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92

Signal: Episode 7

What seems like a simple open-and-shut case turns out have much deeper roots in the movers and shakers in society. Much like our previous cases thus far, there’s a link between the past and present, along with other clues that enable us to learn more about a few key characters and the mysterious walkie-talkie that ties this whole story together.

With corruption and power rampant no matter what year it is, this episode only opens the narrative door slightly ajar. And if Jae-han isn’t careful, he’ll find out just how deep that rabbit hole will go.

SONG OF THE DAY

Taeyeon – “비밀 (Secret)” [ Download ]

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EPISODE 7 RECAP

Even if Han Se-kyu hails from privilege, it doesn’t take much to draw a scared little mouse out of its hole, Jae-han transmits over his radio. The key to this case is Han Se-kyu’s missing red car, which the chauffeur claims doesn’t exist.

Later that night, Jae-han tails the driver from the estate to a shabby shed that houses the red vehicle in question, and watches him take said car near a water source. He shows up before the man can push it in and pops the trunk where the stolen goods are.

He arrives at the precinct in the red car and asks his squad chief if bringing in a witness and plenty of evidence is enough to secure a warrant.

Night passes in 2015 while Jae-han arrests Se-kyu as the serial burglar. The media covers the affair and Oh Kyung-tae is released from prison.

In the morning, Hae-young wakes at his desk and immediately asks his teammates about Soo-hyun. Cut to: Hae-young outside Soo-hyun’s place as he carefully rings the doorbell. He introduces himself when Soo-hyun’s mother answers the door, and he’s happily invited inside. That’s good news, right?

He sees Soo-hyun’s nephews shoot their toy guns at a lump on the bed… and Soo-hyun pulls back the covers. He stares in amazement as Soo-hyun lazily asks, “What? Are you seeing a sick person for the first time?”

As it turns out, Soo-hyun had called in sick, and Hae-young had run out, utterly relieved. Soo-hyun’s mother wastes no time trying to gauge if her daughter’s handsome colleague might be a suitable match for Soo-hyun, who argues that his visit means that work is a mess without her.

She hints at Hae-young to get moving and has to literally kick him out the door to get him away from her mother. Ha.

Soo-hyun’s suffering from a pretty bad cold, but Hae-young can hardly believe that she’s alive and breathing—er, coughing—next to him. His question of whether she ever regretted getting into this dangerous line of work confuses her, since she has no recollection of dying in a fatal explosion in a previous timeline.

Instead of heading to the precinct, she has him drop her off at a nearby sauna and tells him not to slack off in her absence.

Hae-young reads up on the 1995 burglaries at the precinct and discovers that justice was sort-of served: although Se-kyu was found guilty, he only served a six-month jail sentence and a two-year probation. Another startling news article states that Oh Kyung-tae brutally murdered a man—the victim was Yeo-jin’s father.

Jae-han pays a visit to Oh Kyung-tae in jail, bitterly telling him that he wouldn’t have worked so hard to clear his name for larceny if he knew his friend would end up behind bars for murder. He can’t understand why Oh Kyung-tae can’t move on, especially when they had set everything right and the rich folks will soon forget this incident.

What’s even sadder is that Oh Kyung-tae is no longer alive in 2015—Hae-young is taken to a burial site in the mountains where Oh Kyung-tae and other inmates were laid to rest. He thinks to himself: “Even if the past changes, there are things that don’t change—that the world is unfair.”

Jae-han confronts his squad chief in the precinct over the ridiculous news headline stating that Se-kyu robbed those houses out of curiosity and not all of the stolen goods were recovered. But his squad chief is packing up his things because he’s been transferred elsewhere, and Jae-han asks if it has anything to do with Han Se-kyu.

His squad chief leads him out into the hall for a private chat and discloses that the investigation team looking into the collapsed bridge incident have discovered that there’s a lot of money being swapped between the politicians and financial bigwigs in the Jinyang construction project.

Rumor has it that there’s a connection between that and the chaebols that were robbed, and it’s possible that Han Se-kyu knew something because there’s a crucial piece of evidence among the stolen items that would expose the underlying corruption.

Jae-han retorts that nothing came of it, and ultimately the case is now closed. He’s told that this case of corruption is way out of his league, but that’s when they’re interrupted by the entrance of the new squad chief: Kim Bum-joo, aka the future Director Kim.

Unfortunately for Jae-han, his defiant reputation toward his superiors precede him, and Director Kim is quick to put him in his place. Too bad this recent appointment only makes Jae-han more curious about what’s really going on behind the curtain, and vows to make sure that the director has his work cut out for him.

One item that was missing from Se-kyu’s loot was a blue diamond necklace, which Jae-han figures must be the item tied to the corruption in the Jinyang construction project.

The aforementioned necklace once belonged to Senator JANG YOUNG-CHUL (cameo by Sohn Hyun-joo yay!), who is swarmed by reporters. Jae-han makes his presence known by loudly asking if the senator has recovered the necklace, adding that a settlement was reached between the two parties even though the item was still missing.

