knew he was right but she felt she had no choice. But one thing she's just learnt, I think, is that she can no longer rely on her grandfather (who, as Sang-tae told Seok-ju, had appeared to be her only ally in the family). Agree with windsun33 below that this may be the wake-up call she needs.

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I'll admit that she does look good w SJ, but I don't know enough about her to ship SJ w her at this pt. So far she's just a damsel in distress. After SJ gets her out of trouble, what will she be like? Will she cling to that 'family' of hers, just to live a chaebol's life? Remember she was much of a jet setter when we first met her. Or will she grow a backbone and move out? In which case, can she make a living on her own? Or does she just want to live off SJ? We'll have to see what kind of a person she turns out to be.

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Am I the only one thinking that the past SJ was much more sinister and might have been in cahoots with JS's "family" from the very beginning? I sort of feel like JY when she realized she helped that teenage murderer of his parents get a lighter sentence.

Maybe he was engaged to her without really intending to marry her. When the time came for her to take the fall, maybe he could have abused his position as her "fiancé" and persuaded her to rot in prison for 10 years. Then he wouldn't have to marry her and get some sort of kickback from her "family."

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I'm thinking he was in cahoots with respect to the shady business dealings, but out of the loop when it came to their plan for JS to be the scapegoat. I can't see what the advantage would be to him to get engaged to someone and set it up for her to go to jail. Any benefits he'd get from her family he could probably secure just through his lawyering -- it doesn't seem like marrying JS would be necessary. Clearly his engagement and marriage to her would have been tactical, but I don't think that he was part of setting her up for the fall. At least I really hope not.

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SJ planned the shady deals; the greedy uncles took them a step or ten steps further.

I think that in exchange for planning those deals, he got promised a chaebol bride. The grandfather was impressed enough w him and thought him useful to their firm. But things change when his behavior changes post amnesia.

The uncles aren't about to sacrifice any money to bail her out. The 1st uncle objected to it outright; the 2nd one w the Taiwanese wife has a great opportunity to swallow the firm and takes it.

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My take is if she didn't love our Ace Lawyer she will surely develop feelings for him once all of her legal issues are resolved. She looks at him as if to say who is this person and what has caused him to change for the better ?

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I think our Ace Lawyer will take over his fathers office and our little intern will follow because she seems to be a fighter for the common mans rights.

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I heart this show so much...too bad it's ending early

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I was gonna say something coherent about Yeong Woo being both scary AND scared/threatened by Seok Ju... but your Titanic reference cracked me up. :)

Thanks for the recap, DL!

This is before they decided to reduce the episode count, right? I guess we'll see the effects of that on the story soon... *crosses fingers*

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I'm kind of suspecting Seok-ju will take over dad's law firm and file some sort of class action suit against the banks. If that happens, he and Ji-won will surely be butting heads in the courtroom. I'm kind of intrigued by Ji-yoon's character arc. Previously I thought he was more similar to Ji-yoon, but he's now shaping up to have some hints of the old Seok-ju.

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That's the problem when sb is super smart and wants to show it to the world more than anything else, "Look see how very smart I am; I manage this hi profile impossible deal", more than do good w it.
It's the same good Might vs Right dichotomy. When Super Brains render their service on the side of Might, it's really lamentable. Good thing SJ will go to the other side.

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Ha. That last scene though, it's like he's facing his death by following the very bright light. It was super dramatic but unintentionally funny.

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Don't say that! The writer hasn't pulled anything so typically k-dramatic so far, but every time Seok-ju gets a headache I worry that he'll drop dead at the end of the series.

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I don't see the funny in that moment.

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I think his frequent migraine may signal the return of his memory.

KMM is a great actor, but I read he had been really sick throughout filming of this drama. Starting in Ep 3, he lost his voice so he's been relying on medicine and medical equipment to squeak out his voice. I thought his voice sounded cracked but I didn't know he was having such a hard time filming this drama.

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I agree w the headaches signalling the return of his memory. It has to happen even sooner now that the show is to be cut short by 2 eps.

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I do think his memory will return soon, because I remember clearly that his doctor told him that having headaches could signal the return. Therefore the very first time he started having headaches, I had thought his memories would come trickling back, but nothing happened. In the subsequent times he had those headaches, nothing happened either, so I'm not at the edge of my seat each time his head throbs anymore after being fooled so many times!!

