Rating:
Average user rating 4.9
130

Six Flying Dragons: Episode 4

I’d say it’s a bad time to be young and in love, but it’s a bad time just to be young at all. Or even alive. The world in this show is cruel and unforgiving, and it especially excels in putting its young characters through trials and tribulations that would make anyone twice their size cringe in fear. But that’s the climate our six dragons live in, and it’s as much a character at times as they are.

Ratings-wise, Six Flying Dragons led the pack with 13.0% this week, though MBC’s Dazzling Temptation wasn’t far behind with 10.1%. Sassy Go Go continued the good fight, but still landed a meager 3.8%.

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HA:TFELT – “Truth” [ Download ]

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EPISODE 4 RECAP

Minister Hong confronts Bang-won about the Scholar Murders, suspecting that he was the one responsible. Bang-won has to do everything not to smile as he looks right through his teacher and asks in return whether he left the fabric at the scene to frame Scholar Kang.

“That night, you committed an evil act,” Bang-won says, his eyes alight with purpose. “And I committed a just one.” Minister Hong shakes his head at this—is that what Bang-won considers justice? The world would be a frightening place if everyone subscribed to his ideas.

But Bang-won doesn’t feel he has to listen to lectures from an evil man, though he admits that he’s still young, and still has much to learn. If there’s one thing they’re both agreed on though, it’s that neither of them are good. At least, not in the subservient way others would like them to be.

As he walks away, Bang-won thinks to himself, “Until I gain power, I shall not be good. I have seen what has become of those who are good yet powerless.”

It turns out that Gil Tae-mi has a twin brother who acted as Princess Noguk’s bodyguard, and was the only other person besides Ddang-sae’s mother that the princess kept by her side.

Following that investigative lead, Ddang-sae sets out to find him, only he’s not alone—Shifty Bodyguard (the turncoat who fled when the siblings recognized the red seal on the secret letter he carried) follows closely behind.

Shifty and his buddies catch Ddang-sae along and demand to know how he recognized the symbol. Trembling, Ddang-sae tells them that the man who took his mother bore a tattoo of that same symbol. It’s only when he adds that her name was Yeon Hyang, and that she worked in the palace, does he get their attention.

One of them draws a sword, prepared to cut the boy down. He’s stopped when an object is thrown his way, as a man emerges—it’s GIL SUN-MI (also played by Park Hyuk-kwon), the man Ddang-sae came here to find.

With the bad guys successfully scared off, Gil Sun-mi unties Ddang-sae, who notes that he looks exactly like his twin brother, Gil Tae-mi. With a hint of ruefulness, the decidedly un-flamboyant Gil Sun-mi says that their looks are the only thing they share in common.

Ddang-sae’s not the only one looking for Gil Sun-mi—the Chinese elder who accosted his twin brother is nearby and can sense his presence. But when Ddang-sae mentions his mother’s name, Gil Sun-mi takes a knee to look the boy straight in the eye: “From this moment until the day you die, you must forget your mother. You must never say even speak her name.”

He tells the confused boy that his mother committed a great crime against Goryeo and is now considered a traitor, because her mistake caused Princess Noguk’s death. He warns Ddang-sae not to try looking into it any further, because it’ll spell his death. Even if she’s still alive, she’ll be killed, along with her entire family.

Ddang-sae doesn’t understand why he’d be punished for his mother’s crimes, but wonders if that’s why Shifty Bodyguard and his men just tried to kill him. Gil Sun-mi all but gasps, having thought they were just thieves—Ddang-sae’s in danger as long as they know who he really is.

Despondant now, Ddang-sae worries that he’s put his sister in danger, when all he wanted to know was where their mother was. To himself, Gil Sun-mi asks, “What am I supposed to do with this child, Yeon Hyang?” Ahh, so he knew Ddang-sae’s mother personally.

Their moment of reflection is interrupted when Gil Sun-mi senses a presence nearby—it’s the elder’s, and with lightning speed, Gil unsheathes his sword, sending the scabbard flying toward the elder before he leaps across the distance between them with his sword held high.

The fight that ensues is clearly one between two men of great skill, as they parry and dodge each other’s blows as elegantly as if they were dancing. Since that’s how warriors say “Hello,” the elder draws back after the exchange to say that he can’t tell who’s the better swordsman between the twins.

Now acting like a spry old grandpa instead of a hardened swordsman, the elder tells Gil Sun-mi that he’s traveled far to find a student of his. He whispers his name so that we can’t hear it, but it’s one Gil instantly recognizes and respects a great deal.

The likeness he showed Gil Tae-mi is of his student, who died in a duel here in Goryeo. He suspected the Gil Twins at first, but knows now that they weren’t responsible. Gil Sun-mi wonders why he’s seeking revenge if his student was killed in a proper fight, but the elder says it’s not revenge he seeks—he’s merely curious.

Whoever fought his student was able to kill him quickly with just one blow from his blade, and the elder wants to know who could have been capable of such skill. Gil Sun-mi thinks, then remembers being told that the elder always returns favors and even risks his life to keep promises he makes.

So he strikes a deal: if he tells the elder who he thinks killed his student, will he do him a favor? When the elder agrees, Gil Sun-mi tells him of a great general whose swordsmanship skills were the stuff of legend, Cheok Jun-gyeong (who did actually exist), and that his skills were passed onto his children over four generations. He believes the man who killed the elder’s student is his heir, Cheok Sa-kwang.

In return, the favor Gil Sun-mi asks is that the elder protect Ddang-sae. I love that the elder thinks he means just for today, when in all actuality Gil Sun-mi is asking him to raise the boy until he becomes a self-sufficient adult. And because the elder always keeps his promises, he can’t say no now.

Now saddled with his new ward, the elder tells him that he wasn’t planning on staying in Goryeo long, so he’ll have to come with him. But when he offers to teach Ddang-sae his swordsmanship skills so he can learn to protect himself, Ddang-sae simply says he’s not interested.

“Then how am I supposed to protect you?!” the elder sighs, as he curses his rotten luck in telling Gil Sun-mi his name. He still takes his responsibility very seriously despite not liking it, especially when he returns from a potty break to find Ddang-sae missing.

We’re introduced to MOO-HYUL (the last of the six dragons) as a poor boy scrounging int he forest until he comes across a sleeping boar. After a chase scene through the woods, he finally manages to kill it with an expertly thrown boulder.

Moo-hyul takes the haul home to a frankly daunting amount of young siblings, and since their parents are dead the head of the household position is filled by their grandmother, MYO-SANG (Seo Mi-sook).

She’s decided that Moo-hyul should become a swordsman to help feed their enormous family, since she’s heard how well the Gil Twins live off their martial arts abilities. One of Moo-hyul’s siblings pipes that their hyung may be strong, but he can’t even hold a knife correctly. Derp.

Still, Grandma’s determined to make Moo-hyul a swordsman, so she assembles her soccer team of grandchildren to take the boar and what little side dishes they have to MASTER HONG, a famed swordsman who claims to have taught the Gil Twins everything they know.

I love how she offers to just give him all the kids if he’ll promise to take Moo-hyul, and though he wavers, he eventually caves. Moo-hyul will begin as his student starting tomorrow.