He doggedly follows the senator outside and asks point-blank if Senator Jang had no choice but to let Se-kyu off because the blue diamond necklace was still missing. Senator Jang stares at him, but since the reporters are still watching them, he tells Jae-han that he’s working very hard with a hint of warning in his voice.

As for Se-kyu, he’s dropped off at home after being away for a month and sternly reminded that this arrangement was only possible out of the elite men’s generosity.

Hae-young joins Soo-hyun for a cup of coffee on the roof. Wondering if she’s feeling better, he advises her not to get sick or injured, then fills in the awkward silence by adding that she needs to take care of herself at her age if she wants to get married.

He passes the moment off as a joke, then asks if she remembers telling him that if he received a transmission from the past, it’s better to try to do everything he can instead of living in regret even if doing so mucked everything up.

He disagrees with that now, saying that he thinks one should never pick up a transmission like that because “it really can… ruin everything.”

Hae-young sits alone in the precinct when the walkie-talkie lights up at 11:23 PM. He tells Jae-han that he already knows Se-kyu was arrested, and stops Jae-han mid-explanation about a blue diamond necklace and underlying corruption to remind him how Jae-han once wanted these transmissions to end.

He may not know why their particular connection began, but he believes they should stop now. “The world won’t change because of what we’re doing, right? We’ve only invited in chaos. It was like that this time too… an innocent cop nearly died.”

Now it’s Jae-han who desperately asks for Hae-young’s help, asking him to tell him where the missing evidence is. In a last-ditch effort to prevent Hae-young from signing off, Jae-han roars that their job as cops is to make sure that all criminals, regardless of their social class, pay for their crimes.

But that’s when the connection times out, leaving Jae-han frustrated. Hae-young has his mind made up, as he shreds Jae-han’s profile and the case files on his disappearance, and throws the walkie-talkie away as well.

Section Chief Ahn watches Hae-young take out the trash, then ruffles through the bag and pulls out the walkie-talkie, which has a yellow smiley face sticker on the bottom.

That sticker is important because Section Chief Ahn remembers that Soo-hyun was the one who put that on Jae-han’s walkie-talkie. Aha, so Jae-han and Hae-young are speaking to each other via the same radio.

That triggers a time when Soo-hyun had struggled learning how to drive a manual police van, much to Jae-han’s irritation. The peanut gallery had enjoyed the amusement unfolding before them, watching her stall over and over again. Still, Soo-hyun was determined to impress and master the stick shift, only to nearly run her sunbaes over. Er, whoops?

Jae-han would always give her a hard time, though it did little to deter her feelings for him. She’d gotten him a canned coffee (because that’s what he liked) to thank him for the driving lesson, then quickly scribbled out the heart for an exclamation point instead.

When she’d been caught admiring Jae-han’s walkie talkie—his good luck charm—she had secretly placed the yellow smiley-face sticker on the bottom.

When Soo-hyun asks why Section Chief is bringing up the walkie-talkie now, she’s told that her appearances at the NFS building are widely known. Furthermore, she isn’t the only one asking about Jae-han—Hae-young is, too.

Hae-young had approached him about Jae-han, Section Chief continues, and explains what we already know: that there’s no mutual connection between the two men. Hae-young had also asked for Jae-han’s records, which makes his ongoing private investigation even stranger.

She wastes no time in confronting Hae-young when she regroups with the team, but barely gets a word out before they get a visitor. Although she doesn’t recognize the man, he does remember her, adding that they met twenty years ago when Jae-han was around.

Soo-hyun doesn’t miss how Hae-young hangs on the name, though the latter says he knows someone who shares his name. Still, he’s in earshot as the man explains that he came looking for Soo-hyun to take on his case: a fiancee who died twenty years ago by the name of SHIN DA-HAE.

They had met when she was an aspiring actress and he a photographer assistant. One unfortunate day, she had suddenly committed suicide. There was a suicide note and her body was found in a lake. His request? “Please… help me find her.”

It’s certainly a strange request, but the man explains that he thought Da-hae had taken her own life back then. He shows Soo-hyun the last picture he has of her, taken at a cafe they frequented. He says he went back there every now and then, out of habit, and when he stopped by a few days ago, he’d seen a startling sight: a woman sitting in the same spot.

Thinking it was Da-hae, the man had rushed inside only to find the seat empty. He’s convinced that Da-hae is still alive and asks Soo-hyun to track this woman down.

Jae-han, meanwhile, follows up on a lead claiming that a young woman swung by a jewelry shop with a blue diamond necklace. The owner confirms that it was the same one in the photo, and the CCTV footage reveals that it was Da-hae who had brought it in.

She had gasped when the starting price for this exquisite piece of jewelry was 80 million won (around 80,000 USD). Reviewing the tape, Jae-han asks what the black item by the case is, to which he’s told that it was a black floppy disk tucked underneath the case.

