268

Six Flying Dragons: Episode 50 (Final)

Alas, the end is finally here. It’s been one hell of a journey, and Six Flying Dragons delivers a solid finale for an altogether solid, engaging show that I’m still not ready to let go of just yet. Weirdly enough, I didn’t go into this finale with the usually omnipresent fear that one hour could ruin everything, but maybe it was out of assurance that we were in very sane, capable hands. That the show didn’t betray that trust, or its viewers, is an achievement in and of itself. Counting every other achievement aside from that, well, you get what we’ve spent the last six months watching: Awesomeness.

SONG OF THE DAY

Byun Yo-han – “무이이야 (Muyiyiya)” from the OST [ Download ]

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

 
FINAL EPISODE RECAP

After making his grand entrance, Moo-hyul stays behind to fight Gil Sun-mi in order to give Bang-won and Boon-yi time to escape. Gil notices instantly that Moo-hyul is much stronger than the last time they met, but will that be enough?

As their fight rages on, so does the one between Sa-kwang and Bang-ji, which is more like a deadly dance than any battle we’re used to seeing. Like Moo-hyul, Bang-ji is just buying time so that his mother can escape, which comes as a surprise to Yooksan, who still thought Yeon-hyang didn’t know who her son was.

Sa-kwang and Bang-ji seem pretty evenly matched, with both of them drawing first blood at the same time. But Bang-ji’s nervous that Sa-kwang isn’t hesitating at all, which means she cares little for what happens to her. Likewise, Sa-kwang thinks the same about Bang-ji.

Moo-hyul’s fight with Gil Sun-mi is more a battle of brute strength, with each sword clash producing sparks until Gil’s sword is ultimately broken in half. Unfazed, he picks up both pieces of his sword and declares he won’t go easy on Moo-hyul anymore. Moo-hyul is unafraid, since his greatest strength comes when he’s protecting someone else.

Speaking of, Ha Ryun brings a contingent of soldiers to save Bang-won from Nameless’ thugs. (I was wondering where he went.) Boon-yi goes with them, though she’s worried about the fate of both her mother and brother.

Gil Sun-mi meant it when he said he’d be in this to win this, as he spins toward Moo-hyul in a whirlwind of sharp steel. He thinks the battle’s won when he draws first blood, but Moo-hyul overcomes him with strength and technique to land a blow on Gil’s thigh.

Noting that Master Hong will have to attend another one of his pupils’ funerals by the day’s end, Gil Sun-mi spreads his stance to brace for Moo-hyul’s next attack. But by having Moo-hyul deflect the one end of his sword he launches at him, he’s able to use the distraction to stab Moo-hyul with the other end. Right in the chest.

Moo-hyul pushes him off, spins, and slashes. For a moment, the two stand, neither knowing who was really wounded, until a line of red blood appears on Gil Sun-mi’s throat. He looks at Moo-hyul in bewilderment, as the warrior pulls aside his robe to reveal that his blade didn’t pierce through the protection amulet Grandma gave him. (Ah ha, the ol’ Pocket Protector. Knew that thing would come in handy.)

With Gil Sun-mi mortally wounded, Moo-hyul runs off to find Sa-kwang. Yeon-hyang finds Gil still clinging to life, allowing them one final Moment where he apologizes for lying to her about her children, and for not being able to protect her till the end.

But Yooksan, who knows he’s been caught on his lies, decides to try assassinating Yeon-hyang to cover it up. Gil Sun-mi sees him approaching before she does, and with the last ounce of strength he has, he kills Yooksan.

And then, he dies. Yooksan still has some breath in him (since no one dies instantly), and uses it to defend his actions of the past as being for the good of Nameless. Yeon-hyang makes as if to finish the job herself, but Yooksan dies before she can. Ineffective till the end, eh?

Just when it looks like Sa-kwang might be getting the upper hand, it’s Moo-hyul to the rescue—although he isn’t there to rescue Bang-ji, but to take revenge for Young-kyu. Sa-kwang is out for revenge as well, and in order to get it, she has to kill Bang-won and Nameless for what they did to her beloved King Gongyang.

She flies at the two of them with renewed vigor, her movements almost too fast to see. Pulling out all the stops, she lands simultaneous blows on Bang-ji and Moo-hyul, but is stopped from possibly killing Moo-hyul by Bang-ji’s intervention.

An unspoken agreement passes between the two of them then, and soon enough they’re working in tandem to defeat Sa-kwang. The three warriors dance and spin around each other, but at last, Moo-hyul and Bang-ji are able to land two hits.

Sa-kwang goes stumbling back, the white of her robes suddenly erupting with streaks of red blood. She falls to her knees before them, lamenting that she’s a criminal who still couldn’t protect anyone in the end.

Bang-ji can’t help but think of Yeon-hee in that moment, and the comforting words she’d once said to him as a child. “It’s not your fault,” he finds himself repeating to Sa-kwang. “It’s the world that is strange.”

She can only offer a rueful smile at this before turning her eyes up to Moo-hyul. Sincerely thanking him for killing her, she slumps to the ground, dead. Moo-hyul flashes back to reading the note she left for him in the cave, which was a simple thank you for sparing her life.

Being unable to bury her, the two warriors arrange her limbs neatly and place her swords by her side. Moo-hyul finally acknowledges that Bang-ji saved him, but wonders if they still have to fight now. “Become stronger, then come to kill me, Moo-hyul. I beg of you,” Bang-ji replies solemnly.

Bang-ji wanders back to his mother, who asks if he’ll go to the Ming capital with her. They’re joined by Boon-yi, as she tells her brother to do what their mother says—and it’s what she wants, too. It’s time for them to live the next phase of their lives, even if they can’t do it in the same country.

Poor Bang-ji doesn’t have anyone to care for or protect like Boon-yi does, but he’s still happy for his sister. They share a tearful embrace as their not-a-mother watches.

Jukryong meets with Ha Ryun privately to tell him that he’s brought the bodies of Yooksan and Gil Sun-mi, offering his help to eradicate the remaining members of Nameless in exchange for a position in the new world order.

At first, Ha Ryun is scandalized by the very idea, but Jukryong forcibly pulls up the sleeve on Ha Ryun’s arm to reveal a burn mark on his wrist. Then he tells the story of a Nameless member who killed everyone in his branch and escaped… Ha Ryun was that member.

In order to hide that fact, Ha Ryun becomes much more amenable to Jukryong’s proposal, which is that he be allowed to become a bobusang (peddler) now that private trade will go the way of the dodo. He’ll take on his birth name, BAEK DAL-WON, in order to do so. (We’re told that Baek Dal-won would become the founder and leader of a union of Joseon peddlers.) And in a less surprising twist, it turns out he’s still working for Nameless.

Moo-hyul gives Bang-won a letter Boon-yi’s left for him, along with the sash he once gave her. He also lays his sword out on the table as his letter of resignation, which Bang-won accepts. “Leave,” he says. “I’ll keep in mind what you said… about how no one is smiling.”

After he bows, Moo-hyul meets with Grandma and Master Hong on their way out of the capital. All three of them bow deeply outside the gate toward Bang-won in farewell.

Bang-won opens the letter, which reads, “The promise that you made me, Your Highness… the land, and the people’s dream. Please do not forget those things. That way, you will not become the bug. That way, I can be smiling somewhere. Please, take care.”

Two years later. Bang-gan is at the wrong end of the torture chamber as he faces his brother, supposedly for trying to have Bang-won killed. Still, he asks that Bang-won spare him now.

Bang-won does, and is commended by elder brother King Jeongjong for it. But Jeongjong is tired of all the politicking, and abdicates the throne so that Bang-won can have it instead.

Therefore, we see Bang-won wearing the ceremonial myeonbok robe for a king, and Da-kyung wears daeryebok, the ceremonial robe for a queen. They carry scepters of jade for their coronation, as all the assembled ministers wish them a long and prosperous reign.

Bang-won is now introduced via chyron as KING TAEJONG, the third king of Joseon. Da-kyung doesn’t get a chyron, but she’s now QUEEN WONGYEONG, known most famously for being the future mother of King Sejong the Great.

The newly crowned King Taejong takes care of business, which unfortunately includes killing Queen Wongyeong’s brothers. She’s rightfully upset that he would do this to her and her family after they’ve done so much to help him, but his argument is fair: They wanted to kill his two sons, Lee Bo and Lee Do (future King Sejong), in order to secure the current crown prince’s position.

She doesn’t buy that line of reasoning for a second: “Do I not know you, my king?” King Taejong: “If you do, you should be careful.” Oooooh.

King Taejong enters a room that should bring back all the memories for anyone who’s seen Tree With Deep Roots—it looks like an exact replica of what I fondly called the “Sudoku Room,” because the “Lo Shu Square Room” didn’t roll off the tongue quite as well.

But it’s the Lo Shu Square King Taejong finds son Lee Do (cameo by Nam Da-reum, who also played Bang-won Lite) playing with, and he makes his disappointment with his son’s veracity for knowledge clear when he asks him why he reads so much. “Do you want to be king?” Taejong asks. “Do you want to practice politics? What is politics?”

Lee Do stutters as he tries to answer, surprising his father when he clearly says that politics is about distribution—about who to take from, and who to give it to. This frightens King Taejong because of how eerily similar it sounds to how Jung Do-jeon once described politics.