At long last, Ddang-sae returns home to the province of Yangkwang-do to find Boon-yi preparing meager funeral rites for her mother, crying that she’ll do the same for her brother should he spend another month away. She’s overjoyed to see him, and clings to her oppa tightly while crying, “What took you so long?”

But when she asks about their mother, Ddang-sae lies and said he learned nothing new. Their mother is likely gone from this world, which is something Boon-yi has already come to terms with.

Their neighbor, a young girl in fine clothes by the name of YEON-HEE, drops by to check in. Boon-yi happily announces her brother’s return, and the lingering glance Yeon-hee gives Ddang-sae is curious.

Ddang-sae wakes from a nightmare filled with Gil Sun-mi’s dire warnings to a breakfast that’s far above their usual means—likely because Yeon-hee stole the food from her wealthier household. Ddang-sae can’t thank her enough for staying with his sister while he was away, but it becomes clear by the egg Yeon-hee snuck into his rice (protein = love) that she did it for him.

While Ddang-sae might know how she feels, he desperately tries to act like he doesn’t, even though all the boys in the village want Yeon-hee to make them clothes for Chilseok, a traditional festival that takes place before the beginning of monsoon season.

Yeon-hee finds Ddang-sae brooding under a tree, and has already guessed that he hasn’t told Boon-yi everything about their mother. She also knows that it has to be tough on him to keep it all to himself, which he acknowledges by breaking down in front of her.

“I’m a coward,” he cries. “I gave up on my mother.” Yeon-hee can’t help but cry to see him in this state and pats his hand affectionately, telling him all the things he needs to hear.

Afterward, she mentions that she’ll be making clothes for him this Chilseok, since she’s been chosen to represent Jiknyeo, a daughter of heaven who was known for her ability to make beautiful garments. And in the story, Jiknyeo fell in love with a herder named Gyeonwu, though their tale isn’t necessarily a happy one.

They spend happy days together picking berries and generally being adorable, before Ddang-sae has to return to the real world: he burns the likeness of his mother and the copy of the seal tattooed on the man who took her.

We cut to a chaotic scene, as scores of Goryeo ministers squabble amongst each other for seats in the assembly hall. But there are bigger things at stake, since the Japanese have made it as far as Yangkwang-do, the province where Boon-yi and Ddang-sae hail from.

Though Lee In-gyeom calls on the ministers to send men to aid in the fight, no one’s willing to do so, least of all Gil Tae-mi. There’s no incentive to get the ministers to give, either—the national treasury is all but bankrupt.

In order to solve their problem, Minister Hong comes up with a nefarious plan that involves robbing Peter to pay Paul. Since they can claim it’s all for the war effort, they can take land belonging to the citizens and gift it to those ministers who send men to fight, which is sure to change the ministers’ tune on whether or not to contribute.

The plan works just like Minister Hong predicted, since he’s soon overwhelmed by ministers offering men and gifts in order to gain parcels of land. All Lee In-gyeom and Gil Tae-mi have to do is sit back and wait.

Yeon-hee is confused to see men cordoning off land that used to belong to someone in their village, though they now claim it’s Lee In-gyeom’s land. Luckily for her, when the men start getting rough, a contingent of villagers with pitchforks arrive to confront the thieves.

The villagers manage to chase them off their land for now, even though they bear paperwork claiming that all their land now belongs to Lee In-gyeom for the war effort, which they all balk at—since when has the government helped them fight off invaders? The villagers know it all traces back to corruption and greed, though how long they’ll be able to hold the thieves off is another question.

Boon-yi acts as a good winggirl for Yeon-hee by bringing her oppa’s attention to the hanbok Yeon-hee’s made him for Chilseok. Though he tries to hide it, he’s secretly elated when he gets his hands on her handmade gift.

The festival itself is a small affair, but Yeon-hee and Ddang-sae get to act out the story of Jiknyeo and Gyeonwu, who would cross a bridge made of magpies and crows to meet each other once a year. In this reenactment, they cross a bridge made of their fellow villagers.

But just when the festivities are at their highest, a gang of ruffians sent by Gil Tae-mi break up the party with clubs. Ddang-sae falls and twists (breaks?) his ankle, leaving him to limp after Yeon-hee and her brother as they try to escape.

One of the molesting minions who first confronted the villagers appears out of nowhere and stabs Yeon-hee’s brother as payback for his earlier insolence. That was definitely not part of the plan, but he’s got eyes for Yeon-hee as he throws her to the ground. Ohhhh no. No no no no. Come on guys, please don’t do this. Please.

Ddang-sae sits dumbly by with his broken ankle as Yeon-hee stares into his eyes, but he acts like it’s his back that’s broken as she’s dragged into the field of flowers they’d once frolicked in by her rapist.

Once it’s done, Ddang-sae follows Yeon-hee as she walks home, her clothes in tatters. He says nothing, and Yeon-hee has to throw things at him to get him to go away. She doesn’t want to see his face anymore, and honestly, neither do I.

Boon-yi slaps him for just sitting by and doing nothing, even though Ddang-sae defends that both he and Yeon-hee would have been killed if he’d tried to intervene. Boon-yi slaps him again: “Then you should have died!”

She cries as she tells him how much Yeon-hee liked him, how much he was always in her thoughts, and how she just can’t understand how he could hide wearing the clothes Yeon-hee made him while she was raped nearby. You tell him, Boon-yi.

The villagers mourn their dead and cry out in vain against the injustice of it all—it wasn’t foreign invaders, but their own government who killed their family members.

Later that night, Ddang-sae follows the rapist’s cohort to his house, first bludgeoning him with a stone before jumping on him with a sickle in hand. The lightning from the storm shows their struggle in horrible flashes, as Ddang-sae readies the killing blow…

…But the sight of the man’s mother and sibling crying from the entrance as they watch the scene, helpless to do anything, gives him pause. For a few long moments Ddang-sae hesitates, but in the end, he brings the sickle down and runs off into the stormy night. But he only stabbed dirt, leaving the man alive.

Left with nothing else, Ddang-sae finds a high cliff to throw himself off of. “I can’t do anything,” he cries to himself, looking down at the looong drop below.

But just as he’s about to take that plunge, a voice from behind him crows, “I finally found you!” It’s the elder, who’s scandalized when he realizes that Ddang-sae was about to kill himself. He can’t do that, the elder says, because he’s sworn to protect him.

Ddang-sae has had it with this stranger he barely knows, and screams that he wants to die—he couldn’t protect his mother or Yeon-hee, which makes him a fool incapable of doing anything. The elder tells him that if he’s right, he won’t be able to kill himself. It’s not that easy, especially for a fool like him.

“You can’t die,” the elder says with a certainty that unnerves Ddang-sae, who takes it almost as a dare as he throws himself over the edge…

…Only to be caught by the elder, who makes it to the edge of the cliff in the blink of an eye. He just performed a superhuman feat, and as a bewildered Ddang-sae looks up to ask him who he is, the elder smiles and introduces himself as Jang Sam-bong. (The chryon tells us he was a shaman leader and founder of the Tai Chi style of sword fighting. Methinks he’s the legendary Chinese Taoist Zhang Sanfeng, said to have achieved immortality.)

“How much stronger can I become?” Ddang-sae finally asks, still dangling off the edge. “Immeasurably strong!” Jang Sam-bong replies confidently.