Da-hae had stored the floppy disk in her purse while the owner continued to appraise the item. When Jae-han asks if the woman left any kind of contact information behind, he’s told that it was a non-working phone number.

The last two digits are scribbled out for another set of numbers, but before Jae-han can point it out, he notices that he’s picked up a tail. He rips off a page in the address book and asks the owner to erase the video footage they saw.

Back at the precinct, Jae-han calls Soo-hyun out, using their driving lessons as an excuse. He asks if she usually goes unnoticed and if she has access to a phone. Soo-hyun replies yes to both, so he has her look up a phone number whose last two digits could differ from this one.

She’ll be looking for a young woman in her twenties, he tells her, then stops her from swerving into traffic when she looks at him instead of the road. Soo-hyun appears pleased to be told that this investigation will stay a secret between them.

She immediately gets to work in the night duty room to call every possible combination off of the phone number Jae-han has given her. She remains persistent through every dud, and heh, it cracks me up that she’s wearing all-pink. Some things don’t ever change.

Soo-hyun fishes for some praise when she returns to Jae-han with a handful of possibilities. He’s impressed but he doesn’t show it, and prevents her from swerving again.

When they arrive at their destination, Soo-hyun gets out too, curious about who they’re looking for. Unfortunately what greets them is a dismal sight: Da-hae’s family and fiance in mourning over her death.

The photographer’s name is KIM MIN-SUNG, whom Detective Kim thinks is off his rocker. Soo-hyun argues that the women in the photos do look similar, to which Heon-ki counters that a photo’s angle can greatly influence someone’s appearance.

She entertains the possibility that Min-sung never forgot his past love, and Heon-ki makes everyone uncomfortable with his remark that women can be forgotten easily enough. Both Detective Kim and Heon-ki are opposed to this case: a body was found and cremated long ago, so there’s barely anything to go on.

But Soo-hyun stubbornly says there’s a chance there’s some trace of evidence in the cafe, and they can’t be certain unless they look. She overrides Detective Kim’s insistence to take on a different case because if the body found in the lake wasn’t Da-hae, then this also counts as an unsolved case.

Hae-young asks how Soo-hyun knows of Jae-han, and is told that they once worked together. He asks why she and Jae-han went to Da-hae’s funeral then, adding that this is a question related to the case.

Soo-hyun replies that she doesn’t know the details, but was told that the investigation they were conducting had something to do with stolen items. When asked what that item was, Soo-hyun raises an eyebrow and says it was a blue diamond necklace.

Hae-young realizes that Jae-han has continued the case on his own, which involves Han Se-kyu somehow. Soo-hyun tries to get a read on him, and when he asks if she was asked to help after Se-kyu was arrested, she confirms it.

So Hae-young and Soo-hyun are in favor of taking on the case whereas Detective Kim and Heon-ki are not. Detective Kim says they should leave it as a draw, but that’s when Eui-kyung asks if his vote for yes counts too.

Soo-hyun says it does, and immediately delegates tasks to her team. She asks to see Hae-young in private and reminds him that she doesn’t work with people who keeps secrets from her. How does he know Jae-han?

Like before, Hae-young brushes it off and changes the subject. He follows up with the detectives who were on the case, and is told that there was an ID card on the body. Furthermore, he’s told that the victim’s family confirmed that the pajamas on the body were Da-hae’s.

What Hae-young doesn’t understand though, is that if that were all true, it’s strange that the victim would’ve traveled an hour and a half away from home to commit suicide. The detective admits that he thought it strange too, so he suggested getting an autopsy, but the family vehemently rejected the offer.

Soo-hyun meets with Da-hae’s unni, who claims that her mother is very ill in the ICU. She was the one who confirmed the body belonged to Da-hae because the clothes and other details were very similar to her little sister.

Soo-hyun gently asks if there are any belongings she can see, but the unni answers no, adding that the family burned everything Da-hae owned. That rings odd to Soo-hyun’s ears, but it seems she won’t be getting any more answers.

Hae-young, however, believes that it wasn’t suicide because the victims usually travels somewhere they’re familiar with or have an emotional tie to. There was nothing connecting her to the lake where she was supposedly found, and even if she did travel so far, it would’ve needed to be a planned event.

But the police found Da-hae wearing pajamas, which begs the possibility that someone murdered Da-hae and made it look like suicide. The family’s behavior strikes strange to him as well, Hae-young continues—they must be hiding something.

It doesn’t help that Heon-ki can’t distinguish a clear fingerprint out of the dozens found at the cafe. Over in 1995, Jae-han approaches an employee at Se-kyu’s villa to ask about Da-hae, since she was found in possession of the necklace. Could she have been his girlfriend?

But the man scowls that Dae-hae was only one of Se-kyu’s many flings, and he was always left to clean up after Se-kyu’s wild parties of drinking and drugs. Jae-han asks if any of them showed up following the burglaries, to which he’s told that Da-hae did once.

We see that Da-hae had broken into Se-kyu’s car and swiped that blue diamond necklace, and Jae-han realizes that’s when she made off with the necklace.