King Taejong orders all the books in the sudoku room removed, a move that Lee Do adamantly protests. It becomes clear that Taejong is worried that Lee Do’s intelligence will outshine that of the crown prince’s, but when Lee Do proclaims that he should do something while he lives, a statement Boon-yi so firmly believed in, Taejong has no response.

Moo-hyul wows a group of children with his story of how he once held a sword to Zhu Di’s neck, though they stop believing him when he reveals that Judy went on to become the Ming Emperor. That’s how Bang-won finds him, in their first meeting since they parted ways all those years ago.

He asks if he’s seen any smiles among the people, though he notes ruefully that even if there were, Moo-hyul still wouldn’t come back into his service. Which brings him to the reason he’s come, and the person he wanted to introduce Moo-hyul to: his son, Lee Do.

Describing his son as peculiar, Bang-won adds ruefully, “He doesn’t take after me, but has taken after those whom I miss.” Moo-hyul instantly takes a liking to the boy he’ll now be in charge of protecting, which we know will come to fruition later on.

When the topic of Boon-yi comes up, Moo-hyul claims to know where she is, and asks if King Taejong wants to see her. We find Boon-yi living happily with her people on the island they moved to, though she’s called to the port for an arrival—it’s Moo-hyul, back in officer’s robes.

He tells her that King Taejong’s come with him, and offers to take her to him. But when he returns to Bang-won, he returns alone, and Bang-won knows that means she didn’t want to see him. She just looks from far off instead, knowing it would be too difficult for her if she were to face him.

She ends up running into Lee Do, knowing instantly that he’s Bang-won’s son just by resemblance alone. In what he must think is an odd request, she asks if she could embrace him, and does so before he can protest.

A tear rolls down her cheek as she does, as she reveals to Lee Do that he reminded her of her childhood. She can’t help but flash back to all her fond memories with Bang-won, and still wears the hairpin he gave her.

Flash forward to Boon-yi as a much older woman, with salt and pepper hair arranged neatly on her head (and still adorned with Bang-won’s hairpin, no less). She takes a village girl off the island and into the mainland, only to find a woman teaching the tenants of Hangul, the creation of King Sejong the Great, to the local children.

The woman is MOK YA (Shin So-yul, reprising her role from Tree With Deep Roots), and she’s happy to give Boon-yi a cheat sheet for the new letters. Aww, she’s joined by other cameos in Shin Seung-hwan and Kim Ki-bang, who mention the lead protagonist from Tree, Chae-yoon.

Lee Se-na also reprises her role as palace maid GEUN-JI, as she offers to teach Boon-yi Hangul—it’s made so that the people could learn it in ten days or less. Some people, like the aforementioned Chae-yoon, learned Hangul in less than a day.

The very idea is foreign to Boon-yi, who can’t quite comprehend how twenty-eight letters could replace the thousands of Hanja characters people used to have to learn in order to read and write. Remembering how Jung Do-jeon once lamented that the people didn’t have enough time to come up with new ideas to improve their situation, Boon-yi knows now that he’d be proven wrong.

She goes to a tavern, where even the guy who barked like a dog from Tree returns as a cameo. (Whew, this is some reminiscence party, isn’t it? Sorry if I missed anyone.) She overhears a couple sadaebu talking about how Jung Do-jeon would be rolling in his grave to know that the common people had their own alphabet, and interjects to say that just the opposite would be true.

Boon-yi stops by Jung Do-jeon’s gravesite, and cries at the sorry state of the unmarked mound of dirt. Resting her weight on the mound, she looks over the Hangul alphabet and tells Jung that Bang-won’s son accomplished something great.

She closes her eyes to rest after she says those words, which is how the little village girl finds her. Only… she doesn’t wake up. Oh no. Ohh.

The focus shifts to her hairpin, before we flash back to the moments after Boon-yi hugged the young prince Lee Do on the beach. King Taejong had encountered her then, and they’d gone for a walk. He told her that he spends every day being lonely, and she replied that she, too, spends every day feeling lonely despite being so busy.

After a long moment of silence where he just looked at her, he admitted to missing her. Moo-hyul asked King Taejong later why he let the two of them go when he could’ve, y’know, just refused. But Bang-won knows he didn’t have a choice.

“It was a small comfort to myself,” he says to himself. “I was not who I am now.” He knew that neither of them wouldn’t oppose him, but neither did they open their hearts completely to him. He couldn’t have kept them knowing that.

He’d also taken a much harder stance on nearby Japanese pirates because of what Boon-yi told him, even though he claimed that such romanticism wasn’t in him. (It so was.)

Taejong, Lee Bang-won.

Warrior, Moo-hyul.

The people, Boon-yi.

Taejo, Lee Seong-gye.

The Viper, Lee Bang-ji.

The First Root, Jung Do-jeon.

And one last shot of all of them drinking together in peace and harmony, a long long time ago.

 
COMMENTS

It wasn’t until the six final chyrons that it really hit me. Maybe I was in some kind of denial before, or was just too focused on the recap at hand to fully comprehend that the project that single-handedly dominated the last six months of my life, the gathering place it created in our lives, is over. I know that sounds like a bunch of sentimental fluff, but when you spend that long with a show, and roughly the same group of people (I’m talking about you guys—yes, you reading this), it’s hard not to get a little attached.

Put basically, this show was an experience, and the community it created made every week a joy. Perhaps part of the bittersweet sorrow comes from how much Tree With Deep Roots was invoked in this final episode, with Tree not only being one of the best examples of sageuk to ever grace the airwaves, but also being the entire reason I came to Dramabeans in the first place. I loved that show so much, I just had to tell people about it—and here we are, all these years later, coalescing around its very worthy prequel. Life just feels complete.

But enough about me and us and how amazing we all are (*dramatic hair flip*), and onto how great this finale was. Admittedly, it resolved most lingering story threads before the thirty minute mark and left itself little to do afterward, but after this many episodes, it’s hard to fault the team for wanting to take a step back, see the forest for the trees (I can’t help it!), and let it all sort of sink in. It was safe without tying everything up into a neat bow, but still satisfying. Though I do wonder whether it afforded as much closure to those who haven’t yet seen Tree With Deep Roots as opposed to those of us who have, since this finale seemed tailor-made to suit the latter group.

Whether you’re a Tree fan or not though, Bang-ji’s epilogue (or lack thereof) might’ve felt a bit short, though, looking back, there really wasn’t much they could do with him. He’d lost everything in his life, and what he had left, he couldn’t continue to stay around. Maybe it would’ve been nice to check in with him and his horrible excuse for a mother, but maybe the show had already said all it needed to say about him, which was: Life sucks, and then you die.

Out of everyone who could find small joys in life, Bang-ji was never one of those people. He hinged his hopes on Yeon-hee, but when she went, so did his reason to ever smile again. So he left a broken man, and there wouldn’t have been much to see unless the show planned on changing his trajectory. Still, it’s sad to think that his entire life was just… well, there. But at least he went out after having saved Moo-hyul, because that three-way fight was pretty epic.

Bang-won’s story was, of course, the one closest to our hearts, and in that respect the show never faltered. His conclusion fit with the growth he’s experienced over the series, and while still retaining the essence that made him Bang-won, he really did seem to show how he both matured as a person and as a king. Moo-hyul was right, in that Bang-won could’ve chosen to not let either him or Boon-yi go, and in his younger days, he would’ve done just that. But he knew that keeping just their warm bodies next to him wouldn’t be the same as keeping their hearts, and chose loneliness over creating a false reality for himself. You gotta respect that.

Otherwise, Nameless’ tie-up seemed unnecessary, unless the show thought that some of us were really wanting to know how that super interesting Yooksan/Yeon-hyang subplot would play out. As opposed to Hidden Root, they do pale by comparison as a secret group, and up until the end, it was hard to take them seriously. Scratch that, actually—I stopped taking them seriously the moment Yeon-hyang was revealed to be their leader. What were the qualifications for that job, I wonder? Best macaroni noodle art?

Then again, Six Flying Dragons was never about Nameless. They were just a plot device to keep the wheels of the much bigger ideas greased, and to that end, they sometimes worked. This was a show that was all about ideas, and dreams, and the people we can become when we try to attain such abstract concepts. And while we may not remember a great deal of our dreams, the dream Dragons dreamed for us won’t soon be forgotten.

Muyiyiya, you awesome show, you. Muyiyiya.

 
RELATED POSTS

Tags: , , , , ,

268

Required fields are marked *

*cries because its over*
*cries because my life revolved around this show*
*cries because YAI is enlisting soon*
*breaks down*
Thank you for recapping this 50 episode epic. I will miss it dearly

2
8
reply

Required fields are marked *

*cries because my life will never be the same without this show*
*cries because Yoo Ah-in and Shin Se-kyung have now spent two full lifetimes apart*
*cries because my heart is so broken because I won't see Yoon Kyun-sang's Moo-hyul ever again. Not discounting Jo ajhussi's awesomeness though*

Seriously, 3 years and hundreds of dramas later, I've found a drama that managed to hook me for 50 whole episodes. Even Empress Ki, which I loved more than I can say dulled down sometimes.

2
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

That Empress ki, Mr sunshine
and sea God are saddest movie I have ever seen

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

To think I was hesitant to pick up SFD as 50-episode saeguks are not my usual cup of tea, especially after being burned by Empress Ki.

What a drama. It's intelligent and thought provoking with outstanding performances from the ensemble cast. The characters were multi-dimensional instead of the usual black and white demarcations. Mondays and Tuesdats won't be the same without SFD, sniffles...