Six years later.

Lee Bang-won (now grown up and played by Yoo Ah-in) sits despondently on a Sungkyunkwan rooftop as he muses ruefully, “Heo Kang has left. Everyone has left. Everyone good and powerless… has left. Only those who know no shame have remained, and they have won.”

Now all that’s left is human garbage like Scholar/Gil Yoo, now a ranking official, and Bang-won sighs that he’s lost the will to keep fighting. But no sooner does he consider returning to Hamju does he see a shadowy figure drop down from the rooftop to confront Baek Yoon.

It’s Ddang-sae, now known as LEE BANG-JI (Byun Yo-han), and he’s there for business of the darkest nature—once he’s confirmed the man in front of him as Baek Yoon, he stalks toward him and his guard, preparing to draw his sword.

He flashes back to Yeon-hee’s rape and the direct aftermath as he turns his purposeful walk into a sprint, his blade drawn as he leaps into the air to bring it down on Baek Yoon’s guard. He puts up a small fight, but in the end, Bang-ji slits his throat with relative ease.

Remembering the day Jang Sam-bong saved him from suicide by crossing the distance between them at superhuman speed, Bang-ji employs the same method to catch up to the fleeing Baek Yoon and cuts him down. Wow.

All this Bang-won watches from his rooftop perch, leaving him mystified as to what exactly he just witnessed. He goes stock still when Bang-ji passes, hoping to rely on anonymity, and it works.

He follows Bang-ji in secret to the entrance of the cave we saw in Episode 1, and sees the message he left stabbed to the door before letting himself inside. He finds a carved wooden figurine and shelves stuffed with books.

There’s light coming through one of the cave walls, and when Bang-won pulls on a nearby rope, the entire tarp comes down—and there, in open air, is a perfect vista overlooking the capital city of Gaegyeong. And there, on the walls, is a mural of a map—only, it’s not a map of Goryeo.

Cut to Bang-ji, who remembers overhearing Jung Do-jeon talk about needing to kill Baek Yoon in order to bring an end to the corruption in Goryeo.

“Goryeo… I’m going to end this country,” Bang-ji thinks to himself.

That’s when Bang-won finally realizes what he’s looking at. The map may be sideways, but once he realigns it in his mind he realizes that it is Goryeo, just… different. “New Joseon,” the nation on the map is called. “Who made this?” Bang-won wonders, his eyes widening.

“The Third Dragon: Lee Bang-won, Joseon’s future king Taejong.”

On the cliff, Bang-ji wonders where Jung Do-jeon is. “Who must I kill next?” he asks the void.

“The Fourth Dragon: Lee Bang-ji, future master swordsman of the Three Hans.”

 
COMMENTS

Phew. If this episode were a meal, I’d be leaving the table stuffed beyond all imagining and wondering just what exactly I shoved into my mouth for the last hour, but I’d be none the less satisfied for it. It’s just a lot, and while it’s all presented in such a way that it never becomes too much, it does set an awfully high bar for the next forty-six episodes to follow. Then again, this team has mastered the long con, so if this really is the kind of quality we can come to expect for weeks to come, more please.

It’s going to be interesting to see how the show handles each episode’s focus when we’ve moved on from introducing the six dragons, since so far everyone’s gotten their own hour in the spotlight. I hadn’t even realized it was Bang-ji’s until we were really in the thick of it, since his overly quiet and unassuming nature has the tendency to just wash over you. But it wasn’t until he just sat by as Yeon-hee was raped that I actually felt anything about him at all, and my former ambivalence turned into outright rage.

But that’s something I have to give the show props for, since it knew exactly what it was doing leading up to that moment and exactly how to handle the aftermath. It knew we’d hate Bang-ji for his total ineffectiveness, so it made Boon-yi our voice, the voice that demanded answers and not excuses from him. It knew that’d make no difference to us, but her words had a huge impact on Bang-ji, who went from one extreme to the other—first ineffective, then disproportionately reactive. Well, maybe not so disproportionately when you consider the crime committed, but it was quite a scene to see such a normally meek young boy ready to murder a man in front of his family.

And then the fact that he couldn’t bring himself to do even that is what spurred him to want to take his own life, which really would have been the pinnacle of what we would’ve wanted him to suffer for what he did. The show was careful not to take Bang-ji anywhere it didn’t have the confidence to bring him back from, and that takes a certain level of finesse. I have no fondness for Bang-ji as it stands, but I can see the beginnings of his arc, and his character is sure to be one of the more fascinating ones in this series.

As for the time skip, I’ll be happy as long as it sticks, otherwise it’ll just be a big tease. While there are plenty of unanswered questions resulting from all the years we missed, it doesn’t seem like anything that needs a thorough going-over, either. Bang-won brought us up to speed on how the time’s treated him, and where he ended up is no surprise. Bang-ji, however, is more of a puzzle—somewhere in that span of time, he became a big supporter of ending the current state of Goryeo. And I’m inclined to believe that he’s been recently influenced by Jung Do-jeon, because killing a man based on an overheard suggestion made six years ago isn’t exactly efficient, or even very smart. But I guess that doesn’t matter as much when you’re beautiful.

 
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i cant believe im actually watching 50 ep saguek drama which is not my cup of tea. But so far im totally hooked by this show and hope the writer keep on the right track. Just dont waste all the amazing cast.

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This is my first time too, I can't believe I'm doing it.

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So I take you haven't seen JEWEL OF THE PALACE, QUEEN SEON DUK, and JUMONG. You're missing out! ;) Give those three a try because it'll be awhile before this one is over! lol

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I trust friggin' writer. The wonders and the miracles Dae Jang Geum has done, not only in South Korea, but to the entire world affected by k-drama syndrome that year. Dae Jang Geum has affected my room's architecture - immediately after I watched it. My modern room? I converted into the indian seat with a low table [same room of King Jungjong, played by Im Ho] that year. It was crazy. Dae Jang Geum was the very first drama that I binged watched WITHOUT skipping any scene. Now that's history. Dae Jang Geum is sooooo amazing, even until now, I memorized the soundtrack, their Korean dialogue and the sequence. I feel like dubsmashing them now. Argh.

Bottomline: I trust writer. And Kim Myung-min. ♥

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I never could bring myself to watch Tree With Deep Roots as many good things I read about it. (Maybe, maybe about the Dragons. Who knows?) But this case sold the show to me (The male leads, all three of them. And even the baddies. Plus the cameos. What a fine gathering! I need to see to believe when it comes t its ladies).

However, I rather it did not go to the fantastic side. I wasn't told it is a fusion sageuk, so I prefer it as into the realm of verisimilitude as possible.

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I meant ”this cast”. Ranting at 2 in the morning may be a bad idea.

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I was waiting for subs but I don't think I can watch now.......why does this drama have to show a child being raped just to develop the backstory of Bang Ji? It's not right.

It's a different thing if this is central to the story, I can understand that, but they used rape as drama just to give Ddang-se the pain? I feel so disappointed. I'm sorry to the fans, but this is too much.

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Agreed. It was too much using rape. I read production team understood viewers ' being upset, but mentioned it was needed.

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btw Byon Yo-han/Bang-ji looks mighty fine.