At the cafe, Soo-hyun surveys the place until her eyes land on the same book the older maybe-Da-hae was reading from in the photo. She learns that the book doesn’t belong to the cafe—a customer left it behind.

The waitress remembers that the woman sitting by the window left it behind before hurriedly running off. Heon-ki dusts the volume for fingerprints and runs it through the fingerprint matching system….

… and it’s a match. Hae-young breathes, “He was right.” Staring at Da-hae’s photo, Jae-han says that she was holding the key that would solve this entire case.

In the present, Soo-hyun gasps, “Shin Da-hae… isn’t dead.”

 
COMMENTS

And the plot thickens. I do like how our stories in Signal are unfolding from week to week because every episode has me hanging on what else there is to uncover. It’s a mark of exceptional writing—not only is it apparent that each case requires careful thought into its logic and specifics, but the narrative accounts for every consequence that comes out of our characters’ choices, their meddling, or sometimes, events that fate will see through, no matter what.

Such is the case for the 1995 burglaries: whilst Han Se-kyu was prosecuted for his crimes, his influential backers allowed him to get off with a light sentence. And while it’s already unfair that the chaebol was treated differently than the ordinary man (who was imprisoned for years in the previous timeline), there isn’t anything anyone can do to bring Eun-ji back. So though it’s possible that Oh Kyung-tae may have been angry that he was wrongfully accused as a burglar, he does take responsibility for taking his resentment out on Yeo-jin’s father by killing him. Those bitter feelings would remain with Oh Kyung-tae whether or not Jae-han had successfully cleared his name, which makes this outcome a miserable one.

The ironic upside to clearing Oh Kyung-tae’s name (and an added murder) in 1995 is that he never would’ve set up a refrigerated truck bomb that killed Soo-hyun last week. To that end, I’m glad that she wasn’t gone for too long, because along with the radio, she’s the physical link to the past, especially when the cold case squad is approached by visitors who knew Soo-hyun years ago.

It still boggles my mind to think Hae-young is the only one who remembers how events have changed in the present, though I’m inclined to think that the walkie-talkie connection has something to do with it. Many of you have suspected this, but now we know for sure that the antique walkie-talkie once belonged to Jae-han. How it ended up behind a waste disposal truck and why is still shrouded in mystery, but now that it’s in Section Chief Ahn’s hands, Hae-young better think of a way to get it back—and quick before Director Kim catches wind that the key evidence that links back to Jae-han is still floating around.

It was a nice touch in this episode to see Jae-han and Hae-young switch places on how they felt about these transmissions. For the longest time, it was Hae-young who was determined to change the past, but now he was the one unsure about how that would affect everything else. Because what would be the point of trying to do what was right when the rich man got off easy, the poor man died alone, and the world was still unfair?

So I like how Jae-han gained a second wind in this episode and proceeded with trying to uncover the bigger corruption scandal tied to what was seemingly a straightforward burglary case. Much like his former squad chief, I think he’s way over his head, but better that he give it a try than letting shady dealings pass him by. Go get ’em, Jae-han.

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Can I just say, this series gives me chills. Literal chills.

So. Effing. Good.

And the score! Holy crap, the score is amazing.

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Have they released the OST? I am still looking for the one played in the opening credits.

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A lovely person on another board has answered this. OST #3 has been released on You Tube. It's called I Will Forget You (I think) and is sung by Jeong Cha-sik (again I think). He is an Indy Rocker from the 1990's in a band called Rainy Sun but I don't know if it was specifically recorded for Signal or is an older release. Because it is an older piece called I'm Yours written by the man considered to be the godfather of Korean rock music, Shin Jung-hyun. I have been eagerly reading Ask A Korean's infrequent postings on the 50 most influential K-Pop artists starting in the 1950's to the present. He has just reached the final 6, The Legends, I I assume Shin Jung-hyun will be, if not at the top, very close to it. It's a great song and the poster included a link to both the OST and a live version by Shin Jung-hyun. It's hard for me to decide which I like better but it's absolutely perfect to set the mood for such a great drama as Signal.

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Here's the link: Jung Cha Sik - 나는 너를
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qthZo6lWPHk

Can you give the link to Shin Jung-hyun's version? I don't know how to get to the "poster" you're talking about to listen to it.

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It's on the Soompi Signal Forum page 28. I can't find it on YouTube either but it's up there. I think it might be from a live concert in 2006. He's a great rocker for a guy born in 1938. His version of In-a-Gadda-Da-Vida is oddly compelling.

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Found it, thanks!

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If you've found the Shin Jung-Hyun version, could you please share that as well? Thank you!

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Again, thank you! :)

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It's finally out as Part 3 of the Signal OSt. Hurrah! I've been dying to get a hold of it. It's so luscious, I keep wanting to do a Young Shin and start dancing it to it, like she did in Healer for that old song.

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Now that's a thought! Yayee Healer reference!!

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Thanks mucho Lindy12 and news!