1
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

And I'm glad that SFD is actually my first 50 eps saguek. I guess I should stop here. Won't ever be that great again...

*hoping there will maybe come another prequel of that team in the future, because every other saguek will suck in comparison*

2
reply

Required fields are marked *

*cries because I was too invested to the show I cannot move on*

1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Glad to know that I'm not the only one crying that it's over..

As soon as I finished the final episode, my tears started flowing out, just with the realization that this epic drama has finally truly ended and what a journey it has been indeed.

Great plot, beautiful directing, unforgettable characters.

If only this is not split between 2015 and 2016, this show may be the one to win all the drama awards.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm with you all sobbing because this beautiful experience is over.

Deep sigh** what'll I do now?

I never thought I'd feel this way about a 50 episode drama ending. I never thought I'd watch a 50 episode drama, but SFD has proven me wrong and now I am bereft.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Sorry for riding the first comment. But I just have to say this out loud: SIX FLYING DRAGONS IS AWESOMESAUCE!!!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for great recap for a great show!

Some (rough translation) from the interview with SFD writers Kim Young-hyun and Park Sang-yeon:
Q: SFD is prequel of 'Tree with deep roots'. There is a belief in movie world that no sequel is better than the original, but SDF seemed to break that jinx and have brought a new genre out in dramas.
A: When writing a story about 6 leads, there seemed to be 15 people you have to follow their (emotional) lines every episode. To catch all that, we couldn't make the show moving fast enough so we had to skip some characters' emotions, which was disappointing. Good things was that we knew which path we need to take, like "Minbone has to be born, Mu-hyul has to become the bodyguard of Lee Do/Sejong, When Jung De-jeon has to die, Boon-yi has to go into Banchon etc." -like working on puzzle? But at the same time We felt like we went up to a ring to fight with our hands and feet tied up. For 'Tree with deep roots' there was no material about actual Hangeul making, so we filled the story with our imagination, but SFD had so many historical material available, like Wihwado Retreat, Jo Min-soo(another general in the retreat), Choi Young etc, that there was no room for our imagination.

Q:Mu-hyul is the person directly connected to TWDR from SFD. He went back to his hometown, but became Sejong's bodyguard later.
A: Mu-hyul is the most ordinary person closest to general population in SFD. He wants to be succeed but doesn't want to do wrongs and want to live feeling useful. He got attached to Bang-won earlier, but he must have had hard time watching BW killing many people. Compared to BW who was wise but ruthless king, Sejong was compassionate king. Since Sejong had the warmth common people had, it seemed to be easier for MH to serve Sejong as his master.

Q: They say the way Lee Bang-won and Jung Do-jeon portrayed in SFD were different from other dramas.
A: We actually added more treacherous acts for BW. For example, there is no historical record saying that BW did himself incidents like setting DomoonDong ablaze, killing his brother Bang-suk. Even though our starting point was 'Let's not hate LBW', we didn't try to beautify LBW. Yet I hear many people cheered for BW.
JDJ and Jung Mong-joo were noblemen to the bone. JDJ approved political scheming because he could not just watch the political situation, but kept feeling conflicted. Maybe Indecisive? Even though he had absolute power and knew LBW's dangerous ambition, he didn't stop him. JDJ and JMJ fought hard, even revealing all kinds of dirty stuff against each other, but they didn't kill nobles ruthlessly. They only fought within the law(rule?) like accusing them in the court. This could be shown as timid, irresolute to the viewers, compared to BW who showed opposite behavior going over that boundary.

1
12
reply

Required fields are marked *

Q: Favorable and unfavorable opinions are common in dramas based on history, because there is preconception on the figure portrayed in the show (mainly for historical accuracy). Was there any part writer were worried in that sense in SFD?
A: Jo Min-soo incident. According to historical records, Jo Min-soo got off the stage quietly. But we thought there was no way he stepped out quietly since it was Age of warriors. We wanted to portray the clash between world view of people who have lands, and the one of people who don't, and with this incident, Jo Min-soo's and aristocrats' power got weaker. Since there was no record in history, we were concerned but his offspring showed positive responses. We were so thankful.

Q: What is the reason to have Chuk Sa-kwang?
A: We wanted a political wuxia(martial hero) drama from the beginning. Chuk was a needed figure in wuxia plot- Absolute expert but sad character. Her has kind personality, and expert in martial arts even though she didn't want to be one.

Q: Who was your favorite character?
A: We feel attached to every character in the show, but if we have to pick, it is ordinary people. They were important to us as much as JDJ and LBW, and We wanted to show their will power of surviving turbulent times. Bang-ji, Mu-hyul and Boon-yi are exemplary characters. Boon-yi endures pathetic life to the end to save people, Bang-ji lives with sadness, having grudge, Mu-hyul represents the common people even though he looked like having had easier life. We wanted to portray these unknown ordinary people properly along with the figures known in history.

Q: Is there any character who portrayed writer's intention the best?
A: Gil Tae-mi and Jo Young-gyu. He(Park Hyuk-gwun) acted much nicer than we expected fitting his acting talents. We thought GTM has to be the talk of the town by the episode 4. Also Jo Young-gyu portrayed the emotion very well, positioned between BW and MH.

0
11
reply

Required fields are marked *

Q: How about next drama?
A: We have nothing planned. But if we ever do it, since Canto 1 is Six flying dragons, and Canto 2 is Tree with deep roots, I wonder if it could be Canto 3- The water from a deep spring of Yongbieocheonga (='Songs of the Dragons Flying to Heaven'-It was compiled during the reign of Sejong the Great as an official affirmation of the Joseon dynasty and its ancestral heritage. More on wiki). In that case, the show will deal with the coup (GyeYooJungNan in 1453) by Grand Prince Suyang, 2nd son of Great king Sejong (Yes, Princess's man, and much more). It is a tragic story and will be a story of evil people since there is no good person in it. Sejo was favored by king Sejong, but he changed after he became the king. Unlike Lee Sung-gye, he was controlled by his key subjects (with merits) rather than eliminating them like BW. The problem is that there is no good person viewers can approve/favor. This means viewers have to watch fights among evil characters as the third person's perspective. Since there is no precedence this kind of drama has succeeded, if we do it, it will be a risky venture.

More interesting interview comes from show's Sin PD. Will try to post in OT.
Thanks again for the great recap, Heads!

0
10
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you for the interview recap! Provided me with a better understanding on the director's mindwork

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It was really hard for me to watch YAI as Bang-won because I was already familiar with Kim Young-Chul's portrayal in The Great King Sejong (my personal favorite) and the charismatic Yoo Dong Geun in Tears of the Dragon. I couldn't go back so I just glossed over him.

Now if they are going for Grand Prince Suyang (King Sejo) I will have the same problem because Kim Young Chul AGAIN owns it in The Princess Man. He is just that freaking good in playing controversial historical figures. Even Kim Young-Ho in (Queen In-soo), who is a wonderful actor couldn't sway me with his Sejo.
(Maybe I'm just a Kim Young Chul crazy fan-girl).

Anyway, I'd be interested in who they are going to cast if they are going to do it.

Thank you for the translation fan!

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Wow. Finally I met someone who also watched Tears of the Dragon and The Great King Sejong years ago.

I wouldn't compare these two with SFD or YAI's rendition of Taejong though. It's unfair to all of them. SFD is a fusion sageuk. During the time when Tears of the Dragon and The Great King Sejong were broadcast, it is inconceivable to even make something as "unorthodox" as SFD. For me, 1990s were the true golden age of Korean dramas, with seminar works like Sandglass and Eyes of Dawn taking the nation by storm and giving Korean audience a kind of historical consciousness even for sensitive issue like Gwangju Massacre. That's the era that treated TV dramas as a serious means of cultural expression and even political awakening.

Now, Korean dramas are seen as an entertainment "industry," a cash cow. The production environment and the purpose are all very different. I love tears of the Dragon personally, but I wouldn't compare it to SFD. Given the current environment of TV production these days, I actually feel that SFD is a rare solid work.

Also, as Korean viewers have noted rightly, this is a younger version of Lee Bangwon. They prove of YAI's interpretation of young Bangwon and they still love Yoo Dong Gun's version of older Bangwon.

One thing this show excels at is not to represent the "real" history or autobiography of Bangwon, but instead to use Bangwon's journey to offer a subtle and yet explicit critique on the political condition of SK now. *sigh*

1

I know, I've said it earlier (eps 48) that I wasn't going to compare because SFD is a fusion sageuk.

I'm very much a fan of old school sageuks because I love the history. I watched a lot of sageuks, some subs and a few with very little to no subs. That's how crazy I am when it comes to sageuks lol.

I felt that before the halfway mark that the writers must have some kind of propaganda behind the drama. I'm not sure what eps but I did mention it. Now that's interesting to hear.

I've seen all of the writers sageuks so I'm pretty used to their writing style. That doesn't make me an expert in anything. Just a hunch.

0

Once again, thanks for translating the interview!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think that Lee Jung Jae's portrayal as Suyang Deagun in The Face Reader is quite charismatic, but that's all. I just never feel like that character in whatever works lol (esp. The Princess' Man). Furthermore, I doubt any actors in their 20s can play that role as well as YAI played his LBW's role.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's more like preference on my part. I like Lee Jung Jae but not a fan.

0

I don't know it this is just me, but I sense a sort of madness in Yoo Ah In. He said in a previous interview (not during SFD, it was earlier, I think), that every portrayal of his comes out of him, so pretty much every role he's ever taken on was a shade of Yoo Ah In. How he portrayed his last three serious roles were so good and so spot-on, it's a bit unnerving. Or maybe he's just that good of an actor.