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Yeah I really like Byun Yo Han, because of Misaeng I'm a fan. But I just don't feel like I can watch any more :/

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That scene was similar to a part from the drama "I Miss You". That particular chapter in the episode was agony to watch.

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the rape scene was horrifying as f. when the baddies started dragging her into the field I was incredibly pissed off they decided that rape was the best catalyst event to let bang-ji 'develop as a character'. but like Heads said i would say it was appropriately handled, given the times and bang-ji was horrified (and schooled by his sister and the girl) at his uselessness in face of it and all the other murders that happened in the village.

the whole first part was weird tho- starting from the almost killing of bang ji+ random intervention by gil tae mi twin (????)+ weirdly directed fight scene between the swordsman all the way to the chinese guy's decision to take bang-ji under his wing seemed like artificially contrived events- clearly they wanted to arrive at the result of Bang-ji being a disciple of some swords master so the sequence of events leading up to that was minimally hashed out for the viewers.

oh well all adults now!!! although i will miss young boon yi i hope we get an appropriate transition for her too.

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I understand that rape was not unusual at the time (hell, it's not unusual now) but it does feel incredibly weird that it was used to further the development of a specific male character. I hope that we see something of Yeon-hee in the later episodes.

It does unsettle me that Ddang-sae is getting dragged through the mud for not intervening during the rape scene. Within the drama, sure - the girls both are children, and this is a horrible situation, and they're in shock and lashing out. In fact, Ddang-sae is right there with them: they ALL hate him and his inaction, no matter the cause, including Ddang-sae himself.

But I have a much, much harder time thinking that an adult audience would be swept up in the same thinking. Ddang-sae is not a villain here, at all. He's a child who was abruptly confronted by a total nightmare, who probably would have been slaughtered if he'd intervened, who very likely went into shock when it became clear what was happening, and whose reaction could certainly have been one of freezing (not a remotely unusual shock reaction). The kid isn't a ninja, and children do not usually magically fight off rapists, especially in the midst of a town slaughter.

All of the kids are victims in that scene (though some more than others, obviously). But no, Ddang-sae was not responsible for jumping in and possibly getting himself killed, and he's not responsible for an immobilizing shock reaction. Clearly he's trained himself out of it since, and clearly he's taken on most of the burden of not being able to protect his friend.

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I think Yoon Hee will be an active character after. I read it somewhere, but just can't remember.

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Word!
I agree with everything you said and was thinking the exact same things.

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THANK YOU! Seriously I was getting pissed off at all those comments hating him! He's an injured untrained 14 year old kid. He was in shock and couldn't snap out of it. I understand the girls' reaction, since they are kids as well, one went through a worst shock than him, and the other seems him as an adult compared to her small self, but I don't get the viewers reaction!

Whether the scene was a requirement to develop his character or not is beside the point. We know very well rape in those corrupted times was common, so why are people complaining about it? Are they too afraid of seeing reality as is? What is wrong with exposing what is wrong in our world? This isn't a romcom!

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same here i just noticed viewers blamed bang ji as well. That thought never really crossed my mind, i mean of course it was disappointing & cowardly of him but he was a kid put in an extremely horrifying situation, which he's spent his life trying to atone for.

frankly he's my favorite character so far.

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voice of reason, thank you.

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I agree with you here. I didn't hate him. He wasn't the villain. He would have been heroic had he tried but he's right that he at least would have been killed. I felt horrified for both children

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Thanks for the recap. Off to watch, maybe without subs

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I'm mostly just pissed that the rape scene appeared /with no prior warning/ whatsoever. This is a primetime show, with children watching with their parents- and this isn't just rape but also pedophilia (Yeonhee's actress is 14).

I don't want to have to explain to my 13 year old sister about rape when she's supposed to just enjoy flower boys and learn history :/ It sort of makes me apprehensive of what kind of sensationalism the show will throw us next.

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Yeah...I don't have a problem with dramas portraying rape, necessarily, but there needs to be some warning. I mean, if the tone were more consistent this wouldn't be an issue (and we would know that it's not meant for kids). But because one minute it's so light and goofy, and the next minute it's like surprise! rape...idk, if rape and violence against women are the one way this show is going to be historically accurate, it feels pretty exploitative.

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Well it seems it was effective of giving a shock, just like how people were celebrating on one hand, then murdered suddenly. Somehow I just knew that celebration wouldn't last :(

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Why?

13 years old is hardly the age to know nothing about such crimes. Rape is a (cruel) fact of life. Even 4 year olds get bloody raped. Yazidi girls are getting raped.

Not saying that the show was classy in any way regarding this but I don't think child-censoring should be the answer. In fact, I think they need to know about such crimes to protect themselves.

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Uh, you're grossly missing my point about this. What I meant was that I, as a person, would have strongly preferred that there was a forewarn regarding this than having it sprung on me- not that I was 'not allowing my sister to know about such crimes' (she does understand what rape is from other dramas) but there are other children watching that may or may not have the same grasp or understanding towards it.

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There's a 15+ Age warning in every episode, no excuses.

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I guess the rape is realistic. The first casualties of war, the vulnerable. Throughout the history of the world and its wars, there have always been rape.

I guess this scene, shocking and distasteful as it is, gives voice to the horrors of what it means to be vulnerable and oppressed.

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But this wasn't about war. This was done by some local thugs sent by the prime minister to claim the villagers' land.
A poor girl on the street today is just as vulnerable as this poor Goryeo girl back in those days.
I thought it was unnecessary to be honest.

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Agreed.

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At least in modern times the girl can still bring herself to a police station to report the crime.

But in Goryeo times who would dare to lodge anything against thugs with the prime minister's backing? Assuming that whatever they have for a justice system then still works.

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A poor girl in Goryeo can report a rape to the magistrate's office if she chose to.

The rich and the powerful still get away with crimes today just like in the old days.

I hate how women are mostly portrayed in these shows as weak, victims etc.
GORYEO women were not suppressed and helpless like they are shown in most sageuks. They had freedom, they owned their land(s), they ran business, they shared inheritance with their brothers, they were allowed to remarry if their husband died, they don't have to live in their husband's home, they were independent etc.

I have yet to watch a sageuk where Goryeo women are portrayed close to the actual history except for Shin Don.

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Might be a good idea to watch Empress Cheon Chu. Nothing weak about her.

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Forgot about Goryeo's Empress Cheonchu but I've seen it. Although not as historically accurate as Shin Don it showed women going to war to defend their country and more.

Thanks for bringing it up.

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We should just start a Jung Ha-yeon fan club at this point. Whenever I'm on these threads, part of me wants to try to make sense of this drama, but mostly I just want to go off topic and start fangirling Shin Don. Whenever we see some of the historical figures that were also in Shin Don, I get really nostalgic, thinking about all the performances and characters in Shin Don.

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@JMK ooooh I haven't seen Empress Cheonchu yet. It's like 70 episodes so I've been a bit apprehensive about starting it. Did you enjoy it all the way through?

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@juniper Yes, it is pretty good. Some kickass moments, some sad moments. Not sure how historically accurate it is, but all the historical characters are there. Best tough girl scene was when she slugged a general. For historical timeline, watch Shine or Go Crazy (Jang Hyuk) then Empress Chunchu. Her husband Wang Yu is the son of Wang So (played by Jang Hyuk). Hope I got that right......