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Same with the chills! Especially when the papers start ruffling and you know events in the past and the present have changed! Awesome!

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I have been waiting for this. Thanks so much!

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Saving my Rage against the System rant for the next recap.

Gosh! This is such a fab series.

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It's interesting that Haeyoung threw the walkie-talkie in the trash when he decided that it wasn't a good thing to interfere with the past when he was the one who "first" discovered the walkie-talkie in a trash bag in the first or second episode. Perhaps another version of himself threw it away that very first time.

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Oops! I meant to say, "It’s interesting that Haeyoung threw the walkie-talkie in the trash when he decided that it wasn’t a good thing to interfere with the past because he was also the one who 'first' discovered the walkie-talkie in a trash bag in the first or second episode. Perhaps another version of himself threw it away that very first time."

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Isn't there a bit in episode 7 where some records guy says that info on Jae Han was discarded on a particular day - July 27, I think... Chief Ahn then checks out cctv and sees HY picking stuff out of the bag, which makes him suspicious.

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Yes, there was. The higher-ups decided to dispose Jaehan's belongings and his walkie-talkie was one of it.

This ep mentioned that the walkie-talkie was his good luck charm...I wonder if this is the reason for Jaehan's connection to the future, and whether it is the use of communication through this walkie-talkie that will prevent his death in 2005.

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"This ep mentioned that the walkie-talkie was his good luck charm…I wonder if this is the reason for Jaehan’s connection to the future"

The reason the walkie-talkie was his good luck charm was because he used it to communicate with the present.

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It's true, the writing is so awesome in this. I really have to go back and rewatch the whole thing. In the meanwhile, thank you for the recaps that do help so much to keep track of facts, people, events and time-travel changes.

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Did anyone else cheered "she's alive!" when Soo-hyun appeared?

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Definitely. Though, it's immediately followed by 'Is she all right? Is there some trade-off? Does she knows what happened? Does she got that terrible cold because she died before?'

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Yeah, I was wondering that too. It would be interesting if they chose to explain how the changes work a bit better as the series goes, although I wonder if in this case the writer just wanted to leave us in suspense a little bit longer about whether she was okay or not :)

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+1!

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What a great episode!

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Dunno why this show gives me Misaeng vibes, but it does. It might just be because the main characters (or most of the characters really) all seem a little too serious and a little too sad most of the time. Sad might not be the right word, but something about the way they carry themselves and go about their daily work makes you think that they aren't doing their jobs because they enjoy them, but because it's just..what they do. I love the cold case team in particular, and how they always go in reluctantly accepting a case, and then at some point end up throwing their all into it without hesitation. Jae-han is similar this way, and sometimes I wish he had teammates that had his back or encouraged him to push forward, instead of him running around like a half-crazed vigilante fighting for justice on his own. I mean he's a cop, but it seems like he's the only one who gives a damn in his entire precinct.

Hae-young has the same dogged determination, and I think it's what makes them great partners. I love when their stories run parallel, and you have both of them fighting to prove the people around them wrong all on their own, with each other as their only support. This show is so great on so many fronts, and after watching episode 8 I can honestly say I think it's one of those dramas that I wouldn't mind running forever. They're so much depth in the main characters and their stories that I don't think 16 episodes would be enough for me.

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The director is the one who directed Misaeng. :D

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I totally agree with the running forever sentiment. As i watched episode 8 I said , to myself this needs a season 2.

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If the new chief somehow has something to do with JH's missing case, isn't that mean JH is hastening his own disappearance by catching the thief? Okay, that's a scary thought.
Speculation aside, it makes me worried that even after JH & HY corrected their mistake and saved SH, there is still other people died in the past because of them. It's like a trade-off between past and present. And it seems like they can't stop the connection between them no matter what they do.

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After having seen episode eight I must say, this show is actually really disappointing me. I mean, it's great, (as far as the acting, directing etc.) but the story is bugging me. So far, there have only been one or two minor victories for the guys, and several major fails. I mean, this is fiction! It's even FANTASY fiction, which should be about wish-fulfillment! You don't make a premise like this and then screw up everything so it's just depressing. So far, hardly anything that I wanted to happen has happened. They keep saying, you can change the future, blah, blah, blah, but all they've done is make it worse, except for a couple of minor things! (And I don't count Soo Hyun coming back as one of them, because she wasn't supposed to die in the first place.)
The only way I would be happy now, is if they reset everything, and the second half of the show was spent fixing all of their mistakes in the first half. I know they won't do that, but it's really sad that you can't even have fictional happiness in a story like this.

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I think Signal falls into the science-fiction genre rather than fantasy since most stories that deal with the manipulation of time are labeled as sci-fi. I also like to think the writer wants to say that messing with time has repurcussions. The changings things in the past can lead to big things in the future (like here in Signal, death = death). That even if we reset things, then the original timeline resumes. All the cases the solved with remain unsolved. Those who deserved to be punish is free to roam around.

Signal sorta reminds me of this anime called Steins;Gate where the lead desparately tries to change the past but every time he does, situation becomes much worse than the previous times he tried.