0

Thank you so much for the article translations! It helped me a lot understanding the drama better. Of course, with HeadsNo2 amazing recaps, it made all so perfect.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you so much for this!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you for the wonderful recaps. I can't wait to finish Tree after this. This was the longest saeguk I've ever watched. I didn't watch it when it first aired but instead started watching after episode 36. YAI is just captivating as Bang Won. He is the best actor of his generation. I hope he gets every award possible for his portrayal. The entire cast was wonderful as well but YAI did such an amazing job that even though BW was at his most ruthless self, I could never get myself to hate his character.

The only thing I was rather disappointed was with Bang Ji's character. Towards the end, his character didn't really do much. It was like he was just there but not really there. I wanted to see what he was doing in all of those years that he left. Did he stay in Ming all this time? What did he do with that purple envelope? It appears in Tree but how did it get there?

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Me too! I was waiting for a Bang Ji epilogue during the last few minutes of the show. He could have his own internal monologue about his lack of purpose despite his skill or lament about how sad the way and life of a swordsman is... while displaying some of his awesome moves (better if there's water involved for more wuxia feels)

Anyway, i'm also trying to watch Tree again to cure my separation anxiety. But i still can't deny the fact that I miss all the characters of SFD so much. Easily the best sageuk ever!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think the writers had a purpose to make Bangji the way like this, to make a reason why he became the Bangji in TWDR. From the beginning he wasn't the kind of person who had a grande goal but simply to get a revenge and to be forgiven by Yeon Hee. Going with his mother to Nanjing was not the best choice but that's the only choice he has. But his mother will keep fueling the hatred and revengeful in his heart til the end.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

By the end of the show, Bang Ji was basically a lost and broken man. He was just waiting to die like Sa Gwang and that's why he told Moo-hyul to get stronger and come and kill him.

I think the writers were just trying to make a connection to his character in Tree and it made a lot of sense to me.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Seriously, Bang Ji's character had so much potential and I feel like both the character and the actor were criminally wasted during the second half of this series. They should've at least let us properly send him off by showing us the scene in which he looks back before leaving with his mom which was actually in the preview. Ending his story right there in the woods wasn't fair to him.

In that sense, thank you Heads for ending your last recap with the last glimpse of Bang Ji that we were allowed to see. It means a lot to us Bang Ji fans.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

*Seriously, Bang Ji’s character had so much potential and I feel like both the character and the actor were criminally wasted during the second half of this series. They should’ve at least let us properly send him off by showing us the scene in which he looks back before leaving with his mom which was actually in the preview. Ending his story right there in the woods wasn’t fair to him.*

My thoughts exactly... Thank you very much for this post, tt.
No epilog, no appropriate farewell - it's no fair for the character and YBJ fans :(
I wish to watch spin-off with Bang Ji wandering with his mother (errr, I still don't like her), seeking his master San Feng (you know, Bang Ji's teacher was a legendary and "immortal" Chinese taoist. How many secrets he could be revealed to YBJ??) and fighting... Such a loss :(((
Does anyone know good fanfics with Bang Ji? :(

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I really loved Chok Sa Kwung's character in this. She seemed so otherworldly, with a kind of ethereal, unusual beauty and of course, the amazing sword moves. Somehow her scenes tend to linger in my mind.

Overall, it was so good. I've never been a huge saeguk fan but watching this week after week was riveting. Now I just need to go and watch Tree With Deep Roots!

Thank you so much for the recaps.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think being a talented dancer in real life helped a lot with the fight scenes. She was basically dancing with those swords. I loved it.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the hard work you put in recapping SFD each week, i truly appreciated it.
I'm really sad to see the show go and though i knew it wouldnt be a happy ending, it still broke my heart to see them all go their own way...
I'm happy that they show us the introduction between Lee Do and MH (i really believed that MH's dragon intro would appear during that intro, like MH Lee Do's protector or something, too bad it wasnt).
I kind of felt the ending rushed, like there was so much happening it that episode, it could have been stretched in a few bonus episodes. But i guess it's better to end it at 50 great episodes than having a few bonus episodes that just ruin the drama... Still this last episode didnt touch me as much as i would have liked it to (maybe i need time to realise its over).

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the glorious 50 episode recap!

This is my first 50 ep live watching and it's awesome! The waiting, the anticipating, the swordfights, the battle of wits and everything.

Thank god for this drama and thank you again headsno2 for recapping this with gusto!

See you again for the next great saguek to come!

i may have acquired my new wallpapers with that ending 6 dragons pics with their titles! XD

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Gong Seung-yeon look so gorgeous in her queen's outfit. Hope to see her in sageuk drama again.

Overall such an awesome drama, I just wish that there are more storyline about Second Strife of Princes but they cut it too short. Still an awesome drama tho.

Next week 3 new dramas I wonder which one should I watch first..

0
13
reply

Required fields are marked *

Found the ending somewhat rushed, would have loved to see how Bang Won runs his Joseon. The TWDR portion could have been more condensed.

Also thought they could have developed the Lady Min character more. Beyond the ambitious front, were there more layers to her?

0
12
reply

Required fields are marked *

that;s why i'm more disappointed...they are more focus on BY than LM... i wanna see more of LM but in the end it turn out she had a few airtime...

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

That's because Bong Yi's character was the main leading lady. Tree was based on a fictional story so this eps focus more on connecting the fictional characters to Tree.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

yeah ..but i wnt to know more about her...there's no drama whereas Lm is the leading role...i hope there's a drama about her or the story more focus about her..

0

Yes there is. Watch The Great King Sejong. It's available with subs online.

0

but i want GSy's to be the lady min,.. or the young Lady Min, I mean...

0

according to the history, she is a very jealous queen.
To repress her power in palace and her family in kingdom, Bangwon keep bringing noble-noble lady from all over the country and making them his concubine.

0
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

Any woman in her place would be (16 concubines?) and the fact that he totally ignored her after all that she did to put him on the throne. I'm surprise she didn't try to kill him for what he did to her family.

I do feel for her. She paid a heavy price but I think Sejong was worth it.

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

Not sure whether Korean kings just have fewer concubines in general... Is 16 supposed to be a lot? Because for Chinese emperor standards 16 is nothing. There's a Chinese saying called '3000 beauties in the palace'...

0

Fact is he did it on purpose to control her power and her family. Most of his concubines were daughters of high officials so he was able to control them through marriage.

Bang-won was hella smart when it comes to ruling with absolute power. He knew exactly what to do and how keep it.

0

16 only looks like a lot because he was the first Joseon king to take on that many. His father had 2 queens and 4 concubines I think.

0

@Kiara

Marriages in the ancient world were rarely done out of love; they were mostly done to consolidate power & properties. And in the Asian world, to ensure that there would be many descendants who would carry on the (patrilineal) family name.

So end of story, Queen Won'gyeong has no right for her to be jealous, other than doing her duty as her husband's wife as well as being the mother of the nation. Taejong as well was doing his duty in making sure that power was only centralized in the monarchy (the reason why they has a historic falling out with Jeong Do-jeon) as well making sure he has many descendants.

@Kaylie

I think by Korean standards 3000 would be an "excess", even by Neo-Confucian standards. King Uija, the last king of Baekje, was reported to have thousands (forgot the reported number but it was either 10k or 3k) of concubines who successively committed suicide when Baekje fell. This fabricated (to the extent of libel) tale was just to remind people why Baekje fell.

Now, by Chinese standards, "3000 beauties in the palace" consists of ladies who competed for the positions of Empress and higher-ranking consorts. Now since in China as well, once you step inside the Forbidden City, you can only freely step outside when you are dead. Meaning, those who lost the consort selection remained as lower-ranking concubines.
Practically speaking, some of the "3000 beauties" were technically servant girls who were selected as well.

@Kiara

"[Taejong] was the first Joseon king to take on [16]"

Overall he had 19 concubines, and seems to be the King of Joseon who had the most number of noted concubines.
FYI: Ha Ji-won's sageuk debut was "Tears of the Dragon" in 1997, and her role was one of Taejong's concubines (Lady Noh).

2nd place is King Seongjong, who had 14.
3rd place is Emperor Gojong, who had 12 (which incudes Lady Eom).

" [...] [Taejo] had 2 queens and 4 concubines."

Taejo had two wives (even when he was still a general) out of necessity.

Sourcing from "Jeong Do-jeon" + Wiki, YDG's Taejo called Lady Han (Queen Shineui, his first wife who predeceased his kingship) both as his "Hamgyeong wife/mother" & "hometown wife (hyangcheo)", because he married her when he was 17 and she 15.

And when Taejo was succesful in putting down some rebellions and was honored by King Gongmin, and therefore had to settle in the capital (Gaegyeong AKA modern-day Kaesong), he then met a daughter of a high official, Lady Kang (Queen Shindeok), who he called as his "capital wife (gyeongcheo)". Bigamy was never an issue then.

And as many sageuks show, among Lady Han's children, the youngest Taejong OUTRIGHT NEVER LIKED Lady Kang, even though she was the Queen & even after she died at the eve of the First Strife of Princes; it took until King Sukjong's reign (with the help of Song Shi-yeol) to even give her a proper posthumous name (as she was just known as "Consort Hyeon"; Taejong's...

0

Yes we know. Marriage wasn't based on love.