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it is always unnecessary for a female character to be raped to further the development of a male character

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@HN yeah..though it was not war..but it was source of beginning fire at that time I guess.As,corruptions,injustice took hands together..As we see the prime minister is usurping the lands because of war with japanese or something...And the people from government are torturing the native men....These kind of incidents do happen disregarding how the goryeo women were.I thought it was pretty realistic.

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I am finally interested in the show. Historical shows never got me excited this is a first.
What happened to yeon-hee, was it true, or just done in this particular show.?

As Heads said Boon-yi is our voice, hope the elder transition pulls off well. Gonna miss her

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Just curious. Have you seen Tree with Deep Roots?

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No. Historical dramas d6n't excite me.
But why do you ask?

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Dragons is the prequel to Tree. Tree focuses on King Sejong and the promulgation of Hangul. The same team doing this drama were the same team who worked with Tree (except main PD Jang Tae Yoo). It's a really good drama and it's worth watching too. The two dramas are quite tied together so I just thought to ask. Might be worth your time. :)

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Ohk.. Then i will definitely check it out. Maybe i can understand Dragons better. Thank You:)

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I found it disturbing for the defenseless girls to blame the also defenseless boy (who also sprained his ankle) for not standing up to two grown men armed with swords who just stabbed another man to death. Damsels always need saving. No matter the circumstance it seems.

I feel that if the men preferred young boys then and picked Bang Ji instead, we wouldn't have the whole blame game and face slapping on the girls for standing around defenseless. Women are such special snowflakes.

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....or you could stop victim blaming and acknowledge that Yeonhee was /traumatised/ after the entire fiasco, hence pushing Ddangsae away because she had just literally been manhandled by some men in the most brutal way possible. Boonyi is hearing this second-hand, and is obviously upset because she didn't know the full story of the situation this took place.

0/10, bad attempt at victim blaming, try again.

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This

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i get what you're saying but i disagree. you have to be aware that this is (a) a drama, and (b) set in the past

The past in drama land is depicted as a strongly patriarchal society. the fact that a random child/teen can get raped out of the blue is evidence of this, as of course, is their expectation that Bang Ji (a male) would do whatever he can to stop it from happening. The reactions of the girls are legitimate. it may seem stupid now, but arguably its the norm because people were all about dying them noble deaths in the past (as portrayed by drama land at the very least etc) and males had clear societal roles that made them protectors of women.

if you're telling me that there would be an outcry in today's age that some teen didn't go guns out blazing to defend a guy/girl while she/he was raped because he /she was powerless and fearful then i think you're being delusional. people would call those that step up to defend as perhaps stupidly brave but they would hardly condemn inaction

moreover, the purpose of that horrific rape scene of a girl was just for some character development of the guy. you mean there won't be condemnation???? how will he grow??? how will he become determined and bad-ass??? (*sarcastic gasp of horror*). The condemnation was necessary in the drama because it was part of the whole constructed sense of pain Bang ji had to go through. it just so happened that there wasn't a guy character around who would arguably have done the same as the girls (e.g. if yoon hee's bro was alive). if you accept that it would have been possible that someone like yoon hee's brother would have come around and been mad as well, then your whole argument fails.

lastly, i would say that both the girls are just fcking angry. this is their first reaction to the horrific accident. the girl suffered the whole ordeal. both are ashamed, and they happen to both love Bang ji and though the world of him. so they are just lashing out. it's a natural human reaction when people are in grief and angry and helpless to deal with their actual source of pain.
unless you want them to just be all gentle and womanly and cry into handkerchiefs when they get raped, whilst being all understanding and sympathetic when the person not being raped is in turmoil, i think it is a legit initial reaction.

p.s. your POV was interesting, but the whole 'women are such special snowflakes' was just derogatory to women and incredibly unnecessary

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+1 @mykonos

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+1 :)

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thanks for saying this

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The girls' reactions are normal. Both of them love Bang Ji to bits. In their eyes, if the situation were reversed, they would have jumped in and put their own lives at risk. They expected him to do the same for them, and were disappointed that he didn't. This might have made him stupidly brave, but the girls don't see it that way. I think the writer's were on point with the girls' reactions.

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You have a spectacularly weird way of wording things in a misogynistic manner ("special snowflakes"? About a rape scene? Really?), but I'm going to go ahead and tackle this point: I also found it disturbing for the girls to blame the boy, but it's also very understandable and realistic.

Most people genuinely have no idea how they will react in a true emergency, adrenaline-pumping situation. Ddang-sae's inability to move is one of those reactions - your brain just locks up, time stops and that's it. You can hate yourself afterwards, but untrained and in the moment, it overwhelms you. Ddang-sae likely knows conceptually that rape can happen, but never ever thought it would actually happen to someone he knows, while he's there. Not many children react well to a total nightmare jumping out at them and doing something terrible.

Ddang-sae hates himself in the aftermath. Similarly, the girls hate him because a nightmare happened and he's one of the tiny variable that might have made it not-happen, no matter how totally unrealistic that might've been. Note: all three kids hate Ddang-sae for the exact same irrational probably-would-have-got-him-killed reason, because kids are generally idealists. None of this is his fault, but NONE of the kids are responding rationally right now. You lash out, you do weird things after a huge shock.

It's not just kids either. There are tons of stories of people getting attacked and bystanders just gaping or walking past. And sexual assault victims are not really in the frame of mind to be patient because they were walking along minding their business and then WHAM - someone touched them somewhere they didn't think anyone COULD touch them. And I don't mean physically - you feel like someone intruded inside a barrier between you and the world. They make the entire world unsafe for a while, sometimes forever, because you realize literally anyone could do that to you if they wanted to, and the reason you're not being paranoid is because that's exactly what DID happen to you.

I'm very displeased at the way the drama team framed this rape scene as being character-building for Ddang-sae and traumatic for the child actor, while totally ignoring Yeon-hee and the child actress. But I don't think the reactions of any of the characters was out of step.

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does anyone know who is going to be adult moo hyul? and what role is he in this story, is he fictional or historical figure?

i dont know why, but i'm curious with the swordman that kill the granpa's student.

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He is going to be played by Yoon Gyun-Sang and he is a fictional character.

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This show is rivetingly beautiful. The cinematography is stunning, I can't take my eyes off it, even when it's hard to watch.
Kudos!

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Thanks for the recaps & everybody for all the comments. I didn't want to watch til I knew if the mood was going to be QSD or TWDR. I guess I have the answer. Dark, darker, darkest. Nah. Not even for Kim Myung-min.

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I don't know if I'm a Byun Yo Han fan or what, but I just like how he's doing so far. He's so cool!
Like some people who commented here, I'm also not really into serious and long sageuks but for some reason I also became hooked starting from episode 3. Now, how am I going to finish up to Episode 50...

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I keep on telling myself...it's okay, it's just 2 episodes per week (wait, is that what addict tell herself all the time?)

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I know, right? I can't even be patient for episode 5 now. How can I patiently wait for 23 more weeks?

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Byun yo han is amazing here! He suits the quiet but strong role of bangji...And how much different is he from the two previous characters he's played so far.He is quite good an actor..also the sword fight scenes seen from youtube videos look pretty good too.

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Joseon Byun Yo Han is the splitting image of the late Leslie Cheung in wuxia films. I'm so in love!!!