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Yeah, you're probably right about it being more like sci-fi than fantasy. And if messing with time was something that was possible and this was a cautionary tale, I would totally get it. But no one can do what is being done in this show so why tell us what we already know? I mean, I've seen The Butterfly Effect. It's just, can't they make things better instead of worse?

I've heard of that anime, by the way, and it sounded interesting but I never got around to watching it. If it ends with things worse then I would have just been frustrated with it, though.

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Because time travel without mistakes and consequences is boring.

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No, they can make all the mistakes they want, as long as the important ones are made right in the end, that's all that matters. It wouldn't be boring at all to me, it would be satisfying.

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You should definitely watch Steins;Gate. It's one of the best anime I've seen with such an awesome and satisfying ending. The finale ties everything together and yeah, everybody is happy.

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Ok, I'll check it out. I just finished Psycho Pass on a recommendation and I need another anime to watch. :)

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I was wondering if Psycho Pass was good.

You should check out The Girl Who Leapt Through Time. It's one of my all time favorite animes. Someone recommended Erased and I like it so far.

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I think perhaps you may be confused about how science fiction works. It employs mechanics of science and physics/technology that doesn't exist in the real (our) world, to drive the narrative or the plot.

In this case, the 2-way radio is a plot device that initiates the temporal bridge between JH and HY. It makes changing the past possible, but the past is immutable in the real world. No technology exists that can allow the past to be changed.

So, when you introduce something that defies the known laws of the universe, there can be and usually are, disastrous repercussions. The universe is righting itself from the meddling. Changing things for the right reasons doesn't mean the the results will be better. It's all about balance and it's what makes this show so engaging. Knowing our heroes are willfully changing the past, and at first, ignorant of their actions.

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That's what makes Signal so engaging.

Someone mentioned before that it's bit disappointing how the cases are neatly solved, which is true, but I'm still literally at the edge of my seat watching it all unfold and continually worried about the repercussions.

It does ring true to the real world though. When people meddle with nature and the ecosystem, it never bodes well.

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@TransientState This reminds of the famous Fullmetal Alchemist quote, "for every action, there's an equal and opposite reaction".

@news
Exactly! They solve the case but at what cause? Like the price of Soo-hyun's revival is the death of Yeo-jin's dad. It's a happy ending for the case but the events that lead to it is not exactly neat.

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I agree. Also, the matter with Soo Hyun's death, I think it brought home the point, especially to Hae Young that meddling can cause severe repercussions and no one is immune to it.

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@elric
"..but at what cost?"

That actually makes me think a lot about the choices people make daily and how one choice can lead to a different outcome/path, which can incrementally have both good and bad chain reactions. You choose one thing, you give up one thing. It's complicated enough as it is in reality going in one direction (the future), but to throw in the time paradox..Yes, the price of Soo-hyun life is the death of Yeo-jin’s dad. It's impossible to have both. Jae-han and Hae-young can control their own decisions/actions with a specific goal in mind, but they can't control how others will react to it.

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Yes!! I've been waiting for someone to comment that this show reminds me of Steins;Gate. It deals with the same theme of time travel, the Butterfly Effect and how changing the past will change the future. Except that in Steins;Gate they have something called world lines, and unless the world lines are changed, some things will still happen inevitably. That's why when Soo Hyun died I was like 'Oh no is she dead for real? Like does Hae Young have to change world lines to make her come alive? But they can't kill the main character that early in the show?' I really felt so nervous for Soo Hyun but it was relieving she came back on the next episode.

And after Soo Hyun's death, Hae Young seems more sombre and shows his concern toward her more openly. Well, I guess the same can be said for Okabe Rintaro, one of the main characters in Steins;Gate, who changed pretty much after the whole time travel thing. He was a literally a mad scientist, an eccentric and funny guy who sought friends through his crazy inventions. But after accidentally discovering this time machine and changing events in the past just for fun, he discovers that it has an adverse effect on the future. And to prevent the death of his childhood friend, Mayushi, he keeps going back in time to change events in the past. However, no matter how many times he changes the past, her death is inevitable. The saddest part is that he has to relieve her death over and over again, and that he has to go through this his own as no one else realises that the past/future has changed (because they're in a different dimension).

But that being said, I enjoyed the character development of Steins;Gate as each character is distinct and has something they wish to fulfil. Despite the bleakness of the story in the middle, the starting is actually like a slice of life genre, being quite funny. And the end is a happy one, where all the characters finally fulfil their quests in their life.

Yep so Steins;Gate is a highly recommended anime to watch! (I'm so sorry if I spoiled some parts here and there)

But anyway, coming back to Signal-- its a highly paced thriller/sci-fi/investigation drama which really keeps me on my toes and I really wonder if I would come across such a good fast-paced exciting drama ever again. I think so far the story makes sense and the investigation aspect to the storyline keeps viewers interested. As well as the seeing the main characters grow I guess.

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Are you talking about the anime drama series or the film?