In a Confucian world she wasn't allowed to be jealous. As a human being she has every right to be jealous.

I'm not a fan of Ha Ji Won but loved Choi Myung Gil as Queen Won’gyeong from beginning to end.

0

I was dreading so much going into the last 2 eps this week as there’s an overwhelming sense of hopelessness to know something that I treasured doing in the last 6 months was coming to an end... but the way the writers rounded up the story, I felt a fulfilled closure. It was a good ride from the start and the ending was totally satisfying. Gonna take a bit of time to say goodbye to the actors who most lit up SFD for me.

Thank you YAI for gifting us this amazing production before you leave for the military. You have acted your guts out and your dedication and passion will be an inspiration to the younger generation on what constitutes the craft of being an actor. Stay well in the army and come back greater. We only have high hopes for your future projects and know you will deliver every time.

Kim Myung Min - Your steely portrayal of Sambong will always be in my heart the best Jung Do Jeon. You are the finest example of someone who doesn’t need looks to succeed just an immeasurable amount of charisma that fills the screen each time you walk into it. I’m so much looking forward to your new production.

Yoon Kyun Sang - You were amazing in Pinnochio but really outdone yourself here in SFD. From being just one of the minor third leads, you clawed your way into the hearts of fans sometimes out shadowing the leads along the way. I know I will be seeing you soon in Doctors so I won’t miss you too much.

Byun Yohan - From the greasy salary guy you played in Misaeng (wth very bad hair) to the hopeless romantic in Ex-BF’s club, you stole my heart as Lee Bang Ji. If there’s someone who actually looks better in facial hair, imo thats you. Handsome, stoic, loyal, which girl will not fall for Lee Bang Ji. Thank you for the dedication to fleshing out the loneliness of a swordsman’s life and though its been a sad role from start to finish... i wish you well that in your next production you will score the girl, be the lead and have a happy ending.

Han Ye-ri - The most beautiful girl in the show to me. Goodbye Cheok Sa Gwang, from the time I got the biggest chills knowing the character is a “bitch” and not a man, to your mad fighting skills and the ending which was so sad, you’ve left an indelible impression. I will be hunting down your previous works and look forward to your upcoming ones.

0
9
reply

Required fields are marked *

@Melinda Han Ye-ri the prettiest girl on the show. Really? She lacked sex appeal, unappealing eyes. You need to get your eyes checked!

0
7
reply

Required fields are marked *

That's her opinion
Respect other people's opinion even though you dont agree to it or even like it

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

That is some harsh words. For me, I thought Sin Se-kyung was extremely pretty. That is only the third time I felt the actress was pretty in the show - after Park Joo-mi, Seo Ji-hye. I thought Han Ye-ri is very attractive, even with her unappealing eyes you mentioned. Actually I laughed when they said she was casted as the absolute beauty of Goryeo at first.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

She is gorgeous and we all see beauty and value it differently. So no , you do not need your eyes checked as someone has so rudely suggested

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Seo Ji-hye is one gorgeous lady. She will always be Queen Noguk to me.

I want to see her in another sageuk so bad.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love her eyes and I'm glad that she doesn't feel the need to do double eyelid surgery etc. She is a typical film actress who cares more about fine tuning her talents than fixing her face to fit the current beauty standard.

She is a really talented actress and she'll be around for a very long time. Looking forward to her new movie, acting alongside 3 great film directors.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

She’s pretty to me and thats enough. Obviously attractive enough for all the top notch directors to cast her opposite T.O.P and Micky Yoochun as well. She doesn’t need to have PS to make her prettier.... she’s darn attractive as she is and thankfully all my friends in Korea (more than 10 of them) concur. Dun take my word for it? Even the top style program in Korea refers her as a beauty icon. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_63ZFWoolkw

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Han Yeri is the quintessential korean beauty. Too me her face has a classic aura to it. I don't get why korean girls are so obsessed with double eye lids? asian eyes are more striking if unaltered. :)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I like Han Ye Ri's beauty too. It's not perfect but natural and unique. Thanks God she keeps her eyes that way.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I cried watching last episode. 50 episode went by so fast...

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The finale arrived, and my emotions are scattered all over. By the time the cameos CAME, it was like a blast for the past and I was embracing the finale with a bear hug, though I felt the pacing was rushed and then slowed down.

I loved Cheok Sa-gwang's death. Could spotted it a mile away since Eun-Ho, Myeong and Mr. Ok died. And it was magnificent. My ship of them sunk onscreen but lived on in my heart.

Bless everyone that the villagers are ALIVE and well. There's nothing more to say but to see everyone alive and surviving.

The coronation scene was effingly EPIC and I loved it. It was grander than Yi Seong-gye's. But where are the kids though, considering Bang-won and his brothers were there for their dad's coronation.

As for Lady Min, though the last scene was heart-breaking, just know that the historical you was much cooler and probably the historical Bang-won still hold a little affections for you, considering he stated in his will to be buried next to you ... which is romantic in its own twisted sad way.

But on to the celebrations ...

For the writers, I offer you my hypothetical firstborn kitten (I have a neutered male cat) for the sole reason Boon-yi LIVES to a long peaceful life. Turns out my ship Boon-yi + Survival sailed beautifully. Thank you.

For the actors & actresses, I humbly offer you all a shabby imitation of the Oscar made out of gold-plated tissues. The drama wouldn't be flawless as it is, without all of you immersing yourself in the characters.

Bust out the victory trumpet, sashays manically to victory dance, party streamers and flowers being violently hurled at the direction of the 6FD cast and crew.

Phew, this is quite a long comment. But it helps me to get over my 6FD withdrawal faster. See you guys in the next drama I find myself hooked to watch and comment. Adieu!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

SFD and Signal were my favorite dramas this year and a little last year. Both were intense rides from beginning to end and had good endings, which is what Korean dramas actually lack--they start really well and then end terribly.

I liked the focus on our three younger dragons, though I can understand why Bangji was cut short. Even in TWDR, there's nothing much left of his character. I also love how Boonyi was known as the "people." That fits her so well, and I really admire her character. Also love all the cameos! I want to watch TWDR all over again!

If I had to gripe about something, I guess I'm a little sad with what they did to Queen Wongyung and how young Lee Do was portrayed. I remember in TWDR where King Lee Do was talking with his father, and he said stuff like how his younger (not the older ones) maternal uncles were innocent and how he listened to his mother crying alone after all her brothers died, which is why he started playing sudoku. I expected a more reserved, still intelligent, yet distant young Lee Do. Taejong was pretty indifferent to his son, but Lee Do seemed a little too happy-go-lucky for a kid who went through a lot off trauma. Oh, yeah, Lee Bangwon, thanks for being an asshole to your wife. I couldn't enjoy your scenes with Boonyi after how you treated Min Dakyung. Didn't seem fair.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm just so upset Bang Ji gets screwed over till the very end. I'm also upset that they took out the epic fight between Bang Ji and Moo Hyul that was referenced in TWDR. And why is that he never gets to decide anything for himself, even in the last scene? Why does Boon Yi and their mother decide his actions for him? I honestly would've felt much more relieved if we saw him fighting the barbarians from the north like it was talked about in TWDR. There's no... closure for him.

I liked Cheok Sa Gwang as a character too, but it's really disheartening to see that her final scene is much more memorable than Bang Ji and Moo Hyul, who are supposed to be two of the main leads - instead they end up looking like the villains that served as a foil for Cheok's journey as a hero. It feels cheated.

IDK, I didn't enjoy the latter half of the finale at all. Even though this was supposed to be the TWDR prequel, the audience is watching SFD, for the characters and the story in SFD. Dedicating half the finale to plug in your more successful old show feels conceited and I can't believe TWDR ended up stealing the thunder from SFD as evidenced by the popular keyword search on portal sites the next day. This was supposed to be about SFD! And as someone who never watched TWDR I felt excluded and confused.

Also Heads, that's not Boon Yi's granddaughter, she's just a girl from the island village. Boon Yi never got married. :(

0
12
reply

Required fields are marked *

Whoops. Fixed. Otherwise valid points, especially in relation to Bang-ji.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I didn't watch TWDR either and whilst I am ok with some sort of link between TWDR and SFD, there was no real need for it to take up that much time in this final episode.
I would have preferred a proper SFD ending

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

That's true, about Bang-Ji. I was sad that Boon Yi sort of pushed him away and urged him to go Ming China. I thought that at least he did have Boon Yi to care about. His mother hardly counts as family.

0
5
reply

Required fields are marked *

I was hoping that Bang Ji would join Boon-yi on the island and also help protect the people by fighting the Japanese pirates, and maybe end up marrying Gab-boon. At least he won't be so lonely.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

I know right, join her on the island and reprise his identity as Viper! And I agree about Gab-boon too, she stuck with him through thick and thin and knows him even better than Boon-yi. I've always had the feeling Gab-boon has romantic feelings for him.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Agreed on Gab boon and Bang Ji.

0

@ Melinda Bang-ji is one of those weird Korean men who can only love one woman, If he can get her, for whatever reasons, he shut out all women. These men are aplenty in Kdramas. I just hope this is not a reflection of Korean men in real life.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

lol Yes they only exist in Kdramas. btw my fav character being Bang-ji, I wanted to see epic fight between him and MH. I read the martial art team actually worked harder for Bang-ji to do different way of fighting (more common people way- using anything available like torch etc as weapon, not just sword).