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I am sold on the story but not on Yoo Ah In as Bong Won. I know he is a good actor but with history of Bong Won being a ruthless killer may not be suited for him. We shall see. Child actors were so great so hoping that their adult version will show same tenacity.

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Thanks for bringing this up, Ba. A few years ago I watched Sejong the Great, 70+ episode drama.
I can't forget all the truly horrible deeds committed by Lee Bang Won a.k.a Taejong.

Sejong is a really great drama you might want to check out. The acting is fantastic!

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P.S.: Sejong the Great is hard to find but it is on
dramanice.us

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WOW so fast thanx HeadsNo2
love reading your comments

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This is getting interesting! Off to watch~ hopefully there are subs

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I KNEW IT! I knew that Moohyul has always been this hot kid. Right? Right? Plus he's always been a dork. Now, I really miss seeing Jo Jin Woong aas Moohyul. My forever, ahjusshi crush. ><

The world would be a frightening place if everyone subscribed to his ideas.

This gave me chills. Minister Hong, are you a shaman of some sorts? How did you know? lol

Reading your recaps made me cry again when I got to the scene where Yeon Hee got raped. I was screaming and crying while watching it last night. Why is this show so cruel My heart can't take it! (jk, give me more pain, show)

I will now take this as just a fantasy drama now coz we are probably so far away from actual history. It's nice to see where the leaping technique used by Chae Yoon in TWDR came from. We knew that Lee Bang Ji taught him that move but now we see who taught Lee Bang Ji.

So next week, we'll be getting the last 2 dragons. I do hope that they just continue with the current timeframe because I don't want to go back and forth. I'll be so confused. >< Please make SSK's Boon Yi close to the young Boon Yi's character!

Thanks for the recaps, Heads!

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Another fan of Jo Jin Woong here and his Moo-hyul. I'm not sure about the younger version yet. That huge rock that he was carrying looked fake but he was pretty cute. (this director*sigh*).

I should take this as a fantasy drama too instead of being grumpy and annoying because it's not up to my personal expectation.

That's pretty cool that you noticed sword/movement techniques in fight scenes. I can't even tell the difference between Gyebaek's Taekwon-Do and the Chinese Tai Chi style.

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Ugh. Did you see the boar? It was literally CG-ed so bad. I should really stop being bitter about this but where the hell is Jang Tae Yoo PD when you need him? He made Tree so nice. Even fighting scenes that I usually find awkward and corny looked nice in Tree.

Yeah. Basically, only names are historical here. HAHAHA. Very minimal history but I still like it so far.

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Jang Tae-Yoo is not attached to any project right now. They should have 2 PDs here like they did with Tree. It's not going to get better with 50 eps.

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@earthna "It’s nice to see where the leaping technique used by Chae Yoon in TWDR came from." ha...another Jang Hyuk reference. :)

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If Im Yoon Ah ever needs a doppelganger to play a younger version of herself, she absolutely has one in Lee Re. Maybe it's just me, but the resemblance struck me full on the very first time Lee Re came on screen. Her facial expressions and mannerisms are uncannily like a younger version of Yoon Ah. Sadly, looks like this may be her last episode as the younger Boon Yi. Great little actress.

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I love the story of Jiknyeo and Gyeonwu (at least they met once a year, legend says) and the reenactment by the young Ddang-sae and Yeon-hee. It's the foretelling of their future.

I'm sure Yeon-hee will survive and maybe becomes a tailor of some kind (either sell or make clothing) like she did when she was young. Based on the stills that are out there, she looks gorgeous with a stylist hanbok.

In their reenactment they met each other on the bridge but their wedding was interrupted by those thugs. I think that means that they will meet again but they won't get married because she is going to be Jung Do-jeon's wife. I think that's the reason why Ddang-sae chose to be Jung Do-jeon's guard, it's not just to protect him but to protect Yeon-hee.

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I've been thinking about this too coz in Tree, the person Lee Bang Ji loves is Jung Do Jeon's wife. If they are saying that this is prequel to Tree, then it should follow that story as well. I just hope they do the execution well.

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It makes sense, doesn't it?
I think it's a good idea to rewatch Tree because it's obvious that the story is connected to Tree more than the actual history.

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I actually read Heads' recaps of Tree last week and watched snippets of every episode in the process. Took me two days but what an experience! I cried and laughed like a crazy person. Ahh, that show is just so good. 24 episodes is perfect length too.

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@kiara what is the story of Jiknyeo and Gyeonwu..how does it connect to dang sae and yeon hee if I might ask?

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Thank you very much for the quick recap. I watched it raw and could understand maybe only one third of it. I guess many of us here have already watched TWDR. Has anyone noticed that the actress playing Moo Hyul's grandmother in this one is the head lady who was plotting against team Moo Hyul in TWDR? I'm not sure, though. That's why I wanted to ask you, fellow addicts ;-) because the same writing- directing team is behind both series, so I thought there might be a connection. Has anyone noticed this?

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Moo Hyul's grandma here is played by Seo Yi-Sook. She was not in TWDR.
The head lady in TWDR is played by Song Ok-Suk. They do have a similar look though.

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Kiara, thank you for the clarification. Both actresses look alike and have given me the same vibes, hence, the confusion! :D

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I have another question about the timeline. We are told that Dang-Sse and Boon-Yi's mother was somehow responsible or at fault in Princess Nogeuk's demise. But Jeon Do Jeon told in the previous episode that that incident took place twenty years ago, so it would be impossible for the children to be the court lady's children. If the incident around Princess Nogeuk was so long ago, why has the children's mother been kidnapped recently that the children set out to look for their mom? Wouldn't a traitor and her family of three generations in such a case be executed right then and there? Am I missing something here? Can somebody knowledgeable in history or in this dramaverse please enlighten me? ;-)

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The timeline in this drama is all over the place lol. This is far from being historically accurate. There was no conspiracy with Queen Noguk death (not that I know of).
If we go by the year that Queen Noguk died, the current timeline would be 1385.

We are not told yet what happened and how she escaped execution. Maybe someone or some people faked her death so she can escape. We don't know who kidnapped her yet.
The kids are still alive because it's not public knowledge that they are Yeon Hyang's children.

This is just my guess so don't take it as truth lol.

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This timeline is so confusing, I salute you for still trying to make sense of it lol.

The other thing I don't get is that Noguk died in childbirth. Like, is this one of the things where a royal died and all the doctors who tried to treat her are held responsible/put to death? But why would her maid be punished for that? None of this makes any sense, which shouldn't be surprising at this point, but still :(

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Lol if they are not going to give me one I'll make one.

I think they are trying to make a murder mystery/ conspiracy out of Noguk and Gongmin's death. Maybe they are not going with the childbirth as the cause of her death.

Jung Do-jeong and Gil Sun-mi don't seems to think that she was a criminal but a victim.

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After Bang-ji failed to protect Yeon-hee, the way she walked to the giant tree near the cliff with her shaw in hand.....it almost seems like she was going to leave...

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I hate hate HATE when they use rape as a plot device, especially rape of women for a character development of a man. seriously? his motivation has to be driven by his love getting raped? why does someone else have to go through the trauma to provide a rationale for a character's action?

the way writers and the production company defended themselves was ridiculous too, they straight out admitted that it was necessary for ddangsae's development and that the male child actor did brilliantly despite the traumatizing scene - didn't even mention the female child actor, who was actually involved in it. ugh.