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The anime drama series. Didn't know there was a film? (or are you referring to the film The Butterfly Effect?)

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Sorry I wasn't clear. Yes, Steins;Gate has an anime drama and film. I tried watching the drama awhile ago, but I stopped after a few episodes. It's probably because I watched it after The Girl Who Leapt Through Time and loved it, so I couldn't get into Steins;Gate, but maybe I should give the film try because I preferred Cowboy Bebop the anime film over the anime drama series.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steins;Gate:_Fuka_Ryōiki_no_Déjà_vu

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yes to steins;gate! I've also seen the resemblance since the first few eps.

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It also reminds me of a 2004 movie with Asthon Kutcher called The Butterfly Effect. In it, the main character goes to the past so that he can change all the traumatic moments of his childhood. But instead of making the present life better like one would suppose, it would always ruin either him or his friends lives. I think the show is the same in that making the past what you think is right doesn't guarantee the future will be better. You never know.

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Ha! I just commented about that movie! I guess comparisons are inevitable in this case.

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Yes, as well as other time travel dramas. I think what would differentiate them is how the world in the story is introduced and how thematically cohesive everything is. By any chance, have you also seen the Kdrama, Nine?

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I have, and I really liked most of it, but that ending just made me mad. I hate it when shows do that. If you can't think of a proper end to your own drama, how dare you make me end it for you? It's not my job to make up the end and even if it's going to be open-ended, then at least give me some closure, otherwise I will regret watching it. And time loops just make my head hurt.

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The pacing is so good!! Last week I thought Soo-hyun death scene was the final scene of episode 6 then apparently it was only 30 minutes into the show. Then here in episode 7, she was revealed to be alive in less than 10 minutes.

I'm so in love with how things are going with Signal. It makes me feel things. It turns me into an emotional mess with how thrilling and mysterious it is.

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I hope that Park Hae-young realizes that the world is unfair because of a lot of things and changing certain outcomes in the past is really not going to do much on overall inequality and unfairness but the show won't be that interesting if Park Hae-young started fighting against global capitalism and state violence

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Its exhilarating fabulous. I can't wait for the nwxt episodes.

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Week by week I come back and love this show even more. I knew they wouldn't kill her for long. The only thing now is that now we know they are not changing the future and past they are going in the same direction as last time, they haven't changed anything and I am truly worried about the outcome. Thanks Gummimochi :)

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Also why do i have a feeling the case the guy keeps insisting on solving is something that will become very important in the future and even cause a big turning point in the story.

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Even knetz believe they will solve the Oh Dae-young case

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I wonder is it based on a true case, like the other ones? Did Oh Dae-Young really exist, or the equivalent to it?

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I tried googling it and the only thing that came up was a drama titled Missing Noir M.

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It was Odaeyang Mass Suicide (Odaeyang was a firm/religious sect, not a person). 32 members of some splinter group of a church committed mass suicide.

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For anyone who is interested in the case, try google "ask a korean who are these people in orange t-shirts". Look in the post for the bold key word "mass suicide" and read on.

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Thank you for the clarification @Sun :)

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Thank You @sun :)
@elric I know I tried googleing but I was getting the same results.

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I knew she wouldn't stay dead long.

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I love the flashback interaction between Jae-han and rookie Soo-hyun. She was adorable trying to impress Jae-han.

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She has a massive crush on him and Jaehan is just too blind to see that. But I love how her personality seems like a big contrast to how she is now. Guess all that unfairness make her jaded.

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I don't think he is blind to it it's just that in that time period it has only been 6 years since the other girl died and you know how much he loved her. Maybe he doesn't want to get involved with anyone because he is afraid something can happen, specially now that he is involved with the radio transmissions and the outcomes are quite unpredictable.

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We haven't been privy to the scene where she hesitantly approached him and he rushed out saying something like, after this case. Maybe she confessed her feelings?

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You mean the Scene from the first episode? Yeah most likely she confessed, I wonder why it took her four years to do it though. They meet in 1996 and that scene was from 2000 the night he died. Maybe she decided to go back to police university and come back with more experience.

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Kim Hye-Soo is such a great actress. The contrast in Soo-hyun's personality is so apparent. Especially when we switch from past to present.

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Yes, she's awesome. In the present, she's an experienced, sharp and tough detective who is very much in control of her emotions; in the past, she's a bumbling rookie who tries to win points with Jae Han and when he's silently impressed, she can't hide her smile and happiness from his hard-to-get approval. The changes in her voice/tone, posture, gestures, etc. from an inexperienced rookie to an experienced sunbae is absolutely great acting. I wonder what Hae Young would think and say if he ever saw how cute she was, because after this episode, I like her character even more.

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True!
I love how she made her character look like she's really undergone a big change.

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I am full of praises for this Quality drama. It's seriously so good! It's captivating, and always manages to keep me tense (in a good way) and at the edge of my seat!

So glad to have our lead actress back, and the way Hae young couldn't keep his eyes off her was so touching. He was so glad to have her back!