There's so much potential for this show though. Pretty bummed out that they're trimming it down to 16 episodes and we're so close to the end. I would have preferred a showdown between Seok Joo and Ji Won when both are in the same firm. There's also minimal development between Ji Yoon and Seok Joo, and Ji Yoon and Ji Won - their relationships have been taking a back seat for way too many episodes while the focus has been on the backstory and current progress of the case at hand.

I love Sang-tae a lot though. The actor certainly brought this character to life. Love the bromance!

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'Why go home when you can be bromantic? '

'Seok-ju may have left the firm and his marriage plans with Jung-seon may be over, but the bromance will go on.'

I really prefer bromance over romance any day and I just love their scene at the prosecutor's office. Can Kim Myung Min and Oh Jung Se just work together in another drama again? Please drama gods!!!

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'Why go home when you can be bromantic? '

'Seok-ju may have left the firm and his marriage plans with Jung-seon may be over, but the bromance will go on.'

I really prefer bromance over romance any day and I just love their scene at the prosecutor's office. Can Kim Myung Min and Oh Jung Se just work together in another drama again? Please drama gods!!!

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Drama, stop moving me to tears. The farewell between Seokjoo and Partner Cha was epic. And with that, Seokjoo is gone. But not before he cleans up the Yoorim mess for Jeongseon and all investors, in one swoop. Even in amnesia, he is a grade-9 attorney.

Partner Cha is awesome. His snap decisions are always on target. But why do I suspect that the secret overseas bank accounts that keep popping up portend doom for our Darth Vader and dissolution of his law firm in the end?

Also in top form today was Sangtae as the attorney for his amnesiac buddy. With a smile, the smooth-talking Sangtae shut the prosecutor up, who was on a fishing expedition. That’s perfect lawyering, pal. Love you!

And Khan is back home with Seokjoo!!!!!! I knew Khan was there more than to humanize Seokjoo. Khan’s temporary abandonment at the vet was an important part of Seokjoo’s amnesia story. But, as it turns out today, Kahn is also a link between Seokjoo and his dad. I think we can practically write the screenplay ourselves as to how the father/son rapprochement will take place.

Now that Seokjoo is out of CHA Firm, can Sangtae and Jiyoon join forces with Seokjoo to start a dream team? Right on time for Baekdoo Group. And for Sea Star victims? Just take over his dad’s practice already. Do as the script says.

One thing that A New Leaf does NOT do is talk down to its viewers. But it does explain once in a while a key legal concept or the real business significance at stake. When it does that, like it did today, its economy of words is astonishing. Corporate bankruptcy law is something most lawyers in the US avoid like plague. It is complex and technical but also excruciatingly boring. Worse, horse trading skills are written into the job description, at which most attorneys simply suck. Well, after today, we know more about it than most American attorneys do, by way of a Korean corporate reorganization.

And Jiyoon’s take on why parents want their children to go to law school was right on the money.

Today we learned new details about the case against Dosi/Mirae/Gookje Banks, which I still believe will pit Luke and Anakin in the Supreme Court. We are told that it centers on currency “hedging” instruments (dollar vs. won) and that the selling banks targeted healthy & debt-free mid- to small-size businesses, who incurred heavy loss on the bet. And, though he doesn’t know it yet, it is all but certain that Seokjoo will lead a class action lawsuit against the mega banks.

But because no one can predict beforehand the direction of future currency movements (that’s why you hedge), losing money itself does not make a case. Derivatives are legal and purchasers here were institutional buyers presumed sophisticated enough to know what they were buying. The derivatives presumably came with a risk disclosure of phonebook size and the purchasers had to initial it as proof that they read it. Thus, exactly what about the hedge...

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I don't know if this is a coincidence or not, but Seok Joo's front licence plate has KMM's birth year on it: 1972. Funny.

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The show I love the most right now will get cut by 2 eps! Just when the show keeps getting better and awesome...
CYW is scary that he has links to everywhere and anyone but it's understandable cause they're the best law firm. But still I can't hate him. He's scary but not some twisted psycho villain we used to see in dramaland.
I love Seok Joo much more in this episode!!
Hope the writers will still able to keep the good work till the end.

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Oh Noos! It'll get cut by 2 eps! Really?
Hate it when that happens to good shows that don't have hi ratings!

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on the one hand I admire the show for showing us all this serious lawyering but on the other hand it's giving me a headache...even if I pause the video to read all those way too long and quick three line subtitles, I still don't get half of it...please show, give us simple folks a bit more emotions with all those words :P

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Lol, i feel you... i did the most rewinding in ep11.. things i learned in school aeons ago helps..