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Yes, the rape is horrific. So is the murder of her brother (which nobody seems to be talking about).
But, folks, the rape is not just there to shape the boy. Isn't the girl also a character? Doesn't she have her own story? How will it shape HER? Let's not forget her, please!

Also horrific, to me, is the idea that a helpless boy should feel so guilty that he didn't commit suicide by trying to stop the rape (because that's what it would have been) that he decides to commit suicide by jumping off a cliff! Also horrific: carving words on the forehead of a young man, and driving him to suicide. So is terrorizing and humiliating a young boy (Bang Won) with the same threat, and then rolling him up in a mat and beating him bloody. So is the torture that is inflicted on the teachers. Plenty of horrific acts to go around, and yes, we are being asked to examine how these shape all the characters, not just Bang Ji.

In every episode, characters are confronted with acts of cruelty, and have to choose if they will sacrifice themselves, or try to survive, even if survival seems cowardly. In one scene with the other students, Bang Won reminded us that all this is not the fault of the victims, but of the victimizers. But we are also faced with what we think of the murders he commits. He murdered three really evil guys. Does that make it OK? Ddang Sae could have done the same to the rapist, but he couldn't murder a man in front of his family. Does that make him a failure, as he thinks? Lots of parallels, no?

Good, evil, justice: how to understand what is right and wrong in such desperate times? One of the more difficult scenes for me was when the soldiers beat the crowd while the scholars how had inspired their rebellion were forced to look on helplessly. How does a leader urge action he knows will result in such violence? yet how could we not want the people to resist this tyranny?

I don't know much Korean history, so I don't know how the story of the foundation of Joseon has been taught in schools, but clearly the audience is being asked to think beyond more simplistic ideas of good guys/bad guys.

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Very well said. As you mentioned, this is more than a shallow idea of good vs evil. I love how you put it.

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Well said, and yes, I get the sense that Yeon Hee is very much going to have a character arc of her own, rather than simply being a victim who serves as a catalyst for the actions of others. This writing team has created strong, complex female characters repeatedly in the past, and I don't expect them to relegate the women to passive suffering for the duration of the show. It's too early to know for sure, of course, but I'd be hesitant to rush to judgement in this case.

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Very well put! My sentiments exactly! :) Especially on the rape issue which has become a hot topic on this thread. It is such a big, shallow, and heinous crime, yes, but there are also other major crimes that shape the characters and their world view, ethical code and actions, such as torture, murder, etc. Actually, a world like that makes children and adults alike weak and helpless in their shoes, not being able to defend themselves, but also not being able to come to terms with their helplessness, having to choose a side forcibly which will make them lose their self-respect and self-confidence. There are so many conflicts that the characters have to cope with. For instance, do you remember the scene when child Bang-Won told to himself that he would need to be evil until he becomes powerful, only after he gains power would he let himself be good, until then he needed to embrace evil ways to bring justice. That is such a poignant decision for a child/ teenager to make, but under those circumstances I guess people had to mature quicker and act older than their age. I am curious how the show will answer such existential questions. It is so enlightening and enriching to have fellow followers share their ideas. Thank you dramabeans community! :D

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but the producers of the show admitted the rape was done for the character development of the male character

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Liking your comment here.

Victims are victims, but until people can stop thinking of them as victims, can these victims actually move on for real.

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I do agree that the rape part was too much, but it is a part of life (sadly) and especially in the past where commoners are even more powerless. To just take it away because kids shouldn't watch it is a poor excuse imo. If they see this, it's a good chance to educate them about the topic.
As for Yeon Hee being raped for the development of Bang Ji's character, i don't think it was all that pushed him to be what he is later. there is still the fact that he was trying to cope with not being able to do anything about his mother, trying to stay strong for his sister as well. Every factor plays a part and the rape wasn't just to grow his character. He was already falling apart

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Okay, but let's not gloss over the fact that this happens far too often. Do we really need gratuitous, violent rape scenes that exploit female characters, to further the "character development" of a male character? I don't fucking think so. This isn't just one stupid scene, it's part of a long, disgusting tradition of sensationalizing rape and sexual assault in media.

It's an even bigger issue because this was on a major broadcast channel and there was absolutely no warning about the sexual violence. Not to mention the fact that the actress is quite young which makes it all the more disturbing.

Also, I've seen some trying to justify the rape scene on the basis of historical accuracy. Okay, but you know what's also historically accurate? Dysentery. But we never see dysentery being portrayed on television. Why? Because it's fcking gross and no one would want to see that, right? Oh wait. You should have the EXACT same reaction about rape.

And it is possible to tell a story about sexual violence and survivorship without forcing people to watch an exploitative rape scene (see: Mad Max). It's just that Six Flying Dragons failed at it. Or rather, it had no intention of doing that in the first place.

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So I was reading the recaps of this drama to see whether I wanted to watch it, and after this episode the answer is no. Life's too short to waste time on shows that have a girl raped for the sake of a boy's character development.

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That girl is not wasted. She'll grow up and play an important character in this drama (Jung Yumi). I think people need to judge something quickly.

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typo: *need to stop judging on something quickly

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My thoughts exactly. People are jumping into conclusions too fast already and haven't even read character descriptions.

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See my reply below (28.1.3).

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I never said she was wasted. I know she's supposed to become an important character as well. But that doesn't change the fact that the scene of the rape was presented as being all about Bang-ji's character instead. It took place in his introductory episode, was presented from his point of view, and shown as a defining moment in his arc. If it were there primarily for Yeon-hee's character development, then why would they choose to show it like that? They wouldn't. They would have it from her point of view with the effect on him being secondary. So what I object to is the way they chose to prioritize the effect of this horrible crime on the bystander over the effect on the victim. And as queenofavarice points out above, there is a long history in various kinds of media of making sexual violence against women all about men, and once you notice it it gets old really fast.

And although it's not what you meant, I do need to judge something quickly because I have a limited amount of time and there are a lot of dramas out there. I can't watch every single one, so even if this one ends up having other merits, I'd rather spend my time watching the ones that don't make me angry at the creators for perpetuating particularly toxic misogynistic narratives. I think that's as good a criterion for choosing which dramas to watch as any (considering my other criteria are whether or not the story sounds interesting, whether I like the actors, and so forth). Don’t you think?

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I get what you are saying. From the general viewers point the scene does not show explicitly, except that we are given the presumption of it. I think if you are patient enough watching her character development, her point of view will be revealed later in the drama. I have a strong confidence on the writers that they will do amazing thing to Yeon Hee. However, it's your choice and opinion on choosing which drama you will keep watching till the end :)

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Jin (Japanese drama) showed depictions of dysentery. Couldn't help mentioning it, heh.

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I guess I don't understand what made this rape scene so gratuitous. The rape happens entirely off screen (it's just implied), and it was nothing like (for example) the extremely uncomfortable rape scene at the beginning of Missing You (which involved sound effects of the girl screaming and struggling iirc). Sure, rape can be used as a crappy narrative device for character development and I don't know if they needed to use it here, but in the grand scheme of rape scenes (ugh) this one seemed pretty tame compared to some others I've seen even in kdramas.