Why do I feel that said walkie-talkie, though it was thrown away, will make its appearance again like a bad penny? And I feel strongly that the blue diamond necklace, the floppy disk and Shin Da Hae's disappearance is linked to Jae Hee's murder and disappearance.

So my theory of 1 for 2 is proven right in this episode. It's actually 1 for 4. Because Jae Hee interfered with the timeline and arrested Han Se Kyu:

1. Eun ji died, because she would have been at home with her father or on his truck, but not in the bus when the bridge collapsed;

2.Oh Kyung tae still killed the man he felt was responsible for his daughter's death when he was cleared of the burglary charges and released early;

3. Oh Kyung Tae re arrested for murder, dies in prison.

4. This lady, Shin Da Hae's death is also connected to that one act of interference.

I am still waiting to see how the bridge collapse is tied to Han Se Kyung's arrest because prior to Jae hae's interference, the bridge did not collapse. He may be right in saying that some crimes are not meant to be solved.

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The bridge collapsed in every timeline I think. Even prior to the interference.

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Am really enjoying the story. This is like a really good Sci-fi movie drawn out long enough for you to really care about the characters for full impact.

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Another exciting episode! We are slowly unearthing the possible cause of JH's disappearance. And there was also confirmation that indeed the walkie talkie used by HY is actually JH's.

I think that SY will eventually get to join in on the fun once she witnesses one of the transmissions (just a guess). In some other time travel stories, people confided to by the time traveler (lead) also becomes aware of the changes. So maybe same with this one? Can't wait to watch the next episode.

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Just got a chance to watch ep 7 and 8 this morning, and... Whoa, felt drawn to the plot and characters even more. Currently, I'm in the process of persuading my best friend to watch Signal, lol

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Good luck, I tried persuading my mom since she LOVES cop shows but so far no luck

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Keep persuading her ;) don't give up! Update: my bestfriend prefers Cheese in The Trap to watch. But, that won't stop me, there's still time after CITT ends *evillaugh

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Will Jae Han ever be curious of his future self and ask Hae Young about him? Like, do they get to meet each other? Does Hae Young know if he's still in the police force? I know their transmissions are short and always about the cases, but just what if? Or maybe I'm just looking too much into it.. Haha. Anyway. I always watch the eps consecutively cos I hate waiting, so imagine my agony seeing the preview for next week!!! I wanna tear my hair out cos how do they expect me to wait A WEEK for something that looks so exciting?? Lol. Ep8 was intense. So. Good. This show makes me think of so many crazy probabilities and conspiracy theories I LOVE IT. Hahaha.

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Jae-Han is missing, or dead, in 2015. Nothing concrete but I surmise they may try to prevent that, if it's true. However, as we'very seen, preventing a death only replaces it with another. I fear who will have to lose their life if Jae-Han lives. Or even Hae-Young's brother.

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I am pretty sure that JH will stay dead. HY's brother might live, but JH living would take away from the melancholy nature of the show.

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Im not sure whether I love or hate that conflicts or cliffhangers are revolved quickly within the next episode, but then the writer keeps the plot moving with bringing in newer and more entangled cases which keep me just as engaged. So yeah, Im a happy camper.

And its becoming apparent little by little how Hae Young is growing to care for Detective Cha. I totally would support any development between them in the future.

My only gripe is theres not enough discussion about this show!

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I don't think they'll become involved. I see Hae-young's growing concern for her from a point of respect and admiration. She's the first cop to actually listen to him and believe him. Also, his actions get her killed. That would deeply effect anyone.

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Yeah, since this is the same director as Misaeng I don't think we can be sure that there will be a romance the same as there would be on a 'normal' show.

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Am I the only one who's craving for more Jaehan x Soohyun moments? I really love them together ?

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me too!!!
hahahaha
I love tat we can see her cute side during her early days and their chemistry is just natural :) hahaha

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Hi

Just wanted to ask what's the significance of the part in the car where Hae Young ask if Soo Hyun has ever regretted this job, and she asks to be dropped off. You say it was a sauna?

Also when the guy from the new case turns up and says Lee Jae Han and Soo Hyun actually met him 20 years ago - so how old is Soo Hyun? I'm confused. In TVN website she's supposed to be late 30s but I thought early 40s seems to be more accurate.

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I don't know if you will read that, but in any case, there is no link between Have Young's questions and her wanting to go to a sauna. She just didn't want to answer him and she went to the sauna to get away from her nephews.

Lee Jae Han is a 22 years old rookie in 1989 and he's her sunbae. That makes her younger than 48 in 2015. I have no idea how much younger though. When she showed up a the first girl in the precinct, they were in 1995. So, you if you assume she was a 22 years old rookie in 1995, then she is 42 years old, but there is no way of knowing for sure.

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am I the only one shipping Hae young and soo kyung? :">

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Who is Soo-kyung?

If you mean Kim Hye-soo, yes, sometimes I shipped them too. I'm a serial shipper.

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