0

I thought Moo-hyul's scenes were memorable and connected well with his character in Tree. I'm glad that Bang-won respected him enough not to ask him to kill his brother and Sambong for him. I think he would have done it but he would end up resenting Bang-won for it.

It's too bad that he never got married but I'm glad that he retired and do what he wanted to do before he returning as Lee Do bodyguard.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

*returned*

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

As a devout fan of TWDR, I understand where you are coming from. I actually watch SFD because of TWDR, not because of YAI. (Apart from SLA, YAI's picks in TV dramas are never quite successful--even he said that in the premier press conference of SFD).

However, I don't agree with you that SFD is a "more" successful show compared to SFD. Quite the contrary, with episode 49 and 50, SFD is elevated to a completely different level than TWDR. In all different aspects, I insist that SFD is much more ambitious, thoughtful and *relevant* show than TWDR. These two writers outdid themselves in SFD.

In the premier press conference, the writers made it clear that this drama is about what it means to have a "nation." All these characters are used to examine the relationship between the ruler and his people. Therefore, if we just focus solely on each individual character or romance, we are missing out the big picture. SFD is a political allegory and discursive treatise on how power should be "rooted" in people. In TWDR, the idea is there, but it's not well explain due to the constraints of length. The ending is much more rushed than SFD.

AND precisely because history is a force that continues to unfold to the future, I don't think that it's necessary to give a closure to every single character. The fates of BJ, BY and the ordinary folks will repeatedly play out, just like the poor kids who died in Sewol incident. That's also why one of the upvoted comments under naver says: "Let's send radio wave signal to our ancestors (signal motif) to buy 10 acres of land"

I was tearing up when I read the comments. Korean netizens really get the show.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

You said it!

It's not about the character's but it's about the metaphors that the characters represent

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I just want to thank you heads for recapping SFD <3

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Yeah, thank you Heads! I can't believe we've finally made it to the 50th episode haha.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

i'm adding myself in this, thank you Heads for your recaps every week!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The scene Boon Yi said that how Sambong's grave so humble when he's done so much founding the country make me sad.. It took few hundred years to recognized his contribution.

0
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

That was sad. I'm glad she died by his side and still believes in him.
So basically Bong Yi probably outlived everyone? It seems that Hangul was created and taught to the common people.

Few hundred years later kind of make sense in a way because I think Sambong was born before his time.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

According to this drama, Boon Yi outlived everyone except Moo Hyul (who was Sejong's bodyguard) he was killed in Tree, right about the ending, I think.

I was under the impression that he was still alive when Boon Yi went to the mainland, or I could be mistaken.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm basically guessing here. I am assuming that Hangul has been taught among the common people and not in secret which basically mean it was after Moo-hyul died.

I could be wrong too.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It actually took over 500years to finally acknowledge his contribution... Better late than never right.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

In the final episode where Boon Yi said Sambong wouldn't be ashamed of the hanguel alphabet is FALSE. He believed that the bureacrat(IE YANGBANG) IS AT THE TOP, scholar(of confucianism not science/math) second, and artisans(craftmen)/farmer third. Everyone else including WOMEN(YANGBANG WOMEN WERE FORCED TO STAY HOME DURING DAYTIME IN JOSEON), butcher, janitor, slaves, etc were CONSIDRED VICIOUS. He only cared for the farmers/artisans SO LONG AS THEY KNOW THEIR PLACES. Yeah I AM NO FAN OF SEXIST/CASTEFUL CONFUCIANISM.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

So Deep Rooted Tree was RIGHT ABOUT MAKING JEONG DO JUNG A BAD GUY IN TERM OF HANGUEL.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Just wanted to make a brief stop here, even though I still have 8 more episodes to watch, to thank Heads for recapping this awesome show.

It was certainly an experience and a thrilling one at that. ..... Truly memorable.

Thanks again!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Hi everyone! I'm generally a lurker here at db, but I just had to comment about this amazing show. Thank you so much SFD team -- especially the writers and the actors -- for giving us all such a wonderful experience.

Thank you db community for your interesting discussions -- I learned quite a bit of history here! Especially thank you to HeadsNo2 for the recaps :)

On that note, here is a YouTube link I discovered on soompi (which some of you may have already seen) with our favorite warriors that might help curb withdrawal symptoms: https://youtu.be/gm08F0mVS4o

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the link!

Bang Ji and Sa Gwang getting lovey dovey on the set and Moo Hyul getting jealous is awesome! lol

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Loved the chemistry between all 3 of them.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

You did it, Heads! Amazing recaps! I tried to watch SFD, and enjoyed the few episodes that I watched... somehow I just couldn't stick through them all despite having liked what I watched. Anyway, I'm glad for your recaps because when I didn't understand something I could just read your recaps to find out what was happening. Thank you again!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

oh god i am so emotional right now. such a fantastic drama.
i havent watched tree with deep roots, and i'm a little hesitant to bc im not really a fan of song joong ki.
people who've watched it, should i pick it up or not? is it worth my time?

0
6
reply

Required fields are marked *

I was hesitate to start TWDR before yesterday. But then I decided to check out the parts with SJK in it (people were praising his performance), and I was hooked. I am going to marathon the show now.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Song Joong Ki played King Sejong in 4/24 eps of the series, you don't have much to worry about if you are not into his acting. Tree With Deep Roots is a must-watch sageuk. Give it a try and you'll never regret.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

SJK played the hell out of that drama, though. He was really good in TWDR.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Please don't hate me... I'm watching the confrontation between Lee Do and Lee Bang Won in TWDR (Episode 2)... In that scene, Song Joong Ki reminded me of Jung Woong In, or Min Joon Gook from I Hear Your Voice. Sorry, cannot unsee. T_T XD

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

TWDR actually solidified Song Joongki as an actor for me. I liked him in SKKS but only dismissed him as a pretty face but his portrayal of Lee Do was really good. Plus Tree just gets you hooked anyway. HAHA

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Not to mentioned the ratings doubled in those 4 eps.

I honestly don't care for DotS but I'd say that he made a good decision there for a return project. We know he can act and we also know that his more popular now than ever. Star power and talents goes hand in hand in longevity of an actor's career.

Now he just needs to do more movies with the best in the industry.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Wow. This show. What am I going to do with my life now that it is over?!

I was a bit hesitant about taking on such a long sageuk but the good reactions made me do so. And damn, almost every episode can be described as EPIC. Loved the OST to bits too!

As for the ending - it's good. Not as good as could have been but quite solid. As mentioned, I felt like it wasn't the best move to make half of the last episode about TWDR. We get it, it's the sequel and it was nice to see actors and actresses returning to their TWDR roles... But as an SFD watcher, it feels more like fanservice towards people who have watched TWDR than a worthy ending of SFD. I have watched TWDR and I get there is not a lot more you can do about some characters since (SPOILER) most of them find their end in TWDR.

I just feel like it's a bit sad that some of our dragons just completely disappear off the screen. Taejo's last scene was basically the one where he had the worst hair day ever (though I get he doesn't really play a role anymore after his abdication) and Bangji just leaves with his shitty mother to live the rest of his shitty life and shed his good looks. If I would have been an SFD viewer only, this ending would have been not that satisfying for me.

I'm also a bit confused about the Banchon that can be found in TWDR; they just moved new people in there after the old villagers left?

On to my praisings though, I absolutely love this shiw. It has been one of the most consistent shows I have ever watched and it was just so gloriously epic. I loved the flashbacks too, it really showed us how far we have gone from the beginning when everyone was still idealistic and young and happy. Everyone ended up being so jaded, it's really bittersweet. The makeup/costume team really did an amazing job in aging the actors too. They really do look years and years older than in the beginning of the drama!

Really found it interesting to see what had really happened too, this is such an educative way to learn about history! I feel like I could now ace an exam on the founding of Joseon haha. When will I ever watch another drama like you, SFD? Does anyone have any other recommendations - I was contemplating starting Empress Ki, Dae Jang Geum or Queen Seondeok but my issue here again is the same issue that initially made me wary of SFD - the amount of the episodes.

Maybe I should just start rewatching SFD again.

0
10
reply

Required fields are marked *

Empress Ki is nowhere as impressive as SFD. I find the pace of it extremely slow and the power struggles are extremely childish.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

Agree about EK. It started off very well, but faulted after the 8th episode and became draggy. Picked up after several eps, then faulted again, and had an unsatisfying ending, at least for me.

That's why I was hesitant in watching this drama...but now I am extremely glad I did! One of the best 50 hours of my life.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I agree. And it is mostly fictional because there isn't much record about the empress. So don't take it as your history textbook.

But still, it is satisfying to see her tramples her enemies, which is my sole reason to selectively watch some of the episodes.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

If you enjoy seeing female protagonists trampling her enemies in the palace and don't mind Chinese dramas, you should try watching The Legend of Zhen Huan. I think you'll enjoy it tremendously. After watching that I couldn't take Empress Ki seriously.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I did! And I rewatched that drama for like hundreds of times, everytime my mom would ask me "are you watching that 'niang niang' show again?"

And yeah the tactics in Empress Ki was kid's play compared to those in Zhen Huan and SFD.