Also I can't bring myself to be mad at a kid who didn't know what to do when he saw the girl he liked getting attacked by a bunch of bigger, stronger people with weapons who have already murdered people in front of him. If anything this is probably more realistic than most depictions of meek men/boys hulking out to save their damsels in distress from rape.

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This reminds me of I Miss You rape scene. OMG. The perfectly shot cinematography and on point acting didn't help my heart at all. I'm not saying SFD scene is good but it pales in comparison to IMY.

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At least in I Miss You the rape scene is actually the main event that affected the plot, and especially the heroine.

It's not like here, where the rape is only for the boy's character development. ...... I don't like IMY as a drama but at least there, the girl who was raped is not just some plot device, she is one of the two main characters. the drama actually follows her story and shows how much SHE suffered even after sge grew up, not just the boy. In SFD its only about the boy feeling bad when it's the girl who was raped and we don't see her again.

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It might be too early to say that the girl won't have a character development here. She did get an introductory name (like the one that flashes on the screen that says Yeon Hee) so she'll probably be important in the show. She might not be one of the dragons but she will be important. If this drama will faithfully be a prequel to Tree, then she becomes Jung Do Jeon's wife. We might see her being involved in his works and ideas of building Joseon as a new country. You never really know. We still have 46 episodes to go.

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@pigsnout

Yeon-hee is going to be Jung Do-jeong's wife so she will be around for most of the drama. She will meet the adult Ddang-Sae again who's new name will be Lee Bang-ji.
He is going to be on opposite side with his own sister probably because he wants to protect Yeon-hee now that he is the best swordsman in the country.

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Yeon-hee is also a fictional character. She was not Jung Do-jeong’s wife irl.

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After watching Empress Ki im hook with historical drama .they are interesting history and knowing how people in the past live in such a cruel society that up to now still happening in some parts of the world.looking forward for the coming ep.esp.for the 3rd dragon Lee Bang Won.#Yoo Ah In. The raped scene is truly inhuman.?Is must to watch this historical drama.

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Empress Ki, Dae Jang Geum, Tree With Deep Root, Six Flying Dragons etc has very little to no history in it. If you want to know about the history of Korea, take a history class or read about it.

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The rape scene just a trigger to his emotional outburst. Just a cruel reminder of how helpless and useless he really is. That scene didn't bother me at all because they didn't even show the "rape".

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but it is offensive to make the rape scene about him and not the girl who is the actual victim

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i know people use historical accuracy in relation to the rape scene but i've heard people say that for a lot of shows, lets not forget boys got raped and molested back then as well but its rare to see a rape scene/ plot devices with a male victim then it is to constantly see women and young girls. not that i wanna see a young boy instead of a girl in the scene. lets see where the show goes and i hope they somehow dont make this all about the guy's character growth, development etc i mean i know the girl may be important to the story but im not sure they will give due to the girl in a way that doesnt seem like it all goes back to the gu and his character despite showing her story,cause after all his one of the dragons and there will be more focus on him, but maybe im jumping to assumptions and hope that doesnt happen.

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Rape has nothing to do with being historically accurate. This drama is not even based on history. It's a pre-sequel to Tree with Deep Roots which was based entirely on a novel.

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Actually i watch a few episode of Jewel of The Palace a few years ago. it good my sister like it so much. But i dropped because it air during school days, there no tv at uni so. Yes i know QUEEN SEON DUK, and JUMONG is most popular among k-drama lover, but i dont know if i can watch long run drama. I might dropped in the middle. im gonna wait until this show end then i would think about it ☺

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Thank you so much for the recaps !!!
I don't know if I can keep reading for 50 episodes but I'm gonna try !!!
Oh and this is totally off topic ... But I wish people would watch "sassy go go" also !!! It's really good , and not just your typical high school drama !!! The leads r great !!! Thanks :):):) that's all !!!
Fighting yoo ah in !!!

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I think you guys are being a little harsh on this drama for the implied rape scene. We didn't even see or hear it she was just dragged off camera. Unlike in Missing You were you had to listen to the rape happen. I don't see how Missing You's rape served as much character development when all it took was for the heroine to fall in love with the the very same guy who abandoned her and ran away when she raped. I think it was a realistic depiction in Six Flying Dragons. If you want to talk about disturbing rape/near rape scenes in dramas then I'll bring up The Walking Dead in which it depicts a young boy nearly getting raped. I love this drama flaws and all. I look forward to the next episodes!

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I left out the part that in Missimg You all it took for the traumatized heroine to heal emotionally and recover was falls in love with the very guy that abandoned her and ran away right after she was raped. That was one of my issues with that drama. Besides the fact that I hated the male lead.

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I dropped it after episode 4, I think. The child actors did amazingly well but unfortunately, the adult counterparts didn't deliver as much. It also didn't make sense after that. What a mess.

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Could people please just stop saying that the rape scene was just for the kid's character development? The girl becomes an important character later, a really active one. And when I say active, I mean active. Wasting long paragraphs on something that's only four episodes long as of now, judging without even looking at the character information. Really?

Kind of disappointed.

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Agreed

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they are not making it up, the producers of the show said it was for the male characters development, this isn't just our opinion but the opinion of the creators of the show

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Well said Jen.

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@HeadsNo2..good write up. I also loved what you said here --'If this episode were a meal, I’d be leaving the table stuffed beyond all imagining and wondering just what exactly I shoved into my mouth for the last hour, but I’d be none the less satisfied for it. It’s just a lot, and while it’s all presented in such a way that it never becomes too much, it does set an awfully high bar for the next forty-six episodes to follow.'
Goggled the episodes back to back...and now I'm really hooked.The story and the execution both has been good so far..I'm mostly interested in two of the dragons...the future king and the body guard lol...Also wished they were not on the opposite side of the two reigns.

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I want so much to love this show (TWDR is my all-time favorite) but something about the storytelling is falling flat for me. This episode in particular seemed really disjointed.

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Thanks for the recap :)
Can't wait for the next episode >▼<

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I don't see anything harsh on the "rape" scene. It's not explicit at all. There are more inappropriate scenes than this. And one must see the bigger picture. The girl, Yoon Hee, will play an important role in this drama, as well as the boy Lee Bang Ji.

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I agree.

And I also don't get why people are hating on Bang-ji who wouldn't have been able to prevent it from happening even if he had tried. I actually expected the comments to be about the corrupt government and the perpetrators. Not some 12 year-old boy. Let's keep the fault where it belongs.

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This is where I realized who Gil Tae-mi was played by. To say that I was shocked would be an understatement. lol I'm used to seeing the actor play very ordinary characters, like in Secret Love Affair and Punch. I very much enjoy watching him in this drama.

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2016...Re: comments on rape scene...saw it coming when the perverts were ran out of the village ..so of course when they returned that sick b****** would act out his lust.. and someone posted 13 yr old watching and having to explain rape...seriously at 13 you haven't educated children against older kids and sicko adults...and also it's okay to watch the killing and corruption...the things that make you go Hmmmm? Getting ether-net cable tomorrow to hook up to tv so I can watch on big screen...cried end of this episode just knowing they will ascend to greatness...love love love this so far.....and thanks for recaps...have helped in choosing which programs I will watch immensely

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