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I kind of just want seok-ju to get his memories back already... he and jung-seon have all the chemistry of wet cardboard, and I feel like ~evil~ seok-ju had more interest in/connection to/ respect for jiyoon intern. I also hope that she starts doing stuff in future episodes besides standing around looking pathetic and/or shocked...

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'Evil' Seok-ju would never have allowed Ji-yoon to work as closely with him as she did on the Jung Hye-ryeong case. Nor would he have consoled her after she defended the suspicious patricide, or spoken up for her when she was scolded for missing work.

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I suppose, but it's sort of a moot point since he wouldn't have taken the Jung Hye-ryeong case in the first place and he would have had no qualms about flat out telling her that the kid was probably guilty. Wether or not that would have been better for her growth in the long run is debatable, I suppose, but my read on the situation was that he was already well aware of her competence and potential. Some of the softer moments would not have happened, but they feel seriously one-sided and their charged interactions were more interesting to me.

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if Seok-ju had not lost his memory, neither the Jung Hye-ryeong case nor the patricide would have seen light of day at Cha's firm. I agree with you that he already knew how competent Ji-yoon was, and wanted her on his team, but my argument is that old Seok-ju would never have mentored her as closely and sympathetically as new Seok-ju has done. In fact, as the chaebol rapist case showed, if she had continued working with old Seok-ju she might have despised him even more. I know the 'hate turning to love' trope is common and much loved in k-drama, and when it works it's fantastic, but the way Yi-joon grows to like and respect Seok-ju in ANL is interesting as well, and rather moving too.

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Under Yoorim Group, there are a number of affiliated companies, for example, Yoorim Energy, Yoorim Securities, Yoorim Cement, Yoorim Leisure etc. etc. Now the sleazeball gramps and uncles don't care about all these companies except Yoorim Securities and Yoorim Cement, which are still worth some money. So a small portion of the money that they cheated out of all the public investors and sneaked out of the country to offshore places will be brought back in, via one uncle's Taiwanese in-laws, to buy Yoorim Securities. Now, on the facade it will be a Taiwanese investor taking over a securities company in bankruptcy at a fraction of its real worth, but in reality it will be the sleazeball family having the cake and eating it too.

What about Yoorim Cement then? Now this Yoorim Securities has a subsidiary named TJ, a paper company created solely for the purpose of holding 40% of Yoorim Cement stock. This means TJ is the major shareholder of Yoorim Cement. Using this stock as their collateral, TJ sold some CPs, too, to the public investors. Now, these public investors have better chances of recovering their investment compared to other investors who bought, say, Yoorim Leisure's CPs because their collateral is the stock of a company that was doing quite well and making money. However, if the bankruptcy court punitively reduces Yoorim Cement's capital, that means that collateral stock loses most of its value, thus causing damages to these investors as well. So this subset of investors was asking other investors to write petitions on their behalf that at least Yoorim Cement's stock does not get devalued. Other investors went along with it, leaving Yoorim Cement's capital intact and that means TJ is still the major shareholder of Cement and remember, TJ is a subsidiary of Yoorim Securities that was "acquired" by a Taiwanese investor that is really the sleazeball family.

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The plot thread about the petition was confusing to me. Thanks for explaining it so clearly.

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Thank you...

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Wow. At least you get it. I watch intently but gets nosebleed. Hehe

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What I find myself wondering is: if the plan all along, as SeokJu had set it up, was to keep Yoorim Securities, why did the uncles ask SeokJu in their meeting a week or so back which company to save? They already knew which one because he'd planned it out ages ago. Was it just for appearances in front of JungSeon; or was it to confirm that he still thought it was a good idea, and that things would unfold according to plan?

And why would Grandpa be concerned about all that SeokJu had figured out (about the overseas investors etc.) if SeokJu was in on the whole thing from the start (except presumably the plan for JungSeon to take the fall)? He doesn't know about the amnesia, so he wouldn't think there was anything for SJ to figure out. I'm kind of confused about this.

I'm also speculating a little bit about SeokJu's recommendation to save Yoorim Securities. I know that newSeokJu had his own sound logic to explain that advice, but maybe there were also some vague memories of the plan nagging at him from the oldSeokju recesses of his brain that nudged him in that direction?