0

*Sighed when I heard about Empress Ki*
Never complete that series though I'm a fan of Ha Ji Won. It was just... so so.
Historical dramas of Lee Byung Hun the director are good, if you don't mind a number of filler episodes.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I liked Empress Ki, but I did fast-forward some scenes out of boredom. Never had to do that with Six Flying Dragons.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think
The old villagers were only the ones that were Boon Yi during the late Goryeo
So the remaining villagers must've been of those from somewhere else

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

try dae jang geum! you will no regret

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I loved The Return of Iljimae. It is historical, but based on a comic instead of real life.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks Heads. This final episode was just amazing. There are flaws, yes of course, I'm a little disappointed about lacking closure for Bang-Ji like everyone else, but this is almost-perfect. I watched it twice and cried throughout.

Favorite scenes in chronological order:
1. Bang-Ji telling Cheok Sa-gwang it wasn't her fault, that the world is strange. Such a heart-breaking scene, knowing that the both of them have lost their loved ones in meaningless (to them) power struggles. Both of them have always lived and fought for others, the people whom they love. They didn't want to get involved in politics, they simply wanted peaceful lives, yet ultimately the both of them lost everything they cared for. I find it poetic that Cheok Sa-gwang found a little solace in Bang-Ji's words in her final moments. (It always breaks my heart to look into Bang-ji's eyes. The sadness welling from it is overwhelming.)

2. Bang-won telling Moo-Hyul that young Sejong takes after those whom he miss, and Boon-Yi hugging young Sejong (young Bang-won)! Again, I felt that it's symbolic and poetic to let Nam Da-reum take up the role of young Sejong. Young Bang-won started out the same way, innocent and idealistic, wanting to make the world a better place. But along the way he changed, became cruel, lost his friends and became a powerful but terribly lonely person. Young Sejong feels like Bang-won reborn - a second chance for him to make everything right. It was extremely emotional to see Boon-Yi hugging Sejong (/young Bang-won) in tears. She must miss the old Bang-won as much as we do.

3. Old Boon-Yi lying on Jung Do-jeon's grave, exclaiming that Bang-won's son has achieved what he has always dreamt of. And she peacefully passes away. (': She was a tough woman, who lived in turbulent times and gone through many hardships. It seems fitting that she finally passes away in peace by the grave of Jung Do-jeon, knowing that the people of Joseon are in good hands.

4. Bang-won, whether the war against the pirates is for a romantic reason or not, I know your love for Boon-Yi lives on through your love for the Joseon people.

0
4
reply

Required fields are marked *

My fav scenes also include
1) the dialogue between MH and GSM.

Sun-mi: You won't be able to defeat me. We have the same techniques. I can read your moves.

Moo-hyul: I can read your moves too!

Me: Haha! good one Warrior Moo-hyul!!!

2) the 2 fighting scenes simultaneously.
BJ vs CSK and MH vs GSM - Both pairs evenly matched with somewhat the same techniques. Awesome!!!
And the sad but 3-way 'dance' between BJ, MH and SK. Sad that she had to die, but glad that MH and BJ helped each other for the last time. I particularly loved the part when BJ lost his sword and MH flipped it back to him. Reminded me of the earlier fight scene at General Jo's mansion when BJ threw a sword to MH, so that he could defend himself.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

It's actually the other way around, MH got his sword flown out of his hand after CSG hit him and BJ flipped it back to him.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ah! Sorry!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ohh how can I miss out my favourite scene when Bang-won told Boon-yi, I've missed you, Captain Boon-yi!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

seriously half year? did we spent that much time???
but this is my 2nd long drama i watched after dae jang geum. a very good job. for a story that we already know about what happen in the end, they really write this story epicly.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Interestingly the lady writer also co-wrote Dajunggeum. I went to research on her profile after SFD. She’s the ultimate quality assurance ^^

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I've watched all of Kim Young-Hyun's (the head writer) dramas. She wrote Dae Jang Geum, Seo Dong Yo by herself at the beginning of her career. Park Sang-Yeon joined her in H.I.T and they have been co-writers ever since.

Kim is usually the executive producer's of her dramas and that's why her casting is usually spot on with the characters that she wrote. She is very involved with whom she wants in her shows.

Although I've moved on to greener pastures as in the form of writer Jung Ha-Yeon, I still have a soft spot for her since Dae Jang Geum brought me to dramaland.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

It was Dae Jang Geum that brought me to drama-land too and awakened an interest in perfectly presented food :-)

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I can't believe half a year has passed by so quickly! I'll miss this drama and these recaps and Yoo Ah In!! Have a good rest and have fun in Jeju Island, Yoo Ah In! I'll be watching SLA and SFD and all your movies to fill the void when you go to the military :')

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Six Flying Dragons is officially my favorite drama of 2016. Coincidentally my favorite drama of 2015, Punch, was also recapped by you, Heads! I really enjoyed your recaps, they're witty, funny and captures the entire essence of the dramas. They made the drama journey even more enjoyable for me.

Here's a (virtual) toast to you, Heads, for a wonderful drama journey. Looking forward to the next drama you recap, because you've always had good taste in dramas.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Amazing show! Will miss the casts and addictive storyline. The finale could have been better written for certain casts but overall it provided a strong closure. Kudos to the producer, scriptwriter and actors
Finally thank you to our recapper for her wonderful effort ❤️❤️

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

As much as we don't like Bang Ji's mother, in a way, she brings him full circle. Boon Yi was disappointed by her mother's political identity, whereas I think Bang Ji was disappointed that she wasn't living 'as' their mother. His dreams weren't tied up in the grand cause, as has been commented on already. So it surely isn't that the writers gave him a happy ending, but there is some large picture 'closure' in what they chose for him.

It is sort of interesting, too, that in a sense Boon Yi married the villagers, devoted her life to that role and 'those people', as Bang Won said.

I won't say the ending is perfection, and I think the TWDR sections could have been better if condensed into about ten minutes, but I loved seeing the young future scholar king, and aged Boon Yi catching a glimpse of the fruit they all fought for, gave their lives for in different ways, felt just right.

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

Interestingly, Boon-yi did bun up her hair which indicates married status. I saw a comment on soompi's Six Flying Dragons forum that perhaps Boon-yi considered herself married to Bang-won, because she pinned the hairpin he gave her right till the very end.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

I think that's a very good comment and the poetic that the writers played with in making the scholar king out to be a child of their (Bang Won and Boon Yi's) dream, in a sense, the culmination of their early hopes and love, as though they had married within the early idealism.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I thought of that too. When I saw her hair bun in the preview for episode 50 I was like, aw, in her heart she is married to BW.

But I think it is possible that she buns her hair because she is no longer considered young at that time, at that era. So it would make sense for her to take up a hairstyle more suitable for her age.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm generally not the biggest fans of sangueuks. I find the plot drags and the characterisation all over the place. But Six flying dragons was consistently great, it kept me on the edge of my seat and dealt with weighty political concepts head on.

I must admit that the fangirl in me really wanted Bang-won and Boon-yi together even though it wasn't what the show was about and it was never going to happen. I hope Yoo ah-in comes back from the army and does like a rom-com like Song Joong-ki...I want my addictive fluffy glee inducing rom-com godammit.

Thankyou to HeadsNo2 for her marathon recap of this excellent drama.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks so much, Heads, for leaping into the daunting task of recapping a 50 episode show, and for creating a community space for this show. As much as I loved QSD and Tree, I felt both struggled in their final episodes. This one stayed strong until the end - difficult, intensely human, with no easy answers, but with characters determined to keep fighting anyway. A lovely, lovely show.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Heads, many many many thanks to you! What a ride this was! This is how a show must be done. I loved TWDR (of course, I never saw the ending..couldn't do it then, and won't ever do it), but this show, no word. I love it a whole lot more. A very important point for me is this: they let my favorite people live. They didn't kill Boon Yi (to all be honest I expected her to die in episode 49) in the middle of all the fightings, they let Moo Hyul live (well I knew that, since I watched TWDR), and yes...Bang Ji lived a sad sad life, which seemed so hopeless, but I'm not even bitter about that.

I find most of the scenes very bitter sweet. I wonder why Boon Yi never married, I kinda wish she'd eventually marry Moo Hyul. To the romantics out there, you'd probably raise cane at me, but there's something about companionship that I find so comforting. Sure, Boon Yi's forever love is BW, and vice versa...but BY and MH also have shared so many parts of history together. There must be a quiet understanding that only both of them understand. Especially for the timing then, I just wonder why MH and BY never married. The final comfort of BY's death though, it's so satisfying. I love that she died laying her head on JDJ's grave and holding the hangul's cheat sheet.

Anyeong, SFD! Thank you for gracefully fill my M and T for 6 months.

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Er, BoonYi and MooHyul never married because BoonYi lives on a far away island while MooHyul lives right in the heart of the country's capital......

It was the Joseon times, y'know. No email or telephones for long-distance relationships. (Also, BangWon was too close in proximity to MooHyul for him to attempt a thing.)

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh I know that. I know that they live in separate places, but he knows where she lives, and I can still imagine he just moves to the island. I'm not unclear at all where and how they live in the story, but I can still imagine different stories within my head.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I've been dreading the end for so long but it was when Muyiyiya played at the end that my heart finally shattered. I'm realizing that even though I could re-watch the series, nothing will fill the yearning I have for more episodes. I am going to miss this show so much.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

I know right? that's when it hit me! it's OVER! I spent my last six months waiting for my Mondays and Tuesdays, getting all excited for SFD and now I don't know what to do!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Ok so I didn't follow this drama but I DO wanna know what happened to bang-ji & yeonhee? Did they end up together/find some measure of happiness?

Heads wrote she died, did she and how? Anyone who watched who could give me a summary of their ending I would appreciate it a lot, thanks!

0
3
reply

Required fields are marked *

She killed herself to convince Bang-ji to go save Sambong in episode 47.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Bang Ji & Yeon Hee didn't end up together. She took her own life in front of Bang Ji.. Gosh, that scene so heartbreaking.

When Bangwon plan to kill Sambong, they kidnap Yeon Hee so that Bang Ji won't able to protect Sambong. In order to make Bang Ji save Sambong, Yeon Hee slit her own throat.

It's an open ending for Bang Ji as they didn't really show what happen to him, maybe he follow his mother to Ming.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

She killed herself when she was being hold as a hostage to divert BJ's attention from guarding JDJ. And she did it in front of BJ.

It's in episode 47.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Heads THANK YOU SO MUCH!. I really appreciate you for enduring 49 eps recaps for the first time ever on DB. I am glad that you enjoyed/loved it.

I'm glad I got to cheer for my Warrior Moo-hyul and Kim Myung Min. The addition of Han Ye-ri was a pleasant surprise.

Now bring on Choi Min Soo and Jackpot. One ajusshi crush after another lol. Thank you drama Gods.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

WOW! WOW! and SUPER WOW!

First of all, a BIG thank you Heads, for the wonderful recaps. Watching the drama was awesome, but your recaps made it even more so. It was like the seasoning that made the drama more satisfying.

I would also like to thank everyone who has participated in this thread. Your insightful comments were educational and enjoyable to read. I've learnt a lot about this era in Korean history and thoroughly enjoyed the arguments and discussion that was going on. Your comments were like the garnishing on a dish. It made watching a 3-fold joy.

I would also like to give a 90 degree bow to the drama - the script-writers, director, wonderful actors and crew. This is an EPIC drama. In my view, surpassing TWDR. So kamsahamida from the bottom of my heart!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

if only jdj tried to work with bang won and didn't act like a hopeless widower left by his lover jmj, they could have created a better kingdom.

based on the drama's story alone, bw could have been good. it's just normal to feel spiteful when everybody treated him like crap after everything he'd done.

how dare his father say that he couldn't be prince without him? bw saved his life in case he forgot, when jmj was about to have them all executed.

bw saved them many times but they still couldn't forgive him for killing jmj when jmj was bent on having all of them killed.

do koreans really think that way?

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thanks for the recap~
Cant believe I stay for a 50 eps sageuk with no regret at all.
SFD is where I drag my broken heart because of Cheese and I doubly sad now its over...
I'm sad over how Lee Bang Ji ended. I understand why his arc end that way but I'm still sad. I wish we could revisit Lee Bang Ji for a bit, just to see how is his life in Ming, after all that. Does he still as sad?
Lee Bang Ji fight with Cheok Sa Gwang was beautiful & deadly tbh. So beautiful & sad at the same time~

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I'm lost. Who is dodam in six flying dragon?

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

Do you mean the Banchon leader in TWDR? They never link her to SFD. The Banchon people in TWDR were not the people Boon-yi led.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

We can assume that it's Maengsoon since she stayed in Banchon (as opposed to coming with Boonyi) and she have the same accent as Dodam-daek.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Empress Ki is still in my top 5 historical kdramas and now SFD has joined it! I can not say enough good things about Yoo Ah In! The man slays it in every drama he's in. Fashion King wasn't great but he wasn't the problem. Yoo Ah In's performance in this was as stunning and brilliant as Ji Chang Wook in Empress Ki. My only complaint is that SFD just like Empress Ki had a fictional character in love with an actual historical person. I just never was completely sold on the love story in either of the dramas. Empress Ki should have focus on the love/relationship between the her and the Emperor and I felt the same way about SFD. Lady Min would have suit the dragon title better because she's real not fiction.

I still love SFD though that really was my only complaint though I did find episode 49 to be a bit of a filler episode. Ep 50 made up for it! All was forgiven! Thank you so much for the awesome recap!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I love you, Heads.

I love you, writers.

I love you, cameramen.

I love you, lightings-people.

I love you, make up and costumes people.

I love you, directors.

I love you, producers.

I love you, music people.

I love you, extras.

I love you, supporting actors.

I love you, lead actors.

I LOVE YOU, SIX FLYING DRAGONS!!!!

Thank you for veing so awesome!

0
2
reply

Required fields are marked *

+1 yep!

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

I cannot believe I forgot the martial arts team but...

I Love You Too, Martial Arts Team!!!

♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡♡

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The actor who plays Moo Hyul was definitely a stand out once again! He was awesome in Faith too!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

The ending is very satisfying though I wish to see younger Boon Yi more :D Six Flying Dragons is PERFECTION!! Thank you so much HeadsNo2 for giving us so much thoughts on the drama. I love you! Sending my hearts to Yoo Ah In, Yoon Kyun Sang and Han Hyeri, my fave actors/actresses now ♥♥ Especially Yoo Ah In, I'm a new fan!

Once again, congrats to SFD team, writers, PD nim, actors and actresses. Y'all did a great job. Well done!

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

It’s over! Our beloved SFD is over! I can’t believe how fast the time just passed by, it never felt like 50 episodes, I’m not done, I want more! I’m sad and happy, I’m a lot of things right now but all in the best way possible.

I loved it when Bang-ji told Sa-kwang that it was not her fault. He can understand her, he knows how much it hurts, he knows the guilt of not being able to protect the people you love, though Yeon-hee told him it wasn’t his mistake and Jung do-jeon told him not to take revenge for him, he can’t help but fight for them because he’s got nothing else to fight for, maybe just maybe the guilt goes away, the pain eases!

When Bang-ji asked Moo-hyul to become stronger and then come to kill him I was a crying mess. He cares too much for Moo-hyul to hurt him and Moo-hyul knows that! I noticed that it was his strike that cut deeper into Sa-kwang which was the deadly one, and when he saved Moo-hyul I think then Moo-hyul too might have realized that he isn’t yet strong enough to go against Bang-ji! I love these two so much and it hurts, it’s just sad how they have to part ways likes that, but their last scene together was beautiful!

Bang-won got all the powers he wanted, he really did want to make people happy, wanted to make them smile but the means he took drove everyone away and at the end he was lonely. It’s sad how everyone knew how he felt but could do nothing for him. He made his choices and stuck with them till the end. I’m just glad he got to see Boon-yi again. When she hugged Lee do and walked away I thought that’s it, we’re never gonna see her and Bang-won together again but I was wrong, the way he looked at her when he saw the ornament, ugh, what do I do with my heart?! OH MY HEART!

And also, for him to ask Moo-hyul to come back even if as a bodyguard of his son, shows how much he trusts him and how much faith he has in Moo-hyul, it also felt like he wanted him around him, at least Moo-hyul, then maybe he would not feel as lonely as he was, just maybe!

I loved SFD, and I loved every single episode of it, it was definitely worth it! Worth all of my 50 hours! The production team’s done an awesome job with the show, they must be so proud of themselves, I mean I am! I’m so in love with all the actors. Yoo Ah-In was spectacular, I wasn’t his fan before but now I am and I just feel bad that he has to enlist this April, he’ll be missed! I’ll be looking forward for his comeback. Byun Yo-han, I’m so glad he brought me to this show, he’s the best! Everyone was just great!! Now my Mondays and Tuesdays will feel so empty, what am I gonna do with my life?

Thank you so much HeadsNo2 for recapping SFD, and thanks everyone in the comments section, you guys made it a fun ride.

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Thank you Heads2- thank you from the bottom of my heart.
All I can say is that after more than 170 dramas I have shed a lot of tears but NEVER as many as I did at the end of Tree With Deep Roots.
The sheer magnificence of what the great King Sejong did for his people with Hangul - and how it was portrayed in TWDR - had me down on the floor sobbing with joy. And I did the same last April when I went over to South Korea and stood in front of the statue of King Sejong. The tears came again - so, for me, the fact that the end of SFD was a pure homage to TWDR was unexpected perfection, a validation of my emotions more than a year ago- and the tears came - and came - and came at the ending of SFD. That's what Korean dramas do so magnificently to me; connect me to my deepest emotions - over and over and over. This is LOVE.
This is the greatest thanks I can give for all involved in SFD and to Heads2.
This is love.
It is all about love.

0
1
reply

Required fields are marked *

Oh my god. This brought tears to my eyes.

0
reply

Required fields are marked *

So I decided to go on a quick flash back to the past recaps and scenes, and it breaks my heart even more! To see Moo Hyul with oh such light heartedness and joy on his face, to see BW and BY still calling him Bang Won, to just see people with clear hopes and dreams etched on their faces...then to see how cruel life can be. How no one gets through scratch-free. I miss the fierce BY. Granted, she still keeps that to the end...but she's much more resigned after all the strifes. Even more evident is in MH's face and eyes, the twinkle that he lost, at least not until he met the future king Lee Do. And of course, the eternal loneliness BW has chosen for himself...

0
0
reply

Required fields are marked *

Finally it has concluded with bittersweet ending..I've lived the past 6 months in the shadows of 6 dragons and I am glad that is how history has been shaped.

A beautiful written story and well played by the cast.
It was written in a way where the ruthless King Taejong has received numerous sympathy and understanding from the viewers for his sacrifice and contributions he has done to build the country.

Oh-no! No more Lee bang won for the coming weeks... I am doomed. Btw, how on earth did Moo Hyul retain his youth and age since he served Bang Won until to Sejong's reign. Wow! He must be an old dude by the time Sejong created Hangul. :D

0
0
reply