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I am wondering about the same thing. May be he just gave them headlines not the detailed plan? Had he kept some details to be told later as the plan proceed and forgot them after the amnesia? So confused!

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I've been re-watching episode 10 and I think SJ's original plan took everything into account: how saving Securities and losing Cement would look better, and, what's more, be more expedient because Cement can dodge capital reduction via the petitions and eventually be retrieved with overseas funds. The reason why the uncles were still confirming with him whether to sell one or the other was because even at that stage they didn't think the original plan would work. New SJ's recommendation to sell Cement just happened to be in line with the original plan, I think, and it wasn't till after the petitions started rolling that the uncles finally believed in the plan (and thanked SJ for devising it, to his horror).

Er, at least I think that was what happened...

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Love this drama... it's fun AND educational!

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JS' smirking uncle... hate him. The other one wearing taupe also. Even CYW's VP who looks placid/meek most of the time (overshadowed by Cha Himself) shows his true colour once he found out about KSJ's amnesia.

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I trade, short hold in forex. But man, the terms they use does my head in. Can they simplify it a bit? My poor brain cant cope. :)

Still watching this drama. At least I can see distinct characters and solid plot...

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I love SJ's slow walk into the light. It is dramatic and they do underscore the pt, but I enjoy it purely for KMM's acting:
He breathes in, holds it, lets it out; he looks down, then looks up, into the light, and ever so lightly, smiles. He makes us feel the lightened burden right then. It's a KMM moment! A hi light of this ep.

I also enjoy the farewell in Cha's office: Clash of the Titans. Not a clash in an out right way, but in a clash in beliefs that lead to a parting of their ways. Two titans in the legal world, played by two titans of the acting world. That to me, is another one of the hi light of this ep.

Why am I suspicious that the money in that overseas acct is not SJ's own as Cha claims? What reason does SJ have to put his own money in an anonymous overseas acct? It has to be covering up sth ultra shady for the firm. Cha is just using SJ's amnesia to push it all on him.

I like it very much that the script is smart. I like the setup of the financial wheels and deals; they are complicated enough to be convincing as corporate finance dealings. I like it even more when our SJ w a heart does the sleuthing to find out the scheming behind the scenes, which he came up w but can no longer remember. For once there is a drama w a plot that doesn't at all come across as being cartoonish.

Ji-won: You've made a deal w the devil. Are you going to go down that slippery slope? Or will you fight the devil from the inside? Either way, I look fwd to more JW.

Now that SJ is w/o a job but cares for the plight of the weak, and his father is losing his ability to be an advocate lawyer, wouldn't it be perfect for SJ to take over his father's practice?

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Am going into depression now that they have decided to cut short this series. A New Leaf is one of the more interesting dramas for me at the moment - everything else started out very promising but have since descended into the kingdom of yawns and do I really care? Hotel King, Angel Eyes, Dr Stranger, You're All Surrounded...

I have only been kept alive by A New Leaf and Witch's Romance. Witch's Romance has ended its run and now with A New Leaf cut short, Depressionville, here I come.

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I feel you, totally.
A new batch of dramas will be starting soon. Think happy thoughts. ;)

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when he goes out and let out relief breath
believe me
i also let out relieve breath~~

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They could be speaking in gibberish for all I know, even with the subtitles. The recaps help A LOT -- thanks!

But I still really enjoy this drama, and it would love for it to go for 10 seasons American style like the Practice or Law & Order. Solid writing, solid acting -- can't ask for much more than that.

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All of a sudden, I'm curious about Cha:
Does he have wife and kids?
Or does he have a dog, like SJ?
Does he have friends, or just business contacts?
Does he have relatives, parents?
Does he even have a life outside his law firm?
I suspect the last of these is his life.
If so, it's kinda sad, isn't it, even if he is powerful.

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Yeah I would like to know more about him as well, especially in relation to Seok-ju. Of course he might just regard SJ as an instrument that needs to be taken care of, but the interactions between the two men, as portrayed by those two great actors, suggest something deeper, a sort of father-son relationship. The impression I get is that the battles that SJ's dad fought caused a lot of collateral damage to their family (and the mother in particular); SJ couldn't forgive that, rejected his father, and adopted another who was his father's diametric opposite.

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I hadn't thought of that- but yes looks like its true. And I wonder if he will also have to suffer in the end for the new path he had chosen. After all- it's a melo. Could have a sad ending

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very boring drama

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